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Augustine intended the Soliloquies and the Immortality of the Soul to form a single book. For those who are unacquainted with Augustine, it is a good book with which to begin. It deals, as he says, with those matters about which he most wanted to know at this time, i.e. ...
Augustine: Soliloquies and Immortality of the Soul
Augustine intended the Soliloquies and the Immortality of the Soul to form a single book. For those who are unacquainted with Augustine, it is a good book with which to begin. It deals, as he says, with those matters about which he most wanted to know at this time, i.e. between his conversion in the summer of 386 and his baptism at Easter, 387. The matters are the primacy of mind over things of sense, and the immortality of the soul. These central tenets of Neoplatonism are not simply theoretical questions for Augustine. He had been through a period of intense strain, close to a nervous breakdown, and the Soliloquies are the description of his most intimate feelings, a form of therapy. The Soliloquies and the Immortality of the Soul are the finished and the unfinished parts respectively of the same work. The latter shows us the raw material of a dialogue: in the Soliloquies we have a piece of theatre, the dramatised conflict between two personae. They are two aspects of the one character (he invented the word soliloquies), and the presentation gives us a picture of Augustine at this time which is even more immediate than his self-portrait in the Confessions. This early work gives us the first direct evidence on the temperament of the man who created the Confessions: someone fascinated with the mystery of the personality, and particularly memory, a lover of puzzles and paradoxes, a rhetorician with a deep interest in philosophy, a highly emotional human being, and above all, a questioner concerned with knowing the truth. [Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.]
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33.600000 USD
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This edition of St Augustine's The City of God (De Civitate Dei) is the only one in English to provide a text and translation as well as a detailed commentary of this most influential document in the history of western Christianity. In Book V Augustine searches out and presents an ...
Augustine: The City of God Book V
This edition of St Augustine's The City of God (De Civitate Dei) is the only one in English to provide a text and translation as well as a detailed commentary of this most influential document in the history of western Christianity. In Book V Augustine searches out and presents an answer to the question which lies behind the earlier books. In spite of the moral bankruptcy of the Roman state, and in spite of the disasters and injustices which have marked her history since the foundation, Rome has extended her imperial sway throughout Europe and the Near East. If the pagan gods have not guided her to this terrestrial eminence, how has this success been achieved? Augustine divides his response into four main sections: addressing the pagan notion of fate; arguing that God aided the Romans to imperial glory because a minority of them were virtuous even though they did not worship him; stating explicitly that the Roman Empire was set in place by God and is governed by his providence; and devoting the final section to the advent of Christian Emperors. Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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47.51 USD
Hardback
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This edition of St Augustine's The City of God (De Civitate Dei) is the only one in English to provide a text and translation as well as a detailed commentary of this most influential document in the history of western Christianity. In these books Augustine offers a Christian perspective on ...
Augustine: The City of God Books III and IV
This edition of St Augustine's The City of God (De Civitate Dei) is the only one in English to provide a text and translation as well as a detailed commentary of this most influential document in the history of western Christianity. In these books Augustine offers a Christian perspective on the growth of Rome, which its pagan apologists attribute to the providential protection of its gods. Book III spotlights both the injustices inflicted and the privations endured by the Romans, thus rebutting such claims. Book IV offers a withering account of the Roman deities, basing its analysis on the researches of Terentius Varro. This section of The City of God is a vital document for students of Roman history, and especially of Roman religion, for it provides the most detailed evidence of Varro's learned works. Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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37.98 USD

Augustine: The City of God Books III and IV

by Edmund Augustine, P. G. Walsh
Hardback
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This edition of St Augustine's The City of God (De Civitate Dei) is the only one in English to provide a text and translation as well as a detailed commentary of this most influential document in the history of western Christianity. In Book V Augustine searches out and presents an ...
Augustine: The City of God Book V
This edition of St Augustine's The City of God (De Civitate Dei) is the only one in English to provide a text and translation as well as a detailed commentary of this most influential document in the history of western Christianity. In Book V Augustine searches out and presents an answer to the question which lies behind the earlier books. In spite of the moral bankruptcy of the Roman state, and in spite of the disasters and injustices which have marked her history since the foundation, Rome has extended her imperial sway throughout Europe and the Near East. If the pagan gods have not guided her to this terrestrial eminence, how has this success been achieved? Augustine divides his response into four main sections: addressing the pagan notion of fate; arguing that God aided the Romans to imperial glory because a minority of them were virtuous even though they did not worship him; stating explicitly that the Roman Empire was set in place by God and is governed by his providence; and devoting the final section to the advent of Christian Emperors. Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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17.10 USD
Paperback / softback
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Dieses Buch ist in lateinischer Sprache verfasst. Der Augustiner Robert von Cricklade, 1141 zum Prior von Sankt Frideswide in Oxford gewahlt, verfasste neben theologischen Werken ein Exzerpt der Naturalis Historia Plinius' des AElteren und widmete es Koenig Heinrich II. von England (reg. 1154-1189). Dem Werk sind drei Prologe vorangestellt, namlich ...
Roberti Crikeladensis Defloratio Naturalis Historie Plinii Secundi
Dieses Buch ist in lateinischer Sprache verfasst. Der Augustiner Robert von Cricklade, 1141 zum Prior von Sankt Frideswide in Oxford gewahlt, verfasste neben theologischen Werken ein Exzerpt der Naturalis Historia Plinius' des AElteren und widmete es Koenig Heinrich II. von England (reg. 1154-1189). Dem Werk sind drei Prologe vorangestellt, namlich die Widmung an den Koenig, Suetons Pliniusvita und ein Prolog an studiosi et precipue claustrales et scolastici , in dem sich Robert uber Art und Zweck seiner Arbeit aussert. Er schreibt dort, er habe Denkwurdiges und Nutzliches ausgewahlt, UEberflussiges und fur seine Zeit Unnoetiges dagegen weggelassen. Das Exzerpt ist in einzelne Kapitel eingeteilt, denen von Robert selbst verfasste Titel vorangestellt sind. Hier liegt die erste Gesamtausgabe des Exzerpts vor.
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170.050000 USD
Hardback
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This edition contains the thirty-three letters which survive from those exchanged between Cicero and his correspondents between the beginning of January and the end of April, 43 B.C. This was a key period of Roman history, when the forces of the Senate, supported by the precocious young Octavian, faced Mark ...
Cicero: Letters of January to April 43 BC
This edition contains the thirty-three letters which survive from those exchanged between Cicero and his correspondents between the beginning of January and the end of April, 43 B.C. This was a key period of Roman history, when the forces of the Senate, supported by the precocious young Octavian, faced Mark Antony in north Italy, leading to the battle of Mutina (Modena) in April, and the defeat of Antony. The period has the dramatic quality of a tragedy, especially considering the events of the following months. Cicero, now aged sixty-three, is deeply involved in all the political actions, and in touch with most of the protagonists in the confused scenario. Cicero's Letters are normally read, if at all, in selection. Continuous reading of all that survives from a given period is far more interesting, and puts the reader in close contact with the feelings and experiences of those who were living at the time. Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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33.600000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Suetonius (C. Suetonius Tranquillus, born ca. 70 CE), son of a military tribune, was at first an advocate and a teacher of rhetoric, but later became the emperor Hadrian's private secretary, 119-121. He dedicated to C. Septicius Clarus, prefect of the praetorian guard, his Lives of the Caesars. After the ...
Suetonius: Vol 1
Suetonius (C. Suetonius Tranquillus, born ca. 70 CE), son of a military tribune, was at first an advocate and a teacher of rhetoric, but later became the emperor Hadrian's private secretary, 119-121. He dedicated to C. Septicius Clarus, prefect of the praetorian guard, his Lives of the Caesars. After the dismissal of both men for some breach of court etiquette, Suetonius apparently retired and probably continued his writing. His other works, many known by title, are now lost except for part of the Lives of Illustrious Men (of letters). Friend of Pliny the Younger, Suetonius was a studious and careful collector of facts, so that the extant lives of the emperors (including Julius Caesar the dictator) to Domitian are invaluable. His plan in Lives of the Caesars is: the emperor's family and early years; public and private life; death. We find many anecdotes, much gossip of the imperial court, and various details of character and personal appearance. Suetonius's account of Nero's death is justly famous. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Suetonius is in two volumes. Both volumes were revised throughout in 1997-98, and a new Introduction added.
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29.400000 USD
Hardback
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The Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) is an academic series that publishes critical editions of Latin works by late-antique Christian authors from the time of the late 2nd century until the beginning of the 7th century. The editions are prepared in cooperation with internationally renowned experts according to modern editorial ...
Monastica 1: Donati Regula, Pseudo-Columbani Regula monialium (frg.)
The Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) is an academic series that publishes critical editions of Latin works by late-antique Christian authors from the time of the late 2nd century until the beginning of the 7th century. The editions are prepared in cooperation with internationally renowned experts according to modern editorial techniques and are meant to serve as textual basis for scholarly disciplines dealing with Late Antiquity. The volumes are published by the scientific institution CSEL , which was founded in 1864 by the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna and which is part of the University of Salzburg since 2012. In addition, monographs on topics related to the Latin patristic period and conference proceedings are published at irregular intervals (Extra Seriem). Arbeitsgruppe CSEL an der Universitat Salzburg http://csel.sbg.ac.at/ International Advisory Board: Francois Dolbeau, Roger Green, Rainer Jakobi, Robert Kaster, Ernst A. Schmidt, Danuta Shanzer, Kurt Smolak, Francesco Stella, Michael Winterbottom
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95.550000 USD
Hardback
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The fourth book of Tacitus' Annals recounts one of the most turbulent periods of Tiberius' reign: the conflict between the emperor and Agrippina's family moved to its twin climaxes of Tiberius' retirement to Capreae and the destruction of Agrippina and members of her family. An active agent in this drama ...
Tacitus: Annals IV
The fourth book of Tacitus' Annals recounts one of the most turbulent periods of Tiberius' reign: the conflict between the emperor and Agrippina's family moved to its twin climaxes of Tiberius' retirement to Capreae and the destruction of Agrippina and members of her family. An active agent in this drama was Aelius Sejanus, the prefect of the Praetorian Guard, whose own ambitions progressed closer to fulfilment in the course of Annals IV. This edition offers a new translation and commentary, as well as a group of introductory essays which highlight the book's main themes and personalities. These serve to draw together the fruits of David Shotter's research over twenty years in this field, and question not only the actual notion of Tiberius' villainy, but also the degree to which Tacitus subscribed to it. It is contended here that the emperor is shown by Tacitus to be the victim of other people, but also of his own weaknesses of character. As such, a sympathetic presentation of Tiberius emerges as the lasting impression of Annals IV. Although all aspects of Tacitus' writing are embraced in this edition, the emphasis throughout is historical. Latin text with facing page translation, introduction and commentary.
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17.10 USD

Tacitus: Annals IV

by David C. A. Shotter
Paperback / softback
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This edition of St Augustine's The City of God (De Civitate Dei) is the only one in English to provide a text and translation as well as a detailed commentary of this most influential document in the history of western Christianity. In these books Augustine offers a Christian perspective on ...
Augustine: The City of God Books III and IV
This edition of St Augustine's The City of God (De Civitate Dei) is the only one in English to provide a text and translation as well as a detailed commentary of this most influential document in the history of western Christianity. In these books Augustine offers a Christian perspective on the growth of Rome, which its pagan apologists attribute to the providential protection of its gods. Book III spotlights both the injustices inflicted and the privations endured by the Romans, thus rebutting such claims. Book IV offers a withering account of the Roman deities, basing its analysis on the researches of Terentius Varro. This section of The City of God is a vital document for students of Roman history, and especially of Roman religion, for it provides the most detailed evidence of Varro's learned works. Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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21.39 USD

Augustine: The City of God Books III and IV

by Edmund Augustine, P. G. Walsh
Paperback / softback
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Dio Cassius, too often consulted just as a historical source, was an historian of considerable interest and originality - at once a Greek man of letters and a late representative of the Roman tradition of senatorial historical writing. For the reign of Augustus his history is the fullest account to ...
Cassius Dio: The Augustan Settlement: Roman History 53.1-55.9
Dio Cassius, too often consulted just as a historical source, was an historian of considerable interest and originality - at once a Greek man of letters and a late representative of the Roman tradition of senatorial historical writing. For the reign of Augustus his history is the fullest account to survive. This edition covers the years 28 to 5 BC, after which there are substantial gaps in Dio's text; it includes Dio's extended discussion of the constitutional settlement of 27 BC and the imperial system it inaugurated. The notes discuss the historical subject matter and Dio's treatment of it; particular attention is paid to the way Dio shaped his material in the light of his own values and interests. The introduction deals with Dio's life, the character of his history, and his view of Augustus. Ancient Greek text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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33.24 USD
Hardback
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Appian wrote his Roman History in the second century AD as a series of books arranged geographically to chronicle the rise of the Roman Empire. His Iberike, of which this is the first translation with historical commentary in English, deals with the Romans' wars in the Iberian peninsula from the ...
Appian: Wars of the Romans in Iberia
Appian wrote his Roman History in the second century AD as a series of books arranged geographically to chronicle the rise of the Roman Empire. His Iberike, of which this is the first translation with historical commentary in English, deals with the Romans' wars in the Iberian peninsula from the third to the first centuries BC. It is the only continuous source for much of the history of this crucial period in one of the earliest regions of Rome's imperial expansion, and so fills in the gap made by the loss of Livy's later books. He describes the major campaigns of the conquest from the defeat of the Carthaginians by Scipio Africanus, the wars against the Celtiberians, the war against the Lusitanians under Viriathus and the siege of Numantia. The value of the text is not merely as a chronicle of otherwise obscure events, Appian was an historian who deserves to be studied in his own right. This scholarly edition presents the Greek text with facing-page English translation, accompanied by an introduction, historical commentary and copious notes.
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33.600000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Appian wrote his Roman History in the second century AD as a series of books arranged geographically to chronicle the rise of the Roman Empire. His Iberike, of which this is the first translation with historical commentary in English, deals with the Romans' wars in the Iberian peninsula from the ...
Appian: Wars of the Romans in Iberia
Appian wrote his Roman History in the second century AD as a series of books arranged geographically to chronicle the rise of the Roman Empire. His Iberike, of which this is the first translation with historical commentary in English, deals with the Romans' wars in the Iberian peninsula from the third to the first centuries BC. It is the only continuous source for much of the history of this crucial period in one of the earliest regions of Rome's imperial expansion, and so fills in the gap made by the loss of Livy's later books. He describes the major campaigns of the conquest from the defeat of the Carthaginians by Scipio Africanus, the wars against the Celtiberians, the war against the Lusitanians under Viriathus and the siege of Numantia. The value of the text is not merely as a chronicle of otherwise obscure events, Appian was an historian who deserves to be studied in his own right. This scholarly edition presents the Greek text with facing-page English translation, accompanied by an introduction, historical commentary and copious notes.
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37.98 USD
Hardback
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Books V and VI of Tacitus' Annals, when complete, carried the narrative of Tiberius' reign from AD 29 to 37. Unfortunately most of Book V has been lost, and, with it, Tacitus' account of the sensational events that led to the execution on 18 October in AD 31 of Aelius ...
Tacitus: Annals V and VI
Books V and VI of Tacitus' Annals, when complete, carried the narrative of Tiberius' reign from AD 29 to 37. Unfortunately most of Book V has been lost, and, with it, Tacitus' account of the sensational events that led to the execution on 18 October in AD 31 of Aelius Sejanus. Nevertheless, Annals VI contains a fascinating variety of incidents both at Rome and on Capri, to which Tiberius had retired permanently in AD 27. But, in addition to all the material that portrays Tiberius in a highly unfavourable light, there is much in Annals VI that shows a very different side to his character. Whereas Suetonius talks of an elderly emperor who discarded all interest in public affairs from the time he retired to Capri, Tacitus portrays a more complex character - one in which cruelty and vice stand alongside a deep concern for Rome's prosperity at home and abroad. Annals VI provides an absorbing account of the varied aspects of the behaviours and personality of Rome's most enigmatic emperor during the final years of his life. Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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37.98 USD
Hardback
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The Fifth Tusculan Disputation is the finest of the five books, its nearest rival being the First (also edited in this series). The middle three books, represented in this edition by the Second, are, as the author clearly intended, less elevated, though still showing Cicero's flair for elegant and lively ...
Cicero: Tusculan Disputations II & V: with a Summary of Books III & IV
The Fifth Tusculan Disputation is the finest of the five books, its nearest rival being the First (also edited in this series). The middle three books, represented in this edition by the Second, are, as the author clearly intended, less elevated, though still showing Cicero's flair for elegant and lively exposition, and providing much valuable information about the teaching of the main Hellenistic philosophical schools, especially the Stoics. They argue that the perfect human life, or complete human well-being, that of the `wise man', is unaffected by physical and mental distress or extremes of emotion. Against this background the Fifth puts the positive, mainly Stoic, case that virtue, moral goodness, is alone and of itself sufficient. Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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17.10 USD
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Cicero's essay On Friendship (Laelius de Amicitia) is of interest as much for the light it sheds on Roman society as for its embodiment of ancient philosophical views on the subject of friendship. The Dream of Scipio (Somnium Scipionis) was excerpted in late antiquity from Cicero's De Republica, a dialogue ...
Cicero: Laelius on Friendship and The Dream of Scipio
Cicero's essay On Friendship (Laelius de Amicitia) is of interest as much for the light it sheds on Roman society as for its embodiment of ancient philosophical views on the subject of friendship. The Dream of Scipio (Somnium Scipionis) was excerpted in late antiquity from Cicero's De Republica, a dialogue in six books which now only survives in fragmentary form. In the excerpt, which probably formed the conclusion to the dialogue, Cicero describes his vision of the cosmos and the rewards of immortality that the good statesman can expect after death. This work is particularly important for its influence on later literature in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Both dialogues are example of the best of Ciceronian prose. They are presented in this volume in the context of Cicero's philosophical writing. Their place in ancient thought and their literary characteristics are discussed fully in the introduction, while individual points of interpretation are dealt with in the commentary. There is a separate appendix of notes on textual points. Latin text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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33.600000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Dio Cassius, too often consulted just as a historical source, was an historian of considerable interest and originality - at once a Greek man of letters and a late representative of the Roman tradition of senatorial historical writing. For the reign of Augustus his history is the fullest account to ...
Cassius Dio: The Augustan Settlement: Roman History 53.1-55.9
Dio Cassius, too often consulted just as a historical source, was an historian of considerable interest and originality - at once a Greek man of letters and a late representative of the Roman tradition of senatorial historical writing. For the reign of Augustus his history is the fullest account to survive. This edition covers the years 28 to 5 BC, after which there are substantial gaps in Dio's text; it includes Dio's extended discussion of the constitutional settlement of 27 BC and the imperial system it inaugurated. The notes discuss the historical subject matter and Dio's treatment of it; particular attention is paid to the way Dio shaped his material in the light of his own values and interests. The introduction deals with Dio's life, the character of his history, and his view of Augustus. Ancient Greek text with facing-page English translation, introduction and commentary.
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33.600000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Paideia Romana: Cicero's Tusculan Disputations takes a new look at an unloved text of the western canon to reveal it as a punchy and profoundly original work, arguably Cicero's most ingenious literary response to the tyranny of Caesar. The book shows how the Tusculans' much lambasted literary design, critically isolated ...
Paideia Romana: Cicero's Tusculan Disputations
Paideia Romana: Cicero's Tusculan Disputations takes a new look at an unloved text of the western canon to reveal it as a punchy and profoundly original work, arguably Cicero's most ingenious literary response to the tyranny of Caesar. The book shows how the Tusculans' much lambasted literary design, critically isolated prefaces, and overlooked didactic plot start to cohere once we read the dialogue for what it is: not a Latin treatise on Greek philosophy, but a Roman drama on education, with a strong political subtext. The first chapter ('The form - enigmas and answers') tries to make sense of those features of the work that scholars have found baffling or disappointing, such as the nondescript characters, the uncertain genre, or the lack of setting. Chapter 2 ('The prologues - in tyrannum and cultural warfare') analyses how Cicero in his prologues to the five individual books situates his desire to create and teach a 'Latin philosophy' within wider contexts, in particular the dictatorship of Caesar and the intellectual traditions of Greece and Rome. The final chapter 3 ('The plot - teacher and student') explores the pedagogy enacted in the dialogue as a form of constructive outreach, addressed to a future generation of Roman aristocrats. With its emphasis on rhetoric, literary artistry, and historical context, the present volume breaks with earlier scholarship on the Tusculans and thereby makes a significant contribution to the on-going reassessment of Cicero's thought and authorial practice.
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94.500000 USD
Hardback
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