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Magnarelli's latest contribution to the critical dialogue on Spanish-American literature offers fresh, new readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention as well as insightful analyses of others that have seldom been studied. She employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches - feminism, post-colonial theory, gender theory, postmodern ...
Home is Where the (He)art is: The Family Romance in Late Twentieth-century Mexican and Argentine Theater
Magnarelli's latest contribution to the critical dialogue on Spanish-American literature offers fresh, new readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention as well as insightful analyses of others that have seldom been studied. She employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches - feminism, post-colonial theory, gender theory, postmodern theory, and cultural theory, among others - to examine in detail ten plays written or performed between 1956 and 1999. In her analysis of works by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina Hernandez, the North American critic proffers a welcome balance between close readings of the plays in question and a provocative discussion of sociopolitical issues as well as the mechanisms of theatre itself.
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51.88 USD
Hardback
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Central at the Margin examines the work of five Brazilian women writers: Julia Lopes de Almeida, and women's power within and outside the family; Rachel de Queiroz and the relation between backcountry matriarchs and city wives and workers; Lygia Fagundes Telles and the crumbling world of the coffee aristocrat; Clarice ...
Central at the Margin: Five Brazilian Women Writers
Central at the Margin examines the work of five Brazilian women writers: Julia Lopes de Almeida, and women's power within and outside the family; Rachel de Queiroz and the relation between backcountry matriarchs and city wives and workers; Lygia Fagundes Telles and the crumbling world of the coffee aristocrat; Clarice Lispector and what constitutes a Brazilian, a woman, a writer; Carolina Maria de Jesus and the definition of marginality at the margin.They lived and worked between the late nineteenth century and the 1970s. Their names are widely recognized in Brazil: they are central to the literary scene there; collectively they have received every literary honor and prize available. The book examines the meaning of such centrality for women whose work is nevertheless not included in the history of the development of Brazilian literature - their centrality is problematic in their place of origin - and by implication, it questions concepts of centrality and marginality within Brazilian literature and in the relation between Brazilian and world literatures. Renata R. M. Wasserman is a Professor of English and Comparative Literatures at Wayne State University.
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48.95 USD
Hardback
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This book analyzes the narrative and rhetorical structures of Latin American colonial texts by establishing a dialogue with contemporary studies on minority discourse, minor literatures, and colonial and postcolonial theory. The first chapter reviews the current disciplinary debate between colonial Latin American studies and early modern, transatlantic, and postcolonial studies, ...
From Lack to Excess: Minor Reading of Latin American Colonial Discourse
This book analyzes the narrative and rhetorical structures of Latin American colonial texts by establishing a dialogue with contemporary studies on minority discourse, minor literatures, and colonial and postcolonial theory. The first chapter reviews the current disciplinary debate between colonial Latin American studies and early modern, transatlantic, and postcolonial studies, paying attention to the epistemic and institutional junctures that explain the current reconfiguration of these fields of scholarship. As an alternative to an exhausted debate, this study uses Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's notion of a 'minor literature' along with current studies on minority discourse to propose new close readings of canonical texts by Hernan Cortes, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, the Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Carlos de Siguenza y Gongora and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel is Associate Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania.
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48.44 USD
Hardback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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60.29 USD
Hardback
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Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba ...
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World: Silvestre De Balboa's Espejo De Paciencia
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba on April 29, 1604. Marrer-Fente argues that the disappearance of the Espejo de paciencia manuscript during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries did not prevent the poetic world described in the text from founding a trope of enduring possibilities in Cuban literature. Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World makes a salient contribution to Cuban colonial studies by offering a comparison between Balboa's poem and the works of other contemporary authors from the Canary Islands, Spain, Spanish America, emphasizing the relevance of transatlantic relations in the poetic production of the period.
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38.21 USD
Hardback
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This book offers a richly detailed panorama of contemporary Spanish Caribbean literature and culture, as well as a compelling theoretical exploration of how authors of the Spanish Caribbean (Cuba, Santo Domingo, and Puerto Rico) have incorporated the cultural legacy of Africa into their narrative fictions. The book offers an in-depth ...
Voices Out of Africa in Twentieth-century Spanish Caribbean Literature
This book offers a richly detailed panorama of contemporary Spanish Caribbean literature and culture, as well as a compelling theoretical exploration of how authors of the Spanish Caribbean (Cuba, Santo Domingo, and Puerto Rico) have incorporated the cultural legacy of Africa into their narrative fictions. The book offers an in-depth analysis of cultural and religious expressions associated with Africa in the Caribbean and of the complex codification associated with the representation of those expressions. Voices Out of Africa explores how literary representations of Africa in the Spanish Caribbean construct a self-referential discourse about Africa in a Caribbean landscape, and examines how Afro-Caribbean practices, rituals, local memories, and belief systems inform such discourse. It is a textual journey through the multiple layers of the region's cultural expressions. It is also a work of scholarship and theory accessible to scholars and to interested laypersons in Afro-Caribbean lore and culture. Julia Cuervo Hewitt is Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Pennsylvania State University.
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67.22 USD
Hardback
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The End of the World as They Knew It maps the shifting constructions of the space of the South in Argentine discourses of identity, nation, and self-fashioning. In works by Domingo F. Sarmiento, Lucio V. Mansilla, Francisco P. Moreno, Jorge Luis Borges, Ricardo Piglia, and Cesar Aira, Eva-Lynn Alicia Jagoe ...
The End of the World as They Knew it: Writing Experiences of the Argentine South
The End of the World as They Knew It maps the shifting constructions of the space of the South in Argentine discourses of identity, nation, and self-fashioning. In works by Domingo F. Sarmiento, Lucio V. Mansilla, Francisco P. Moreno, Jorge Luis Borges, Ricardo Piglia, and Cesar Aira, Eva-Lynn Alicia Jagoe examines how representations of the South - as primitive, empty, violent, or a place of potential - inform Argentine liberal ideology. Part of this process entails the reception of travel narratives by Francis Bond Head, Charles Darwin, and W.H. Hudson, which served the purpose of ratifying the gaze of the criollo, and of appropriating the South through civilized discourses.Focusing on crucial moments in Argentine cultural history, such as the 1871 Conquest of the Desert and the military dictatorship of the 1970s, Jagoe compellingly argues that these intensely experiential narrations of the South are inextricably linked to questions of collective memory and the construction of an Argentine history and tradition. Well written and thoroughly researched, The End of the World as They Knew It will appeal to scholars of Argentine literature and culture, as well as those interested in travel writing and nation building.
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52.99 USD
Hardback
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This book is a path-breaking contribution to the study of the enigmatic Peruvian anthropologist and creative writer, Jose Maria Arguedas. Not only the first book-length study on this important Latin American writer in English, this study also gives us a new way to read Latin American indigenista and neo-indigenista writing, ...
Creating The Hybrid Intellectual: Subject, Space, and the Feminine in the Narrative of Jose Maria Argiedas
This book is a path-breaking contribution to the study of the enigmatic Peruvian anthropologist and creative writer, Jose Maria Arguedas. Not only the first book-length study on this important Latin American writer in English, this study also gives us a new way to read Latin American indigenista and neo-indigenista writing, by insisting on linking a reading of gender and gendered categories in Arguedian narrative with a reading of race and ethnicity. Lambright asserts that it is through reading the role and trajectory of the feminine in Arguedian narrative that we can best understand the author's national vision. Lambright's analysis also identifies and theorizes a less-studied subject capable of understanding, mediating, and expressing white, mestizo, and indigenous cultures.Using theories of gender, race, nationness, and radical geography, Lambright shows how Arguedian narrative creates new mappings of Peru that contest dominant understandings of the same, and how the hybrid intellectual moves among spaces and national subjects that resist and provide alternatives to an oppressive dominant culture. Anne Lambright is an Associate Professor of Modern Language and Literatures at Trinity College in Hartford.
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130.18 USD
Hardback
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Out of Bounds teases out the intricacies of a territorial conception of nationhood in the context of a global reorganization that ostensibly renders historical boundaries irrelevant. Hispanic Caribbean writers have traditionally pointed toward the supposed perfect equivalence of island and nation and have explained local culture as a direct consequence ...
Out of Bounds: Islands and the Demarcation of Identity in the Hispanic Caribbean
Out of Bounds teases out the intricacies of a territorial conception of nationhood in the context of a global reorganization that ostensibly renders historical boundaries irrelevant. Hispanic Caribbean writers have traditionally pointed toward the supposed perfect equivalence of island and nation and have explained local culture as a direct consequence of that equation. The major social, political, and demographic shifts of the twentieth century increasingly call this equation into question, yet authors continue to assert its existence and its centrality in the evolution of Caribbean identity.The author contends that traditional forms of identification have not been eviscerated by globalization; instead, they have persisted and, in some cases, have been intensified by recent geopolitical shifts. Out of Bounds underscores the ongoing role of the nation as the site of identity formation. In this manner, the book presents Hispanic Caribbean cultural production as a case study that acutely dramatizes the paradoxical status of traditional demarcations of self-definition in an increasingly globalized context. Dara E. Goldman is Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
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51.88 USD
Hardback
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This is an historically comparative postcolonial study asserting the dialogic relation between Irish and Caribbean narrative form, relating Irish Big House and Caribbean Plantation novels, the 'errantry' of Jocye's and Walcott's epic geographies, and the transition from traditional bildrungsroman modes of exile to contemporary memoirs of 'diseased' emigration. The book ...
Washed by the Gulf Stream: The Historic and Geographic Relation of Irish and Caribbean Literature
This is an historically comparative postcolonial study asserting the dialogic relation between Irish and Caribbean narrative form, relating Irish Big House and Caribbean Plantation novels, the 'errantry' of Jocye's and Walcott's epic geographies, and the transition from traditional bildrungsroman modes of exile to contemporary memoirs of 'diseased' emigration. The book focuses on the demise of empire and the role of geography in creating an 'island imaginary' for writers from James Joyce and Jean Rhys to Jamaica Kincaid and Frank McCourt.The complex interplay of cultures that makes up both Ireland and the Caribbean, the islands they inhabit both literally and metaphorically, ensures that neither peoples nor cultures exist in anything less than a 'meta-archipelago'. The links in these chains of islands and peoples, dispersed geographically, economically, and politically connect strongly, not simply throughout the North Atlantic but throughout the larger diasporic world. Maria McGarrity is an associate professor of English at Long Island University in Brooklyn, New York.
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33.61 USD
Hardback
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This study examines Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian women writers, as well as analyzing the roles of women of African descent in Cuban and Brazilian literature. Initially, literary imagination locked women into circumscribed roles, a result of hierarchies embedded in slavery and coloniality, and sustained by hierarchical theories on race and gender. ...
Literary Passion, Ideological Commitment: Toward a Legacy of Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian Women Writers
This study examines Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian women writers, as well as analyzing the roles of women of African descent in Cuban and Brazilian literature. Initially, literary imagination locked women into circumscribed roles, a result of hierarchies embedded in slavery and coloniality, and sustained by hierarchical theories on race and gender. The discussion illustrates how these negative aspects have influenced the mainstream literary imagination that contrasts with the 'self-portrayals' created by women writers themselves.Even as there continues to be disadvantageous constructions, there is no doubt that a modification has occurred over time in images, representation, and articulation. It is a change directly associated with the instances when women themselves are the writers. The historiographic image of the Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian woman as a written object is ideologically replaced by a vision of her as a writing subject. It is here that the vision of a creative, multifaceted, and diversified literature becomes important. Dawn Duke is an Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Tennessee.
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50.12 USD
Hardback
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In Home Is Where the (He)art Is Sharon Magnarelli employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches to examine ten dramatic works written or performed between 1956 and 1999. Focusing on plays by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina ...
Home Is Where The (He)art Is: The Family Romance in Late Twentieth-Century Mexican and Argentine Theater
In Home Is Where the (He)art Is Sharon Magnarelli employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches to examine ten dramatic works written or performed between 1956 and 1999. Focusing on plays by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina Hernandez, Magnarelli demonstrates how the playwrights engage with family relationships to comment on sociopolitical issues of national and international significance while simultaneously challenging dramatic conventions and theatrical representation. This insightful study provides fresh readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention. It also serves as a useful introduction to the modern theater of Mexico and Argentina for the interested non-specialist.
49.37 USD
Hardback
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