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Bounded by the counties of Hampshire, Somerset, Berkshire, Dorset, Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire, the county of Wiltshire has several significant main line railway routes passing through it: to the north is the Great Western Main Line from London Paddington to South Wales; the Berks & Hants route from Reading to Westbury ...
Wiltshire Traction
Bounded by the counties of Hampshire, Somerset, Berkshire, Dorset, Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire, the county of Wiltshire has several significant main line railway routes passing through it: to the north is the Great Western Main Line from London Paddington to South Wales; the Berks & Hants route from Reading to Westbury runs through the heart of the county, and westwards to Taunton; and to the south of the county the former London & South Western Railway route runs from London Waterloo to Exeter, while the cross-country route from Southampton to Bath cuts across the county from the south-east to the north-west. Wiltshire is also home to the Great Western Railway town of Swindon, although it is now sadly a shadow of its former past. Covering more than thirty years, these previously unpublished photos show the diverse workings and traction that have passed through the county, from the days of British Rail to the privatised railway of today.
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25.58 USD

Wiltshire Traction

by Mark Jamieson
Paperback / softback
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The six principal classes of diesel locomotive that once made up the `Type 4' classification - the 40, 44, 45, 46, 47 and 50 - were the survivors of a wider group that can trace its origins to the British Transport Commission's Modernisation Plan of 1955. Designating a power output ...
Type 4 Locomotives of British Rail
The six principal classes of diesel locomotive that once made up the `Type 4' classification - the 40, 44, 45, 46, 47 and 50 - were the survivors of a wider group that can trace its origins to the British Transport Commission's Modernisation Plan of 1955. Designating a power output of between 2,000 and 3,000 hp, the type once contained representatives of several non-standard and one-off prototype builds, including the Warship and Western diesel-hydraulics, which between them originally numbered over 100 examples. The scrapping, exporting or accidental writing off of the numerous Type 4 prototypes in the 1960s and early 1970s - with the exception of the ten Class 44 Peaks - left a cohort of over 900 diesel-electrics that became the real backbone of the BR fleet, including the most numerous single mainline class ever built in Britain, the `Brush 4' - or Class 47, as it later became. This pictorial collection presents a wide-ranging selection of images of Type 4 locomotives from the late 1970s to the present day, photographed and compiled by Andrew Walker and John Walker with contributions from fellow photographer Vaughan Hellam.
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25.58 USD

Type 4 Locomotives of British Rail

by John Walker, Andrew Walker
Paperback / softback
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The railway in 1980 had not changed much since the 1960s. There were certainly no more steam locomotives, but passenger trains consisted largely of carriages hauled by locomotives, which had mostly been constructed in the 1950s or early 1960s. Secondary services were provided by various types of multiple units from ...
The Later Years of British Rail 1980-1995: West Midlands, Wales and South-West England
The railway in 1980 had not changed much since the 1960s. There were certainly no more steam locomotives, but passenger trains consisted largely of carriages hauled by locomotives, which had mostly been constructed in the 1950s or early 1960s. Secondary services were provided by various types of multiple units from the same era. Freight traffic was still buoyant and marshalling yards busy. There were numerous freight branches and sidings. Traditional signalling was still very much in evidence throughout the system, even on some main lines. In 1980, BR was still one railway. All this was about to change. Sectorisation arrived during the 1980s; many freight traffics were lost, including newspapers and parcels. Numerous freight branches and sidings went out of use. At the same time new types of motive power were introduced, replacing the former loco-hauled trains. Hundreds of traditional signal boxes closed. Finally, in 1995, privatisation arrived. Focusing here on the West Midlands, Wales and South-West England, and utilising a wealth of photographs and maps, together with comprehensive notes, this book reflects the immense changes that took place in the railway scene between 1980 and 1995. The British railway scene continues to change, and, in fact, the changes since 1995 have in many ways been greater than in the preceding period. So much so that the majority of images in this volume show scenes that no longer exist.
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25.58 USD

The Later Years of British Rail 1980-1995: West Midlands, Wales and South-West England

by Patrick Bennett
Paperback / softback
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The Avonmouth Line - History and Working describes the railway built between the northern suburbs of Bristol and the docks constructed at the mouth of the River Avon, from its inception in 1865. It describes how a short passenger line was first constructed, running from a station in the Avon ...
The Avonmouth Line: History and Working
The Avonmouth Line - History and Working describes the railway built between the northern suburbs of Bristol and the docks constructed at the mouth of the River Avon, from its inception in 1865. It describes how a short passenger line was first constructed, running from a station in the Avon Gorge at Hotwells to the new Docks. The Midland Railway and then the Great Western Railway took advantage of the rising popularity of the Avonmouth docks, and additional routes were constructed at Kingswood Junction on the Bristol-Gloucester line, and from a jucntion with the Great Western at Pilning. Contents include the beginnings of the line as the 'Bristol Port Railway and Pier'; the docks lines at their height of use and during wartime; post 1950s run-downs and attempts to close the line; the line in 2018 and finally, duties and memories of the staff who worked the line.
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42.66 USD

The Avonmouth Line: History and Working

by P.D. Rendall
Paperback / softback
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In 1987 British Rail decided it needed a new class of AC electric locomotive for use on the West Coast Main Line. The idea was that this class would help eliminate the Class 85 locomotives and would be used on both freight and passenger workings. Fifty members of the class ...
Class 90 Locomotives
In 1987 British Rail decided it needed a new class of AC electric locomotive for use on the West Coast Main Line. The idea was that this class would help eliminate the Class 85 locomotives and would be used on both freight and passenger workings. Fifty members of the class were built at Crewe Works, alongside the Class 91 locomotives that were built for the East Coast Main Line. The Class 90s were designed to be able to work with a Mk 3 DVT, which also eliminated the need to run round at terminal stations. The first twenty-five members were delivered in InterCity Swallow livery, the following eleven in InterCity Mainline livery, allowing them to be used on passenger and freight workings, with the final fourteen members delivered in Railfreight Speedlink livery being predominantly freight locomotives. Most of the class are still in use today, with fifteen still used on passenger workings out of Norwich and the remainder in use with DB Cargo or Freightliner. This book tells the story of the Class 90s.
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25.58 USD

Class 90 Locomotives

by Andrew Cole
Paperback / softback
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The Great Western Railway, had two classes of tender locomotives named after counties, the first class of two cylinder 4-4-0 tender locomotives, designed by George Jackson Churchward, were introduced in the 1900s to provide efficient motive power, for express passenger services on lines in the North Western area, of what ...
Great Western, County Classes: The Churchward 4-4-0 Tender, 4-4-2 Tanks and Hawksworth and 4-6-0 Tender Class
The Great Western Railway, had two classes of tender locomotives named after counties, the first class of two cylinder 4-4-0 tender locomotives, designed by George Jackson Churchward, were introduced in the 1900s to provide efficient motive power, for express passenger services on lines in the North Western area, of what was the Great Western, which were jointly operated, with the L & N W R from Shrewsbury to Birkenhead Woodside. The 4-4-0 counties were in service on top link services until the early 1930s, when they were withdrawn and replaced by more modern motive power. The 4-4-0 counties, were paralleled in design by the county 4-4-2 tanks, which operated suburban services in the London area and were also withdrawn in the early 1930s. In 1945, the Great Western Introduced the County 4-6-0 tender locomotives, designed by F W Hawksworth, these two cylinder machines had a high pressure boiler, that was meant to give the same tractive effort as a Castle class, 4-6-0, four cylinder locomotive, After modifications and boiler pressure reduction, the County class 4-6-0s, operated in express and semi fast train service, until the last members of the class were withdrawn in 1964.
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51.19 USD

Great Western, County Classes: The Churchward 4-4-0 Tender, 4-4-2 Tanks and Hawksworth and 4-6-0 Tender Class

by David Maidment
Hardback
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Celebrate the golden age of the British railway with this illustrated desk diary featuring the stylish, iconic travel posters of the 1920s to 1960s. This week-to-view diary with a ribbon marker features a selection of the popular vintage travel posters used by the railway companies of the past to promote ...
National Railway Museum Desk Diary 2019
Celebrate the golden age of the British railway with this illustrated desk diary featuring the stylish, iconic travel posters of the 1920s to 1960s. This week-to-view diary with a ribbon marker features a selection of the popular vintage travel posters used by the railway companies of the past to promote travel to all corners of the British Isles and abroad. From the National Railway Museum, one of the greatest railway museums in the world, this iconic diary will brighten up any desk - and inspire new travel plans! Also available in pocket diary format.
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23.88 USD

National Railway Museum Desk Diary 2019

by National Railway Museum
Hardback
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The Southern Region of British Rail was not all third rail EMUs, although it often seems like it. There was a huge variety of freight and inter-regional workings that brought `foreign' locomotives in to the area. During the 1970s, once the author had a camera, school holidays meant cheap Runabout ...
The Southern Region in the 1970s and 1980s
The Southern Region of British Rail was not all third rail EMUs, although it often seems like it. There was a huge variety of freight and inter-regional workings that brought `foreign' locomotives in to the area. During the 1970s, once the author had a camera, school holidays meant cheap Runabout tickets to get to more exotic locations like Southampton or Ashford. Later the Young Persons Railcard, and later still the British Rail free passes and priv. tickets, meant that his travels expanded. In this volume Andy Gibbs showcases the long-gone BR Blue era and the variety of trains that went with it in a fascinating collection of previously unpublished photographs, allowing the reader to enjoy this interesting period in British railway history in all its grubbiness.
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25.58 USD

The Southern Region in the 1970s and 1980s

by Andy Gibbs
Paperback / softback
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Railways Around Hereford features photographs taken by author Robert Lewis and a number of other railway enthusiasts, covering a period of around fifty years. The end of steam is featured, as well as up to date images of the current scene around Hereford. These images feature a large variety of ...
Railways Around Hereford
Railways Around Hereford features photographs taken by author Robert Lewis and a number of other railway enthusiasts, covering a period of around fifty years. The end of steam is featured, as well as up to date images of the current scene around Hereford. These images feature a large variety of locomotives and workings that have been recorded by local enthusiasts over the years. As well as changes in locomotives and stock, the changing nature of freight traffic in the area is also recorded here. It also features areas and lines that have now sadly been closed, including the Bulmer's Railway Centre and the Barton line and yard. With a wealth of previously unpublished images, this nostalgic look back on the railways in and around Hereford will appeal to any enthusiast who has taken a snap, recorded a number or simply caught a train at Hereford.
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25.58 USD

Railways Around Hereford

by Robert Lewis
Paperback / softback
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This volume is the latest in a series of tramway books covering Britain's post war tram networks. The book covers the systems that survived the Second World War, in the Midlands and the South East of England, except London which will have a separate book. This extensive volume, covers all ...
Regional Tramways - Midlands and South East England
This volume is the latest in a series of tramway books covering Britain's post war tram networks. The book covers the systems that survived the Second World War, in the Midlands and the South East of England, except London which will have a separate book. This extensive volume, covers all the post war systems from their inception, through to closure, with often rare unpublished pictures depicting each operation, from horse tram days through to the end. The volume has good maps and material that will be of value to tramway modellers, with a selection of colour illustrations for livery details.
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42.66 USD

Regional Tramways - Midlands and South East England

by Peter Waller
Hardback
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Celebrate the golden age of the British railway with this illustrated pocket diary featuring the stylish, iconic travel posters of the 1920s to 1960s. This week-to-view diary with a ribbon marker features a selection of the popular vintage travel posters used by the railway companies of the past to promote ...
National Railway Museum Pocket Diary 2019
Celebrate the golden age of the British railway with this illustrated pocket diary featuring the stylish, iconic travel posters of the 1920s to 1960s. This week-to-view diary with a ribbon marker features a selection of the popular vintage travel posters used by the railway companies of the past to promote travel to all corners of the British Isles and abroad. From the National Railway Museum, one of the greatest railway museums in the world, this iconic diary will brighten up any desk - and inspire new travel plans! Also available in desk diary format.
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13.64 USD

National Railway Museum Pocket Diary 2019

by National Railway Museum
Hardback
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During the nineteenth century, as the railways developed at an extraordinary pace, people began to build models of locomotives to either show how the finished engine would look when constructed or, more usually, so that they could see the locomotive in a much smaller scale than the original. One such ...
Miniature Railway Locomotives and Rolling Stock
During the nineteenth century, as the railways developed at an extraordinary pace, people began to build models of locomotives to either show how the finished engine would look when constructed or, more usually, so that they could see the locomotive in a much smaller scale than the original. One such modeller, Sir Arthur Percival Heywood, believed that railways with a gauge as small as 15 inches could prove useful for businesses and private estates alike. Thus began the miniature railway scene, with the Cagney brothers of the United States soon transforming miniature railways into tourist attractions. Before long, they were popular in the UK and have seen a surge of popularity over the last decade. With a collection of photographs documenting locomotives and rolling stock of all gauges between 31/2 and 15 inches, Royston Morris offers a charming look at the current British scene.
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25.58 USD

Miniature Railway Locomotives and Rolling Stock

by Royston Morris
Paperback / softback
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The Midland & South Western Junction Railway was formed in 1884 by amalgamation of the Swindon, Marlborough & Andover and the Swindon & Cheltenham Extension railways. It provided a north-south link between the Midland and the London & South Western railways through the heartland of the Great Western Railway. It ...
The Midland & South Western Junction Railway Through Time
The Midland & South Western Junction Railway was formed in 1884 by amalgamation of the Swindon, Marlborough & Andover and the Swindon & Cheltenham Extension railways. It provided a north-south link between the Midland and the London & South Western railways through the heartland of the Great Western Railway. It also served several military establishments in Wiltshire. It joined the Banbury & Cheltenham Direct Railway at Andoversford with running rights to Cheltenham; its junction with the L&SWR was at Andover. Passing west of the GWR station at Swindon, it is sometimes referred to as `Swindon's Other Railway' but was absorbed by the GWR in 1923. The line was closed by British Railways in 1961, apart from a few freight sections that had gone by 1970. The Swindon & Cricklade heritage railway is recreating some of the line from its base at Blunsdon. Several sections of the trackbed have been converted to pleasant walking and cycling routes.
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25.58 USD

The Midland & South Western Junction Railway Through Time

by Steph Gillett
Paperback
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One of the most evocative reminders of Victorian ingenuity at the British seaside is the much-loved cliff lift. This simple method of transporting people up and down the cliff side has been a feature of our coast, and a few inland towns, for over 150 years and has recently undergone ...
Cliff Railways, Lifts and Funiculars
One of the most evocative reminders of Victorian ingenuity at the British seaside is the much-loved cliff lift. This simple method of transporting people up and down the cliff side has been a feature of our coast, and a few inland towns, for over 150 years and has recently undergone a renaissance at places as varied as the National Coal Mining Museum, Legoland and the Centre for Alternative Technology. The cliff lift, otherwise termed the cliff railway or tramway, is also known as a funicular railway. The word `funicular' is defined as `of rope or tension', in other words a cable-hauled railway or tramway. The lifts were directly descended from cable-hauled railways, prevalent in mines and quarries, but also early passenger lines, where an engine or winding gear hauled loads up steep slopes. The term `cliff lift' also generally encompasses the elevator-type lifts that were erected at some resorts. This book illustrates, mainly in colour, all the principal cliff lifts and railways that have been built in the British Isles, along with associated cable tramways, since their inception in the Victorian age. In addition to featuring all the surviving lifts, this book includes others which are long gone, and serves as a fine record of these charming and unique structures.
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25.58 USD

Cliff Railways, Lifts and Funiculars

by Martin Easdown
Paperback
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British Railway Accidents and Incidents in Maps and Pictures describes some of the most interesting incidents that have occurred on Britain's railways over the last 200 years. From the earliest misfortune - the sad fate of William Huskisson MP, mown down in 1830 at the opening ceremony of the Liverpool ...
British Railway Accidents and Incidents in Maps and Pictures
British Railway Accidents and Incidents in Maps and Pictures describes some of the most interesting incidents that have occurred on Britain's railways over the last 200 years. From the earliest misfortune - the sad fate of William Huskisson MP, mown down in 1830 at the opening ceremony of the Liverpool & Manchester Railway by that most famous of engines, Stephenson's Rocket - this book gives the reader an absorbing ride through time, charting minor incidents along with major calamities. Original photographs from postcards portray vividly the scenes just as they occurred and period railway maps pinpoint the exact locations where they happened.
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25.58 USD

British Railway Accidents and Incidents in Maps and Pictures

by Jon Mountfort
Paperback / softback
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In September 1962, the author started revisiting his boyhood trainspotting haunts at the London terminals - this time armed with a newly purchased camera loaded with colour slide film. A few days were thought adequate to record mainly steam at Kings Cross, Euston and Paddington but after many viewing sessions ...
London Terminal Stations in the 1960s
In September 1962, the author started revisiting his boyhood trainspotting haunts at the London terminals - this time armed with a newly purchased camera loaded with colour slide film. A few days were thought adequate to record mainly steam at Kings Cross, Euston and Paddington but after many viewing sessions of the resulting slides over the winter, there was enthusiasm for more visits in 1963. So began a period over the next four years of travelling by train, via the London terminals, all over the rail system to seek out steam. Although steam was the priority, diesels were not ignored - especially the early livery variants. The decade finished up with several Specials being recorded from Kings Cross, with LNER-liveried Flying Scotsman then the only standard-gauge steam loco allowed on BR. Kings Cross, Paddington, Euston, Marylebone, Waterloo and Victoria all appear in this collection, as well as the author's `home' terminal, Liverpool Street.
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25.58 USD

London Terminal Stations in the 1960s

by David Christie
Paperback / softback
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Many railway historians and enthusiasts only know about the railways in the Barry area, because of Woodham Brothers scrap yard, where so many locomotives were rescued for preservation. However, there is a wider story to be told of the development and history of the railway and docks and John Hodge, ...
Barry, Its Railway and Port: Before and After Woodham's Scrapyard
Many railway historians and enthusiasts only know about the railways in the Barry area, because of Woodham Brothers scrap yard, where so many locomotives were rescued for preservation. However, there is a wider story to be told of the development and history of the railway and docks and John Hodge, the author of this detailed and informative volume, provides accounts of the various aspects of railway and dock activity over the years with details and photographs of the several industries involved. The Barry story is far more than the location of a once-famous scrapyard which, by the end of the 1960s, held over two hundred condemned locomotives. This book covers the history of the railway and docks at this fascinating town, from the construction and opening of the Barry Railway and Dock in 1888/9, through to the demise of its principal traffic, coal, in the early 1970s, and on to the present day.
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51.19 USD

Barry, Its Railway and Port: Before and After Woodham's Scrapyard

by John Hodge
Hardback
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This fascinating pocket book draws on numerous primary sources from the early days of the rail network through to the Big Four, British Railways and beyond to present a unique guide to the knowledge and skills required for locomotive drivers, engineers and firemen. Beginning with an introduction to steam from ...
The Railwayman's Pocketbook
This fascinating pocket book draws on numerous primary sources from the early days of the rail network through to the Big Four, British Railways and beyond to present a unique guide to the knowledge and skills required for locomotive drivers, engineers and firemen. Beginning with an introduction to steam from about 1890, the book outlines the rules of the rail network, locomotive management from driving to servicing, a guide to signalling and operations, and rules of the running shed along with a wealth of practical advice and conditions of service for the men on the footplate. The Railwayman's Pocket Book offers a unique insight into the age of steam that will appeal to all railway enthusiasts.
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15.34 USD

The Railwayman's Pocketbook

by R. H. N. Hardy
Hardback
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How many times have we heard the phrase `they don't make them like they used to'? Whatever the merits or otherwise of applying such a comment to UK railway locomotives, the fact remains that there are many longstanding survivors from our railway past. Of course, we all know of the ...
50 Not Out: Locomotives Working After Half A Century
How many times have we heard the phrase `they don't make them like they used to'? Whatever the merits or otherwise of applying such a comment to UK railway locomotives, the fact remains that there are many longstanding survivors from our railway past. Of course, we all know of the role played by preserved railways in the UK; they have secured a place in history for heritage diesel and electric locos as well as many steam examples. But a number of ageing locomotive classes still remain on rail operators' books. Many are over half a century old. A quick tally suggests at least fourteen classes and, more importantly, between 100 and 200 individual examples remain on the network. They continue to attract more than their fair share of interest, particularly among the nostalgia enthusiast market. Yes, some are sidelined but many still see day-to-day service in the hands of mainstream operators. These locos are `50 not out', and the level of variety is perhaps surprising. This book celebrates some of those that have passed their half century and continue to work passenger or freight services.
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25.58 USD

50 Not Out: Locomotives Working After Half A Century

by John Jackson
Paperback / softback
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Under-maintained and over-worked during the Second World War, Britain's railways emerged from the conflict carrying a `poor bag of physical assets'. Yet the new government of 1945 saw a need to bring the nation's great industries into public ownership - a move that saw the creation of a single railway ...
The Fifties Railway
Under-maintained and over-worked during the Second World War, Britain's railways emerged from the conflict carrying a `poor bag of physical assets'. Yet the new government of 1945 saw a need to bring the nation's great industries into public ownership - a move that saw the creation of a single railway network three years later. At first, it seemed like `business as usual', but as the 1950s dawned and BR's deficit grew deeper, it was clear that costs needed to be cut wherever possible. And that meant modernisation. Published at the very end of 1954, the so-called Modernisation Plan would see the ordering of over 170 diesel locomotives and the launch of a bold plan to electrify much of the West Coast Main Line. The downside for enthusiasts and traditionalists was the beginning of the end for steam, though the path to modernisation would not run smooth; neither would it come cheap. The decade would end much as it had begun - with a new government seeking ways to save money. Doctor Beeching was on his way. This book is part of the Britain's Heritage series, which provides definitive introductions to the riches of Britain's past, and is the perfect way to get acquainted with the Fifties Railway in all its variety.
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15.34 USD

The Fifties Railway

by Greg Morse
Paperback / softback
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Journeys to forty of Britain's loneliest railway stations. Written for the railway enthusiast but also for anyone who enjoys travel books. Illustrated with more than 150 colour and black & white photos, both recent and historical. Combining a love of remote places and of travelling on our more interesting trains, ...
Remote Stations
Journeys to forty of Britain's loneliest railway stations. Written for the railway enthusiast but also for anyone who enjoys travel books. Illustrated with more than 150 colour and black & white photos, both recent and historical. Combining a love of remote places and of travelling on our more interesting trains, Peter Caton visits forty of Britain's most lonely railway stations. His travels take him to all four corners of the country; to the top of a snowy mountain, to moors, hills and marshes, and even a mile out to sea, as he rides on some of our most scenic railway lines. Along the way he unearths stories of some bizarre accidents, tales of human endeavour and railway history. He finds a station that closed before it officially existed, wonders why some survived, laments others that should never have been lost and on finding that one of his forty stations is proposed for closure joins the battle to try to save it. Peter enjoys walks along deserted coast and countryside and discovers five stations that closed long ago. His choice covers a wide variety of stations including a few on resurrected narrow gauge railways. Some are well known, others obscure. He often writes that the train stopped `just for me' and the station `serves nowhere at all'. Remote Stations is written with a railway theme but is not a heavy or technical railway book. It will also appeal to those who enjoy an easy reading travel book describing journeys to some of the most remote parts of Britain.
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17.05 USD

Remote Stations

by Peter Caton
Paperback
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Chicago's South Shore Line is a photographic essay of the last interurban electric railroad operating in the United States. Completed as the Chicago, Lake Shore & South Bend Railway (CLS&SBR) connecting South Bend, Indiana, with Pullman, Illinois, in 1909, the line went into receivership in 1925. It reorganized as the ...
Chicago's South Shore Line
Chicago's South Shore Line is a photographic essay of the last interurban electric railroad operating in the United States. Completed as the Chicago, Lake Shore & South Bend Railway (CLS&SBR) connecting South Bend, Indiana, with Pullman, Illinois, in 1909, the line went into receivership in 1925. It reorganized as the Chicago South Shore & South Bend Railroad (CSS&SBR) which rebuilt the railroad and provided direct passenger service from South Bend to downtown Chicago. The Great Depression forced the railroad into bankruptcy in 1933 but reorganized in 1938 and handled record ridership during World War II. After the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad acquired the railroad in 1970, the electric freight service was dieselized. Soaring passenger deficits resulted in the formation of the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District (NICDT). Beginning in 1984, the Venango River Corporation operated the line until it went bankrupt in 1988. The Anacostia & Pacific Company began operating the freight service in 1990, and NICDT handles passenger service. Chicago's South Shore Line documents the history of this railway that has survived obstacles to maintain passenger service over its original route.
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30.400000 USD

Chicago's South Shore Line

by Kenneth C. Springirth
Paperback / softback
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Steam on Britain's railways ended in 1968 - and the fifty years since have been a period of controversy and debate; has it been a time of progress and development, or under-investment and political meddling? Some would say that Beeching's cuts led to an era of corporate monotony, whereas others ...
Fifty Years Since the End of Steam: Britain's Railways 1968-2018
Steam on Britain's railways ended in 1968 - and the fifty years since have been a period of controversy and debate; has it been a time of progress and development, or under-investment and political meddling? Some would say that Beeching's cuts led to an era of corporate monotony, whereas others would claim that the last half century has witnessed remarkable technological advancements, with innovations like the HST 125 and Crossrail. Taking an often controversial viewpoint, and utilising a wealth of images, author Mark Lee Inman explores the rapid changes made on Britain's railways over the last half century, decade by decade, considering whether it really has been a period of progress, from the end of steam right up to Crossrail, Class 88s and beyond.
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25.58 USD

Fifty Years Since the End of Steam: Britain's Railways 1968-2018

by Mark Lee Inman
Paperback / softback
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Following the end of steam on the network, many stations were devoid of notebook holding, camera toting enthusiasts on the ends of busy station platforms. This did not mean, though, that there was nothing of interest happening. The 1970s saw the end of famous trains like the Brighton Belle and ...
Southern Region Through the 1970s: Year by Year
Following the end of steam on the network, many stations were devoid of notebook holding, camera toting enthusiasts on the ends of busy station platforms. This did not mean, though, that there was nothing of interest happening. The 1970s saw the end of famous trains like the Brighton Belle and the green livery of the Southern changed to a BR corporate livery of first blue, and then blue/grey for coaching stock. Older pre-war coaching stock was being phased out with new open plan seating units being introduced. Industrial relations on the railways were not good, with lightning strikes regularly taking place. There were also a number of serious accidents across the region. Aided by a wealth of previously unpublished images, Michael Hymans documents this tumultuous decade in a nostalgic and evocative journey along the Southern Region through the 1970s, documenting the many changes along the way.
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25.58 USD

Southern Region Through the 1970s: Year by Year

by Michael Hymans
Paperback / softback
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The InterCity 125s were introduced into passenger service from 1976 and instantly revolutionised rail travel. As the world's fastest diesel trains, they heralded significant journey-time reductions, reversing declining demand without requiring the construction of new lines to accommodate them. At each end of the train a sleek 2,250 hp power ...
125 - The Enduring Icon
The InterCity 125s were introduced into passenger service from 1976 and instantly revolutionised rail travel. As the world's fastest diesel trains, they heralded significant journey-time reductions, reversing declining demand without requiring the construction of new lines to accommodate them. At each end of the train a sleek 2,250 hp power car with its iconic shape made the 125 an instantly recognisable train, while the distinctive noise produced by the original turbocharger resulted in a train that commanded attention wherever it went. Privatisation saw the 125s refurbished and repainted as they remained at the forefront of their new owners' fleets. 125 Group was formed in 1994 by a small group of enthusiasts to provide a focus point for information and news regarding the HST. Since then it has grown into a preservation organisation with over 500 members, restoring and now operating the prototype HST power car No. 41001, owning and operating three Mk 3 coaches and still providing a quality quarterly magazine. With an array of fascinating photographs and insights, 125 Group tells the story of an enduring icon of Britain's railways.
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25.58 USD

125 - The Enduring Icon

by 125 Group
Paperback / softback
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The Bulleid Pacifics remain one of the most iconic classes of locomotives in the history of Britain's railways - a unique breed that delighted enthusiasts all around the Southern Region. With their distinctive shape and technical innovations, they are an ever-popular favourite of modellers and enthusiasts alike and continue to ...
Bulleid Pacifics
The Bulleid Pacifics remain one of the most iconic classes of locomotives in the history of Britain's railways - a unique breed that delighted enthusiasts all around the Southern Region. With their distinctive shape and technical innovations, they are an ever-popular favourite of modellers and enthusiasts alike and continue to delight in preservation. Oliver Bulleid's Merchant Navy, West Country and Battle of Britain Pacifics had such relatively short lives, yet their performance feats over the switchback West Country hills, the Kentish boat trains, and the Bournemouth and Weymouth line still fascinate loyal enthusiasts and students of locomotive performance to this day. Focusing here on the twilight years of the 1960s, and featuring a large number of previously unpublished images, long-time Bulleid Pacific aficionado Nigel Kendall shares some of his stunning archive images of these majestic machines in action.
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25.58 USD

Bulleid Pacifics

by Nigel Kendall
Paperback
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By 1905, Cornelius and Mary Abby Tenney Rogers were used to travelling and each had made other trips - many to Boston, to the greater New York City area and to Springfield, Massachusetts, as well as one to Iowa and St. Louis - but this is the illustrated story of ...
An 8,000 Mile Trip by Rail in 1905-1906: Cornelius and Mary Abby Rogers's Trip to the West Coast and Back to Vermont 6 November 1905 - 16 April 1906
By 1905, Cornelius and Mary Abby Tenney Rogers were used to travelling and each had made other trips - many to Boston, to the greater New York City area and to Springfield, Massachusetts, as well as one to Iowa and St. Louis - but this is the illustrated story of one extraordinary journey which took almost six months and covered many varied kinds of terrain and experience. The tour took in the Plains and Prairies, the Rockies, Puget Sound and the shores of the Pacific, wide rivers bridged by long spans, and a warm winter in California. The enterprising, Democrat, New England farmer and his talented, Republican, wife who 'shopped with glee wherever she went', were seeing their country just as the frontier was closing, aware of the expropriation of tribal lands and noticing some new patterns of immigration, but before the major social and economic changes that came with the rapid industrialization after 1900. They chose to travel and to stay with relatives, friends and former acquaintances, thus managing costs and gaining local guides and insights in both cities and on farms - eager to see sights but also willing to cultivate the garden, pick fruit or olives, chop wood and file saws, and wash or iron with and for their friends, and curious enough to try the medicines of a Chinese herbalist and the food of oriental cooks. Well-documented in Mary Abby's diaries, postcards, photographs, brochures and souvenirs, the adventure - and the attitude to life that it represented - became a collective family memory. It is presented here by their great-grandson.
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36.750000 USD

An 8,000 Mile Trip by Rail in 1905-1906: Cornelius and Mary Abby Rogers's Trip to the West Coast and Back to Vermont 6 November 1905 - 16 April 1906

by Roger Lee Emerson
Hardback
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'BR rebel chairman resigns' THE GUARDIAN. 'Rebel rail chief in row' DAILY MAIL. 'I don't take it back says sacked rail chief' DAILY EXPRESS. This is the notorious book that got Gerard Fiennes sacked from British Railways while he was Chairman and General Manager of the Eastern Region in 1968. ...
I Tried to Run a Railway
'BR rebel chairman resigns' THE GUARDIAN. 'Rebel rail chief in row' DAILY MAIL. 'I don't take it back says sacked rail chief' DAILY EXPRESS. This is the notorious book that got Gerard Fiennes sacked from British Railways while he was Chairman and General Manager of the Eastern Region in 1968. Fiennes became a railwayman by accident, joining the L.N.E.R as a Traffic Apprentice in 1928. Over the next four decades he worked himself up to the top of the management tree, experiencing all facets of railway life - steam through diesel to electrification - on his way to the top. When he got there, he knew the service was ripe for a revolution... and he believed he was the man to lead it. But of course, it was the wrong time for a manager who thought that railways could be a success - Dr. Beeching was sharpening his axe and unprofitable lines were closed rather than turned round. After being resisted, circumvented, delayed and blocked, G. F. Fiennes ran out of patience and put pen to paper and ran his career into the buffers as he told the story of what happens when non-railwaymen tried to run the railway.
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17.06 USD

I Tried to Run a Railway

by Gerard Fiennes
Paperback
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This book explores the impact of railways on colonial Indian society from the commencement of railway operations in the mid-nineteenth to the early decades of the twentieth century. The book represents a historiographical departure. Using new archival evidence as well as travelogues written by Indian railway travellers in Bengali and ...
Imperial Technology and 'Native' Agency (Open Access): A Social History of Railways in Colonial India, 1850-1920
This book explores the impact of railways on colonial Indian society from the commencement of railway operations in the mid-nineteenth to the early decades of the twentieth century. The book represents a historiographical departure. Using new archival evidence as well as travelogues written by Indian railway travellers in Bengali and Hindi, this book suggests that the impact of railways on colonial Indian society were more heterogeneous and complex than anticipated either by India's colonial railway builders or currently assumed by post-colonial scholars. At a related level, the book argues that this complex outcome of the impact of railways on colonial Indian society was a product of the interaction between the colonial context of technology transfer and the Indian railway passengers who mediated this process at an everyday level. In other words, this book claims that the colonised `natives' were not bystanders in this process of imposition of an imperial technology from above. On the contrary, Indians, both as railway passengers and otherwise influenced the nature and the direction of the impact of an oft-celebrated `tool of Empire'. The historiographical departures suggested in the book are based on examining railway spaces as social spaces - a methodological index influenced by Henri Lefebvre's idea of social spaces as means of control, domination and power.
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196.22 USD

Imperial Technology and 'Native' Agency (Open Access): A Social History of Railways in Colonial India, 1850-1920

by Aparajita Mukhopadhyay
Hardback
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Narrow gauge railways have long been a source of fascination for many. From famous public lines such as the Ffestiniog Railway and Lynton & Barnstaple Railway, to peat extraction lines in Cumbria and brickworks systems on Humberside, the narrow gauge railway has transcended two centuries. A big part of the ...
Narrow Gauge Locomotives
Narrow gauge railways have long been a source of fascination for many. From famous public lines such as the Ffestiniog Railway and Lynton & Barnstaple Railway, to peat extraction lines in Cumbria and brickworks systems on Humberside, the narrow gauge railway has transcended two centuries. A big part of the charm of these lines is the locomotives that were built to operate them. Narrow gauge is defined as anything less than the standard gauge of UK main lines - usually down to 15 inch gauge - but in that spectrum there is no limit to size, simplicity or shape. These were machines built to do a job, pure and simple, but those jobs were many and varied. Multiple wheeled complex engines could share the same track as a simple motorised wagon, whilst all manner of propulsion could be found - steam, diesel, petrol and electric - even fireless, compressed air or steam locos converted to electric power. This book looks at them all and their legacy today across the plethora of pleasure and heritage lines that exist. This book is part of the Britain's Heritage series, which provides definitive introductions to the riches of Britain's past, and is the perfect way to get acquainted with narrow gauge locomotives in all their variety.
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15.34 USD

Narrow Gauge Locomotives

by Anthony Coulls
Paperback
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