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While playing the southern lady for the white political establishment, thousands of mostly middle-class, middle-aged, married white women become grassroots activists in America's civil rights movement, sometimes at the cost of friendships, status, economic security, and family support. The original essays in this collection tell who these women were, why ...
Throwing Off the Cloak of Privilege: White Southern Women Activists in the Civil Rights Era
While playing the southern lady for the white political establishment, thousands of mostly middle-class, middle-aged, married white women become grassroots activists in America's civil rights movement, sometimes at the cost of friendships, status, economic security, and family support. The original essays in this collection tell who these women were, why they became committed to racial justice and equal opportunity, and how they organized to change southern society. The women worked within a range of national and local institutions, both segregated and biracial. Their stories, largely unknown, span half of the 20th century from the New Deal to the early 1970s and took place across the South from Louisville to New Orleans. Some of them brought years of experience in church groups or welfare organizations to the movement; others became converts only when local crises forced them to examine the hypocrisy and privilege of their lives. Some couched their civil rights arguments in terms of their maternal identity and a belief that racial discrimination defiled the world in which they reared their children. Many shared a basic optimism about the willingness of white southerners to change. And many were well aware that their leisure to pursue reform activities often was made possible by the black women who managed their households, cooked their food, and tended their children. Four essays profile specific women and their personal strategies for attacking prejudice and discrimination. The remaining essays focus on particular organizations, such as the YWCA, United Church Women, the Women's Emergency Committee to Open Our Schools, and the Saturday Luncheon Club, a group whose name belied its subversive intentions. Using autobiography, oral history, news accounts, organization papers, and personal letters, the contributors show the importance of female support networks, the influence of African American mentors, and the social ostracism that resulted from defying white supremacy. In the ongoing struggle for human dignity and a voice in American life, this book adds a new and necessary dimension to our understanding of both biracial activism and white anti-racism.
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78.750000 USD

Throwing Off the Cloak of Privilege: White Southern Women Activists in the Civil Rights Era

by Gail S Murray
Hardback
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The use of secret police, security agencies and informers to spy on, disrupt and undermine opposition to the dominant political and economic order has a long history. This book reflects on the surveillance, harassment and infiltration that pervades the lives of activists, organisations and movements that are labelled as 'threats ...
Activists and the Surveillance State: Learning from Repression
The use of secret police, security agencies and informers to spy on, disrupt and undermine opposition to the dominant political and economic order has a long history. This book reflects on the surveillance, harassment and infiltration that pervades the lives of activists, organisations and movements that are labelled as 'threats to national security'. Activists and scholars from the UK, South Africa, Canada, the US, Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand expose disturbing stories of political policing to question what lies beneath state surveillance. Problematising the social amnesia that exists within progressive political networks and supposed liberal democracies, Activists and the Surveillance State shows that ultimately, movements can learn from their own repression, developing a critical and complex understanding of the nature of states, capital and democracy today that can inform the struggles of tomorrow.
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110.250000 USD

Activists and the Surveillance State: Learning from Repression

Hardback
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This book examines the relationship between inequalities and identities in the context of an unprecedented state advocacy of human rights with a distinct emphasis on (ethnic) group rights in post-civil war Ethiopia. The analysis is set against the background of a dramatic state remaking by a rebellion movement (the Ethiopian ...
Contesting Inequalities, Identities and Rights in Ethiopia
This book examines the relationship between inequalities and identities in the context of an unprecedented state advocacy of human rights with a distinct emphasis on (ethnic) group rights in post-civil war Ethiopia. The analysis is set against the background of a dramatic state remaking by a rebellion movement (the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front - EPRDF) that seized control of the Ethiopian state in 1991, after a decisive battlefield victory over an unpopular regime. The new government of former rebels pledged to institute a new system of ethnic self-government that celebrated ethnic diversity with a firm pledge to guarantee basic human rights. After nearly three decades in office, however, the Ethiopian government is challenged by the resilience of identity-based inequalities it ostensibly sought to end, and by protests against its own policies and practices that intensified inequality. The events in Ethiopia, reverberating throughout the Horn of Africa, have inspired heated and often polarized debates between academics, policy experts, political activists, and the media. Data D. Barata contributes to this debate through a nuanced ethnographic analysis of why identities with distinct notions of inequality persist, even after relentless interventions and ideological repudiations. The contestations and struggles over political representation, local governance, cultural identities, land and religion that the book examines are shaped, one way or another, by the global human rights discourse that has inspired millions of Africans to confront entrenched structures of power. This book will be of interest to scholars and students in the fields of anthropology, African studies, political science, sociology and cultural studies.
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196.22 USD

Contesting Inequalities, Identities and Rights in Ethiopia

by Data D Barata
Hardback
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This volume provides a concise but authoritative overview of the NFL national anthem protests and the fierce debates they have sparked about patriotism, constitutional rights, military service, police brutality, and social justice. * Features entries devoted to specific events and milestones * Profiles highlight the contributions of important activists and ...
The NFL National Anthem Protests
This volume provides a concise but authoritative overview of the NFL national anthem protests and the fierce debates they have sparked about patriotism, constitutional rights, military service, police brutality, and social justice. * Features entries devoted to specific events and milestones * Profiles highlight the contributions of important activists and other figures * Explores the lasting impact of the Kaepernick's protest on American life * Provides a bibliography of sources for further study
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40.950000 USD

The NFL National Anthem Protests

by Margaret Haerens
Hardback
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Kosovo: The Politics of Identity and Space explores the Albanian-Serbian confrontation after Slobodan Milosevic's rise to power and the policy of repression in Kosovo through the lens of the Kosovo education system. The argument is woven around the story of imposed ethnic segregation in Kosovo's education, and its impact on ...
Kosovo: The Politics of Identity and Space
Kosovo: The Politics of Identity and Space explores the Albanian-Serbian confrontation after Slobodan Milosevic's rise to power and the policy of repression in Kosovo through the lens of the Kosovo education system. The argument is woven around the story of imposed ethnic segregation in Kosovo's education, and its impact on the emergence of exclusive notions of nation and homeland among the Serbian and Albanian youth in the 1990s. The book also critically explores the wider context of the Albanian non-violent resistance, including the emergence of the parallel state and its weaknesses. Kosovo: The Politics of Identity and Space not only provides an insight into events that led to the bloodshed in Kosovo in the late 1990s, but also shows that the legacy of segregation is one of the major challenges the international community faces in its efforts to establish an integrated multi-ethnic society in the territory.
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51.19 USD

Kosovo: The Politics of Identity and Space

by Denisa Kostovicova
Paperback / softback
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This is a biography of Helena Swanwick, a remarkable woman who has been greatly overlooked. Apart from her autobiography, there are virtually no accounts of Helena Swanwick's life, firstly as a prominent campaigner for the rights of women and secondly as a dedicated pacifist who in the early years of ...
Against All Odds: The Life and Work of Helena Swanwick
This is a biography of Helena Swanwick, a remarkable woman who has been greatly overlooked. Apart from her autobiography, there are virtually no accounts of Helena Swanwick's life, firstly as a prominent campaigner for the rights of women and secondly as a dedicated pacifist who in the early years of the 20th century foresaw the horrors of the war to come. She herself wrote a number of books of which 'The War in its effect up Women' and 'Women and War' are perhaps the most compelling in their understanding of how women would suffer in the event of the conflict. Swanwick worked closely with E D Morel, and during the years of World War I was secretary to the Union for Democratic Control. Following the end of the war, she was elected as a substitute delegate to the Fifth Assembly of the League of Nations, the first woman to be so. Helena Swanwick finally retired to her house in Maidenhead where she was able to pursue her love of gardening.
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13.640000 USD

Against All Odds: The Life and Work of Helena Swanwick

by Donald Mitchell
Paperback / softback
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Most civil rights victories are achieved behind the scenes, and this riveting, beautifully written memoir by a black first looks back with searing insight on the decades of struggle, friendship, courage, humor and savvy that secured what seems commonplace today-people of color working in mainstream media. Told with a pioneering ...
Trailblazer: A Pioneering Journalist's Fight to Make the Media Look More Like America
Most civil rights victories are achieved behind the scenes, and this riveting, beautifully written memoir by a black first looks back with searing insight on the decades of struggle, friendship, courage, humor and savvy that secured what seems commonplace today-people of color working in mainstream media. Told with a pioneering newspaper writer's charm and skill, Gilliam's full, fascinating life weaves her personal and professional experiences and media history into an engrossing tapestry. When we read about the death of her father and other formative events of her life, we glimpse the crippling impact of the segregated South before the civil rights movement when slavery's legacy still felt astonishingly close. We root for her as a wife, mother, and ambitious professional as she seizes once-in-a-lifetime opportunities never meant for a dark-skinned woman and builds a distinguished career. We gain a comprehensive view of how the media, especially newspapers, affected the movement for equal rights in this country. And in this humble, moving memoir, we see how an innovative and respected journalist and working mother helped provide opportunities for others. With the distinct voice of one who has worked for and witnessed immense progress and overcome heart-wrenching setbacks, this book covers a wide swath of media history -- from the era of game-changing Negro newspapers like the Chicago Defender to the civil rights movement, feminism, and our current imperfect diversity. This timely memoir, which reflects the tradition of boot-strapping African American storytelling from the South, is a smart, contemporary consideration of the media.
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28.350000 USD

Trailblazer: A Pioneering Journalist's Fight to Make the Media Look More Like America

by Dorothy Butler Gilliam
Hardback
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While medical identification and treatment of gender dysphoria have existed for decades, the development of transgender as a collective political identity is a recent construct. Over the past 25 years, the transgender movement has gained statutory nondiscrimination protections at the state and local levels, hate crimes protections in a number ...
The Remarkable Rise of Transgender Rights
While medical identification and treatment of gender dysphoria have existed for decades, the development of transgender as a collective political identity is a recent construct. Over the past 25 years, the transgender movement has gained statutory nondiscrimination protections at the state and local levels, hate crimes protections in a number of states, inclusion in a federal law against hate crimes, legal victories in the courts, and increasingly favorable policies in bureaucracies at all levels. It has achieved these victories despite the relatively small number of trans people and despite the widespread discrimination, poverty, and violence experienced by many in the transgender community. This is a remarkable achievement in a political system where public policy often favors those with important resources that the transgender community lacks: access, money, and voters. The Remarkable Rise of Transgender Rights explains the growth of the transgender rights movement despite its marginalized status within the current political opportunity structure.
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94.500000 USD

The Remarkable Rise of Transgender Rights

by Daniel Clay Lewis, Donald P. Haider Markel, Jami Kathleen Taylor
Hardback
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Why you have the right to resist unjust government The economist Albert O. Hirschman famously argued that citizens of democracies have only three possible responses to injustice or wrongdoing by their governments: we may leave, complain, or comply. But in When All Else Fails, Jason Brennan argues that there is ...
When All Else Fails: The Ethics of Resistance to State Injustice
Why you have the right to resist unjust government The economist Albert O. Hirschman famously argued that citizens of democracies have only three possible responses to injustice or wrongdoing by their governments: we may leave, complain, or comply. But in When All Else Fails, Jason Brennan argues that there is a fourth option. When governments violate our rights, we may resist. We may even have a moral duty to do so. For centuries, almost everyone has believed that we must allow the government and its representatives to act without interference, no matter how they behave. We may complain, protest, sue, or vote officials out, but we can't fight back. But Brennan makes the case that we have no duty to allow the state or its agents to commit injustice. We have every right to react with acts of uncivil disobedience. We may resist arrest for violation of unjust laws. We may disobey orders, sabotage government property, or reveal classified information. We may deceive ignorant, irrational, or malicious voters. We may even use force in self-defense or to defend others. The result is a provocative challenge to long-held beliefs about how citizens may respond when government officials behave unjustly or abuse their power.
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37.54 USD

When All Else Fails: The Ethics of Resistance to State Injustice

by Jason Brennan
Hardback
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The first General Election after British women won the right to vote in 1918 was almost an entirely male affair. With just days to spare before the old Parliament dissolved, legislation was rushed through that enabled female candidates to stand. Women scrambled to be nominated, but only seventeen made it ...
Taking On The Men: The First Women Parliamentary Candidates 1918
The first General Election after British women won the right to vote in 1918 was almost an entirely male affair. With just days to spare before the old Parliament dissolved, legislation was rushed through that enabled female candidates to stand. Women scrambled to be nominated, but only seventeen made it onto the ballot paper. Three were in the West Midlands. Christabel Pankhurst (Smethwick) is probably the best known of them now. But, at the time, Mary Macarthur (Stourbridge), and Margery Corbett Ashby (Ladywood) were equally capable of making headline news... and often did. Ranged against them were all the forces of tradition and rigid conservatism, determined that women candidates should fail. Taking On the Men is a fascinating, superbly researched and thoroughly well-told tale of three women who took on the men and - simply by standing for Parliament - scored a small victory against what would now be known as 'the patriarchy'.
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16.98 USD

Taking On The Men: The First Women Parliamentary Candidates 1918

by David J. A. Hallam
Paperback / softback
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All across the United States, in the last few years, there has been a resurgence of Black protest against structural racism and other forms of racial injustice. Black Resistance in the Americas draws attention to this renewed energy and to how this theme of resistance intersects with other communities of ...
Black Resistance in the Americas
All across the United States, in the last few years, there has been a resurgence of Black protest against structural racism and other forms of racial injustice. Black Resistance in the Americas draws attention to this renewed energy and to how this theme of resistance intersects with other communities of Black people around the world. This edited collection examines in-depth stories of resistance against slavery; narratives of resistance in African American, Afro-Caribbean, and Afro-Latin American literature; resistance in politics, education, religion, music, dance, and film, exploring a range of new perspectives from established and emerging researchers on Black communities. The chapters in this pivotal book discuss some of the mechanisms that Black communities have used to resist bondage, domination, disempowerment, inequality, and injustices resulting from their encounters with the West, from colonization to forced migration.
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51.18 USD

Black Resistance in the Americas

Paperback / softback
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All across the United States, in the last few years, there has been a resurgence of Black protest against structural racism and other forms of racial injustice. Black Resistance in the Americas draws attention to this renewed energy and to how this theme of resistance intersects with other communities of ...
Black Resistance in the Americas
All across the United States, in the last few years, there has been a resurgence of Black protest against structural racism and other forms of racial injustice. Black Resistance in the Americas draws attention to this renewed energy and to how this theme of resistance intersects with other communities of Black people around the world. This edited collection examines in-depth stories of resistance against slavery; narratives of resistance in African American, Afro-Caribbean, and Afro-Latin American literature; resistance in politics, education, religion, music, dance, and film, exploring a range of new perspectives from established and emerging researchers on Black communities. The chapters in this pivotal book discuss some of the mechanisms that Black communities have used to resist bondage, domination, disempowerment, inequality, and injustices resulting from their encounters with the West, from colonization to forced migration.
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187.69 USD

Black Resistance in the Americas

Hardback
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Hugo Blanc is Peru's best-known revolutionary. A leader of the indigenous people of the Andes, he was born in 1934 in Cusco, the former Inca capital. He is a lifelong environmental campaigner in defence of the natural riches of the Andean region and beyond. In the 1960s he led a ...
Hugo Blanco: A revolutionary for Life!
Hugo Blanc is Peru's best-known revolutionary. A leader of the indigenous people of the Andes, he was born in 1934 in Cusco, the former Inca capital. He is a lifelong environmental campaigner in defence of the natural riches of the Andean region and beyond. In the 1960s he led a successful armed peasant uprising demanding land rights. He was placed on death row and released only after a huge international campaign supported by Jean Paul Sartre. In exile in Chile he was lucky to escape death after the 1973 coup. More recently Hugo Blanco was a Presidential candidate and was elected as a Senator in Peru. He was exiled to Mexico, where he was influenced by the Zapatistas. Still politically active today, he publishes the newspaper Lucha Indigena (Indigenous Struggle). This engaging political biography will survey the life of this unassuming but compelling activist - a guerrilla fighter praised by Che Guevara, one- time member of the Fourth International - from the 1960s to the present. It is a story of ideas and activism: surveying Hugo Blanco's views on defence of the environment, social and political movements, indigenous peoples, left governments and political strategy. Hugo Blanco is one of the most significant activists and ecosocialist thinkers in the world today.
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25.58 USD

Hugo Blanco: A revolutionary for Life!

by Derek Wall
Paperback / softback
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Critically-acclaimed author and cultural historian Jabari Asim presents eight essays that seek to reclaim the narrative of Black history and culture in America, focusing on how Black bodies, Black words, and Black culture and society have been policed, punished, and stolen for hundreds of years. In We Can't Breathe Jabari ...
We Can't Breathe: On Black Lives, White Lies, and the Art of Survival
Critically-acclaimed author and cultural historian Jabari Asim presents eight essays that seek to reclaim the narrative of Black history and culture in America, focusing on how Black bodies, Black words, and Black culture and society have been policed, punished, and stolen for hundreds of years. In We Can't Breathe Jabari Asim takes what Toni Morrison has called The Master Narrative and rewritten it - whether it is the history of jokes, black fatherhood, black literature, or strutting, to create a more accurate and empowered view of Black history in America. Asim emphasizes the power of narrative capital, which he see as critical to Black Americans' well-being along with intellectual capital, economic capital and social capital. We Can't Breathe points to the insidious nature of racism in centuries of American history, but it also highlights the vibrant and sustaining nature of Black culture and Americans who persist and thrive.
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17.850000 USD

We Can't Breathe: On Black Lives, White Lies, and the Art of Survival

by Jabari Asim
Paperback / softback
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In this intimate and extraordinary memoir, Ziauddin Yousafzai, the father of Malala, gives a moving account of fatherhood and his lifelong fight for equality - proving there are many faces of feminism. Whenever anybody has asked me how Malala became who she is, I have often used the phrase. `Ask ...
Let Her Fly: A Father's Journey and the Fight for Equality
In this intimate and extraordinary memoir, Ziauddin Yousafzai, the father of Malala, gives a moving account of fatherhood and his lifelong fight for equality - proving there are many faces of feminism. Whenever anybody has asked me how Malala became who she is, I have often used the phrase. `Ask me not what I did but what I did not do. I did not clip her wings' For over twenty years, Ziauddin Yousafzai has been fighting for equality - first for Malala, his daughter - and then for all girls throughout the world living in patriarchal societies. Taught as a young boy in Pakistan to believe that he was inherently better than his sisters, Ziauddin rebelled against inequality at a young age. And when he had a daughter himself he vowed that Malala would have an education, something usually only given to boys, and he founded a school that Malala could attend. Then in 2012, Malala was shot for standing up to the Taliban by continuing to go to her father's school, and Ziauddin almost lost the very person for whom his fight for equality began. Let Her Fly is Ziauddin's journey from a stammering boy growing up in a tiny village high in the mountains of Pakistan, through to being an activist for equality and the father of the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, and now one of the most influential and inspiring young women on the planet. Told through intimate portraits of each of Ziauddin's closest relationships - as a son to a traditional father; as a father to Malala and her brothers, educated and growing up in the West; as a husband to a wife finally learning to read and write; as a brother to five sisters still living in the patriarchy - Let Her Fly looks at what it means to love, to have courage and fight for what is inherently right. Personal in its detail and universal in its themes, this landmark book shows why we must all keep fighting for the rights of girls and women everywhere.
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20.48 USD

Let Her Fly: A Father's Journey and the Fight for Equality

by Louise Carpenter, Ziauddin Yousafzai
Paperback / softback
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In this intimate and extraordinary memoir, Ziauddin Yousafzai, the father of Malala, gives a moving account of fatherhood and his lifelong fight for equality - proving there are many faces of feminism. Whenever anybody has asked me how Malala became who she is, I have often used the phrase. `Ask ...
Let Her Fly: A Father's Journey and the Fight for Equality
In this intimate and extraordinary memoir, Ziauddin Yousafzai, the father of Malala, gives a moving account of fatherhood and his lifelong fight for equality - proving there are many faces of feminism. Whenever anybody has asked me how Malala became who she is, I have often used the phrase. `Ask me not what I did but what I did not do. I did not clip her wings' For over twenty years, Ziauddin Yousafzai has been fighting for equality - first for Malala, his daughter - and then for all girls throughout the world living in patriarchal societies. Taught as a young boy in Pakistan to believe that he was inherently better than his sisters, Ziauddin rebelled against inequality at a young age. And when he had a daughter himself he vowed that Malala would have an education, something usually only given to boys, and he founded a school that Malala could attend. Then in 2012, Malala was shot for standing up to the Taliban by continuing to go to her father's school, and Ziauddin almost lost the very person for whom his fight for equality began. Let Her Fly is Ziauddin's journey from a stammering boy growing up in a tiny village high in the mountains of Pakistan, through to being an activist for equality and the father of the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, and now one of the most influential and inspiring young women on the planet. Told through intimate portraits of each of Ziauddin's closest relationships - as a son to a traditional father; as a father to Malala and her brothers, educated and growing up in the West; as a husband to a wife finally learning to read and write; as a brother to five sisters still living in the patriarchy - Let Her Fly looks at what it means to love, to have courage and fight for what is inherently right. Personal in its detail and universal in its themes, this landmark book shows why we must all keep fighting for the rights of girls and women everywhere.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780753552964.jpg
25.58 USD

Let Her Fly: A Father's Journey and the Fight for Equality

by Louise Carpenter, Ziauddin Yousafzai
Hardback
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In 1944 the political philosopher and refugee, Hannah Arendt wrote: 'Everywhere the word 'exile' which once had an undertone of almost sacred awe, now provokes the idea of something simultaneously suspicious and unfortunate.' Today's refugee 'crisis' has its origins in the political-and imaginative-history of the last century. Exiles from other ...
Placeless People: Writings, Rights, and Refugees
In 1944 the political philosopher and refugee, Hannah Arendt wrote: 'Everywhere the word 'exile' which once had an undertone of almost sacred awe, now provokes the idea of something simultaneously suspicious and unfortunate.' Today's refugee 'crisis' has its origins in the political-and imaginative-history of the last century. Exiles from other places have often caused trouble for ideas about sovereignty, law and nationhood. But the meanings of exile changed dramatically in the twentieth century. This book shows just how profoundly the calamity of statelessness shaped modern literature and thought. For writers such as Hannah Arendt, Franz Kafka, W.H. Auden, George Orwell, Samuel Beckett, Simone Weil, among others, the outcasts of the twentieth century raised vital questions about sovereignty, humanism and the future of human rights. Placeless People argues that we urgently need to reconnect with the moral and political imagination of these first chroniclers of the placeless condition.
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42.66 USD

Placeless People: Writings, Rights, and Refugees

by Lyndsey Stonebridge
Hardback
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Recent revelations about government surveillance of citizens have led to questions about whether there should be better defined boundaries around privacy. Should government officials have the right to specifically target certain groups for extended surveillance? United States municipal, territorial, and federal agencies have investigated religious groups since the nineteenth century. ...
Government Surveillance of Religious Expression: Mormons, Quakers, and Muslims in the United States
Recent revelations about government surveillance of citizens have led to questions about whether there should be better defined boundaries around privacy. Should government officials have the right to specifically target certain groups for extended surveillance? United States municipal, territorial, and federal agencies have investigated religious groups since the nineteenth century. While critics of contemporary mass surveillance tend to invoke the infringement of privacy, the mutual protection of religion and public expression by the First Amendment positions them, along with religious expression, comfortably within in the public sphere. This book analyzes government monitoring of Mormons of the Territory of Utah in the 1870s and 1880s for polygamy, Quakers of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) from the 1940s to the 1960s for communist infiltration, and Muslims of Brooklyn, New York, from 2002 to 2013 for suspected terrorism. Government agencies in these case studies attempted to understand how their religious beliefs might shape their actions in the public sphere. It follows that government agents did not just observe these communities, but they probed precisely what constituted religion itself alongside shifting legal and political definitions relative to their respective time periods. Together, these case studies form a new framework for discussions of the historical and contemporary monitoring of religion. They show that government surveillance is less predictable and monolithic than we might assume. Therefore, this book will be of great interest to scholars of United States religion, history, and politics, as well as surveillance and communication studies.
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196.22 USD

Government Surveillance of Religious Expression: Mormons, Quakers, and Muslims in the United States

by Kathryn Montalbano
Hardback
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This book examines conflict and violence among religious minorities and the implication on the idea of citizenship in contemporary India. Going beyond the usual Hindu-Muslim question, it situates communalism in the context of conflicts between Muslims and Christians. By tracing the long history of conflict between the Marakkayar Muslims and ...
Interrogating Communalism: Violence, Citizenship and Minorities in South India
This book examines conflict and violence among religious minorities and the implication on the idea of citizenship in contemporary India. Going beyond the usual Hindu-Muslim question, it situates communalism in the context of conflicts between Muslims and Christians. By tracing the long history of conflict between the Marakkayar Muslims and Mukkuvar Christians in South India, it explores the notion of `mobilization of religious identity' within the discourse on communal violence in South Asia as also discusses the spatial dynamics in violent conflicts. Including rich empirical evidence from historical and ethnographic material, the author shows how the contours of violence among minorities position Muslims as more vulnerable subjects of violent conflicts. The book will be useful to scholars and researchers of politics, political sociology, sociology and social anthropology, minority studies and South Asian studies. It will also interest those working on peace and conflict, violence, ethnicity and identity as also activists and policymakers concerned with the problems of fishing communities.
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196.22 USD

Interrogating Communalism: Violence, Citizenship and Minorities in South India

by Salah Punathil
Hardback
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Advocates representing historically disadvantaged groups have long understood the need for strong public relations, effective fundraising, and robust channels of communication with the communities that they serve. Yet the neoliberal era and its infusion of money into the political arena have deepened these imperatives, thus adding new financial hurdles to ...
Political Advocacy and Its Interested Citizens: Neoliberalism, Postpluralism, and LGBT Organizations
Advocates representing historically disadvantaged groups have long understood the need for strong public relations, effective fundraising, and robust channels of communication with the communities that they serve. Yet the neoliberal era and its infusion of money into the political arena have deepened these imperatives, thus adding new financial hurdles to the long list of obstacles facing minority communities. To respond to these challenges, a professionalized, nonprofit model of political advocacy has steadily gained traction. In many cases, advocacy organizations sought to harness and redirect the radical verve that characterized the protest movements of the 1960s into pragmatic, state-sanctioned approaches to political engagement. In Political Advocacy and Its Interested Citizens, Matthew Dean Hindman looks at how and why contemporary political advocacy groups have transformed social movements and their participants. Looking to LGBT political movements as an exemplary case study, Hindman explores the advocacy explosion in the United States and its impact on how advocates encourage citizens to understand their role in the political process. He argues that current advocacy groups encourage members of the LGBT community to view themselves as stakeholders in a common struggle for political incorporation. In doing so, however, they often overshadow more imaginative and transformational approaches that could unsettle and challenge straight society and its prevailing political and sexual norms. Advocacy groups carved out a space within a neoliberalizing political process that enabled them to instruct their members, followers, and constituents on serving effectively as industrious political claimants. Political Advocacy and Its Interested Citizens thus sheds light on grassroots politics as it is practiced in present-day America and offers a compelling and original analysis of the ways in which neoliberalism challenges citizens to participate as consumers and investors in the advocacy marketplace.
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73.450000 USD

Political Advocacy and Its Interested Citizens: Neoliberalism, Postpluralism, and LGBT Organizations

by Matthew Dean Hindman
Hardback
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THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER 'I've been wondering who might fill the intellectual void after James Baldwin died. Clearly it is Ta-Nehisi Coates' Toni Morrison 'Searing. One of the foremost essayists on race in the West... [He] is responsible for some of the most important writing about what it is ...
We Were Eight Years in Power: 'One of the foremost essayists on race in the West' Nikesh Shukla, author of The Good Immigrant
THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER 'I've been wondering who might fill the intellectual void after James Baldwin died. Clearly it is Ta-Nehisi Coates' Toni Morrison 'Searing. One of the foremost essayists on race in the West... [He] is responsible for some of the most important writing about what it is to be black in America today' Nikesh Shukla, editor of The Good Immigrant An essential account of modern America, from Obama to Trump, from black lives matter to white supremacists rising - by the bestselling author of Between the World and Me Obama's presidency was a watershed moment in American history. From 2008-2016, the leader of the free world was a black man. In those eight years, Obama transformed the conversation around race, gender, class and wealth - inspiring hope but also attracting criticism and breeding discontent. In this unflinching book, Ta-Nehisi Coates takes stock of Obama's eight years in power, through such iconic, unmissable essays as 'Fear of a Black President' and 'The Case for Reparations'. His account traverses the intersections of the political, the ideological and the cultural, presenting an America in radical flux and yet still in the grip of racial injustice, class warfare and institutional conspiracy. And it reflects on the author's own journey through these eight years, charting the public through the private in passages of startling intimate and piercingly relevant memoir. Ta-Nehisi Coates is one of our most brilliant, most fearless and most essential living writers - and his work is crucial to understanding race in America today. Finalist for the Los Angeles Book Prize 2018 Longlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence 2018 RAVE READER REVIEWS: 'Brilliantly written, incisive, and extremely relevant. Read it with your families, use it in your classrooms, give copies to your friends' (Liz) 'Coates thinks more deeply and writes more clearly about the national tragedy and disgrace that is our collective failure to confront the legacy of White Supremacy than just about anyone... I can't recommend it highly enough' (Worddancer Redux) 'Every white person who wants to really know how it looks from 'the other side' should take on the responsibility of reading Coates' eye-opening, informative book... A must read for everyone of every colour' (Indy JV) 'A masterful understanding of how the USA really works' (shedgirl) 'If you want to know the wellsprings of racism in America - then read this book!' (David C. R. Hancock)
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17.05 USD

We Were Eight Years in Power: 'One of the foremost essayists on race in the West' Nikesh Shukla, author of The Good Immigrant

by Ta-Nehisi Coates
Paperback / softback
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Part political thriller, part meditation on social change, part love story, The Children of Harvey Milk tells the epic stories of courageous men and women around the world who came forward to make their voices heard during the struggle for equal rights. Featuring LGBTQ icons from America to Ireland, Britain ...
The Children of Harvey Milk
Part political thriller, part meditation on social change, part love story, The Children of Harvey Milk tells the epic stories of courageous men and women around the world who came forward to make their voices heard during the struggle for equal rights. Featuring LGBTQ icons from America to Ireland, Britain to New Zealand; Reynolds documents their successes and failures, heartwarming stories of acceptance and heartbreaking stories of ostracism, demonstrating the ways in which an individual can change the views and voting behaviors of those around them. The book also includes rare vignettes of LGBTQ leaders in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean who continue to fight for equality in spite of threats, violence, and homophobia. A touchstone narrative of the tumultuous journey towards LGBTQ rights, The Children of Harvey Milk is a must-read for anyone with an interest in social change.
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39.23 USD

The Children of Harvey Milk

by Andrew Reynolds
Hardback
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During the 2016 presidential campaign, millions of voters, concerned about the economic impact of illegal immigration, rallied behind the notion of a wall between the United States and Mexico. Not quite two years into the Trump presidency, immigration endures as a hotly contested topic in United States politics. In Dreams ...
Dreams Derailed: Undocumented Youths in the Trump Era
During the 2016 presidential campaign, millions of voters, concerned about the economic impact of illegal immigration, rallied behind the notion of a wall between the United States and Mexico. Not quite two years into the Trump presidency, immigration endures as a hotly contested topic in United States politics. In Dreams Derailed sociologist William A. Schwab shares the stories of immigration reform advocates and follows up on stories told in his 2013 book Right to DREAM, which argued in favor of the DREAM Act that would have provided conditional residency for undocumented youth brought to the United States as children, a version of which was later enacted by executive order and referred to as DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). Taking as its focal point the Trump administration's decision to rescind the Obama-era DACA protection for the children of undocumented immigrants, Dreams Derailed delves into the economic, political, and social factors that inform the public conversation about immigration, making a clear case for the many benefits of inclusive policies. It also takes a close look at the factors that carried Donald Trump to the White House, demonstrating how economic upheaval and historic levels of immigration influenced the 2016 presidential election, analyzing current immigration laws, and suggesting next steps for reform. Dreams Derailed utilizes individual narratives from the diverse economic landscape of Northwest Arkansas to address common misconceptions about immigrants and immigration. In telling the stories of reform advocates and following up on stories outlined in his previous volume, Schwab highlights the humanistic and economic factors that comprise part of the debate about immigration, creating a potent yet balanced argument for the protection of undocumented youths.
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46.92 USD

Dreams Derailed: Undocumented Youths in the Trump Era

by William A Schwab
Paperback / softback
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Created in 1964 as part of the Mississippi Freedom Summer, the Mississippi Freedom Schools were launched by educators and activists to provide an alternative education for African American students that would facilitate student activism and participatory democracy. The schools, as Jon N. Hale demonstrates, had a crucial role in the ...
The Freedom Schools: Student Activists in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement
Created in 1964 as part of the Mississippi Freedom Summer, the Mississippi Freedom Schools were launched by educators and activists to provide an alternative education for African American students that would facilitate student activism and participatory democracy. The schools, as Jon N. Hale demonstrates, had a crucial role in the civil rights movement and a major impact on the development of progressive education throughout the nation. Designed and run by African American and white educators and activists, the Freedom Schools counteracted segregationist policies that inhibited opportunities for black youth. Providing high-quality, progressive education that addressed issues of social justice, the schools prepared African American students to fight for freedom on all fronts. Forming a political network, the Freedom Schools taught students how, when, and where to engage politically, shaping activists who trained others to challenge inequality. Based on dozens of first-time interviews with former Freedom School students and teachers and on rich archival materials, this remarkable social history of the Mississippi Freedom Schools is told from the perspective of those frequently left out of civil rights narratives that focus on national leadership or college protestors. Hale reveals the role that school-age students played in the civil rights movement and the crucial contribution made by grassroots activists on the local level. He also examines the challenges confronted by Freedom School activists and teachers, such as intimidation by racist Mississippians and race relations between blacks and whites within the schools. In tracing the stories of Freedom School students into adulthood, this book reveals the ways in which these individuals turned training into decades of activism. Former students and teachers speak eloquently about the principles that informed their practice and the influence that the Freedom School curriculum has had on education. They also offer key strategies for further integrating the American school system and politically engaging today's youth.
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28.350000 USD

The Freedom Schools: Student Activists in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement

by Jon N Hale
Paperback / softback
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This volume examines the success of the 9/11 attacks in undermining the cherished principles of Western democracy, free speech and tolerance, which were central to US values. It is argued that this has led to the USA fighting disastrous wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and to sanctioning the use of ...
Human Rights and America's War on Terror
This volume examines the success of the 9/11 attacks in undermining the cherished principles of Western democracy, free speech and tolerance, which were central to US values. It is argued that this has led to the USA fighting disastrous wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and to sanctioning the use of torture and imprisonment without trial in Guantanamo Bay, extraordinary rendition, surveillance and drone attacks. At home, it has resulted in restrictions of civil liberties and the growth of an ill-affordable military and security apparatus. In this collection the authors note the irony that the shocking destruction of the World Trade Center on 9/11 should become the justification for the relentless expansion of security agencies. Yet, this is a salutary illustration of how the security agencies in the USA have adopted faulty preconceptions, which have become too embedded within the institution to be abandoned without loss of credibility and prestige. The book presents a timely assessment of both the human rights costs of the `war on terror' and the methods used to wage and relentlessly continue that war. It will be of interest to researchers, academics, practitioners and students in the fields of human rights law, criminal justice, criminology, politics and international studies.
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196.22 USD

Human Rights and America's War on Terror

Hardback
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Thailand's politics has been contentious in recent years. With a military coup in 2006 and another in 2014, the country has moved from being a promising electoral democracy to a military dictatorship. Electoral politics was embraced enthusiastically by some groups, including those in rural areas of the north and northeast, ...
Military, Monarchy and Repression: Assessing Thailand's Authoritarian Turn
Thailand's politics has been contentious in recent years. With a military coup in 2006 and another in 2014, the country has moved from being a promising electoral democracy to a military dictatorship. Electoral politics was embraced enthusiastically by some groups, including those in rural areas of the north and northeast, but came to be feared by groups variously identified as the old elite, royalists and the establishment. The transition to authoritarianism saw large and lengthy street protests and considerable violence. This book examines the background to and the sources of conflict and the turn to authoritarianism. It addresses: the return of the military to political centre stage; the monarchy's pivotal role in opposing electoral democracy; the manner in which sections of civil society have rejected electoral politics; and the rise of powerful non-elected bodies such as the Constitutional Court. In examining Thailand's authoritarianism, attention is also given to how income and wealth inequality may motivate political outcomes and also to the ways in which the military and the old elite have attempted to establish a Thai-style democracy that disenfranchises the majority. This book was previously published as a special issue of Journal of Contemporary Asia.
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63.12 USD

Military, Monarchy and Repression: Assessing Thailand's Authoritarian Turn

Paperback / softback
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Winner of the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction Longlisted for the National Book Award One of the New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Books of 2017 Former public defender James Forman, Jr. is a leading critic of mass incarceration and its disproportionate impact on people of colour. In ...
Locking Up Our Own
Winner of the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction Longlisted for the National Book Award One of the New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Books of 2017 Former public defender James Forman, Jr. is a leading critic of mass incarceration and its disproportionate impact on people of colour. In Locking Up Our Own, he seeks to understand the war on crime that began in the 1970s and why it was supported by many African American leaders in the nation's urban centres. Forman shows us that the first substantial cohort of black mayors, judges and police chiefs took office amid a surge in crime and drug addiction. Many prominent black officials, including Washington, DC mayor Marion Barry and federal prosecutor Eric Holder, feared that the gains of the civil rights movement were being undermined by lawlessness - and thus embraced tough-on-crime measures, including longer sentences and aggressive police tactics. In the face of skyrocketing murder rates and the proliferation of open-air drug markets, they believed they had no choice. But the policies they adopted would have devastating consequences for residents of poor black neighbourhoods. A former public defender, Forman tells riveting stories of politicians, community activists, police officers, defendants and crime victims. He writes with compassion about individuals trapped in terrible dilemmas - from the men and women he represented in court to officials struggling to respond to a public safety emergency. Locking Up Our Own enriches our understanding of why American society became so punitive and offers important lessons to anyone concerned about the future of race and the criminal justice system.
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17.05 USD

Locking Up Our Own

by JR, James Forman
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James Baldwin Review (JBR) is an annual journal that brings together a wide array of peer-reviewed critical and creative work on the life, writings, and legacy of James Baldwin. In addition to these cutting-edge contributions, each issue contains a review of recent Baldwin scholarship and an award-winning graduate student essay. ...
James Baldwin Review: Volume 4
James Baldwin Review (JBR) is an annual journal that brings together a wide array of peer-reviewed critical and creative work on the life, writings, and legacy of James Baldwin. In addition to these cutting-edge contributions, each issue contains a review of recent Baldwin scholarship and an award-winning graduate student essay. James Baldwin Review publishes essays that invigorate scholarship on James Baldwin; catalyze explorations of the literary, political, and cultural influence of Baldwin's writing and political activism; and deepen our understanding and appreciation of this complex and luminary figure. -- .
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27.29 USD

James Baldwin Review: Volume 4

Paperback / softback
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Can free speech coexist with an inclusive campus environment? Hardly a week goes by without another controversy over free speech on college campuses. On one side, there are increased demands to censor hateful, disrespectful, and bullying expression and to ensure an inclusive and nondiscriminatory learning environment. On the other side ...
Free Speech on Campus
Can free speech coexist with an inclusive campus environment? Hardly a week goes by without another controversy over free speech on college campuses. On one side, there are increased demands to censor hateful, disrespectful, and bullying expression and to ensure an inclusive and nondiscriminatory learning environment. On the other side are traditional free speech advocates who charge that recent demands for censorship coddle students and threaten free inquiry. In this clear and carefully reasoned book, a university chancellor and a law school dean-both constitutional scholars who teach a course in free speech to undergraduates-argue that campuses must provide supportive learning environments for an increasingly diverse student body but can never restrict the expression of ideas. This book provides the background necessary to understanding the importance of free speech on campus and offers clear prescriptions for what colleges can and can't do when dealing with free speech controversies.
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20.46 USD

Free Speech on Campus

by Howard Gillman, Erwin Chemerinsky
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Breach of Peace is a photo-history told in images old and new. The book includes the mug shots of all 328 Freedom Riders arrested in Jackson, Mississippi, along with contemporary portraits of 98 Riders, supplemented by interviews and brief bios. (The 2008 edition had 82 profiles.) In the spring and ...
Breach of Peace: Portraits of the 1961 Mississippi Freedom Riders
Breach of Peace is a photo-history told in images old and new. The book includes the mug shots of all 328 Freedom Riders arrested in Jackson, Mississippi, along with contemporary portraits of 98 Riders, supplemented by interviews and brief bios. (The 2008 edition had 82 profiles.) In the spring and summer of 1961, several hundred Americans blacks and whites, men and women-entered Southern bus and train stations to challenge the segregated waiting rooms, lunch counters, and bathrooms. The Supreme Court had ruled that such segregation was illegal, and the Riders were trying to make the federal government enforce that decision. Though there were Freedom Rides across the South, Jackson soon became the campaign's focus. The 328 Riders arrested there were quickly convicted of breach of peace. The Riders then compounded their protest by refusing bail. Jail, no bail! was their cry, and they soon filled the city's jails. Mississippi responded by transferring them to Parchman, the infamous Delta prison farm, for the remainder of their time behind bars, usually about six weeks. New to the expanded edition are five portraits made in the maximum-security cells at Parchman during the fiftieth anniversary events of 2011. The mug shots of each Rider, bearing name, birth date, and other personal details, were duly filed away by agents of the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission, a state investigative body dedicated to preserving white supremacy. By carefully preserving the mug shots, the Commission inadvertently created a testament to these heroes of the civil rights movement.
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31.450000 USD

Breach of Peace: Portraits of the 1961 Mississippi Freedom Riders

by Eric Etheridge
Paperback / softback
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