Filter
(found 29 products)
Book cover image
As good health is inextricably wedded to pure drinking water-and this particular concern looms larger every day-understanding delivery systems is almost as important as the water itself. Water for Hartford chronicles the century-long effort, beginning in the 1850s, to construct a viable, efficient water system. The story of Hartford's water ...
Water for Hartford
As good health is inextricably wedded to pure drinking water-and this particular concern looms larger every day-understanding delivery systems is almost as important as the water itself. Water for Hartford chronicles the century-long effort, beginning in the 1850s, to construct a viable, efficient water system. The story of Hartford's water works is a fascinating one, for it recalls the hard work, great sacrifice, and extraordinary engineering feats necessary to deliver wholesome drinking water to a growing urban center. It also illuminates the ever-changing social, political, and economic milieu in which it was built. The story of its construction is also the story of three men-Hiram Bissell, Ezra Clark, and Caleb Saville. Readers are transported back in time and given a firsthand glimpse of what these champions of a water system faced on a daily basis: unforgiving geography, venal politicians, and an often-indifferent public. The book culminates in the exhilaration of having built a water works from scratch to deliver clean, safe drinking water to the masses. Water for Hartford is a human story, peopled by men of vision and achievement, who understood that their decisions and actions would affect millions of people for decades to come.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780819570802.jpg
36.750000 USD

Water for Hartford

by Kevin Murphy
Hardback
Book cover image
We live with a myth about New England, write naturalists Nona Bell Estrin and Charles W. Johnson: that we have four distinct seasons here. As careful and experienced observers of the natural world, Estrin and Johnson know that nature's progressions are gradual, continuous, and interconnected. And as they demonstrate in ...
In Season
We live with a myth about New England, write naturalists Nona Bell Estrin and Charles W. Johnson: that we have four distinct seasons here. As careful and experienced observers of the natural world, Estrin and Johnson know that nature's progressions are gradual, continuous, and interconnected. And as they demonstrate in their remarkable book, the close examination of nature-even unassuming landscapes close at hand-yields rich rewards on a daily basis. In Season combines the immediacy of direct field observations with broader perspectives on natural cycles. An accomplished field artist as well as a naturalist, Nona Estrin selects extracts from her rich journals to trace the sequences of natural events over the course of a year. From Toothaker Island, Maine to Kettle Pond, Vermont to Cape Cod, Massachusetts, her precise, lively observations, along with her lovely drawings and watercolors, reveal the lives of warblers and butterflies, deer and grouse, frogs and fiddlehead ferns. Occasionally, her records of the natural world are punctuated by charming asides about the difficulty of drawing bees or the rescue of a fledgling kingbird caught in a fishing line. In alternating chapters, Charles Johnson's essays tell the stories behind her scenes, exploring such seasonal cycles as mating, migration, and winter survival. His wide-ranging knowledge of the natural world clarifies the continuity of life and the interconnections among species. Rather than focus on categorization and identification, Johnson explores the dynamics which shape the natural world in New England, not only for plants and wildlife, but for people as well. With its mix of detailed observation and overarching explanation, as well as the stunning color reproductions of Estrin's on-the-spot watercolors, In Season offers an appreciation of the natural world in New England that is rooted in the specific experience of its ceaseless alternations.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781584651277.jpg
34.71 USD

In Season

by Nona Bell Estrin, Charles W. Johnson
Hardback
Book cover image
In a series of entertaining essays, geoscientist Jelle Zeilinga de Boer describes how early settlers discovered and exploited Connecticut's natural resources. Their successes as well as failures form the very basis of the state's history: Chatham's gold played a role in the acquisition of its Charter, and Middletown's lead helped ...
Stories in Stone
In a series of entertaining essays, geoscientist Jelle Zeilinga de Boer describes how early settlers discovered and exploited Connecticut's natural resources. Their successes as well as failures form the very basis of the state's history: Chatham's gold played a role in the acquisition of its Charter, and Middletown's lead helped the colony gain its freedom during the Revolution. Fertile soils in the Central Valley fueled the state's development into an agricultural power house, and iron ores discovered in the western highlands helped trigger its manufacturing eminence. The Statue of Liberty, a quintessential symbol of America, rests on Connecticut's Stony Creek granite. Geology not only shaped the state's physical landscape, but also provided an economic base and played a cultural role by inspiring folklore, paintings, and poems. Illuminated by 50 illustrations and 12 color plates, Stories in Stone describes the marvel of Connecticut's geologic diversity and also recounts the impact of past climates, earthquakes, and meteorites on the lives of the people who made Connecticut their home.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780819568915.jpg
28.300000 USD

Stories in Stone

by Jelle Zeilinga De Boer
Hardback
Book cover image
At the vanguard of renewed interest in Maine's influential early modernist Marsden Hartley (1877-1943), author Donna M. Cassidy brilliantly appraises the contemporary social, political, and economic realities that shaped Hartley's landmark late art. During the late 1930s and early 1940s, Hartley strove to represent the distinctive subjects of his native ...
Marsden Hartley
At the vanguard of renewed interest in Maine's influential early modernist Marsden Hartley (1877-1943), author Donna M. Cassidy brilliantly appraises the contemporary social, political, and economic realities that shaped Hartley's landmark late art. During the late 1930s and early 1940s, Hartley strove to represent the distinctive subjects of his native region-the North Atlantic folk, the Maine coast, and Mount Katahdin-producing work that demands an interpretive approach beyond art history's customary biographical, stylistic, and thematic methodologies. Cassidy, sensitive to the psychological and gender analysis traditionally central to interpretations of Hartley, becomes the first scholar to reassess his late work in light of contemporary American perceptions of race, ethnicity, place, and history. This remarkable new book resonates not only as a seminal Hartley study and a complex art and cultural period history, but as a superb example of applied early twentieth-century American intellectual history informed by an impressive command of primary and secondary interdisciplinary literature. Numerous and rich illustrations, as well as transcriptions of several key essays by Hartley, some never before published, including This Country of Maine (1937-38), round out this insightful, nuanced, and revolutionary treatment. Donna M. Cassidy's Marsden Hartley will engage general readers as well as scholars and students.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781584654469.jpg
48.89 USD

Marsden Hartley

by Donna M. Cassidy
Hardback
Book cover image
In the course of the mundane routines of life, we encounter a variety of landscapes and objects, either ignoring them or looking without interest at what appears to be just a tree, stone, anonymous building, or dirt road. But the deep traveler, according to Hartford Courant essayist David K. Leff, ...
Hidden in Plain Sight
In the course of the mundane routines of life, we encounter a variety of landscapes and objects, either ignoring them or looking without interest at what appears to be just a tree, stone, anonymous building, or dirt road. But the deep traveler, according to Hartford Courant essayist David K. Leff, doesn't make this mistake. Instead, the commonplace elements become the most important. By learning to see the magic in the mundane, we not only enrich daily life with a sense of place, we are more likely to protect and make those places better. Over his many years working at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and writing about the state's landscape, Leff gained unparalleled intimacy while traveling its byways and back roads. In Hidden in Plain Sight, Leff's essays and photographs take us on a point-by-point journey, revealing the rich stories behind many of Connecticut's overlooked landmarks, from the Merritt Parkway and Cornwall's Cathedral Pines to roadside rock art and centuries-old milestones.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780819572813.jpg
26.200000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Connecticut in the American Civil War offers readers a remarkable window into the state's involvement in a conflict that challenged and defined the unity of a nation. The arc of the war is traced through the many facets and stories of battlefield, home front, and factory. Matthew Warshauer masterfully reveals ...
Connecticut in the American Civil War
Connecticut in the American Civil War offers readers a remarkable window into the state's involvement in a conflict that challenged and defined the unity of a nation. The arc of the war is traced through the many facets and stories of battlefield, home front, and factory. Matthew Warshauer masterfully reveals the varied attitudes toward slavery and race before, during, and after the war; Connecticut's reaction to the firing on Fort Sumter; the dissent in the state over whether or not the sword and musket should be raised against the South; the raising of troops; the sacrifice of those who served on the front and at home; and the need for closure after the war. This book is a concise, amazing account of a complex and troubling war. No one interested in this period of American history can afford to miss reading this important contribution to our national and local stories. The paperback edition includes a reading guide, which is also available at http://www.wesleyan.edu/wespress/e-books/materials/warshauer_reading_guide.pdf
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780819571380.jpg
31.450000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
In Traces of Thoreau, Stephen Mulloney faithfully follows his 1849 walking tour from Orleans to Provincetown, vividly describing not only the differences between yesterday's Cape and today's but also their timeless similarities. In duplicating Thoreau's journey, Stephen Mulloney captures views of the Cape rarely seen by tourists and allows the ...
Traces of Thoreau: Cape Cod Journey
In Traces of Thoreau, Stephen Mulloney faithfully follows his 1849 walking tour from Orleans to Provincetown, vividly describing not only the differences between yesterday's Cape and today's but also their timeless similarities. In duplicating Thoreau's journey, Stephen Mulloney captures views of the Cape rarely seen by tourists and allows the reader to explore and contemplate the Great Outer Beach as if for the first time. Mulloney's entertaining travelogue gives us nature by day -- with captivating descriptions of plants, animals, and geological features -- and civilization by night as he seeks food and lodging in beach communities swarming with visitors. Here one meets a delightful sampling of colorful Cape characters, from members of the cocktail set to Wellfleet oystermen encountered in a working-class bar. Traces of Thoreau richly conveys the grandeur of beach and sky juxtaposed with fast food stands and miniature golf. It is a celebration of the bare beauty of the landscape and an invitation to share the meditations of a modern-day Thoreau who rediscovers the restorative powers of one of America's most scenic locales.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781555533441.jpg
52.42 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
How is a sense of place created, imagined, and reinterpreted over time? That is the intriguing question addressed in this comprehensive look at the 400-year, multi-layered history of Salem, Massachusetts, and the experiences of fourteen generations of people who lived in a place forever enshrined, indeed mythologized, in the public ...
Salem: Place, Myth and Memory
How is a sense of place created, imagined, and reinterpreted over time? That is the intriguing question addressed in this comprehensive look at the 400-year, multi-layered history of Salem, Massachusetts, and the experiences of fourteen generations of people who lived in a place forever enshrined, indeed mythologized, in the public imagination by the horrific witch trials and executions of 1692 and 1693. By exploring the rich textures of Salem as a local, national, and global entity from its settling in 1626 to the present, this highly original, cohesive, and teachable collection Illuminates how people influence a place and how a place influences its people. The contributors combine the perspectives of history, literary studies, the arts, and popular culture with compelling photographs to examine Salem's many-sided urban identities over four centuries: frontier outpost of European civilization, cosmopolitan seaport, gateway to the Far East, mecca of exceptional architecture, refuge for religious diversity, center for education, and Witch City tourist attraction. This passage through Salem's long history - its people, legacies, and myths - challenges readers to reconsider the multiple meanings of any place. For courses in American studies, this unique work will deepen one's understanding of how a place's present resonates with its past; and, for the general reader, it will enrich the experience of visitors touring Salem's historic sites and vibrant cultural institutions.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781555536091.jpg
USD
Hardback
Book cover image
In Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks, the editors and contributors trace the rise and fall of New Haven, Connecticut, as an industrial city. While New Haven's story is typical of many thriving cities during the American Industrial Revolution-fascinating to preservationists, urban and landscape historians, architects, industrial archaeologists, and community ...
Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks
In Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks, the editors and contributors trace the rise and fall of New Haven, Connecticut, as an industrial city. While New Haven's story is typical of many thriving cities during the American Industrial Revolution-fascinating to preservationists, urban and landscape historians, architects, industrial archaeologists, and community historians-it is atypical as well. Most American industrial cities relied on the manufacture of a single product, but New Haven diversified, fabricating over one hundred assorted manufactured goods at the turn of the twentieth century. In a remarkable feat of historical continuity, Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks explores the origins, preservation, reclamation, and reuse of the extant industrial sites and firmly iterates a unique sense of place for modern citizens of this post-industrial city. Five scholarly narrative essays interpret specific sites, and detailed historical profiles are included for sixteen selected industrial sites located on or near New Haven's harbor, including the Quinnipiac Brewery and the Candee Rubber Company. More than one hundred historically significant illustrations depict historical and modern views of sites, the products manufactured there, and New Haven's working people. Maps and tables illustrate the progress of the city's urban development from the seventeenth through the mid-twentieth centuries. Based on primary source material including land and fire department records, city directories, newspaper articles, maps, and personal accounts, this book is the culmination of the Industrial Heritage Project of the New Haven Preservation Trust's mission to evaluate and document the city's historic industrial sites and to produce educational and advocacy programs for preservation efforts.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781584654209.jpg
48.89 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Blacks have lived and worked in Maine as early as the seventeenth century, but historically have constituted less than one percent of Maine's population. Probably for this reason, books on Blacks in New England have largely ignored the experience of African American Mainers. Black Bangor is the first major published ...
Black Bangor: African Americans in a Maine Community, 1880-1950
Blacks have lived and worked in Maine as early as the seventeenth century, but historically have constituted less than one percent of Maine's population. Probably for this reason, books on Blacks in New England have largely ignored the experience of African American Mainers. Black Bangor is the first major published study of a Black community in Maine. This tightly woven case study examines the African American community in Bangor during its heyday, 1880-1950, the period that saw an unprecedented migration of Blacks to that city. Blacks migrated to Bangor not just from other New England states, but from the Caribbean and Canadian Maritime Provinces as well, creating a heterogeneous community with roots in two hemispheres. Constituting an ultraminority in Bangor (according to the census, Blacks never numbered more than 300 souls during this period), this diverse community nonetheless came together to establish an impressive range of institutions, including local chapters of the NAACP and Odd Fellows, as well as of Mothers and Junior Mothers Clubs. Concentrated in an area known as the Parker Street neighborhood, Black women in Bangor became domestics and cooks, caterers and beauticians, clerks and stenographers. Men worked as loggers, teamsters, porters, chefs, and barbers; a few owned businesses. Organized thematically, with sections on migration, labor, daily life, and community, Black Bangor's topics include not just migration patterns, work, and religious and cultural organizations, but also African American homes, furniture, clothing, and foodways. Elgersman Lee also examines race relations and depictions of Blacks in the local media, and draws comparisons between the experiences of Bangor's African American population and those of Blacks in other New England cities. This fascinating and exhaustive study will appeal to anyone from Maine, as well as those interested in African American history, and the rich texture of the region's cultural life.
73.65 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
In this thoughtful and wide-ranging cultural critique, Taylor explores the condition and role of the intellectual in nineteenth-century New England by examining five writers: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, William James, and George Santayana. Using key texts from each, he analyzes the status and identity of intellectual ...
Thinking America: New England Intellectuals and the Varieties of American Identity
In this thoughtful and wide-ranging cultural critique, Taylor explores the condition and role of the intellectual in nineteenth-century New England by examining five writers: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, William James, and George Santayana. Using key texts from each, he analyzes the status and identity of intellectual figures, and explores the relationship between intellectual work and theories of national identity. The questions the book raises-about the alliance between thought and action, about the best locations for intellectual work, and about the challenges posed to thinking by an increasingly fragmented and diverse public-remain pertinent today. Chronologically and geographically focused, Thinking America has wide resonance for the ongoing debates about the genealogy-and future viability-of the public intellectual.
67.35 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Two Vermonts establishes a little-known fact about Vermont: that the state's fascination with tourism as a savior for a suffering economy is more than a century old, and that this interest in tourism has always been dogged by controversy. Through this lens, the book is poised to take its place ...
Two Vermonts: Geography and Identity, 1865-1910
Two Vermonts establishes a little-known fact about Vermont: that the state's fascination with tourism as a savior for a suffering economy is more than a century old, and that this interest in tourism has always been dogged by controversy. Through this lens, the book is poised to take its place as the standard work on Vermont in the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era. Searls examines the origins of Vermont's contemporary identity and some reasons why that identity ( Who is a Vermonter? ) is to this day so hotly contested. Searls divides nineteenth-century Vermonters into conceptually uphill, or rural/parochial, and downhill, or urban/cosmopolitan, elements. These two groups, he says, negotiated modernity in distinct and contrary ways. The dissonance between their opposing tactical approaches to progress and change belied the pastoral ideal that contemporary urban Americans had come to associate with the romantic notion of Vermont. Downhill Vermonters, espousing a vision of a mutually reinforcing relationship between tradition and progress, unilaterally endeavored to foster the pastoral ideal as a means of stimulating economic development. The hostile uphill resistance to this strategy engendered intense social conflict over issues including education, religion, and prohibition in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The story of Vermont's vigorous nineteenth-century quest for a unified identity bears witness to the stirring and convoluted forging of today's Vermont. Searls's engaging exploration of this period of Vermont's history advances our understanding of the political, economic, and cultural transformation of all of rural America as industrial capitalism and modernity revolutionized the United States between 1865 and 1910. By the late Progressive Era, Vermont's reputation was rooted in the national yearning to keep society civil, personal, and meaningful in a world growing more informal, bureaucratic, and difficult to navigate. The fundamental ideological differences among Vermont communities are indicative of how elusive and frustrating efforts to balance progress and tradition were in the context of effectively negotiating capitalist transformation in contemporary America.
80.07 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Benjamin L. Hartley brings to light the little-known story of relative latecomers to Boston's religious scene: Methodist, Salvation Army, Baptist, and nondenominational Christians. Focusing on Congregationalists and Roman Catholics, Boston urban historians have largely overlooked these groups. Hartley, however, sheds light on the role of immigrant evangelical leaders from Italy, ...
Evangelicals at a Crossroads: Revivalism and Social Reform in Boston, 1860-1910
Benjamin L. Hartley brings to light the little-known story of relative latecomers to Boston's religious scene: Methodist, Salvation Army, Baptist, and nondenominational Christians. Focusing on Congregationalists and Roman Catholics, Boston urban historians have largely overlooked these groups. Hartley, however, sheds light on the role of immigrant evangelical leaders from Italy, Sweden, and elsewhere in revivalism and social reform in postbellum Boston. Further, examining the contested nature of revivalism and social reform in a particular, local nineteenth-century context provides a basis for understanding the roots of current divisions in American Protestantism and the contentious role of evangelical religion in American politics. Hartley documents the importance of the American holiness movement as a precursor to the significant presence of Pentecostal groups in urban America, adding an important historical context for evangelical social action today.
89.250000 USD
Hardback
Page 1 of 1