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At the turn of the twentieth century new laws introduced paid holidays for the masses and the seaside towns of Scotland saw a huge influx of visitors. From Glasgow, Paisley and the industrial heartland of Scotland, poured holidaymakers on the Fair Holiday trip 'doon the watter'. Some Scottish resorts such ...
By Steamer to the Ayrshire Coast
At the turn of the twentieth century new laws introduced paid holidays for the masses and the seaside towns of Scotland saw a huge influx of visitors. From Glasgow, Paisley and the industrial heartland of Scotland, poured holidaymakers on the Fair Holiday trip 'doon the watter'. Some Scottish resorts such as Largs, Fairlie, Troon, Ardrossan, Saltcoats, Millport, Gourock and Wemyss Bay saw their populations double or treble for much of the summer. By the end of the 1960s, the annual Fair Holiday was in decline. No longer was there as great a need to close factories for a week, nor was the holidaymaker so reliant on the pleasure steamers. Cars and aircraft had taken their toll and the resorts began to decline. Alistair Deayton, one of the acknowledged experts on the Clyde pleasure steamers, and author of many books on the subject, shows the Ayrshire and Renfrewshire resorts in their heyday, while exploring their decline, as well as that of the pleasure steamers, only one of which, Waverley, remains today.
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25.58 USD

By Steamer to the Ayrshire Coast

by Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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Services from mainland Scotland to Orkney and Shetland were, from the dawn of steam navigation right up until 2002, in the hands of the North of Scotland, Orkney & Shetland Shipping Company, known as the North Company, whose predecessors dated back to 1790 and which became part of P&O Ferries ...
Steamers and Ferries of the Northern Isles
Services from mainland Scotland to Orkney and Shetland were, from the dawn of steam navigation right up until 2002, in the hands of the North of Scotland, Orkney & Shetland Shipping Company, known as the North Company, whose predecessors dated back to 1790 and which became part of P&O Ferries in 1975. In this book, Alistair Deayton uses his wonderful collection of photographs to tell the story of the ferries and steamers of the northern isles, including not only the North Company but its successors and competitors on the routes between mainland Scotland and the islands, including chartered vessels and wartime Ministry of War Transport ships travelling to Scapa Flow. The book also includes the inter-island ferries in both Orkney and Shetland, not forgetting the services to remote Foula and Fair Isle. This book is a must for all those interested in the transport history of Orkney and Shetland and evokes the days when the only way to travel to the northern isles was by sea.
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25.58 USD

Steamers and Ferries of the Northern Isles

by Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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In 1897, a revolutionary new type of ship blasted its way through the Royal Review at an unprecedented 30+ knots. This small vessel, still extant in Newcastle, was the Turbinia, and she was powered by the world's first marine steam turbine. Developed by Charles Parsons, in one fell swoop she ...
Turbine Excursion Steamers: A History
In 1897, a revolutionary new type of ship blasted its way through the Royal Review at an unprecedented 30+ knots. This small vessel, still extant in Newcastle, was the Turbinia, and she was powered by the world's first marine steam turbine. Developed by Charles Parsons, in one fell swoop she revolutionised sea travel. She was the first turbine steamer. Economical and fast, the turbine steamer was soon to revolutionise ferries and pleasure steamers, as well as huge ocean liners and the mightiest of battleships. The turbine not only promised speed, economy and reliability, it delivered these qualities too. Our story looks at the turbine pleasure steamers in coastal and short-sea service and it covers the first passenger steam turbine vessels on the Clyde, as well as the Irish Sea and South Coast of England as well as the German turbine pleasure steamers. From the ships of Williamson-Buchanan to the Isle of Man and cross channel ferries, the turbine revolutionised short sea transport. Alistair Deayton and Iain Quinn look at the development of the turbine steamer for pleasure use, concentrating on the ships that served the Clyde, Irish Sea and the short sea crossings in the English Channel. Ships of the Isle of Man Steam Packet, Williamson-Buchanan, Caledonian Steam Packet, General Steam Navigation Co., David MacBrayne and the Liverpool & North Wales Steam Ship Co. are covered in depth in this new book, which tells the story of the turbine excursion steamer over the century and a bit since the first revolutionary turbine pleasure steamer made its maiden voyage on the Clyde at the dawn of the Edwardian era.
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34.11 USD

Turbine Excursion Steamers: A History

by Iain Quinn, Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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On 8 August 1974, the world's last seagoing paddle steamer was sold by her owners for the princely sum of a pound. The PS Waverley has now spent more of her career in preservation than in service with the British Transport Commission and Caledonian MacBrayne. She is still a common ...
Waverley Steam Navigation Company
On 8 August 1974, the world's last seagoing paddle steamer was sold by her owners for the princely sum of a pound. The PS Waverley has now spent more of her career in preservation than in service with the British Transport Commission and Caledonian MacBrayne. She is still a common sight on the Clyde, Bristol Channel, the Thames and around Britain's coastline. Purchased by members of the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society, many millions have been spent on Waverley in the intervening years to keep her in tiptop condition. Originally built for service on the Firth of Clyde, the Waverley is the most travelled paddle steamer in the world and one of the most successful of all the restored tourist ships that still survive. Formed upon preservation, Waverley Steam Navigation Company was created to operate the Waverley and, subsequently, the Balmoral, and has successfully operated the two vessels over the past four decades. Nowadays, after a huge lottery-funded restoration, Waverley is capable of sailing for another ten or twenty years, giving pleasure to many thousands per annum on her voyages around Britain's coast.
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34.12 USD

Waverley Steam Navigation Company

by Iain Quinn, Alistair Deayton
Hardback
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Unlike in the rest of the United Kingdom the pier in Scotland has always seen as functional rather than as a pleasure pier. This was certainly the case on the West Highland Coast. During the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth century shipping was the only way to transport ...
West Highland Piers
Unlike in the rest of the United Kingdom the pier in Scotland has always seen as functional rather than as a pleasure pier. This was certainly the case on the West Highland Coast. During the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth century shipping was the only way to transport goods and people in and out of the West Highlands and Islands. Served by paddle steamers, puffers and small coasters, the piers served a vital function for their communities. Often with stunning mountain backdrops, many settlements clustered around the piers. Some piers, like at Oban could accommodate a number of ships at once, while others, such as at Scarinish on the Island of Tiree, were built with functionality in mind, providing for the needs of the inhabitants. Alistair Deayton brings together a superb selection of images of the West Highland piers. Telling their history and showing just some of the variety of vessels that called there. Included are the piers at Oban, Ullapool, Port Askiag, Kennacriag, Malliag, Tarbet and Armadale. From Macbrayne's steamers to the working vessels of McCallum, Orme and the puffers of Glenlight, a vast array of ships are shown. Many of the piers are still an important part of life on the West Coast with Caledonian MacBrayne ferries running between the mainland and the Islands.
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25.58 USD

West Highland Piers

by Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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The Caledonian Steam Packet Co. was founded in 1889 by the Caledonian Railway and in 2014 is 125 years old. It originally sailed from Gourock but came to encompass many of the Clyde coast piers and resorts, from Girvan to Argyll. At one time in competition with the Glasgow & ...
The Caledonian Steam Packet Company: An Illustrated History
The Caledonian Steam Packet Co. was founded in 1889 by the Caledonian Railway and in 2014 is 125 years old. It originally sailed from Gourock but came to encompass many of the Clyde coast piers and resorts, from Girvan to Argyll. At one time in competition with the Glasgow & South Western steamers and those of the North British Railway, by 1948 and the nationalisation of the railway companies, the steamers of these companies had all come under the auspices of the Caledonian Steam Packet Co. By 1973, the fleets of David MacBrayne and the CSP were amalgamated. The CalMac fleet comprises the third volume in this series on Clyde and West Coast steamers. This follow-up to Alistair Deayton's David MacBrayne history tells the story of the other constituent company of CalMac, whose vessels, with their blacktipped yellow funnels, once flourished on the Clyde, sailing to Ayrshire, Renfrewshire and Argyll.
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34.11 USD

The Caledonian Steam Packet Company: An Illustrated History

by Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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Built in 1949 in Southampton for the Southampton, Isle of Wight & South of England Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., MV Balmoral operated in their Red Funnel fleet for twenty years. Moving to Bristol, she became the last vessel purchased by P&A Campbell for the pleasure steamer services down the ...
MV Balmoral: The First Sixty Years
Built in 1949 in Southampton for the Southampton, Isle of Wight & South of England Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., MV Balmoral operated in their Red Funnel fleet for twenty years. Moving to Bristol, she became the last vessel purchased by P&A Campbell for the pleasure steamer services down the Bristol Channel and across to Wales. As well as service in the South West, she was used in North Wales too, even making sailings to Douglas in the Isle of Man, where she was used to serve as a tender to Swedish American Line Kungsholm. P&A Campbell ceased trading in 1980 and, after a short lay-up, MV Balmoral moved to Dundee to become a floating restaurant. This move was unsuccessful and she was purchased for use as a pleasure steamer again. In1986, she returned to service and to the Bristol Channel where she still operates today. In 2002 she was fitted with new engines that have increased her lifespan considerably. In conjunction with her stable-mate, the paddle steamer Waverley, she also operates on the Clyde, the Thames, North Wales and from Southampton and the South Coast. Balmoral and Waverley, two ships, markedly different, but built within two years of each other, are a reminder of the heyday of coastal cruising, when many such ships took holidaymakers on day trips to resorts the length and breadth of the country. Alistair Deayton and Iain Quinn bring together, in words and pictures, a celebration of the first sixty years of MV Balmoral's career as a sea-going pleasure steamer.
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12.98 USD

MV Balmoral: The First Sixty Years

by Iain Quinn, Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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In August 1812, two centuries ago, the River Clyde would see a transport revolution - one that would change the economy of the river for ever. A Helensburgh hotel owner began to operate Europe's first ever commercial steam ship from Glasgow to Greenock. No longer would ships be dependent on ...
200 Years of Clyde Pleasure Steamers
In August 1812, two centuries ago, the River Clyde would see a transport revolution - one that would change the economy of the river for ever. A Helensburgh hotel owner began to operate Europe's first ever commercial steam ship from Glasgow to Greenock. No longer would ships be dependent on the tide or the wind. The Comet, as his ship was known, had been built by John Wood, of Port Glasgow, and was fitted with paddle wheels. Her first voyage from Glasgow to Greenock was made at about 5mph against a headwind. Advertised to sail on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from Glasgow, the Comet operated the first scheduled steamship service in Europe. It was the start of a revolution that would see the Clyde as the greatest shipbuilding river in the world, and the river's estuary as a haven for pleasure steamers and puffers calling at the remote loch-side piers and inlets. Companies such as David MacBrayne's and the Caledonian Steam Packet Co. would be formed to operate steamers far and wide, a legacy kept alive today by the Paddle Steamer Waverley. Alistair Deayton and Iain Quinn take us through the two centuries of Clyde paddle steamers, illustrating the most famous, such as the Columba, Jeanie Deans and Waverley, illustrating not just the ships themselves but the piers they sailed from, from Rothesay to Helensburgh and from Loch Goil to Loch Long.
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26.200000 USD

200 Years of Clyde Pleasure Steamers

by Iain Quinn, Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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Alistair Deayton takes us on another tour of Clyde pleasure steamers, looking at the ships of Williamson Buchanan and Turbine Steamers Ltd, two of the major independent players on the Clyde. The Williamson-Buchanan steamers served the routes 'doon the watter' from the centre of Glasgow to the Clyde Coast resorts, ...
Steamers of the Clyde: The White Funnel Fleet
Alistair Deayton takes us on another tour of Clyde pleasure steamers, looking at the ships of Williamson Buchanan and Turbine Steamers Ltd, two of the major independent players on the Clyde. The Williamson-Buchanan steamers served the routes 'doon the watter' from the centre of Glasgow to the Clyde Coast resorts, whilst the ships of Turbine Steamers covered long-distance day excursions to Inveraray and Campbeltown. The book also includes the steamers of the Lochgoil Company and the two magnificent paddle steamers called the Lord of the Isles. From Arran to Rothesay and all ports in between, we're taken on a nostalgic trip back to the days when steam was King on the Clyde and when you could travel from Arran to Glasgow in less than two hours. A special chapter is given to the development of the White Funnel turbines, which saw the world's first steam-turbine-powered passenger ship, King Edward, sail on the Clyde.
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28.880000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Created in 1973 with the amalgamation of the Caledonian Steam Packet Co. and David MacBrayne, CalMac's black hulls and white toppings have been a common sight on the Clyde estuary, sailing to the Western Isles and on numerous short crossings in the western Highlands. So widely does the company operate ...
CalMac: An Illustrated History of Caledonian MacBrayne
Created in 1973 with the amalgamation of the Caledonian Steam Packet Co. and David MacBrayne, CalMac's black hulls and white toppings have been a common sight on the Clyde estuary, sailing to the Western Isles and on numerous short crossings in the western Highlands. So widely does the company operate in the west of Scotland that it has even been immortalised in song. Starting with much old tonnage, the fleet has been updated over the past decades with more new ships due to come into service, and now comprises some very modern shipping, still sailing to the Western Isles, through the wonderful landscape of the western Highlands and to Arran, Bute and Cumbrae. This book, the follow-up to Alistair Deayton's illustrated histories of David MacBrayne and the Caledonian Steam Packet, tells the story of CalMac, from its inception to the present day.
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36.700000 USD
Paperback / softback
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In 1812, the first paddle steamer to sail in European coastal waters made its maiden voyage between Glasgow and Greenock. No longer was man restricted to sail, but steam had shown the way. Since then, over 400 paddle steamers have plied the waters of the Clyde, some for a short ...
Directory of Clyde Paddle Steamers
In 1812, the first paddle steamer to sail in European coastal waters made its maiden voyage between Glasgow and Greenock. No longer was man restricted to sail, but steam had shown the way. Since then, over 400 paddle steamers have plied the waters of the Clyde, some for a short while, others to make a short transit up the Leven to Loch Lomond and others for long and fruitful careers. For the first time, a truly definitive record of the Clyde paddlers has been produced. Alistair Deayton has used contemporary records from the Clyde Trustees and local newspapers as well as the steamship operators and the shipyards to produce a book detailing every one of the Clyde steamers from the Comet of 1812 to the last surviving sea-going paddle steamer, PS Waverley. He has created a list of all 419 paddlers that have sailed the waters of the upper and lower Clyde on revenue-earning service.
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37.53 USD

Directory of Clyde Paddle Steamers

by Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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At the turn of the twentieth century, new laws introduced paid holidays for the masses and the seaside towns of Scotland saw a huge influx of visitors. Holidaymakers poured from Glasgow, Paisley and the industrial heartland of Scotland on the Fair Holiday trip 'doon the watter'. Some Scottish resorts such ...
By Steamer to the Argyllshire Coast
At the turn of the twentieth century, new laws introduced paid holidays for the masses and the seaside towns of Scotland saw a huge influx of visitors. Holidaymakers poured from Glasgow, Paisley and the industrial heartland of Scotland on the Fair Holiday trip 'doon the watter'. Some Scottish resorts such as Dunoon, Hunters Quay and Campbeltown saw their populations double or treble for much of the summer. By the end of the 1960s, the annual Fair Holiday was in decline. No longer was there as great a need to close factories for a week, nor was the holidaymaker so reliant on the pleasure steamers. Cars and aircraft had taken their toll and the resorts began to decline. Alistair Deayton, one of the acknowledged experts on the Clyde pleasure steamers, and author of many books on the subject, takes a look at the Scottish seaside resorts on the Argyllshire coast and the steamers that brought the holidaymakers in their thousands every summer, only one of which, Waverley, remains today.
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26.200000 USD
Paperback / softback
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In 1851 G.&J. Burns sold their West Highland steamer services to David Hutcheson & Co. One of the conditions of the sale was that Hutcheson take on David MacBrayne, a nephew of the Burns brothers, as a junior partner. When David Hutcheson retired in 1878, David MacBrayne, at the age ...
A MacBrayne Album
In 1851 G.&J. Burns sold their West Highland steamer services to David Hutcheson & Co. One of the conditions of the sale was that Hutcheson take on David MacBrayne, a nephew of the Burns brothers, as a junior partner. When David Hutcheson retired in 1878, David MacBrayne, at the age of sixty-five, took the company over and renamed it, Ever since MacBraynes has been an integral part of life in the West Highland and islands of Scotland, and since 1973 as part of Caledonian MacBrayne. At the heart of this book is a unique collection of glass slides and glass-mounted medium format negatives originally belonged to Captain Alex Rodger. Special attention is given to four steamers, Columba, the premier paddle steamer operating in UK waters, Iona, her predecessor on the Royal Route from Glasgow to Ardrishaig, and which had a remarkably long life of seventy-one years, and the two turbine steamers Saint Columba, which succeeded Columba on the Royal Route, and King George V, which made the Staffa and Iona cruise from Oban her own from 1936 to 1974. The other paddle and screw steamers in the fleet are not ignored, neither are the motor vessels, which were used by MacBrayne from the early 1900s onwards, and the 'wee red boats' which tendered to the larger vessels at ports without a pier, particularly at Staffa and Iona.
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26.200000 USD

A MacBrayne Album

by Alistair Deayton, Iain Quinn
Paperback / softback
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Steamships and the Clyde have been synonymous since 1812 when the Comet introduced the first regular steamship service in Europe running from Helensburgh to Glasgow. The unique geography of the Firth of Clyde made shipping the most natural mode of transport and on certain routes water travel is still faster ...
Steamers of the Clyde: NB & LNER
Steamships and the Clyde have been synonymous since 1812 when the Comet introduced the first regular steamship service in Europe running from Helensburgh to Glasgow. The unique geography of the Firth of Clyde made shipping the most natural mode of transport and on certain routes water travel is still faster today than any other form of transport except for the helicopter. This uniqueness created an arena for a whole series of fleets of steamers, some privately owned but the remainder being railway-operated businesses. The three main railway companies competed for traffic to the coastal resorts and for commuters to Glasgow and the industrial towns bordering the river. The steamers were a natural extension of their business in an area surrounded by so much water. One of those companies, the North British Steam Packet Company, is the subject of this volume. From humble beginnings in 1863, the NB Steam Packet Co. eventually grew to encompass a fleet of ships, many of which are still household names in areas of the Clyde. From the Dandie Dinmont to the Jeanie Deans and a series of paddlers called Waverley the NB Steam Packet and its successor, the LNER, ran a fleet from its bases of Helensburgh and Craigendoran. Included within are scenes from a bygone age when the paddle steamer was King on the Clyde. The advent of the motor car removed the need for many of the steamers and all that survives now are the essential ferry services. The name of the NB Steam Packet lives on however in the Waverley. She is the last vestige of the Clyde's most colourful period and still runs pleasure cruises using many piers that would otherwise lie unused and forgotten.
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11.28 USD
Paperback / softback
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Often a lifeline for remote waterside communities, the Scottish pier has been a functional rather than a pleasure pier. Served by paddle steamers, puffers and small coasters, the piers served a vital function for their communities. Often with stunning mountain backdrops, many settlements clustered around the piers, which provided a ...
Clyde Coast Piers
Often a lifeline for remote waterside communities, the Scottish pier has been a functional rather than a pleasure pier. Served by paddle steamers, puffers and small coasters, the piers served a vital function for their communities. Often with stunning mountain backdrops, many settlements clustered around the piers, which provided a means of communication with the world at large. Some piers, like Rothesay's, could accommodate a number of pleasure steamers at once, while others, such as Tighnabruaich's, were built with functionality in mind, providing for the needs of the inhabitants. Alistair Deayton brings together a superb selection of images of the Clyde Coast piers from the late nineteenth century to the present day, telling their history and showing just some of the variety of vessels that called there. From MacBrayne's steamers to the paddle steamers filled to the gunwales with daytrippers and the puffers of Glenlight, a vast array of ships are shown.
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28.300000 USD

Clyde Coast Piers

by Alistair Deayton
Paperback / softback
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From Gigha in the south to Lewis in the north and St Kilda in the west, Alistair Deayton covers the piers of the Hebrides and other outlying islands in the companion volume to his West Highland Piers. Since the 1810s, steamers have provided a valuable service to the communities of ...
Piers of the Hebrides & Western Isles
From Gigha in the south to Lewis in the north and St Kilda in the west, Alistair Deayton covers the piers of the Hebrides and other outlying islands in the companion volume to his West Highland Piers. Since the 1810s, steamers have provided a valuable service to the communities of the Western Isles. Sometimes operated by independent operators, and by the ships of McCallum, Orme, as well as David MacBrayne's vessels, each island was served by a regular service of steamers and motorships, as well as by the ubiquitous puffers, carrying cargo. Alistair Deayton has managed to accumulate a fascination collection of images of many of the piers, some in islands inaccessible and remote, showing how travel to and from the Hebrides was undertaken, even up to recent times. For some islands, small ferries served the steamers, which anchored off the calling places, until very recent years. Most of the piers of the Hebrides are shown here, with informative captions.
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25.58 USD
Paperback / softback
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