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How does one read a landscape? Inspired by the classic work of Hans Kurath documenting the dialect geography sub-regions of New England, Christopher J. Lenney set out to determine whether such patterns of linguistic migration were repeated in the everyday features of our man-made landscape. Through inspired conjecture and methodical ...
Sightseeking: Clues to the Landscape History of New England
How does one read a landscape? Inspired by the classic work of Hans Kurath documenting the dialect geography sub-regions of New England, Christopher J. Lenney set out to determine whether such patterns of linguistic migration were repeated in the everyday features of our man-made landscape. Through inspired conjecture and methodical fieldwork, Lenney discovered that at least six cultural and material artifacts could be mapped into similar flows and clusters: placenames, boundaries, townplans, roads, houses, and gravestones. With infectious enthusiasm and wit, Lenney guides the reader through a historical and cultural examination of how this artificial landscape came to be. Of the many possible sources of placenames, for example, there are evident patterns of Algoquian and transplanted English; there is the obvious irony of patriot and Tory honored side by side. But what do we make of the apparent hodgepodge of placename suffixes that dot our maps-the -fields, -tons, -hams, and -burys that append themselves to our life and land? And how do we explain the Great-Big line, a dramatic yet invisible scar across the map of Maine? The other five cultural markers similarly reveal themselves in a surprising patterning of the New England countryside-in the areas where the connected farmstead dominates, where recessed balconies or twin rearwall chimneys distinguish the scene; in the migration of gravestone cutters and their motifs, which left odd undulating waves of artistic expression throughout the region. Lenney forces the reader to reconsider the shape of the village greens, to wonder why old roads go where they go, and to question where (good neighbors and Robert Frost notwithstanding) we built stone walls. By pushing us beyond mere sightseeing to sightseeking, Lenney dares to fundamentally alter the way we-old-time Yankee, newcomer, and tourist alike-experience and interpret the New England landscape.
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26.200000 USD
Paperback
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At the vanguard of renewed interest in Maine's influential early modernist Marsden Hartley (1877-1943), author Donna M. Cassidy brilliantly appraises the contemporary social, political, and economic realities that shaped Hartley's landmark late art. During the late 1930s and early 1940s, Hartley strove to represent the distinctive subjects of his native ...
Marsden Hartley
At the vanguard of renewed interest in Maine's influential early modernist Marsden Hartley (1877-1943), author Donna M. Cassidy brilliantly appraises the contemporary social, political, and economic realities that shaped Hartley's landmark late art. During the late 1930s and early 1940s, Hartley strove to represent the distinctive subjects of his native region-the North Atlantic folk, the Maine coast, and Mount Katahdin-producing work that demands an interpretive approach beyond art history's customary biographical, stylistic, and thematic methodologies. Cassidy, sensitive to the psychological and gender analysis traditionally central to interpretations of Hartley, becomes the first scholar to reassess his late work in light of contemporary American perceptions of race, ethnicity, place, and history. This remarkable new book resonates not only as a seminal Hartley study and a complex art and cultural period history, but as a superb example of applied early twentieth-century American intellectual history informed by an impressive command of primary and secondary interdisciplinary literature. Numerous and rich illustrations, as well as transcriptions of several key essays by Hartley, some never before published, including This Country of Maine (1937-38), round out this insightful, nuanced, and revolutionary treatment. Donna M. Cassidy's Marsden Hartley will engage general readers as well as scholars and students.
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48.89 USD

Marsden Hartley

by Donna M. Cassidy
Hardback
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Benjamin L. Hartley brings to light the little-known story of relative latecomers to Boston's religious scene: Methodist, Salvation Army, Baptist, and nondenominational Christians. Focusing on Congregationalists and Roman Catholics, Boston urban historians have largely overlooked these groups. Hartley, however, sheds light on the role of immigrant evangelical leaders from Italy, ...
Evangelicals at a Crossroads
Benjamin L. Hartley brings to light the little-known story of relative latecomers to Boston's religious scene: Methodist, Salvation Army, Baptist, and nondenominational Christians. Focusing on Congregationalists and Roman Catholics, Boston urban historians have largely overlooked these groups. Hartley, however, sheds light on the role of immigrant evangelical leaders from Italy, Sweden, and elsewhere in revivalism and social reform in postbellum Boston. Further, examining the contested nature of revivalism and social reform in a particular, local nineteenth-century context provides a basis for understanding the roots of current divisions in American Protestantism and the contentious role of evangelical religion in American politics. Hartley documents the importance of the American holiness movement as a precursor to the significant presence of Pentecostal groups in urban America, adding an important historical context for evangelical social action today.
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48.89 USD

Evangelicals at a Crossroads

by Benjamin L. Hartley
Paperback / softback
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In the course of the mundane routines of life, we encounter a variety of landscapes and objects, either ignoring them or looking without interest at what appears to be just a tree, stone, anonymous building, or dirt road. But the deep traveler, according to Hartford Courant essayist David K. Leff, ...
Hidden in Plain Sight
In the course of the mundane routines of life, we encounter a variety of landscapes and objects, either ignoring them or looking without interest at what appears to be just a tree, stone, anonymous building, or dirt road. But the deep traveler, according to Hartford Courant essayist David K. Leff, doesn't make this mistake. Instead, the commonplace elements become the most important. By learning to see the magic in the mundane, we not only enrich daily life with a sense of place, we are more likely to protect and make those places better. Over his many years working at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and writing about the state's landscape, Leff gained unparalleled intimacy while traveling its byways and back roads. In Hidden in Plain Sight, Leff's essays and photographs take us on a point-by-point journey, revealing the rich stories behind many of Connecticut's overlooked landmarks, from the Merritt Parkway and Cornwall's Cathedral Pines to roadside rock art and centuries-old milestones.
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26.200000 USD
Hardback
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New Englanders talk as much about their weather as about all other subjects combined. Anyone who's scampered for shelter during a summer shower or shoveled a path through snow in May knows that bending to the weather's whims is a way of life in New England. But what do you ...
New England Weather, New England Climate
New Englanders talk as much about their weather as about all other subjects combined. Anyone who's scampered for shelter during a summer shower or shoveled a path through snow in May knows that bending to the weather's whims is a way of life in New England. But what do you actually know about New England's weather or climate? Combining a scholarly appreciation of weather systems and events with an ability to transmit their passion to a general audience, Gregory A. Zielinski and Barry D. Keim have written a one-of-a-kind guide to New England weather and climate. Not only are weather patterns in New England more changeable and more extreme than almost anywhere in the country, New England is the ultimate destination of nearly all storm tracks nationwide. Recently, newsworthy items such as global warming, El Nino, and La Nina have significantly impacted our local weather, in both the short and long term. Luckily, the science of meteorology and climatology and their tools of observation and analysis have made great strides in the past few years. The authors offer an in-depth explanation of the latest theoretical insights into New England's weather along with a flurry of stories and lore about the vagaries of our clime. The book is divided into the seasons as we actually experience them-ski season, mud season, beach and lake season, and foliage season. It includes photos and illustrations: some all too familiar, many hard to believe. Zielinski and Keim succeed in providing an illuminating and entertaining analysis and commentary while whole-heartedly embracing our region's atmospheric peculiarities. This book won't do anything about New England's weather or climate but it will help you understand each of them.
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24.82 USD

New England Weather, New England Climate

by Barry D Keim, Gregory A. Zielinski
Paperback / softback
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Connecticut in the American Civil War offers readers a remarkable window into the state's involvement in a conflict that challenged and defined the unity of a nation. The arc of the war is traced through the many facets and stories of battlefield, home front, and factory. Matthew Warshauer masterfully reveals ...
Connecticut in the American Civil War
Connecticut in the American Civil War offers readers a remarkable window into the state's involvement in a conflict that challenged and defined the unity of a nation. The arc of the war is traced through the many facets and stories of battlefield, home front, and factory. Matthew Warshauer masterfully reveals the varied attitudes toward slavery and race before, during, and after the war; Connecticut's reaction to the firing on Fort Sumter; the dissent in the state over whether or not the sword and musket should be raised against the South; the raising of troops; the sacrifice of those who served on the front and at home; and the need for closure after the war. This book is a concise, amazing account of a complex and troubling war. No one interested in this period of American history can afford to miss reading this important contribution to our national and local stories. The paperback edition includes a reading guide, which is also available at http://www.wesleyan.edu/wespress/e-books/materials/warshauer_reading_guide.pdf
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31.450000 USD
Hardback
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From catching rainbows, browns, and brookies in the streams and rivers of the Berkshires to hauling in cod, haddock, and tuna in the salt waters of Stellwagen Bank, this book is your ultimate guide to fishing in Massachusetts. Manny Luftglass, a veteran fisherman and journalist, has written a definitive and ...
Gone Fishin'
From catching rainbows, browns, and brookies in the streams and rivers of the Berkshires to hauling in cod, haddock, and tuna in the salt waters of Stellwagen Bank, this book is your ultimate guide to fishing in Massachusetts. Manny Luftglass, a veteran fisherman and journalist, has written a definitive and entertaining guide to fishing the salt, fresh, and brackish waters of the Bay State. Providing easy-to-follow directions, boat launch information, and detailed advice on live and dead baits, artificial lures, fishing methods, equipment, depths, weather, best times of the day and the year, and even specific areas to fish at most locations, this is truly the only fishing guide to Massachusetts you'll ever need. For ease of use, the book has been organized according to the areas recognized by the Massachusetts Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, with an accompanying map for each section. Good-humored and packed to the gills with useful information, it's like having the author as your personal fishing guide.
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15.700000 USD

Gone Fishin'

by Manny Luftglass
Paperback / softback
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In this book, a long-time resident and devoted fly fisherman imparts a wealth of knowledge about fly fishing in Connecticut. Kevin Murphy teaches novice anglers about the state's trout hatcheries and stocking programs, the differences between brook, brown, and rainbow trout, and offers easy-to-follow instructions on the basics of fly ...
Fly Fishing in Connecticut
In this book, a long-time resident and devoted fly fisherman imparts a wealth of knowledge about fly fishing in Connecticut. Kevin Murphy teaches novice anglers about the state's trout hatcheries and stocking programs, the differences between brook, brown, and rainbow trout, and offers easy-to-follow instructions on the basics of fly fishing. In this concise text, the reader finds the essentials in fly fishing gear, stream tactics, casting, and a host of related topics. In addition, would-be anglers gain a useful glimpse into the history of fishing in the state, plus important tips on stream conservation, fly fishing etiquette, regulations, and safety. Most importantly, anglers will find a veritable road map to Connecticut's best trout streams and rivers. The book even offers excellent suggestions for comfortable lodging in prime fly fishing locations and-once the day's fishing is done-a few mouth-watering recipes for cooking one's catch. Whether you're in the market for that first pair of waders, thinking of tuning up your casting technique, or just want to know where the fish are biting, this is the book to read.
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15.700000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Photographs from the Salt Center for Documentary Field Studies portray a Maine strikingly different from the standard postcard views of mist-shrouded lobstering villages or rocky, sun-splashed shores. This is the Maine not of the tourist but of the native, a record of both the light and the shadow of the ...
Maine, a Peopled Landscape: Salt Documentary Photography, 1978-95
Photographs from the Salt Center for Documentary Field Studies portray a Maine strikingly different from the standard postcard views of mist-shrouded lobstering villages or rocky, sun-splashed shores. This is the Maine not of the tourist but of the native, a record of both the light and the shadow of the state's culture and society. Shot by students and faculty of the Portland-based Center, which has been teaching the art of documentary photography and oral history since 1973, this collection of more than a hundred photos creates an archive of Maine's diversity: fishermen's faces craggy as the coastline, back-to-landers scratching a living from a renovated farm, migrant workers harvesting apples and broccoli, a community band at a holiday parade, a Cambodian wedding in Portland. Taken together, the images and accompanying text tell a tale of survival, of traditions sorely beset by radical change, of ways of life that endure in the face of continuing challenges. Three essays complement the photographs: Function and Form in Salt Documentary Photography by R. Todd Hoffman, Salt's Director of Photography; The Documentary Photograph in Maine's Past by C. Stewart Doty, University of Maine, Orono; and Salt, the FSA, and the Documentary Tradition by James Curtis, University of Delaware. Salt Research Director Hugh T. French provides an introduction entitled Maine's Changing Face.
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USD

Maine, a Peopled Landscape: Salt Documentary Photography, 1978-95

by James C. Curtis introd. C. Stewart Doty, Hugh T. French
Paperback / softback
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The shoreline of New Hampshire may be short-eighteen miles of ocean from Portsmouth to Seabrook-but it's long on scenery, history, and has some of the best bicycling in the state! With more than 28 guided rides exploring New Hampshire's Seacoast, this book is an indispensable resource for riders of all ...
Bicycling New Hampshire's Seacoast
The shoreline of New Hampshire may be short-eighteen miles of ocean from Portsmouth to Seabrook-but it's long on scenery, history, and has some of the best bicycling in the state! With more than 28 guided rides exploring New Hampshire's Seacoast, this book is an indispensable resource for riders of all skill levels who are eager to take advantage of everything the area has to offer. So grab your copy, climb on your bike, and take in expansive views of the Atlantic Ocean and sun on sandy beaches, or visit one of the Seacoast's many historic properties and scenic byways. Head farther inland to areas that may be lesser known, but are equally beautiful for cycling-such as peaceful, rolling Kensington; quaint Barrington; or the serene environment of Newmarket's Great Bay. Choose one of the rides that skirt into Maine and visit Nubble Lighthouse, or ride south into Massachusetts along the Merrimac River. Whether you pedal through an inland village or oceanfront town, you'll find the Seacoast region offers a perfect opportunity to enjoy New Hampshire at its best.
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18.850000 USD
Paperback / softback
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In Traces of Thoreau, Stephen Mulloney faithfully follows his 1849 walking tour from Orleans to Provincetown, vividly describing not only the differences between yesterday's Cape and today's but also their timeless similarities. In duplicating Thoreau's journey, Stephen Mulloney captures views of the Cape rarely seen by tourists and allows the ...
Traces of Thoreau: Cape Cod Journey
In Traces of Thoreau, Stephen Mulloney faithfully follows his 1849 walking tour from Orleans to Provincetown, vividly describing not only the differences between yesterday's Cape and today's but also their timeless similarities. In duplicating Thoreau's journey, Stephen Mulloney captures views of the Cape rarely seen by tourists and allows the reader to explore and contemplate the Great Outer Beach as if for the first time. Mulloney's entertaining travelogue gives us nature by day -- with captivating descriptions of plants, animals, and geological features -- and civilization by night as he seeks food and lodging in beach communities swarming with visitors. Here one meets a delightful sampling of colorful Cape characters, from members of the cocktail set to Wellfleet oystermen encountered in a working-class bar. Traces of Thoreau richly conveys the grandeur of beach and sky juxtaposed with fast food stands and miniature golf. It is a celebration of the bare beauty of the landscape and an invitation to share the meditations of a modern-day Thoreau who rediscovers the restorative powers of one of America's most scenic locales.
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52.42 USD
Hardback
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Why is it that although Vermont is relatively distant - both geographically and metaphysically - from publishing centers as well as many issues at the heart of current literature, it is also home to some of America's greatest writers? Is there something about the place that speaks to them? In ...
A State of Mind: Writing in Vermont
Why is it that although Vermont is relatively distant - both geographically and metaphysically - from publishing centers as well as many issues at the heart of current literature, it is also home to some of America's greatest writers? Is there something about the place that speaks to them? In this book, twenty-one contemporary Vermont authors are profiled along with examples of their writing. Included are: Julia Alvarez, Chris Bohjalian, David Budbill, Joseph Citro, Joan Connor, David Huddle, Jamaica Kincaid, Galway Kinnell, Sydney Lea, Jeffrey Lent, David Moats, Howard Frank Mosher, Grace Paley, Jay Parini, Verandah Porche, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Ruth Stone, Abigail Stone, Phoebe Stone, Tom Smith, and Ellen Bryant Voigt. In their conversations with Yvonne Daley, these writers open their toolboxes to share their writing approaches and techniques, their tricks of the trade. Special exercises are also included for students to make this a useful resource for the classroom. Most importantly, the book provides entry into the treasure trove that is the work of a select group of gifted Vermont writers sustaining a rich literary tradition that too many of us take for granted.
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61.68 USD
Paperback / softback
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How is a sense of place created, imagined, and reinterpreted over time? That is the intriguing question addressed in this comprehensive look at the 400-year, multi-layered history of Salem, Massachusetts, and the experiences of fourteen generations of people who lived in a place forever enshrined, indeed mythologized, in the public ...
Salem: Place, Myth and Memory
How is a sense of place created, imagined, and reinterpreted over time? That is the intriguing question addressed in this comprehensive look at the 400-year, multi-layered history of Salem, Massachusetts, and the experiences of fourteen generations of people who lived in a place forever enshrined, indeed mythologized, in the public imagination by the horrific witch trials and executions of 1692 and 1693. By exploring the rich textures of Salem as a local, national, and global entity from its settling in 1626 to the present, this highly original, cohesive, and teachable collection Illuminates how people influence a place and how a place influences its people. The contributors combine the perspectives of history, literary studies, the arts, and popular culture with compelling photographs to examine Salem's many-sided urban identities over four centuries: frontier outpost of European civilization, cosmopolitan seaport, gateway to the Far East, mecca of exceptional architecture, refuge for religious diversity, center for education, and Witch City tourist attraction. This passage through Salem's long history - its people, legacies, and myths - challenges readers to reconsider the multiple meanings of any place. For courses in American studies, this unique work will deepen one's understanding of how a place's present resonates with its past; and, for the general reader, it will enrich the experience of visitors touring Salem's historic sites and vibrant cultural institutions.
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USD
Hardback
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This lavishly illustrated guidebook to the many distinctive attractions of Boston's Victorian heritage provides the walker and the armchair traveler alike with delightful and enlightening discoveries of the city's remarkable treasure trove of nineteenth-century landmarks and luminaries. Designed and written by a diverse group of specialists in history, architecture, literature, ...
Victorian Boston Today: Twelve Walking Tours
This lavishly illustrated guidebook to the many distinctive attractions of Boston's Victorian heritage provides the walker and the armchair traveler alike with delightful and enlightening discoveries of the city's remarkable treasure trove of nineteenth-century landmarks and luminaries. Designed and written by a diverse group of specialists in history, architecture, literature, and culture, the narrators of these twelve unique tours offer rich historical detail and engaging anecdotes about this vibrant period in Boston's past. Victorian Boston Today, edited by Mary Melvin Petronella for the New England Chapter of the Victorian Society of America, includes a beautifully drawn map for each tour, and contains such features as expanded descriptive captions for the profuse vintage illustrations, telephone numbers and web addresses for sites open to the public, directions between tour sites, information about public transportation, and a wealth of other practical enhancements and tips. From the South End's signature residential squares, to the Black Heritage Trail[registered], to Jamaica Plain's pastoral landscape, these walking tours vividly recapture the spirit of Victorian Boston. The guidebook will fascinate Boston's residents, tourists, and historians, and provide inspiration for the active preservation of the city's magnificent buildings and neighborhoods.
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36.79 USD
Paperback / softback
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Now that New Hampshire's dominant White Mountain peak can be climbed relatively easily in a long day, or more comfortably ascended by car or cog railway, it is easy to forget that it was once considered by Native Americans and most European settlers to be too sacred and formidable to ...
Passaconaway's Realm
Now that New Hampshire's dominant White Mountain peak can be climbed relatively easily in a long day, or more comfortably ascended by car or cog railway, it is easy to forget that it was once considered by Native Americans and most European settlers to be too sacred and formidable to attempt. In fact, mountain climbing was relatively rare until recent times, making the fifteen ascents of Mount Washington between 1632 and 1804 all the more remarkable. Passaconaway's Realm is a concise, historically and scientifically correct, and very dramatic story of Mount Washington's earliest climbs and the men who made them in pursuit of botanical specimens; meteorologic, geographic, and geological data; and personal adventure. Incorporating sources that have never been utilized, Russell M. Lawson highlights the interaction of the wilderness landscape and the native peoples with such British-American newcomers and invaders as Walter Neale, Darby Field, John Josselyn, Captain Wells, Robert Rogers, Nicholas Austin, Governor John Wentworth, Jeremy Belknap, and Manasseh Cutler. He focuses on rustic frontiersman Captain John Evans, a founder of Fryeburg, Maine, an axe-man and hunter, but also the wilderness guide for the men of science during the 1784 Belknap-Cutler expedition. Lawson describes in close and intriguing detail the personal relations and aspirations, the logistics and difficulties, and the scientific aspirations and outcomes of this key early ascent.
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18.40 USD

Passaconaway's Realm

by Russell M Lawson
Paperback / softback
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What's So Scary about Vermont? In The Vermont Ghost Guide, Vermont's Ghostmaster Joseph A. Citro teams up with award-winning artist Stephen R. Bissette to answer that question definitively. Organized alphabetically by town, this remarkable pocket-sized collection of lore and line art points travelers toward dozens of mystifying sites to discover ...
The Vermont Ghost Guide
What's So Scary about Vermont? In The Vermont Ghost Guide, Vermont's Ghostmaster Joseph A. Citro teams up with award-winning artist Stephen R. Bissette to answer that question definitively. Organized alphabetically by town, this remarkable pocket-sized collection of lore and line art points travelers toward dozens of mystifying sites to discover -- or perhaps avoid. Both a guidebook and a reference tool, The Vermont Ghost Guide contains over 100 entries with 39 illustrations of haunted houses, ghostly spots, and mysterious events from every Vermont county. Many of the stories have never been published before. Vermont's mysterious mountains, hills, and hollows are rich with timeless tales of ghosts, phantoms, and horrible haunts, and Joe Citro has been covering that dead-beat for over a decade. In The Vermont Ghost Guide you'll encounter: - a poltergeist raining stones on a hapless North Pownal farm; - Northfield's Phantom Gravedigger; - a Ryegate ghostly door that appears and vanishes; - Charles Dickens's ghost guiding a writer's hand in Brattleboro; - a doppelganger's prediction of death in Cavendish; - the Midnight Cow, haunting the highways; - a miner's specter, embedded in stone; - the mysterious Eddy Brothers who marked Vermont as The Spirit Capital of the Universe ; - and many, many more. But Be Warned! Citro's Vermont is not the idyllic New England wonderland of tourist bureaus and scenic postcards. These are shadowy haunts and whispered horrors, the ghosts, ghouls, gores, and mysteries of the Green Mountain State, rendered in eerie black-and-white by artist Steve Bissette. Perfect for visitors and residents, children and anyone else with an interest in or curiosity about Vermont history, legend, and lore, The Vermont Ghost Guide is sure to have a long shelf life and be of continuing interest for years to come.
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15.700000 USD
Paperback / softback
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In Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks, the editors and contributors trace the rise and fall of New Haven, Connecticut, as an industrial city. While New Haven's story is typical of many thriving cities during the American Industrial Revolution-fascinating to preservationists, urban and landscape historians, architects, industrial archaeologists, and community ...
Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks
In Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks, the editors and contributors trace the rise and fall of New Haven, Connecticut, as an industrial city. While New Haven's story is typical of many thriving cities during the American Industrial Revolution-fascinating to preservationists, urban and landscape historians, architects, industrial archaeologists, and community historians-it is atypical as well. Most American industrial cities relied on the manufacture of a single product, but New Haven diversified, fabricating over one hundred assorted manufactured goods at the turn of the twentieth century. In a remarkable feat of historical continuity, Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks explores the origins, preservation, reclamation, and reuse of the extant industrial sites and firmly iterates a unique sense of place for modern citizens of this post-industrial city. Five scholarly narrative essays interpret specific sites, and detailed historical profiles are included for sixteen selected industrial sites located on or near New Haven's harbor, including the Quinnipiac Brewery and the Candee Rubber Company. More than one hundred historically significant illustrations depict historical and modern views of sites, the products manufactured there, and New Haven's working people. Maps and tables illustrate the progress of the city's urban development from the seventeenth through the mid-twentieth centuries. Based on primary source material including land and fire department records, city directories, newspaper articles, maps, and personal accounts, this book is the culmination of the Industrial Heritage Project of the New Haven Preservation Trust's mission to evaluate and document the city's historic industrial sites and to produce educational and advocacy programs for preservation efforts.
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48.89 USD
Hardback
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Blacks have lived and worked in Maine as early as the seventeenth century, but historically have constituted less than one percent of Maine's population. Probably for this reason, books on Blacks in New England have largely ignored the experience of African American Mainers. Black Bangor is the first major published ...
Black Bangor: African Americans in a Maine Community, 1880-1950
Blacks have lived and worked in Maine as early as the seventeenth century, but historically have constituted less than one percent of Maine's population. Probably for this reason, books on Blacks in New England have largely ignored the experience of African American Mainers. Black Bangor is the first major published study of a Black community in Maine. This tightly woven case study examines the African American community in Bangor during its heyday, 1880-1950, the period that saw an unprecedented migration of Blacks to that city. Blacks migrated to Bangor not just from other New England states, but from the Caribbean and Canadian Maritime Provinces as well, creating a heterogeneous community with roots in two hemispheres. Constituting an ultraminority in Bangor (according to the census, Blacks never numbered more than 300 souls during this period), this diverse community nonetheless came together to establish an impressive range of institutions, including local chapters of the NAACP and Odd Fellows, as well as of Mothers and Junior Mothers Clubs. Concentrated in an area known as the Parker Street neighborhood, Black women in Bangor became domestics and cooks, caterers and beauticians, clerks and stenographers. Men worked as loggers, teamsters, porters, chefs, and barbers; a few owned businesses. Organized thematically, with sections on migration, labor, daily life, and community, Black Bangor's topics include not just migration patterns, work, and religious and cultural organizations, but also African American homes, furniture, clothing, and foodways. Elgersman Lee also examines race relations and depictions of Blacks in the local media, and draws comparisons between the experiences of Bangor's African American population and those of Blacks in other New England cities. This fascinating and exhaustive study will appeal to anyone from Maine, as well as those interested in African American history, and the rich texture of the region's cultural life.
73.65 USD
Hardback
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Before 1940, residents in rural New England communities listened to and performed music in limited social spheres - the home, neighborhood, village, or work place. Few opportunities existed at that time to bring new music into the community or to share local music more widely. When commerce and the media ...
Music in Rural New England Family and Community Life,1870-1940
Before 1940, residents in rural New England communities listened to and performed music in limited social spheres - the home, neighborhood, village, or work place. Few opportunities existed at that time to bring new music into the community or to share local music more widely. When commerce and the media began to dominate the music scene with the phonograph and, later, the radio, exchanges among musicians and fans transcended the local and broadened spheres of influence and radically altered the musical landscape. Drawing upon interviews and archival primary source materials, this book presents new insights into the musical practices and traditions of late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century rural Northern New England - a context that includes traditional ballads and hymns and, surprisingly, popular songs and commercial dance music. Jennifer C. Post lets the voices of ordinary people - the participants - tell us about their music and cultural history. Their stories are infused with issues of concern to ethnomusicologists, historians, and social scientists about landscape and community, gendered expression, imagined traditions, and historical representation.
55.25 USD
Mixed media product
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In this thoughtful and wide-ranging cultural critique, Taylor explores the condition and role of the intellectual in nineteenth-century New England by examining five writers: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, William James, and George Santayana. Using key texts from each, he analyzes the status and identity of intellectual ...
Thinking America: New England Intellectuals and the Varieties of American Identity
In this thoughtful and wide-ranging cultural critique, Taylor explores the condition and role of the intellectual in nineteenth-century New England by examining five writers: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, William James, and George Santayana. Using key texts from each, he analyzes the status and identity of intellectual figures, and explores the relationship between intellectual work and theories of national identity. The questions the book raises-about the alliance between thought and action, about the best locations for intellectual work, and about the challenges posed to thinking by an increasingly fragmented and diverse public-remain pertinent today. Chronologically and geographically focused, Thinking America has wide resonance for the ongoing debates about the genealogy-and future viability-of the public intellectual.
67.35 USD
Hardback
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Two Vermonts establishes a little-known fact about Vermont: that the state's fascination with tourism as a savior for a suffering economy is more than a century old, and that this interest in tourism has always been dogged by controversy. Through this lens, the book is poised to take its place ...
Two Vermonts: Geography and Identity, 1865-1910
Two Vermonts establishes a little-known fact about Vermont: that the state's fascination with tourism as a savior for a suffering economy is more than a century old, and that this interest in tourism has always been dogged by controversy. Through this lens, the book is poised to take its place as the standard work on Vermont in the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era. Searls examines the origins of Vermont's contemporary identity and some reasons why that identity ( Who is a Vermonter? ) is to this day so hotly contested. Searls divides nineteenth-century Vermonters into conceptually uphill, or rural/parochial, and downhill, or urban/cosmopolitan, elements. These two groups, he says, negotiated modernity in distinct and contrary ways. The dissonance between their opposing tactical approaches to progress and change belied the pastoral ideal that contemporary urban Americans had come to associate with the romantic notion of Vermont. Downhill Vermonters, espousing a vision of a mutually reinforcing relationship between tradition and progress, unilaterally endeavored to foster the pastoral ideal as a means of stimulating economic development. The hostile uphill resistance to this strategy engendered intense social conflict over issues including education, religion, and prohibition in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The story of Vermont's vigorous nineteenth-century quest for a unified identity bears witness to the stirring and convoluted forging of today's Vermont. Searls's engaging exploration of this period of Vermont's history advances our understanding of the political, economic, and cultural transformation of all of rural America as industrial capitalism and modernity revolutionized the United States between 1865 and 1910. By the late Progressive Era, Vermont's reputation was rooted in the national yearning to keep society civil, personal, and meaningful in a world growing more informal, bureaucratic, and difficult to navigate. The fundamental ideological differences among Vermont communities are indicative of how elusive and frustrating efforts to balance progress and tradition were in the context of effectively negotiating capitalist transformation in contemporary America.
80.07 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Benjamin L. Hartley brings to light the little-known story of relative latecomers to Boston's religious scene: Methodist, Salvation Army, Baptist, and nondenominational Christians. Focusing on Congregationalists and Roman Catholics, Boston urban historians have largely overlooked these groups. Hartley, however, sheds light on the role of immigrant evangelical leaders from Italy, ...
Evangelicals at a Crossroads: Revivalism and Social Reform in Boston, 1860-1910
Benjamin L. Hartley brings to light the little-known story of relative latecomers to Boston's religious scene: Methodist, Salvation Army, Baptist, and nondenominational Christians. Focusing on Congregationalists and Roman Catholics, Boston urban historians have largely overlooked these groups. Hartley, however, sheds light on the role of immigrant evangelical leaders from Italy, Sweden, and elsewhere in revivalism and social reform in postbellum Boston. Further, examining the contested nature of revivalism and social reform in a particular, local nineteenth-century context provides a basis for understanding the roots of current divisions in American Protestantism and the contentious role of evangelical religion in American politics. Hartley documents the importance of the American holiness movement as a precursor to the significant presence of Pentecostal groups in urban America, adding an important historical context for evangelical social action today.
89.250000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
In 1784 Connecticut laid claim to a territory stretching from Pennsylvania's western border 120 miles along Lake Erie. In 1786 Congress took steps to legitimate this claim, and explicitly recognized it in 1800. The Peopling of New Connecticut presents primary documents that define Connecticut's complex relationship with this territory, known ...
The Peopling of New Connecticut
In 1784 Connecticut laid claim to a territory stretching from Pennsylvania's western border 120 miles along Lake Erie. In 1786 Congress took steps to legitimate this claim, and explicitly recognized it in 1800. The Peopling of New Connecticut presents primary documents that define Connecticut's complex relationship with this territory, known then as the Western Reserve. Using excerpts from previously published official records, diaries, newspapers, periodical journals, pamphlets, and the occasional book that illustrates the process whereby Connecticut transplanted some of its people to a distant, western land, this Acorn Club publication illuminates not only the experience of the emigrants as they journeyed to Ohio and settled in the Western Reserve but also the effect that the emigrants' departure had on the society they left behind. The volume comes with an introduction and commentary about the significance of these republished materials. The Peopling of New Connecticut is a vital, enlightening record of this special chapter in Connecticut's history and provides unique insight into the early westward movement after the Revolutionary War.
26.200000 USD
Paperback / softback