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When a master novelist, essayist, and critic searches for the wellsprings of his own work, where does he turn? Mario Vargas Llosa - Peruvian writer, presidential contender, and public intellectual - answers this most personal question with elegant concision in this collection of essays. In Four Centuries of Don Quixote, ...
Wellsprings
When a master novelist, essayist, and critic searches for the wellsprings of his own work, where does he turn? Mario Vargas Llosa - Peruvian writer, presidential contender, and public intellectual - answers this most personal question with elegant concision in this collection of essays. In Four Centuries of Don Quixote, he revisits the quintessential Spanish novel -a fiction about fiction whose ebullient prose still questions the certainties of our stumbling ideals. In recounting his illicit, delicious discovery of Borges' fiction - the most important thing to happen to imaginative writing in the Spanish language in modern times - Vargas Llosa stands in for a generation of Latin American novelists who were liberated from their sense of isolation and inferiority by this Argentinean master of the European tradition.In a nuanced appreciation of Ortega y Gasset, Vargas Llosa recovers the democratic liberalism of a misunderstood radical -a mid-century political philosopher on a par with Sartre and Russell, ignored because he was only a Spaniard. And in essays on the influence of Karl Popper and Isaiah Berlin, the author finds an antidote to the poisonous well of fanaticism in its many modern forms, from socialist utopianism and nationalism to religious fundamentalism. From these essays a picture emerges of a writer for whom the enchantment of literature awakens a critical gaze on the turbulent world in which we live.
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13.25 USD

Wellsprings

by Mario Vargas Llosa
Hardback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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19.90 USD
Paperback / softback
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Determinations is both an uncompromising Marxian engagement with a n erstwhile 'postcolonial theory' and a set of new critical readings of a body of 'postcolonial' narratives, mainly Latin American. Its central propositions are twofold: first, that the national question, however its terms have changed, is the still under-theorized and unresolved ...
Determinations: Essays on Theory, Narrative and Nation in the Americas
Determinations is both an uncompromising Marxian engagement with a n erstwhile 'postcolonial theory' and a set of new critical readings of a body of 'postcolonial' narratives, mainly Latin American. Its central propositions are twofold: first, that the national question, however its terms have changed, is the still under-theorized and unresolved problem that haunts the hyper-abstractions and mystifications of postcolonial theory and other ideological flights into 'globalization'; second, the important insight into the close cultural link between 'nation' and 'narration' must be carried further so as to disclose their concretely historical, fully determinate relationship. In essays that first engage the current theoretical parlances of 'ambivalence', hybridity' and the 'subaltern', and that go on to flesh out the alternative 'political narratology' through the readings of Cortazar, Carpentier, Garcia Marquez, Rulfo and Vargas Llosa, Larsen concludes with critical reassessment of Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities. In place of cultural essentializing of third-worldisms and of the indeterminacies of Bhabhaite or Spivakian textualism, Determinations develops a dialectical, radically historicized account of the national and the colonial as literary and cultural mediations.
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23.100000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Joseph Conrad, Jean Rhys, and Pramoedya Ananta Toer are writers renowned for crafting narratives of great technical skill that resonate with potent truths on the colonial condition. Yet given the generational and geographical boundaries that separated them, they are seldom considered in conjunction with one another. The Passage of Literature ...
The Passage of Literature: Genealogies of Modernism in Conrad, Rhys, Pramoedya
Joseph Conrad, Jean Rhys, and Pramoedya Ananta Toer are writers renowned for crafting narratives of great technical skill that resonate with potent truths on the colonial condition. Yet given the generational and geographical boundaries that separated them, they are seldom considered in conjunction with one another. The Passage of Literature unites the three in a bracing comparative study that breaks away from traditional conceptions of modernism, going beyond temporal periodization and the entrenched Anglo-American framework that undergirds current scholarship. This study nimbly traces a trio of distinct yet interrelated modernist genealogies. English modernism as exemplified by Conrad's Malay trilogy is productively paired with the hallmark work of Indonesian modernism, Pramoedya's Buru quartet. The two novel sequences, penned years apart, narrate overlapping histories of imperialism in the Dutch East Indies, and both make opera central for understanding the cultural dynamic of colonial power. Creole modernism-defined not only by the linguistic diversity of the Caribbean but also by an alternative vision of literary history-provides a transnational context for reading Rhys's Good Morning, Midnight and Wide Sargasso Sea, each novel mapped in relation to the colonial English and postcolonial Indonesian coordinates of Conrad's The Shadow-Line and Pramoedya's This Earth of Mankind. All three modernisms-English, Creole, and Indonesian-converge in a discussion of the Indonesian figure of the nyai, a concubine or house servant, who represents the traumatic core of transnational modernism. Throughout the study, Pramoedya's extraordinary effort to reconstruct the lost record of Indonesia's emergence as a nation provides a model for reading each fragmentary passage of literature as part of an ongoing process of decolonizing tradition. Drawing on translated and un-translated works of fiction and nonfiction, GoGwilt effectively reexamines the roots of Anglophone modernist studies, thereby laying out the imperatives of a new postcolonial philology even as he resituates European modernism within the literary, linguistic, and historical context of decolonization.
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35.650000 USD

The Passage of Literature: Genealogies of Modernism in Conrad, Rhys, Pramoedya

by Christopher GoGwilt
Paperback / softback
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Political, social, and aesthetic change marked Latin American society in the years between 1960 and 1985. In this book, Martin Stabb explores how these changes made their way into the essayistic writings of twenty-six Spanish American intellectuals. Stabb posits that dissent-against ideology, against simplistic notions of technological progress, against urban ...
The Dissenting Voice: The New Essay of Spanish America, 1960-1985
Political, social, and aesthetic change marked Latin American society in the years between 1960 and 1985. In this book, Martin Stabb explores how these changes made their way into the essayistic writings of twenty-six Spanish American intellectuals. Stabb posits that dissent-against ideology, against simplistic notions of technological progress, against urban values, and even against the direct linear expository style of the essay itself-characterizes the work of these contemporary essayists. He draws his examples from major canonical figures, including Paz, Vargas Llosa, Fuentes, and Cortazar, and from lesser-known writers who merit a wider readership, such as Monterroso, Zaid, Edwards, and Ibarguengoitia. This exploration overturns many conventional assumptions about Latin American intellectuals and also highlights some of the other achievements of authors famous primarily for novels or short stories.
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20.950000 USD
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Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams uses Elena Garro's eccentric life and work as a lens through which to examine mid-twentieth-century Mexican intellectuals' desire to reconcile mexicanidad with modernidad. The famously scandalous first wife of Nobel Prize winner poet Octavio Paz, and an award-winning author in her own right, Garro ...
Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams
Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams uses Elena Garro's eccentric life and work as a lens through which to examine mid-twentieth-century Mexican intellectuals' desire to reconcile mexicanidad with modernidad. The famously scandalous first wife of Nobel Prize winner poet Octavio Paz, and an award-winning author in her own right, Garro constructed a mysterious and often contradictory persona through her very public participation in Mexican political conflicts. Herself an anxious and contentious Mexican writer, Elena Garro elicited profound political and aesthetic anxiety in her Mexican readers. She confused the personal and the public in her creative fictions as well as in her vision of Mexican modernity. This violation of key distinctions rendered her largely illegible to her contemporaries. That illegibility serves as a symptom of unacknowledged desires that motivate twentieth-century views of national modernity. Taken together, Garro's public persona and critical perspective expose the anxieties regarding ethnicity, gender, economic class, and professional identity that define Mexican modernity. Blending cultural studies and detailed literary analysis with political and intellectual history, Mexico's Modern Dreams argues that, in addition to the intriguing gossip she elicited in literary and political circles, Garro produced a radical critique of Mexican modernity. Her critique applies as well to the nation's twenty-first-century crisis of globalization, state power, and pervasive violence.
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57.740000 USD

Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams

by Rebecca E. Biron
Paperback / softback
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Migrant Revolution offers an overview of twentieth-century Haitian literature, placing its rich tradition in the context of transnational anti-colonial politics. Kaussen argues that the anti-colonial politics of Haitian modernist literature is based on the philosophies of human rights that drove the Haitian Revolution and, further, that Haitian literary modernity has ...
Migrant Revolutions: Haitian Literature, Globalization, and U.S. Imperialism
Migrant Revolution offers an overview of twentieth-century Haitian literature, placing its rich tradition in the context of transnational anti-colonial politics. Kaussen argues that the anti-colonial politics of Haitian modernist literature is based on the philosophies of human rights that drove the Haitian Revolution and, further, that Haitian literary modernity has continually challenged the world colonial order, including the contemporary era of globalization.
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49.340000 USD

Migrant Revolutions: Haitian Literature, Globalization, and U.S. Imperialism

by Valerie Kaussen
Paperback / softback
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This book constitutes an attempt to theorize the process of the emergence, in eighteenth-century New Spain, of a position of intellectual subjectivity differentiated from that established by the regime of Spanish imperial authority. The principal concern has been to trace how certain groups of criollo intellectuals try to construct such ...
Constructing the Criollo Archive: Subjects of Knowledge in the Bibliotheca Mexicana and the Rusticano Mexicana
This book constitutes an attempt to theorize the process of the emergence, in eighteenth-century New Spain, of a position of intellectual subjectivity differentiated from that established by the regime of Spanish imperial authority. The principal concern has been to trace how certain groups of criollo intellectuals try to construct such discourses, paradoxically, out of the framework of available European systems of knowledge and representation. In this fashion, it was sought to discern the outline of an ideological program for criollo political and cultural hegemony in the eighteenth century
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31.450000 USD

Constructing the Criollo Archive: Subjects of Knowledge in the Bibliotheca Mexicana and the Rusticano Mexicana

by Antony Higgins
Hardback
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In One-Way Tickets, Borinsky offers up a splendid tour across 20th-century literatures, providing a literary travelogue to writers and artists in exile. She describes their challenges in adjusting to new homelands, issues of identity and language, and the brilliant works produced under the discomforts and stresses of belonging nowhere. Speaking ...
One-Way Tickets: Writers and the Culture of Exile
In One-Way Tickets, Borinsky offers up a splendid tour across 20th-century literatures, providing a literary travelogue to writers and artists in exile. She describes their challenges in adjusting to new homelands, issues of identity and language, and the brilliant works produced under the discomforts and stresses of belonging nowhere. Speaking with the authority of first-hand experience, Borinsky relates the story of her own family--Eastern European Jews, with one-way tickets to Buenos Aires, refugees from the countries that spat them out and massacred those who stayed on. Borinksy herself becomes an exile, fleeing Argentina after the take-over of a bloody military dictatorship. She understood, then, her grandfather's lessons: There's nothing like languages to save your life, open your mind, speed you away from persecution. As a writer of poetry, fiction, and essays, the author also knows intimately the struggles of writing from between worlds, between languages. In these pages, we encounter Russian Vladimir Nabokov, writing in English in the United States; Argentine writer Julio Cortazar in Paris; Polish writer, Witold Gombrowicz in Buenos Aires; Alejandra Pizarnik, Argentine writer for whom exile is a state of mind; Jorge Luis Borges, labyrinthine traveler in time and space; Isaac Bashevis Singer, a Jewish writer in New York driven from Poland by the Nazis; Latino writers Oscar Hijuelos, Cristina Garcia, and Junot Diaz; and Clarice Lispector, transplanted from Ukraine, to Brazil, to Europe, and the United States. Not surprisingly, these charismatic and artistic people, as well as many others in Borinsky's nearly encyclopedic associations, inhabit equally intriguing circles. She introduces us to a wide range of friends and lovers, mentors and detractors, compatriots and hosts. We come away with a terrific breadth of knowledge of 20th-century literature and culture in exile--its uneasy obsessions, its difficult peace, its hard-won success.
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17.20 USD
Hardback
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Angel Cuadra was a prisoner of conscience, sentenced to one of Castro's gulags in 1967 for conspiracy. He became a forgotten man in his own country, expunged from contemporary Cuban letters. As a young literary figure and anti-Batista conspirator in the fifties, Cuadra participated both in the arts and in ...
Angel Cuadra: The Poet in Socialist Cuba
Angel Cuadra was a prisoner of conscience, sentenced to one of Castro's gulags in 1967 for conspiracy. He became a forgotten man in his own country, expunged from contemporary Cuban letters. As a young literary figure and anti-Batista conspirator in the fifties, Cuadra participated both in the arts and in politics. In the flush of Batista's downfall, Cuadra enjoyed a moment of recognition as an international spokesman for Castro's successful revolution and as a popular and widely translated poet. At the same time he became a government lawyer, a helpful cover when he renewed his underground activities. A short time after Castro's triumph, the artists and writers who participated in the original revolution reappraised the new government, soon establishing a new resistance. Writing under the pen name of Alejandro Almanza, Cuadra became one of the movement's leaders. Cuadra was released from prison in 1982 after serving his full sentence. Now a part of the Cuban intellectual community in exile in Miami, he works as an international jurist concerned with political prisoners. Cuadra continues to write; in 1988 he received an award from the government of Spain for his love poems and in 1990 received special recognition for his poetry from President Vaclav Havel of Czechoslovakia. This volume includes three of Cuadra's works in translation. The essay Writers in Socialist Cuba describes his final three years in Cuba, when he was free from prison but forbidden to leave the country. He tells of attempts to readjust to his beloved Havana, of reunions with friends and not-so-well-wishers, and of existence in the Castro years when all hope for a better life had evaporated. A recent postscriptgives his impressions of the Cuban artistic and intellectual climate since the mid-eighties. A Correspondence of Poems (from Jail) presents Cuadra's poetic letters to the exiled Cuban poet Juana Rosa Pita. Befitting its lyrical spirit, this poetry was smuggled out of prison in a musi
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26.200000 USD
Hardback
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Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986), an Argentine writer of serious avant-garde poetry and prose, often wrote of the humor in the works of contemporaneous authors such as Franz Kafka. In response to this humor, Borges created a comedic tradition all his own. Humor in Borges studies the humor embedded in the ...
Humor in Borges
Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986), an Argentine writer of serious avant-garde poetry and prose, often wrote of the humor in the works of contemporaneous authors such as Franz Kafka. In response to this humor, Borges created a comedic tradition all his own. Humor in Borges studies the humor embedded in the fiction of a serious and metaphysical literary figure. Ren? de Costa shows how Borges was concerned with making the embedded humor in his work more apparent without abandoning the essential story line. De Costa examines the ways in which Borges transformed established modes of writing-the chronicle, the book review, the obituary, the detective story-into genre parodies. He looks at Borges's canonical collections, identifying the humor in such simple things as a footnote, a false epigraph, or a postscript. Humor in Borges couples elegant scholarship with a comedic edge and is both accessible and enjoyable to read. Scholars and students of twentieth-century Spanish and Latin American literature will delight in this fascinating look at laughter in the work of Jorge Luis Borges.
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34.640000 USD

Humor in Borges

by Rene De Costa
Hardback
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When confronting twentieth-century political oppression and violence, writers and artists in Portugal and South America have often emphasized the complex relationship between freedom and tyranny. In Seeing Politics Otherwise, Patricia Vieira uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore the interrelation of politics and representations of vision and blindness in Latin American ...
Seeing Politics Otherwise: Vision in Latin American and Iberian Fiction
When confronting twentieth-century political oppression and violence, writers and artists in Portugal and South America have often emphasized the complex relationship between freedom and tyranny. In Seeing Politics Otherwise, Patricia Vieira uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore the interrelation of politics and representations of vision and blindness in Latin American and Iberian literature, film, and art. Vieira's discussion focuses on three literary works: Graciliano Ramos's Memoirs of Prison, Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden, and Jose Saramago's Blindness, with supplemental analyses of sculpture and film by Ana Maria Pacheco, Bruno Barreto, and Marco Bechis. These artists use metaphors of blindness to denounce the totalizing gaze of dictatorial regimes. Rather than equating blindness with deprivation, Vieira argues that shadows, blindfolds, and blindness are necessary elements for re-imagining the political world and re-acquiring a political voice. Seeing Politics Otherwise offers a compelling analysis of vision and its forcible deprivation in the context of art and political protest.
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33.24 USD
Hardback
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This book offers discussion and analysis of the subtle writing of Nobel Laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez - a traditionalist who draws from classic Western texts, a Modernist committed to modernizing the conservative literary tradition in Colombia and Latin America, an internationally recognized major writer of the 1960s Boom, the key ...
A Companion to Gabriel Garcia Marquez
This book offers discussion and analysis of the subtle writing of Nobel Laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez - a traditionalist who draws from classic Western texts, a Modernist committed to modernizing the conservative literary tradition in Colombia and Latin America, an internationally recognized major writer of the 1960s Boom, the key figure in popularizing what has been called magic realism and, finally, a Modernist who has occasionally engaged in some of the strategies of the postmodern. The author demonstrates that Garcia Marquez is above all a committed and highly accomplished Modernist fiction writer who has successfully synthesized his political vision in his writing and absorbed a vast array of cultural and literary traditions. Drawing on Garcia Marquez's interviews with Williams and others over the years, the book also explores the importance of the non-literary, the presence of oral tradition and the visual arts, thus providing a more complete insight into Garcia Marquez's strategies as a Modernist with heterogeneous aesthetic interests, as well as an understanding of his social and political preoccupations. RAYMOND LESLIE WILLIAMS is Professor of Latin American Literature at the University of California, Riverside.
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27.250000 USD
Paperback
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Threshold Time provides an introductory survey of the cultural, social and political history of Mexican American and Chicano literature, as well as new in-depth analyses of a selection of works that between them span a hundred years of this particular branch of American literature. The book begins its explorations of ...
Threshold Time: Passage of Crisis in Chicano Literature
Threshold Time provides an introductory survey of the cultural, social and political history of Mexican American and Chicano literature, as well as new in-depth analyses of a selection of works that between them span a hundred years of this particular branch of American literature. The book begins its explorations of the passage of crisis with Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton's The Squatter and the Don, continues with Americo Paredes' George Washington Gomez, Tomas Rivera's ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him, Richard Rodriguez's Hunger of Memory, and ends with Helena Maria Viramontes' Under the Feet of Jesus and Benjamin Alire Saenz' Carry Me Like Water. In order to do justice to the idiosyncrasies of the individual texts and the complexities they embrace, the analyses refer to a number of other texts belonging to the tradition, and draw on a wide range of theoretical approaches. The final chapter of Threshold Time brings the various readings together in a discussion circumscribed by the negotiations of a temporality that is strongly aligned with a sense of memory peculiar to the history of the Chicano presence in the United States of America.
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33.05 USD
Paperback / softback
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This bracing and far-ranging study compares modern (post-1492) literary treatments of millenarian narratives- end of the world stories charting an ultimate battle between good and evil that destroys previous social structures and rings in a lasting new order. While present in many cultures for as long as tales have been ...
Millennial Literatures of the Americas, 1492-2002
This bracing and far-ranging study compares modern (post-1492) literary treatments of millenarian narratives- end of the world stories charting an ultimate battle between good and evil that destroys previous social structures and rings in a lasting new order. While present in many cultures for as long as tales have been told, these accounts take on a profound dramatic resonance in the context of Europe's centuries-long colonization of the American hemisphere. With an impressive interdisciplinary approach that employs insights from history, ethnography, and theology, Thomas O. Beebee provides nuanced readings of the apocalyptic vision in a diverse group of forms and writers, stretching from the letters of Christopher Columbus to the lyrics of Bob Marley and Bob Dylan, the poetry of Ernesto Martinez, and the bestselling novels of the Left Behind franchise, among other works. Throughout, he pointedly illustrates how millennial discourse has been used as a technology of control to further national and imperial agendas while paradoxically, often simultaneously, serving the forces of resistance. Drawing on a wide variety of records, his analysis shows that repeated eruptions of imagined, epochal conflicts reveal native populations fighting against the eradication of traditional ways of life, making sense of unprecedented violence, and searching for sources of origin. It seems that Americans-North, South, Middle, and Caribbean-tend to define themselves by narrating their End. Informed by extensive research and an imaginative marshalling of diverse insights, Beebee presents a comprehensive comparative treatment of millennial themes in works from English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish. In so doing, he illustrates that prophesies of telos, and the literature that imagines them, provide a vital context for understanding the connected yet distinct cultures that have shaped the American hemisphere.
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40.900000 USD
Hardback
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Since his first publication in 1942, Luis Leal has likely done more than any other writer or scholar to foster a critical appreciation of Mexican, Chicano, and Latin American literature and culture. This volume, bringing together a representative selection of Leal's writings from the past sixty years, is at once ...
A Luis Leal Reader
Since his first publication in 1942, Luis Leal has likely done more than any other writer or scholar to foster a critical appreciation of Mexican, Chicano, and Latin American literature and culture. This volume, bringing together a representative selection of Leal's writings from the past sixty years, is at once a wide-ranging introduction to the most influential scholar of Latino literature and a critical history of the field as it emerged and developed through the twentieth century. Instrumental in establishing Mexican literary studies in the United States, Leal's writings on the topic are especially instructive, ranging from essays on the significance of symbolism, culture, and history in early Chicano literature to studies of the more recent use of magical realism and of individual New Mexican, Tejano, and Mexican authors such as Juan Rulfo, Carlos Fuentes, Jose Montoya, and Mariano Azuela. Clearly and cogently written, these writings bring to bear an encyclopedic knowledge, a deep understanding of history and politics, and an unparalleled command of the aesthetics of storytelling, from folklore to theory. This collection affords readers the opportunity to consider - or reconsider - Latino literature under the deft guidance of its greatest reader.
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38.800000 USD
Hardback
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Creolizing the Metropole is a comparative study of postwar West Indian migration to the former colonial capitals of Paris and London. It studies the effects of this population shift on national and cultural identity and traces the postcolonial Caribbean experience through analyses of the concepts of identity and diaspora. Through ...
Creolizing the Metropole: Migrant Caribbean Identities in Literature and Film
Creolizing the Metropole is a comparative study of postwar West Indian migration to the former colonial capitals of Paris and London. It studies the effects of this population shift on national and cultural identity and traces the postcolonial Caribbean experience through analyses of the concepts of identity and diaspora. Through close readings of selected literary works and film, H. Adlai Murdoch explores the ways in which these immigrants and their descendants represented their metropolitan identities. Though British immigrants were colonial subjects and, later, residents of British Commonwealth nations, and the French arrivals from the overseas departments were citizens of France by law, both groups became subject to otherness and exclusion stemming from their ethnicities. Murdoch examines this phenomenon and the questions it raises about borders and boundaries, nationality and belonging.
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17.71 USD
Paperback
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Although Spanish-American literature first came to the attention of a world-wide audience in the 1960s, it enjoys a continuous tradition stretching back to the Conquest. This introduction to the Spanish-American literary canon re-traces that history in a clear and readable style. It contains short, incisive sections on the major literary ...
A Companion to Spanish-American Literature
Although Spanish-American literature first came to the attention of a world-wide audience in the 1960s, it enjoys a continuous tradition stretching back to the Conquest. This introduction to the Spanish-American literary canon re-traces that history in a clear and readable style. It contains short, incisive sections on the major literary writers and works of Spanish America from the Conquest to the present day, ranging from the Popol Vuh, the Bible of the Mayas, to Isabel Allende's The House of the Spirits, a novel on contemporary Chile. The book treats authors in considerable depth, and addresses in particular the social value of the literary work and the ways in which it functioned in the society which gave it life. STEPHEN M. HART is Professor of Hispanic Studies, University College London, and Profesor Honorario, Universidad de San Marcos, Lima.
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36.700000 USD
Hardback
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This issue considers the oeuvre of Haitian writer Marie Vieux-Chauvet (1916-1973) as a prism through which to examine individual and collective subject formation in the postcolonial French-writing Caribbean, the wider Afro-Americas, and beyond. While both Vieux-Chauvet and her corpus are situated in the violent space of mid-twentieth century Haiti, her ...
Yale French Studies, Number 128: Revisiting Marie Vieux Chauvet: Paradoxes of the Postcolonial Feminine
This issue considers the oeuvre of Haitian writer Marie Vieux-Chauvet (1916-1973) as a prism through which to examine individual and collective subject formation in the postcolonial French-writing Caribbean, the wider Afro-Americas, and beyond. While both Vieux-Chauvet and her corpus are situated in the violent space of mid-twentieth century Haiti, her work articulates the obstacles to claiming legitimized human existence on a global scale. The contributors to this interdisciplinary volume examine Vieux-Chauvet's positioning within the Haitian public sphere, as well as her broader significance to understanding gendered and racialized postcolonial subjectivities in the twenty-first century.
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36.750000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Social and cultural historian, political analyst, trade union educator, artist, expert on development and cultural dynamics, man of letters - these represent only a few of the areas of expertise of Rex Nettleford, one of the Caribbean's finest scholars. This carefully selected collection of 42 of Nettleford's speeches can only ...
Rex N: Rex Nettlefold: Selected Speeches
Social and cultural historian, political analyst, trade union educator, artist, expert on development and cultural dynamics, man of letters - these represent only a few of the areas of expertise of Rex Nettleford, one of the Caribbean's finest scholars. This carefully selected collection of 42 of Nettleford's speeches can only provide a mere glimpse of his formidable intellect and his contribution to the search for and validation of a Caribbean cultural identity. Known affectionately in academic, cultural, literary and artistic circles the world over, simply as Rex, this informal and unpretentious designation is used to capture the essence of the man whose ideas and speeches can be said to collectively represent the 'Triumph of the Caribbean Spirit and Imagination'. Readers who have had the privilege of hearing one or more of Rex Nettleford's speeches will agree with Barry Chevannes that 'Reading Rex Nettleford is not quite the same as hearing him...even when the ideas are the same...to hear Rex Nettleford address an audience is to be treated to a performance.' Of Nettleford, Chevannes writes: 'As a Caribbean man, Nettleford himself embodies the multilayered complexity which he insists is characteristic of the region, a five-foot eleven black man with rhythm in his steps and intertexuality in his living, who exercises the powers of his creative imagination to help his fellow tenants hold on to their legacy of a sense of self, for which monumental work he is a much revered, much appreciated voice teaching lessons for life on all the continents tenanted by homo sapiens.
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26.200000 USD
Hardback
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Through economic liberalization and the untethering of labor and production markets, masculinity as hegemon has entered a crisis stage. Renegotiated labor and familial orders have triggered a widespread cultural renegotiation of how masculinity operates and is represented. This holds especially true in Latin America. Addressing this, Vinodh Venkatesh uses contemporary ...
The Body as Capital: Masculinities in Contemporary Latin American Fiction
Through economic liberalization and the untethering of labor and production markets, masculinity as hegemon has entered a crisis stage. Renegotiated labor and familial orders have triggered a widespread cultural renegotiation of how masculinity operates and is represented. This holds especially true in Latin America. Addressing this, Vinodh Venkatesh uses contemporary Latin American literature to examine how masculinity is constructed and conceived. The Body as Capital centers socioeconomic and political concerns, anxieties, and paradigms on the male anatomy and on the matrices of masculinities presented in fiction. Developing concepts such as the "market of masculinities" and the "transnational theater of masculinities," the author explains how contemporary fiction centers the male body and masculine expressions as key components in the relationship between culture, space, and global tensile forces. Venkatesh includes novels by canonical and newer writers from Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, Peru, and Chile. He focuses on texts produced after 1990, coinciding with what has popularly been termed the neoliberal experiment. In addition to probing well-known novels such as La fiesta del Chivo and La mujer habitada and their accompanying body of criticism, The Body as Capital defines and examines several masculine tropes that will be of interest to scholars of contemporary Latin American literature and gender studies. Ultimately, Venkatesh argues for a more holistic approximation of discursive gender that will feed into other angles of criticism, forging a new path in the critical debates over gender and sexuality in Latin American writing.
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26.200000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In 1865, 23-year-old William James began his studies at the Harvard Medical School. When he learned that one of his most esteemed professors, Louis Agassiz, then director of the recently established Museum of Comparative Zoology, was preparing a research expedition to Brazil, James offered his services as a voluntary collector. ...
Brazil Though the Eyes of William James: Diaries, Letters, and Drawings, 1865-1866
In 1865, 23-year-old William James began his studies at the Harvard Medical School. When he learned that one of his most esteemed professors, Louis Agassiz, then director of the recently established Museum of Comparative Zoology, was preparing a research expedition to Brazil, James offered his services as a voluntary collector. Over the course of a year, James kept a diary, wrote letters to his family, and sketched the plants, animals, and people he observed. During this journey, James spent time primarily in Rio de Janeiro, Belem, and Manaus, and along the rivers and tributaries of the Amazon Basin. This volume is a critical, bilingual (English - Portuguese) edition of William James's diaries and letters, and also includes reproductions of his drawings. This original material belongs to the Houghton Archives at Harvard University and is of great interest to both William James scholars and Brazilian studies experts.
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21.80 USD
Hardback
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