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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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19.90 USD
Paperback / softback
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Educating the Educators consists of two narratives. The first discusses the paradigmatic shifts that have taken place within British Hispanism in response to the historical development of capitalism, through its competitive, monopolistic, and global stages. At the ideological level, these shifts correspond to the transformation of the traditional intellectual into ...
Educating the Educators: Hispanism and Its Institutions
Educating the Educators consists of two narratives. The first discusses the paradigmatic shifts that have taken place within British Hispanism in response to the historical development of capitalism, through its competitive, monopolistic, and global stages. At the ideological level, these shifts correspond to the transformation of the traditional intellectual into a state functionary and, ultimately, into a technician or 'expert', totally subsumed under capital and charged with the management of 'cultural studies'. Running alongside, and locked into, this first narrative is a second, which, in the form of three autobiographical essays, traces the author's long trek from his childhood origins in a working class family, through the institutions of education- and the experience of embourgeoisement- to his attempts, within the Australasian, Carribean, and North American academies, to retrieve the legacy of socialism. These two narratives are brought into symbolic relation through a theory of ideological production that explores the radicalizing effects of contradiction and conflict within the otherwise unconscious reproduction of social relations.
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22.73 USD
Paperback / softback
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Through economic liberalization and the untethering of labor and production markets, masculinity as hegemon has entered a crisis stage. Renegotiated labor and familial orders have triggered a widespread cultural renegotiation of how masculinity operates and is represented. This holds especially true in Latin America. Addressing this, Vinodh Venkatesh uses contemporary ...
The Body as Capital: Masculinities in Contemporary Latin American Fiction
Through economic liberalization and the untethering of labor and production markets, masculinity as hegemon has entered a crisis stage. Renegotiated labor and familial orders have triggered a widespread cultural renegotiation of how masculinity operates and is represented. This holds especially true in Latin America. Addressing this, Vinodh Venkatesh uses contemporary Latin American literature to examine how masculinity is constructed and conceived. The Body as Capital centers socioeconomic and political concerns, anxieties, and paradigms on the male anatomy and on the matrices of masculinities presented in fiction. Developing concepts such as the "market of masculinities" and the "transnational theater of masculinities," the author explains how contemporary fiction centers the male body and masculine expressions as key components in the relationship between culture, space, and global tensile forces. Venkatesh includes novels by canonical and newer writers from Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, Peru, and Chile. He focuses on texts produced after 1990, coinciding with what has popularly been termed the neoliberal experiment. In addition to probing well-known novels such as La fiesta del Chivo and La mujer habitada and their accompanying body of criticism, The Body as Capital defines and examines several masculine tropes that will be of interest to scholars of contemporary Latin American literature and gender studies. Ultimately, Venkatesh argues for a more holistic approximation of discursive gender that will feed into other angles of criticism, forging a new path in the critical debates over gender and sexuality in Latin American writing.
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26.200000 USD
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This study is about representation and resistance in Afro-Uruguayan culture. It explores the manner in which Afro-Uruguayans defined, and continue to affirm, their place in a country in which societal and self perceptions were/are constantly shifting. This is a continuing process to which the written records hold the key. It ...
Afro-Uruguayan Literature: Post-Colonial Perspective
This study is about representation and resistance in Afro-Uruguayan culture. It explores the manner in which Afro-Uruguayans defined, and continue to affirm, their place in a country in which societal and self perceptions were/are constantly shifting. This is a continuing process to which the written records hold the key. It has been common knowledge among literary historians that Afro-Uruguayans published a number of periodicals beginning as early as 1872. It is only now, however, with recent discoveries in the National Library in Montevideo that the extent of this production has become evident. It is primarily through these periodicals that much of the cultural legacy of Afro-Uruguayans can be reconstructed. Using post-colonialism as its theoretical framework, this study analyzes place and displacement, the drum culture, the role of periodicals, and poetry, as well as the dramatic tradition. This approach allows the reader to understand better the cultural dynamics of an important, but almost forgotten, diasporan population. Marvin A. Lewis is a Professor of Spanish and Director of the Afro-Romance Institute for Languages and Literatures of the African Diaspora of the University of Missouri-Columbia.
31.33 USD
Hardback
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