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Dude Lit: Mexican Men Writing and Performing Competence, 1955-2012
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68.250000 USD

Dude Lit: Mexican Men Writing and Performing Competence, 1955-2012

by Emily Hind
Hardback
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Revealing Rebellion in Abiayala: The Insurgent Poetics of Contemporary Indigenous Literature
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57.750000 USD

Revealing Rebellion in Abiayala: The Insurgent Poetics of Contemporary Indigenous Literature

by Hannah Burdette
Hardback
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Studies in Spanish-American Literature
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29.350000 USD

Studies in Spanish-American Literature

by Isaac Goldberg, Ed.
Hardback
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Studies in Spanish-American Literature
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29.350000 USD

Studies in Spanish-American Literature

by Isaac Goldberg, Ed.
Hardback
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Studies in Spanish-American Literature
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29.350000 USD

Studies in Spanish-American Literature

by Isaac Goldberg, Ed.
Hardback
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A reevaluation of Edouard Glissant that centers on the catastrophe of the Middle Passage and creates deep, original theories of trauma and Caribbeanness While philosophy has undertaken the work of accounting for Europe's traumatic history, the field has not shown the same attention to the catastrophe known as the Middle ...
Glissant and the Middle Passage: Philosophy, Beginning, Abyss
A reevaluation of Edouard Glissant that centers on the catastrophe of the Middle Passage and creates deep, original theories of trauma and Caribbeanness While philosophy has undertaken the work of accounting for Europe's traumatic history, the field has not shown the same attention to the catastrophe known as the Middle Passage. It is a history that requires its own ideas that emerge organically from the societies that experienced the Middle Passage and its consequences firsthand. Glissant and the Middle Passage offers a new, important approach to this neglected calamity by examining the thought of Edouard Glissant, particularly his development of Caribbeanness as a critical concept rooted in the experience of the slave trade and its aftermath in colonialism. In dialogue with key theorists of catastrophe and trauma-including Aime Cesaire, Frantz Fanon, George Lamming, Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, Derek Walcott, as well as key figures in Holocaust studies-Glissant and the Middle Passage hones a sharp sense of the specifically Caribbean varieties of loss, developing them into a transformative philosophical idea. Using the Plantation as a critical concept, John E. Drabinski creolizes notions of rhizome and nomad, examining what kinds of aesthetics grow from these roots and offering reconsiderations of what constitutes intellectual work and cultural production. Glissant and the Middle Passage establishes Glissant's proper place as a key theorist of ruin, catastrophe, abyss, and memory. Identifying his insistence on memories and histories tied to place as the crucial geography at the heart of his work, this book imparts an innovative new response to the specific historical experiences of the Middle Passage.
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113.400000 USD
Hardback
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Magnarelli's latest contribution to the critical dialogue on Spanish-American literature offers fresh, new readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention as well as insightful analyses of others that have seldom been studied. She employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches - feminism, post-colonial theory, gender theory, postmodern ...
Home is Where the (He)art is: The Family Romance in Late Twentieth-century Mexican and Argentine Theater
Magnarelli's latest contribution to the critical dialogue on Spanish-American literature offers fresh, new readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention as well as insightful analyses of others that have seldom been studied. She employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches - feminism, post-colonial theory, gender theory, postmodern theory, and cultural theory, among others - to examine in detail ten plays written or performed between 1956 and 1999. In her analysis of works by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina Hernandez, the North American critic proffers a welcome balance between close readings of the plays in question and a provocative discussion of sociopolitical issues as well as the mechanisms of theatre itself.
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51.88 USD
Hardback
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During the colonial period in Guyana, the country's coastal lands were worked by enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In Creole Indigeneity, Shona N. Jackson investigates how their descendants, collectively called Creoles, have remade themselves as Guyana's new natives, displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes ...
Creole Indigeneity: Between Myth and Nation in the Caribbean
During the colonial period in Guyana, the country's coastal lands were worked by enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In Creole Indigeneity, Shona N. Jackson investigates how their descendants, collectively called Creoles, have remade themselves as Guyana's new natives, displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes and policies. Looking particularly at the nation's politically fraught decades from the 1950s to the present, Jackson explores aboriginal and Creole identities in Guyanese society. Through government documents, interviews, and political speeches, she reveals how Creoles, though unable to usurp the place of aboriginals as First Peoples in the New World, nonetheless managed to introduce a new, more socially viable definition of belonging, through labor. The very reason for bringing enslaved and indentured workers into Caribbean labor became the organizing principle for Creoles' new identities. Creoles linked true belonging, and so political and material right, to having performed modern labor on the land; labor thus became the basis for their subaltern, settler modes of indigeneity-a contradiction for belonging under postcoloniality that Jackson terms Creole indigeneity. In doing so, her work establishes a new and productive way of understanding the relationship between national power and identity in colonial, postcolonial, and anticolonial contexts.
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60.29 USD
Hardback
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Central at the Margin examines the work of five Brazilian women writers: Julia Lopes de Almeida, and women's power within and outside the family; Rachel de Queiroz and the relation between backcountry matriarchs and city wives and workers; Lygia Fagundes Telles and the crumbling world of the coffee aristocrat; Clarice ...
Central at the Margin: Five Brazilian Women Writers
Central at the Margin examines the work of five Brazilian women writers: Julia Lopes de Almeida, and women's power within and outside the family; Rachel de Queiroz and the relation between backcountry matriarchs and city wives and workers; Lygia Fagundes Telles and the crumbling world of the coffee aristocrat; Clarice Lispector and what constitutes a Brazilian, a woman, a writer; Carolina Maria de Jesus and the definition of marginality at the margin.They lived and worked between the late nineteenth century and the 1970s. Their names are widely recognized in Brazil: they are central to the literary scene there; collectively they have received every literary honor and prize available. The book examines the meaning of such centrality for women whose work is nevertheless not included in the history of the development of Brazilian literature - their centrality is problematic in their place of origin - and by implication, it questions concepts of centrality and marginality within Brazilian literature and in the relation between Brazilian and world literatures. Renata R. M. Wasserman is a Professor of English and Comparative Literatures at Wayne State University.
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48.95 USD
Hardback
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This book analyzes the narrative and rhetorical structures of Latin American colonial texts by establishing a dialogue with contemporary studies on minority discourse, minor literatures, and colonial and postcolonial theory. The first chapter reviews the current disciplinary debate between colonial Latin American studies and early modern, transatlantic, and postcolonial studies, ...
From Lack to Excess: Minor Reading of Latin American Colonial Discourse
This book analyzes the narrative and rhetorical structures of Latin American colonial texts by establishing a dialogue with contemporary studies on minority discourse, minor literatures, and colonial and postcolonial theory. The first chapter reviews the current disciplinary debate between colonial Latin American studies and early modern, transatlantic, and postcolonial studies, paying attention to the epistemic and institutional junctures that explain the current reconfiguration of these fields of scholarship. As an alternative to an exhausted debate, this study uses Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's notion of a 'minor literature' along with current studies on minority discourse to propose new close readings of canonical texts by Hernan Cortes, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, the Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Carlos de Siguenza y Gongora and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel is Associate Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania.
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48.44 USD
Hardback
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Serves as a kind of cultural-historical road map to Sao Paulo (including alternative routes and detours), one that will be a necessary resource for any subsequent cultural studies of Sao Paulo and Latin American urbanization. --Justin Read, author ofModern Poetics and Hemispheric American Cultural Studies The essays brought together in ...
Sao Paulo: Perspectives on the City and Cultural Production
Serves as a kind of cultural-historical road map to Sao Paulo (including alternative routes and detours), one that will be a necessary resource for any subsequent cultural studies of Sao Paulo and Latin American urbanization. --Justin Read, author ofModern Poetics and Hemispheric American Cultural Studies The essays brought together in this volume all focus on the city of Sao Paulo, in the triple dynamic of cultural production: the critical representation of society, the analytical interpretation of the internal dynamic, and the principled imagination of alternative ways of living. --Pedro Meira Monteiro, author ofA Moralist in the Tropics David Foster brings an intense curiosity and lifelong familiarity to this unique examination of the cultural tapestry of Sao Paulo, the largest city in South America and the second largest in Latin America. Examining everything from the poetics of Mario de Andrade to the Eisner Award-winning graphic novels of Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba, Foster paints a portrait as colorful and multifaceted as the city it reveals. He offers representative examples of poetry, fiction, graphic art, photography, film, and social commentary to introduce readers to some of the most important cultural dimensions of the city as well as some of its most outstanding writers and artists. Foster selects his featured artists and works with care and precision in order to reveal insights into the development of the city throughout the twentieth century. This is a tour-de-force overview of the cultural output of one of the world's great urban centers, one that future researchers on Brazilian culture will ignore at their peril. David William Foster, Regents' Professor of Spanish, Humanities, and Women's Studies at Arizona State University, is author of Buenos Aires: Perspectives on the City and Cultural Production, Urban Photography in Argentina: Nine Artists of the Post-Dictatorship Era, and Queer Issues in Contemporary Latin American Cinema.
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66.71 USD
Hardback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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60.29 USD
Hardback
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Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba ...
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World: Silvestre De Balboa's Espejo De Paciencia
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba on April 29, 1604. Marrer-Fente argues that the disappearance of the Espejo de paciencia manuscript during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries did not prevent the poetic world described in the text from founding a trope of enduring possibilities in Cuban literature. Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World makes a salient contribution to Cuban colonial studies by offering a comparison between Balboa's poem and the works of other contemporary authors from the Canary Islands, Spain, Spanish America, emphasizing the relevance of transatlantic relations in the poetic production of the period.
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38.21 USD
Hardback
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This book offers a richly detailed panorama of contemporary Spanish Caribbean literature and culture, as well as a compelling theoretical exploration of how authors of the Spanish Caribbean (Cuba, Santo Domingo, and Puerto Rico) have incorporated the cultural legacy of Africa into their narrative fictions. The book offers an in-depth ...
Voices Out of Africa in Twentieth-century Spanish Caribbean Literature
This book offers a richly detailed panorama of contemporary Spanish Caribbean literature and culture, as well as a compelling theoretical exploration of how authors of the Spanish Caribbean (Cuba, Santo Domingo, and Puerto Rico) have incorporated the cultural legacy of Africa into their narrative fictions. The book offers an in-depth analysis of cultural and religious expressions associated with Africa in the Caribbean and of the complex codification associated with the representation of those expressions. Voices Out of Africa explores how literary representations of Africa in the Spanish Caribbean construct a self-referential discourse about Africa in a Caribbean landscape, and examines how Afro-Caribbean practices, rituals, local memories, and belief systems inform such discourse. It is a textual journey through the multiple layers of the region's cultural expressions. It is also a work of scholarship and theory accessible to scholars and to interested laypersons in Afro-Caribbean lore and culture. Julia Cuervo Hewitt is Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Pennsylvania State University.
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67.22 USD
Hardback
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Verses Against the Darkness: offers a new assessment of Pablo Neruda's poetry by looking at the intersection of his aesthetic method and political radicalism from 1925 to 1954. It challenges the canonical view that Neruda was a gifted verse maker who, in 1936, let himself be carried away by the ...
Verses Against the Darkness: Pablo Neruda's Poetry and Politics
Verses Against the Darkness: offers a new assessment of Pablo Neruda's poetry by looking at the intersection of his aesthetic method and political radicalism from 1925 to 1954. It challenges the canonical view that Neruda was a gifted verse maker who, in 1936, let himself be carried away by the excesses of communist politics. Instead, by focusing primarily on Tercera residencia (1935-1945), Greg Dawes argues for an uneven yet steady evolution and continuity in Neruda's work, politics, and morality. Dawes relies on historical accounts, biographies, literary history, and criticism - and on Neruda's political and aesthetic theory - to prove that his poetry became, contrary to received critical opinion, more sophisticated literarily and politically as he became more radicalized during the Spanish Civil War and World War II and as he developed his dialectical realism or guided spontaneity. Greg Dawes is Associate Professor of Latin American and World Literatures at North Carolina State University and is the editor of the on-line journal A contracorriente.
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Hardback
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Littoral of the Letter is the first full-fledged study in English of the work of the late Argentine author Juan Jose Saer (1937-2005), who was highly regarded as Argentina's best living novelist, a continuator of Burgess' literary legacy. Characterized by an uncommon coherence and rigor, Juan Jose Saer's writing defies ...
Littoral of the Letter: Saer's Art of Narration
Littoral of the Letter is the first full-fledged study in English of the work of the late Argentine author Juan Jose Saer (1937-2005), who was highly regarded as Argentina's best living novelist, a continuator of Burgess' literary legacy. Characterized by an uncommon coherence and rigor, Juan Jose Saer's writing defies simple categories. In both his fictional and essayistic writing, Saer defamiliarizes the reader by questioning some of his most cherished certainties, especially those having to do with the role ascribed to Latin American literature, the uses of prose and poetry in the present, and the relation between language and the mass media. By questioning the assimilation of prose theory and the novel theory dictated by pragmatic needs of the state and the market, Saer produces a change in the function of narrative language that allows him to start where more traditional forms of realism end: the unsayable. The purpose of the book is to make explicit Saer's procedures, the main coordinates of his poetics and to reflect on the situation of literature in an age dominated by images and the total cultural phenomenon. Gabriel Riera is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University.
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USD
Hardback
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The End of the World as They Knew It maps the shifting constructions of the space of the South in Argentine discourses of identity, nation, and self-fashioning. In works by Domingo F. Sarmiento, Lucio V. Mansilla, Francisco P. Moreno, Jorge Luis Borges, Ricardo Piglia, and Cesar Aira, Eva-Lynn Alicia Jagoe ...
The End of the World as They Knew it: Writing Experiences of the Argentine South
The End of the World as They Knew It maps the shifting constructions of the space of the South in Argentine discourses of identity, nation, and self-fashioning. In works by Domingo F. Sarmiento, Lucio V. Mansilla, Francisco P. Moreno, Jorge Luis Borges, Ricardo Piglia, and Cesar Aira, Eva-Lynn Alicia Jagoe examines how representations of the South - as primitive, empty, violent, or a place of potential - inform Argentine liberal ideology. Part of this process entails the reception of travel narratives by Francis Bond Head, Charles Darwin, and W.H. Hudson, which served the purpose of ratifying the gaze of the criollo, and of appropriating the South through civilized discourses.Focusing on crucial moments in Argentine cultural history, such as the 1871 Conquest of the Desert and the military dictatorship of the 1970s, Jagoe compellingly argues that these intensely experiential narrations of the South are inextricably linked to questions of collective memory and the construction of an Argentine history and tradition. Well written and thoroughly researched, The End of the World as They Knew It will appeal to scholars of Argentine literature and culture, as well as those interested in travel writing and nation building.
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52.99 USD
Hardback
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With the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, during an economic crisis termed its special period in times of peace, Cuba began to court the capitalist world for the first time since its 1959 revolution. With the U.S. dollar instated as domestic currency, the island seemed suddenly accessible ...
Cuban Currency: The Dollar and Special Period Fiction
With the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, during an economic crisis termed its special period in times of peace, Cuba began to court the capitalist world for the first time since its 1959 revolution. With the U.S. dollar instated as domestic currency, the island seemed suddenly accessible to foreign consumers, and their interest in its culture boomed. Cuban Currency is the first book to address the effects on Cuban literature of the country's spectacular opening to foreign markets that marked the end of the twentieth century. Based on interviews and archival research in Havana, Esther Whitfield argues that writers have both challenged and profited from new transnational markets for their work, with far-reaching literary and ideological implications. Whitfield examines money and cross-cultural economic relations as they are inscribed in Cuban fiction. Exploring the work of Zoe Valdes, Pedro Juan Gutierrez, Antonio Jose Ponte and others, she draws out writers' engagements with the troublesome commodification of Cuban identity. Confronting the tourist and publishing industries' roles in the transformation of the Cuban revolution into commercial capital, Whitfield identifies a body of fiction peculiarly attuned to the material and political challenges of the special period. Esther Whitfield is assistant professor of comparative literature at Brown University.
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54.35 USD
Hardback
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The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica's work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jesus Lara, ...
The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism
The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica's work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jesus Lara, Jose Maria Arguedas, and Rosario Castellanos, among other thinkers, Tarica explores the rhetorical and ideological aspects of interethnic affinity and connection. In her examination, she demonstrates that these connections posed a challenge to existing racial hierarchies in Spanish America by celebrating a new kind of national self at the same time that they contributed to new forms of subjection and discrimination. Going beyond debates about the relative merits of indigenismo and mestizaje, Tarica puts forward a new perspective on indigenista literature and modern mestizo identities by revealing how these ideologies are symptomatic of the dilemmas of national subject formation. The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism offers insight into the contemporary resurgence and importance of indigenista discourses in Latin America. Estelle Tarica is associate professor of Latin American literature and culture at the University of California, Berkeley.
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54.35 USD
Hardback
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