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'BR rebel chairman resigns' THE GUARDIAN. 'Rebel rail chief in row' DAILY MAIL. 'I don't take it back says sacked rail chief' DAILY EXPRESS. This is the notorious book that got Gerard Fiennes sacked from British Railways while he was Chairman and General Manager of the Eastern Region in 1968. ...
I Tried to Run a Railway
'BR rebel chairman resigns' THE GUARDIAN. 'Rebel rail chief in row' DAILY MAIL. 'I don't take it back says sacked rail chief' DAILY EXPRESS. This is the notorious book that got Gerard Fiennes sacked from British Railways while he was Chairman and General Manager of the Eastern Region in 1968. Fiennes became a railwayman by accident, joining the L.N.E.R as a Traffic Apprentice in 1928. Over the next four decades he worked himself up to the top of the management tree, experiencing all facets of railway life - steam through diesel to electrification - on his way to the top. When he got there, he knew the service was ripe for a revolution... and he believed he was the man to lead it. But of course, it was the wrong time for a manager who thought that railways could be a success - Dr. Beeching was sharpening his axe and unprofitable lines were closed rather than turned round. After being resisted, circumvented, delayed and blocked, G. F. Fiennes ran out of patience and put pen to paper and ran his career into the buffers as he told the story of what happens when non-railwaymen tried to run the railway.
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17.06 USD

I Tried to Run a Railway

by Gerard Fiennes
Paperback
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The first thought, when contemplating a new study of the Great Western Railway locomotive fleet, must surely be to ask what can there be left to say? But there is no single source which gives a general introduction to the Great Western locomotive fleet. There are monographs on individual classes, ...
An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development
The first thought, when contemplating a new study of the Great Western Railway locomotive fleet, must surely be to ask what can there be left to say? But there is no single source which gives a general introduction to the Great Western locomotive fleet. There are monographs on individual classes, an excellent multi-volume detail study from the RCTS, and superb collections of photographs, but nothing that brings it all together. This work is intended to provide that general introduction. The volume begins with a series of short essays covering general trends in design development, whilst the main body of the volume covers individual classes. For each class there is a small table containing some principal dimensions and paragraphs of text, covering an introduction, renumbering, key changes in the development of the class and information on withdrawal. The volume concludes with appendices covering the development and types of standard boilers, the various numbering schemes used by the GWR, the arcane subject of locomotive diagrams and lot numbers, and a short reference on the many lines the GWR engulfed. The majority of illustrations are new profile drawings to a consistent format. Described as sketches, they are drawn to a consistent scale, but do not claim to be scale drawings. Much minor equipment has been omitted and the author has certainly not dared to include rivets! Although most are based around GWR weight diagrams, they are not simple traces of the original drawings. Detail has been added from other sources, components copied from different drawings and details have been checked against historical and modern photographs. One must also bear in mind that steam locomotives were not mass produced. Minor fittings frequently varied in position and changes were made over the locomotives' lifetimes. Nevertheless, this collection of drawings provides a uniquely consistent view of the GWR locomotive fleet.
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59.72 USD

An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development

by Jim Champ
Hardback
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Narrow gauge railways have long been a source of fascination for many. From famous public lines such as the Ffestiniog Railway and Lynton & Barnstaple Railway, to peat extraction lines in Cumbria and brickworks systems on Humberside, the narrow gauge railway has transcended two centuries. A big part of the ...
Narrow Gauge Locomotives
Narrow gauge railways have long been a source of fascination for many. From famous public lines such as the Ffestiniog Railway and Lynton & Barnstaple Railway, to peat extraction lines in Cumbria and brickworks systems on Humberside, the narrow gauge railway has transcended two centuries. A big part of the charm of these lines is the locomotives that were built to operate them. Narrow gauge is defined as anything less than the standard gauge of UK main lines - usually down to 15 inch gauge - but in that spectrum there is no limit to size, simplicity or shape. These were machines built to do a job, pure and simple, but those jobs were many and varied. Multiple wheeled complex engines could share the same track as a simple motorised wagon, whilst all manner of propulsion could be found - steam, diesel, petrol and electric - even fireless, compressed air or steam locos converted to electric power. This book looks at them all and their legacy today across the plethora of pleasure and heritage lines that exist. This book is part of the Britain's Heritage series, which provides definitive introductions to the riches of Britain's past, and is the perfect way to get acquainted with narrow gauge locomotives in all their variety.
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15.34 USD

Narrow Gauge Locomotives

by Anthony Coulls
Paperback
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From the late 1940s onward, Wallace W. Abbey masterfully combined journalistic and artistic vision to transform everyday transportation moments into magical photographs. Abbey, a photographer, journalist, historian, and railroad industry executive, helped people from many different backgrounds understand and appreciate what was taken for granted: a world of locomotives, passenger ...
Wallace W. Abbey: A Life in Railroad Photography
From the late 1940s onward, Wallace W. Abbey masterfully combined journalistic and artistic vision to transform everyday transportation moments into magical photographs. Abbey, a photographer, journalist, historian, and railroad industry executive, helped people from many different backgrounds understand and appreciate what was taken for granted: a world of locomotives, passenger trains, big-city terminals, small-town depots, and railroaders. During his lifetime he witnessed and photographed sweeping changes in the railroading industry from the steam era to the era of diesel locomotives and electronic communication. Wallace W. Abbey: A Life in Railroad Photography profiles the life and work of this legendary photographer and showcases the transformation of transportation and photography after World War II. Featuring more than 175 exquisite photographs in an oversized format, Wallace W. Abbey is an outstanding tribute to a gifted artist and the railroads he loved.
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52.500000 USD

Wallace W. Abbey: A Life in Railroad Photography

by Kevin P Keefe, Scott Lothes
Hardback
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When Stanier joined the LMS in 1932, as their CME, he was expected to breathe new life into this ailing giant. Since its formation it had steadily lost ground to its main rival, the LNER. In Doncaster, Nigel Gresley and his team, with an eye to advancing locomotive design at ...
The Princess Royal Pacifics
When Stanier joined the LMS in 1932, as their CME, he was expected to breathe new life into this ailing giant. Since its formation it had steadily lost ground to its main rival, the LNER. In Doncaster, Nigel Gresley and his team, with an eye to advancing locomotive design at the same time as making the company commercially successful, had quickly begun producing a series of high performance and iconic Pacific engines to pull their high profile express trains. Their impact left the LMS trailing in their wake. Under previous CMEs, the LMS had concentrated on 4-6-0 designs to pull their express services, but many felt they lacked sufficient power and had little to offer in performance or glamour when compared to their rivals. Stanier, heavily influenced by his mentor, George Churchward, his work on the GWR and the potential of the Pacific design, saw such a class as essential to the success of the LMS. And so the Princess Royal Class came into being, against a background of some opposition and cultural differences. Despite this, they proved their worth and became popular with their crew and managers. Within a few short years, however, their premier position in the company had been taken by a very worthy successor, the Princess Coronation Class. Overshadowed and often overlooked, they tend to be seen as a stepping stone to something better. Yet, in reality they stand up well to the closest scrutiny, and this book tells the story of these engines through the eyes of those who came into contact with them. They also best represent the impact William Stanier had on locomotive design and best describe the way he changed the culture of the LMS to allow it to grow successfully. It is a story of great endeavor and courage that can only be told by revealing and discussing political, social, economic and engineering issues.
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51.19 USD

The Princess Royal Pacifics

by Tim Hillier-Graves
Hardback
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The British were at the forefront of railway development for the first fifty years of the nineteenth century. Railway Empire tells the story of how the British gave railways to the world, not only in the empire, but also in other countries outside areas of direct influence. It is often ...
Railway Empire: How the British Gave Railways to the World
The British were at the forefront of railway development for the first fifty years of the nineteenth century. Railway Empire tells the story of how the British gave railways to the world, not only in the empire, but also in other countries outside areas of direct influence. It is often forgotten today that the British were responsible for the construction and management of a large proportion of the railways constructed in Africa, South America and Australasia not to mention many thousands of miles of mileage in Asia, India, Malaya, Burma, China and Japan. This book looks at the political, economic and technical aspects of this development, which made Britain a country at the forefront of this form of transport.
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42.66 USD

Railway Empire: How the British Gave Railways to the World

by Anthony Burton
Hardback
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At the beginning of 1967 the writing was clearly on the wall for Southern Steam, with the intention of eliminating it altogether on the 18th June of that year. From the 2nd January, with the Brush type 4s working many main line trains including the Bournemouth Belle , steam was ...
Southern Steam: January - July 1967: Countdown to Extinction
At the beginning of 1967 the writing was clearly on the wall for Southern Steam, with the intention of eliminating it altogether on the 18th June of that year. From the 2nd January, with the Brush type 4s working many main line trains including the Bournemouth Belle , steam was reduced to thirteen departures from Waterloo, three of which were in the early hours. From the 3rd April this was further reduced to just five day and three night time departures. However, by this time it was realised that due to late delivery of the new electric stock, the deadline for the demise of steam was put back to the 9th July and an interim timetable introduced from 12th June. Using information gathered from many sources, Countdown to Extinction chronicles the events of 1967, with the final five weeks in detail, including events that formed the background to the time.
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42.66 USD

Southern Steam: January - July 1967: Countdown to Extinction

by Alan J Goodwin
Hardback
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This photographic album portrays the four classes of locomotives introduced to operate on the British Railways system, prior to Privatisation in 1994. Increasing loads and deteriorating reliability of older classes necessitated the design of new, higher horsepower classes of diesel locomotives to operate the increasing requirement to operate trains handling ...
Type 5 Heavy Freight Locomotives
This photographic album portrays the four classes of locomotives introduced to operate on the British Railways system, prior to Privatisation in 1994. Increasing loads and deteriorating reliability of older classes necessitated the design of new, higher horsepower classes of diesel locomotives to operate the increasing requirement to operate trains handling loads in bulk, such as coal, minerals, fuels etc. The four classes included one American design the class 59 which set new standards in haulage capacity and reliability. The other three designs classes 56, 58 and 60 were more suitable to their tasks than previous models, but in the case of the class 56, suffered a poor repuatation for availability for several years, although the few remaining members of the class have now attained acceptable standards. Of the four classes, a small number of class 56s operate in private ownership, all the class 58s have been withdrawn, but all the class 59s and 60s are in daily use throughout England and Wales. This album has been written by David Cable, author of a series of illustrated books covering railways in the UK as well as overseas. The book shows examples of all four classes working a variety of duties at a wide range of locations.
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51.19 USD

Type 5 Heavy Freight Locomotives

by David Cable
Hardback
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When Robert D. Krebs joined the ranks of Southern Pacific Railroad in 1966, the industry had been in decline for decades, and the future of trains was in peril. Despite these obstacles, Krebs fell in love with the rugged, competitive business of railroads and was determined to overcome its resistance ...
Riding the Rails: Inside the Business of America's Railroads
When Robert D. Krebs joined the ranks of Southern Pacific Railroad in 1966, the industry had been in decline for decades, and the future of trains was in peril. Despite these obstacles, Krebs fell in love with the rugged, competitive business of railroads and was determined to overcome its resistance to change and put rail transportation back on track. By the age of 40, Krebs was president of the Southern Pacific Railroad and had also served as chief executive of both the Santa Fe Railway and Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway companies. Riding the Rails: Inside the Business of America's Railroads details Krebs's rise to a position of influence in the recovery of America's railroads and offers a unique insider's view into the boardrooms where executives and businessmen reimagined transportation in the United States.
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47.250000 USD

Riding the Rails: Inside the Business of America's Railroads

by Robert D Krebs
Hardback
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The Class 156 (Super Sprinter) is a diesel multiple-unit (DMU) built between 1987 and 1989 by Metro-Cammell to replace the aging first-generation 'Heritage' DMUs. 114 of these units were produced at the Washwood Heath works in Birmingham. Here, Rich Makin utilises his terrific collection of photographs to celebrate a unit ...
Class 156 DMU
The Class 156 (Super Sprinter) is a diesel multiple-unit (DMU) built between 1987 and 1989 by Metro-Cammell to replace the aging first-generation 'Heritage' DMUs. 114 of these units were produced at the Washwood Heath works in Birmingham. Here, Rich Makin utilises his terrific collection of photographs to celebrate a unit still seen on the railways today. Featuring members of the class in a variety of locations, this is an essential pictorial tribute to one of the great mainstays of the last thirty years of traction in Britain.
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25.58 USD

Class 156 DMU

by Rich Mackin
Paperback
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During the 1970s steam locos still played a big part in the operation of train services on the Deutsche Reichbahn in the German Democratic Republic. On the main lines steam still worked a lot of important passenger services, including the express trains between Berlin and Dresden, as well as a ...
East German Steam in the 1970s
During the 1970s steam locos still played a big part in the operation of train services on the Deutsche Reichbahn in the German Democratic Republic. On the main lines steam still worked a lot of important passenger services, including the express trains between Berlin and Dresden, as well as a lot of freight traffic. Steam was also responsible for most of the trains on the surviving narrow gauge lines - some of which can still be seen in action today. Despite being behind the Iron Curtain, East Germany was probably the easiest of those countries to take train photos without being arrested - particularly if you went on a tour organised by one of the British enthusiast clubs. These images were captured on trips such as these and, while not being welcomed with open arms, visitors were at least allowed quite a lot of freedom. Featuring many of the different locomotives and train that could be seen in East Germany in the 1970s, George Woods presents a fascinating and illuminating selection of photographs sure to interest any steam enthusiast.
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25.58 USD

East German Steam in the 1970s

by George Woods
Paperback
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When British Rail was formed in 1948, it inherited a large number of workshops that were used by the big four Railway companies. They were located all over the country, and British Rail would set about closing some of the smaller locations. The workshops were used to build, repair, overhaul ...
Locomotives at BR Workshops
When British Rail was formed in 1948, it inherited a large number of workshops that were used by the big four Railway companies. They were located all over the country, and British Rail would set about closing some of the smaller locations. The workshops were used to build, repair, overhaul and scrap various British Rail locomotives, multiple units and carriages. While many of the smaller workshops were to close, some would go on to become major engineering hubs for British Rail. The main workshops were located in different regions, with the biggest being Crewe, Doncaster, Derby, Eastleigh, Swindon, St Rollox, Wolverton and York. These workshops would last, largely untouched, until Swindon closed in 1986. The workshops came under the British Rail Engineering Limited banner in 1969, and were eventually privatised in 1989. BREL would be sold in 1992, becoming Bombardier. Today only the workshops at Crewe, Eastleigh, Wolverton and St Rollox, later called Springburn, remain in use. This book tries to show these workshops in their everyday use, and shows locomotives in various states of repair.
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25.58 USD

Locomotives at BR Workshops

by Andrew Cole
Paperback
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As in many countries in the 1970s, South African railways were making the change over from steam to diesel and electric traction at an ever-increasing pace. As a member of the Locomotive Club of Great Britain I was able to join a tour organised in 1973 to see steam in ...
South African Steam in the 1970s
As in many countries in the 1970s, South African railways were making the change over from steam to diesel and electric traction at an ever-increasing pace. As a member of the Locomotive Club of Great Britain I was able to join a tour organised in 1973 to see steam in action at a time that some of the older types of locos were still around, and there was still a considerable amount of regular steam working. Featuring a variety of rare and unpublished colour photographs, George Woods shows the great variety of locos in action - from 4-8-2 tank engines to huge 4-8-4s and Beyer-Garratts, often polished and decorated by their crews, that could be seen in daily service.
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25.58 USD

South African Steam in the 1970s

by George Woods
Paperback
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Southern Gallery 1923 1947 is the first volume in a new series of picture books, designed to be of interest to railway historians and modellers. The series subjects are themed to include an interesting mixture of useful historic illustrations, depicting locomotives, rolling stock and infrastructure. Southern Gallery 1923 1947 covers ...
Southern Railway Gallery: A Pictorial Journey Through Time
Southern Gallery 1923 1947 is the first volume in a new series of picture books, designed to be of interest to railway historians and modellers. The series subjects are themed to include an interesting mixture of useful historic illustrations, depicting locomotives, rolling stock and infrastructure. Southern Gallery 1923 1947 covers the history of the Southern Railway from its beginings 1923, to nationalisation in 1948, covering most aspects of its fascinating history and operations. The book looks at aspects of the Southern from the early years in the early 1920s, when the company had old worn-out stock on many of its lines, through to the introduction of new modern rolling stock and the electrification of much of its network in Kent, Sussex, Surrey and parts of Hampshire. The company operated an extensive rail and bus network on the Isle of Wight, which covered the whole island and is well remembered to this day. Although the Southern introduced a number of modern new steam classes, its main goal was to electrify as much of the network as possible, however this did not preclude the company from introducing two classes of successful Pacific type locomotives in the 1940s. The company owned and operated docks and harbours throughout its existence, having an extensive fleet of ferries and cargo vessels, some of which served with the Royal Navy in the Second World War as hospital ships. The Southern, also operated bus and road services, which covered many areas not served by a local railway station on the system. The Southern Railway ceased to exist at midnight on 31 December 1947, after a remarkable existence of twenty-four years.
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42.66 USD

Southern Railway Gallery: A Pictorial Journey Through Time

by John Scott-Morgan
Hardback
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This photographic album showing the class 47 diesel locomotives has been compiled by a well-established author of similar titles, David Cable. More examples of this class were built than any other design of modern traction. They also carried more varieties of colour schemes than any other type, and these are ...
Class 47 Diesel Locomotives
This photographic album showing the class 47 diesel locomotives has been compiled by a well-established author of similar titles, David Cable. More examples of this class were built than any other design of modern traction. They also carried more varieties of colour schemes than any other type, and these are well portrayed in this volume. The class 47 was truly the maid of all work on the British Rail system for the forty-odd years since their inception in the early 1960s, and certain members of the class are still in daily use. All types of traffic from major expresses to coal trains were worked by these engines, and this full colour album illustrates many examples of an engine that could be seen in almost all parts of Great Britain from Inverness to Penzance and Dover to Holyhead.
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51.19 USD

Class 47 Diesel Locomotives

by David Cable
Hardback
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Never before has a comprehensive history been written of the track used by railways of all gauges, tramways, and cliff railways, in Great Britain. And yet it was the development of track, every bit as much as the development of the locomotive, that has allowed our railways to provide an ...
The Railway - British Track Since 1804
Never before has a comprehensive history been written of the track used by railways of all gauges, tramways, and cliff railways, in Great Britain. And yet it was the development of track, every bit as much as the development of the locomotive, that has allowed our railways to provide an extraordinarily wide range of services. Without the track of today, with its laser-guided maintenance machines, the TGV and the Eurostar could not cruise smoothly at 272 feet per second, nor could 2,000-ton freight trains carry a wide range of materials, or suburban railways, over and under the ground, serve our great cities in a way that roads never could. Andrew Dows account of the development of track, involving deep research in the papers of professional institutions as well as rare books, company records and personal accounts, paints a vivid picture of development from primitive beginnings to modernity. The book contains nearly 200 specially-commissioned drawings as well as many photographs of track in its very many forms since the appearance of the steam locomotive in 1804\. Included are chapters on electrified railways, and on the development of mechanised maintenance, which revolutionised the world of the platelayer.
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42.66 USD

The Railway - British Track Since 1804

by Andrew Dow
Paperback
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Most people's perception of a model railway is an arrangement of track work, decorated with some buildings and a cursory backdrop rising briefly to a sloping ceiling. Not so with Chadbury. When you walk into what was a 17ft square, double garage, you enter another world. The eyes look up ...
Chadbury: A Town and Industrial Scape in '0' Gauge
Most people's perception of a model railway is an arrangement of track work, decorated with some buildings and a cursory backdrop rising briefly to a sloping ceiling. Not so with Chadbury. When you walk into what was a 17ft square, double garage, you enter another world. The eyes look up before they look down at a painted backdrop, which is 8ft high and painted in oils, with watercolour landscapes of the Pennine hills. A dark satanic sky rises above the 'Cliff' cotton mill, which is 7ft wide to a tower top at 40 inches high, along with with 166 windows. As you enter, on the left you see a canal basin surrounded by factories that continue around the layout until the town of Chadbury is reached. The doorway is bridged by a girder bridge, which comples a continuous circular track. To the left lies the shed area, to the right lies the station. At a tower level to the main layout lies a street lined with terraced houses and further industrial and wharf buildings serving another canal. Creating the various buildings have been a great interest of mine, and I have demonstrated how I build and weather them in the book. All the buildings light up, providing both a daytime and night-time look to the layout. It is DCC operated, and my loco stock is ex-LMS and LNER in a begrimed BR livery. Notes on materials used, tips on weathering and building dimensions are all there to help, and hopefully inspire, the would-be modeller. The book includes over 100 photographs and a detailed track plan.
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42.66 USD

Chadbury: A Town and Industrial Scape in '0' Gauge

by Eric Bottomley
Hardback
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In an earlier album titled _BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation_ Fred Kerr detailed the many classes of BR diesel locomotives that had been preserved and noted that some purchases had been made with the hope of operating them on the national network. The Railways Bill 1993 provided an opportunity for ...
Heritage Traction on the Main Line
In an earlier album titled _BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation_ Fred Kerr detailed the many classes of BR diesel locomotives that had been preserved and noted that some purchases had been made with the hope of operating them on the national network. The Railways Bill 1993 provided an opportunity for this to happen and this album shows such locomotives at work during the early part of the 21st century upto December 2016\. During this period many new train operators entered the market and their early operations used elderly locomotives withdrawn from service by their original operators until their business(es) were established and new locomotives could be bought. On occasion these new companies were prepared to hire preserved locomotives with main line access to service short-term contracts and these, mainly freight, services provided much of the variety of locomotive operations that offset the increasing sight of multiple unit train services that epitomise the modern railway. The author has chosen to consider heritage traction as any locomotive older than twenty years, which therefore includes electric locomotives but excludes those of that age which are still operated by their owners as at April 1 1994 when British Railways (BR) was privatised. This results in the Class 59 fleet being excluded because its ownership has been constant but the Class 60 fleet being included because of purchases by Colas Railfreight after that date.
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42.66 USD

Heritage Traction on the Main Line

by Fred Kerr
Hardback
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This, the first of four books, looks at the treatment of varying aspects of public transport with the aid of postage stamps, either issued by the postal authorities of most of the worlds nations, or some of the railway companies themselves, especially heritage operators. It has long intrigued the author ...
Narrow Gauge Railway Stamps: A Collector's Guide
This, the first of four books, looks at the treatment of varying aspects of public transport with the aid of postage stamps, either issued by the postal authorities of most of the worlds nations, or some of the railway companies themselves, especially heritage operators. It has long intrigued the author as to why narrow gauge systems throughout the world have demanded a far greater attention from the public and stamp producers than railway subjects from the standard gauge lines, which make up the vast majority of the western worlds major railway systems. The conclusion he has reached is that in most cases they are considered cute a truly abominable term, which is (thankfully) gradually fading from our vocabulary, but just how the author felt on first seeing engines of the Talyllyn Railway, in mid-Wales, from the top of the station approach at Tywyns Wharf Station: tiny little kettles in sparkling, rich green and lots of brass. The Talyllyn has the double honour of being the worlds first railway to be taken-over and operated by a preservation society in 1951, and also the first railway in the modern era to issue its own Railway Letter Service stamps, a practice that can be traced back to the very earliest of times, which allowed people in outlying areas to send letters by the railways to the nearest post office for onward transport. The Talyllyns first stamps were issued in 1957, and today the lucky collector can demand a substantial premium on the paltry issue value. From whatever origin or country, there is a huge variety of stamps covering narrow gauge railways, and usually they are attractive miniature works of art that make them very collectable. The author has not set out to cover every country or issue in these books, but to present a wide selection of those stamps that are note-worthy.
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34.11 USD

Narrow Gauge Railway Stamps: A Collector's Guide

by Howard Piltz
Hardback
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Why build a Railway to Cambridge? This is the first substantive illustrated book about Cambridge Station which explores the opening of the station in 1845; the four principal railway companies which all worked to and from the station in a tangle of mutual inconvenience; the extensive goods traffic which was ...
Cambridge Station: Its Development and Operation as a Rail Centre
Why build a Railway to Cambridge? This is the first substantive illustrated book about Cambridge Station which explores the opening of the station in 1845; the four principal railway companies which all worked to and from the station in a tangle of mutual inconvenience; the extensive goods traffic which was handled in the several goods yard around the station; and the way the Station operated from early beginnings, to what Abellio East Anglia and Network Rail offer today. Cambridge Station is renowned for having one of the longest single platforms in the UK, served by Up and Down trains. Ingenious trackwork and extensive signalling could satisfy passengers who were told at the central booking hall entrance: 'Turn left for Kings Lynn or right for London.' The book contains several pictures never before published, showing how the Eastern Counties and then the Great Eastern Railway Companies contrived Cambridge Station and the Engine Sheds, Goods Yards, Signal Boxes and extensive sidings to serve East Anglia. And it tells people stories too, because the author worked on the station in the 1950s and 1960s and knows Cambridge and East Anglia well. He is a geographer and writes with knowledge, wisdom and humour.
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42.66 USD

Cambridge Station: Its Development and Operation as a Rail Centre

by Rob Shorland-Ball
Hardback
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The genesis of 25kv overhead electrification began in the late 1960s on the West Coast Main Line, the 1980s for the East Anglian Main Line, and the East Coast Main Line in the late 1980s. Development took place in stages culminating in fully electrified lines from London to Scotland on ...
British Railways AC Electric Locomotives: A Pictorial Guide
The genesis of 25kv overhead electrification began in the late 1960s on the West Coast Main Line, the 1980s for the East Anglian Main Line, and the East Coast Main Line in the late 1980s. Development took place in stages culminating in fully electrified lines from London to Scotland on both East and West Coast lines, and from London to Norwich. The introduction of these lines required the construction of new motive power. Initially five types were produced for the WCML, from which the second phase of loco design was developed, giving a higher level of reliability, as well as power output. These newer designs were applied to the Anglian services, but the ECML plans required an updated design, ostensibly for mixed traffic, but hardly ever used on anything other than express passenger services, for which their 140mph potential enabled a major recast of the timetable. The opening of the Channel Tunnel required a mixed traffic dual voltage locomotive, running on both 25kv and the Southern Region 750v third rail DC. The locomotives are classified between 81 and 92 inclusive, and this book of photographs by David Cable covers all the classes in a variety of locations and duties.
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63.000000 USD

British Railways AC Electric Locomotives: A Pictorial Guide

by David Cable
Hardback
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This fascinating book explores the development of locomotives over the course of fifty years. From Richard Trevithick's first experimental road engine of 1801 up to the Great Exhibition some fifty years later, locomotives have come far in reimagining and reinventing themselves to serve the people and British industry. The early ...
The Locomotive Pioneers: Early Steam Locomotive Development 1801 - 1851
This fascinating book explores the development of locomotives over the course of fifty years. From Richard Trevithick's first experimental road engine of 1801 up to the Great Exhibition some fifty years later, locomotives have come far in reimagining and reinventing themselves to serve the people and British industry. The early years showed slow development amongst locomotives: Trevithick's first railway locomotives failed significantly as the engine broke the brittle cast-iron rails. The story is continued through the years when locomotives were developed to serve collieries, a period that lasted for a quarter of a century, and saw many different engineers trying out their ideas; from the rack and pinion railway developed by Blenkinsop and Murray, to George Stephensons engines for the Stockton & Darlington Railway. The most significant change came with Robert Stephensons innovative Rocket, the locomotive that set the formula for future developments. British engineers dominated the early years, although in France Marc Seguin developed a multi-tubular boiler at the same time as Stephenson. The next period was marked by the steady spread of railways in Europe and across the Atlantic. Timothy Hackworth of the Stockton & Darlington railway supplied locomotives to Russia, and his men had an exciting ride to deliver parts by sleigh across the snowy steppes, pursued by wolves. In America, the first locomotives were delivered from England, but the Americans soon developed their own methods and styles, culminating in the Baldwin engines, a type that has become familiar to us from hundreds of Western films. This is more than just a book about the development of a vital technology, it is also the story of the men who made it possible, from the steadily reliable team of William Buddicom and Alexander Allan, who developed their locomotives at Crewe, to the flamboyant Isambard Kingdom Brunel, whose broad gauge was served by the magnificent engines of Daniel Gooch.
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42.66 USD

The Locomotive Pioneers: Early Steam Locomotive Development 1801 - 1851

by Anthony Burton
Hardback
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This is the shocking true story behind the botched introduction of Automatic Half-Barrier level-crossings into Britain. January 1968 saw the convening of the first Parliamentary Court of Inquiry into a railway accident in Britain since the Tay Bridge Disaster nearly a century before. Why was this? Because Britain's 'Railway Detectives', ...
Leominster and Hixon: A Railway Disaster Waiting to Happen
This is the shocking true story behind the botched introduction of Automatic Half-Barrier level-crossings into Britain. January 1968 saw the convening of the first Parliamentary Court of Inquiry into a railway accident in Britain since the Tay Bridge Disaster nearly a century before. Why was this? Because Britain's 'Railway Detectives', the Railway Inspectorate, who would normally investigate all aspects of railway safety, were also in charge of the introduction of automatic Continental-style, level-crossings into this country. At Hixon in Staffordshire, one of these newly installed 'robot' crossings on British Rail's flagship Euston to Glasgow mainline, was the scene of a fatal high-speed collision between a packed express train and an enormous, heavily laden low-loader. For once, the 'Railway Detectives' were the ones having to explain their actions, in the full glare of media attention, to an expectant and increasingly worried nation. (There was another awful, fatal collision at an automatic crossing at Beckingham, Lincolnshire, in April of 1968). Using previously undisclosed information, the author has been able to cast fresh light on to not only the Hixon Disaster, but also the extraordinary story of the largely successful attempts, by British Railways and the Railway Inspectorate of the time, to hide the truth of just how close we came to having dozens of 'Hixons' right across the rail network.
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34.11 USD

Leominster and Hixon: A Railway Disaster Waiting to Happen

Hardback
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The ten-hour journey from the North-East coast to almost the westernmost tip of England is one of ever-changing scenery with endless interest to railway enthusiast and casual traveller. From Tyne bridges past Durham Cathedral and York Minster, through industrial South Yorkshire past Chesterfield's twisted spire to the railway mecca of ...
North East to South West by Rail in the 1980s
The ten-hour journey from the North-East coast to almost the westernmost tip of England is one of ever-changing scenery with endless interest to railway enthusiast and casual traveller. From Tyne bridges past Durham Cathedral and York Minster, through industrial South Yorkshire past Chesterfield's twisted spire to the railway mecca of Derby and into Birmingham. Subterranean New Street with its electric trains is left behind the journey takes you Brunel's Bristol and over the Devon banks to Plymouth and over the Tamar into rural Cornwall. On a journey such as this, the notes in a trainspotter's pad would fill two or three pages. This book relives those days. A delightfully nostalgic trip across and the country and down memory lane, Colin Alexander offers up a wonderful array of photos and memories celebrating the diversity of our railways during the 1980s and the long-gone variety of locomotives and scenery.
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25.58 USD

North East to South West by Rail in the 1980s

by Colin Alexander
Paperback
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Italy is dominated by its national operator Trenitalia. With most of the country bordered by the Mediterranean, there is little scope for cross-border traffic, although there are a couple of famous crossings, most notably Brenner to the north-west and Chiasso to the north. The busiest part of the country is ...
Italian Traction
Italy is dominated by its national operator Trenitalia. With most of the country bordered by the Mediterranean, there is little scope for cross-border traffic, although there are a couple of famous crossings, most notably Brenner to the north-west and Chiasso to the north. The busiest part of the country is to the north, with various amounts of both passenger and freight workings. By far the most numerous class of locomotives are the Class 464 electric locos, with over 700 in use with operator Trenitalia and also Trenord. There are also various electric locomotives in use, mostly being Class 402s, and Class 444s. There are also some diesel locomotives in use on passenger workings, being from the Class 345 and 445. On the freight side, most are operated by Trenitalia, although there are a number of smaller operators, including DB. Trenitalia use a variety of locomotives from the Class 632 through to the Class 655/656, which have a most unusual appearance. Italy is a fascinating country to visit, with high-speed trains operating alongside slow regional workings.
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25.58 USD

Italian Traction

by Andrew Cole
Paperback
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In 1862, Viscount Milton and Dr Cheadle set off to cross western Canada to try and find a route through the Rocky Mountains that could be used for railways to transport gold from the British Columbia goldfields to eastern Canada. Behind that simple description lies one of the strangest yet ...
Connecting Canada: The Northwest Passage Overland: Milton and Cheadle's Extraordinary Journey
In 1862, Viscount Milton and Dr Cheadle set off to cross western Canada to try and find a route through the Rocky Mountains that could be used for railways to transport gold from the British Columbia goldfields to eastern Canada. Behind that simple description lies one of the strangest yet at the same time most important 19th-century expeditions in North America. Strange? The two men were an odd couple to begin with and one of their travelling companions was so peculiar people thought he was fictional. Important? Important enough that their account became the best-selling book of the age, beaten only by the Bible - and the trip was instrumental in bringing the railroad from the east and ensuring that BC became part of the Canadian Confederation in 1871 and not part of the US. The intention in London was to hold fast to the rich and fertile land in the west and 'to found a second England on the shores of the Pacific'. Milton and Cheadle were part of the process, not least because Viscount Milton could later argue the case for the railroad and for confederation in Parliament. Author (and expedition leader) Ernest Coleman has not only returned to the primary sources to retell the story of their eventful journey, he has also followed the entire route today. The centuries-long search for the northwest passage by sea never actually became a navigable trade route; it was the land route that fixed the political map of North America. Imagine how different the world might have been if the whole of its Pacific seaboard had been part of the US.
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28.99 USD

Connecting Canada: The Northwest Passage Overland: Milton and Cheadle's Extraordinary Journey

by E. C. Coleman
Paperback
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Featuring an array of unpublished images, Royston Morris documents the fascinating world of the vehicles and equipment that keep the nation's railways on track and on time. There are numerous machines that can carry out various different duties. These include tamping machines, ballast regulating machines, track relaying machines, ballast consolidating ...
Railway Maintenance Vehicles and Equipment
Featuring an array of unpublished images, Royston Morris documents the fascinating world of the vehicles and equipment that keep the nation's railways on track and on time. There are numerous machines that can carry out various different duties. These include tamping machines, ballast regulating machines, track relaying machines, ballast consolidating machines, stoneblowers, snowploughs and many more. During the 1980s road-rail vehicles were starting to appear, having been converted to such use. The two main companies who were doing these conversions were Rexquote and Philmor Rail Ltd. These vehicles were usually excavators to begin with, though they also include lorries, land rovers and bulldozers. Perfect for enthusiasts and modellers alike, this is a fascinating look at the forgotten heroes of the rail network.
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25.58 USD

Railway Maintenance Vehicles and Equipment

by Royston Morris
Paperback
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Over the course of several volumes, Allen Jackson uses an array of photographs to lavishly illustrate the story of signalling in the principal constituents of the LNER - continuing here with the North British Railway, Great North of Scotland Railway and the CLC. The LNER is most popularly remembered by ...
Signalling and Signal Boxes Along the North British Railway, Great North of Scotland Railway and the CLC Routes
Over the course of several volumes, Allen Jackson uses an array of photographs to lavishly illustrate the story of signalling in the principal constituents of the LNER - continuing here with the North British Railway, Great North of Scotland Railway and the CLC. The LNER is most popularly remembered by the Railway Races to the North in the 1870s and trains like the Flying Scotsman and streamlined record breaker Mallard. The last link with such glory days is the mechanical signalling and signal boxes, many of which have witnessed the LNER's finest exploits. This way of life is coming to an end and this book records some of the last of the semaphore scene, which in some cases is no longer with us and the rest is on notice. Although the LNER was the second largest railway company, it had the largest route mileage and area served. From bucolic East Anglian branch lines to the intensity of the Nottinghamshire, Yorkshire, Durham and Northumberland coal fields and the chemical industry and shipping of Teeside. In Scotland the picture was much the same, with the LNER active from the Borders to Inverness. Although modernised in the 1960s and 1970s, enough of the mechanical signalling scene remains to give a flavour of the way railways were worked and controlled in the nineteenth century. Further, more recent, modernisation in North Lincolnshire, Humberside and Norfolk have rendered the signalling scene even sparser and this series of books provide a nostalgic and timely look back at the halcyon days of British signalling.
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25.58 USD

Signalling and Signal Boxes Along the North British Railway, Great North of Scotland Railway and the CLC Routes

by Allen Jackson
Paperback
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Dorset - where the South Coast meets the West Country. From golden sandy beaches, to rolling hills, delightful seaside towns, and idyllic country villages, Dorset has long been a popular destination for visitors. Although not a vast railway network several main lines either cut through the county, or finish there. ...
Dorset Traction
Dorset - where the South Coast meets the West Country. From golden sandy beaches, to rolling hills, delightful seaside towns, and idyllic country villages, Dorset has long been a popular destination for visitors. Although not a vast railway network several main lines either cut through the county, or finish there. The most famous line to have passed through this county is the now long-closed Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway from Bath to Bournemouth. Many other lines were either also closed over the years; the branch lines to Lyme Regis, Bridport, Portland and Abbotsbury, and the Swanage branch from Wareham - all closed and lifted. The most recent closure has been that of the Weymouth Quay tramway which saw its last train in 1999. Since the end of Southern steam in 1967, and into the modern traction era, Dorset has probably been synonymous with the Class 33/1 and 4TC operation between Bournemouth and Weymouth prior to the 1988 electrification west of Bournemouth. After twenty-one years of service, these in turn were replaced by the Class 442 'Wessex Electrics' until 2007 when the Siemens-built Class 444 and 450 'Desiro' units took over. The 'West of England' route from Waterloo to Exeter lost its loco-hauled trains in June 1993 when the then new BREL Derby built Class 159s came into service, and twenty-three years later still work the same line they were intended for very reliably. The photographs chosen for this book, published for the first time, represent the traction Dorset has enjoyed over the years since the end of steam in 1967, and the landscape which they pass through.
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25.58 USD

Dorset Traction

by Mark Jamieson
Paperback
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In his time Isambard Kingdom Brunel was the world's greatest engineer. His list of achievements is truly breathtaking: the Thames Tunnel, the first underwater tunnel in the world; the SS Great Britain, the first propeller-driven ship; the Clifton Suspension Bridge, then the longest span of any bridge in the world; ...
Isambard Kingdom Brunel: The Life of an Engineering Genius
In his time Isambard Kingdom Brunel was the world's greatest engineer. His list of achievements is truly breathtaking: the Thames Tunnel, the first underwater tunnel in the world; the SS Great Britain, the first propeller-driven ship; the Clifton Suspension Bridge, then the longest span of any bridge in the world; and the Great Western Railway. History has been kind to his memory: many of his creations still exist and he is lauded by historians as a truly 'Great Briton'. In this full-scale biography Colin Maggs presents a portrait of a complex, ambitious and determined genius. But the Brunel that emerges is not without flaws. He made mistakes, both personal and technical - he wasn't always right but never admitted he was wrong. Drawing on Brunel's diaries, letters and business papers, we see the real Isambard, a more human figure, emerging from behind the towering structures and machines he created.
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18.75 USD

Isambard Kingdom Brunel: The Life of an Engineering Genius

by Colin Maggs
Paperback
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