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Jews and Latinos have been unlikely partners through tumultuous times. This groundbreaking, eclectic book of readings, edited by Ilan Stavans, whom The Washington Post described as one of our foremost cultural critics, offers a sideboard of the ups and downs of that partnership. It includes some seventy canonical authors, Jews ...
The Scroll and the Cross: 1,000 Years of Jewish-Hispanic Literature
Jews and Latinos have been unlikely partners through tumultuous times. This groundbreaking, eclectic book of readings, edited by Ilan Stavans, whom The Washington Post described as one of our foremost cultural critics, offers a sideboard of the ups and downs of that partnership. It includes some seventy canonical authors, Jews and non-Jews alike, through whose diverse oeuvre-poetry, fiction, theater, personal and philosophical essays, correspondence, historical documents, and even kitchen recipes-the reader is able to navigate the shifting waters of history, from Spain in the tenth century to the Spanish-speaking Americas and the United States today. The Reader showcases the writings of such notable authors as Solomon ibn Gabirol, Maimonides, Miguel de Cervantes, Henry W. Longfellow, Miguel de Unamuno, Federico Garcia Lorca, Jorge Luis Borges, Jacobo Timerman, Mario Vargas Llosa, Ruth Behar, and Ariel Dorfman to name only a few.
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31.89 USD
Paperback / softback
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This anthology provides an opportunity for English-speaking audiences to read previously untranslated fiction by women from Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. Much of this work is inspired by an awareness of social injustice--particularly for women, indigenous groups, and other marginalized members of society and by a desire to transcend that injustice ...
Fire from the Andes: Short Fiction by Women from Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru
This anthology provides an opportunity for English-speaking audiences to read previously untranslated fiction by women from Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. Much of this work is inspired by an awareness of social injustice--particularly for women, indigenous groups, and other marginalized members of society and by a desire to transcend that injustice through personal revelation. Most of the stories focus on women's inner lives and their struggles to make sense of experience. Like Monica Bravo's heroine attempting to outwit death, or the mayor's wife, in a story by Alicia Yanez Cossio, surviving the news of her husband's infidelity, many of the protagonists are strong women, wise and shrewd. Perhaps the same could be said of the twenty-four authors who have drawn from their experience and imagination to create these compelling, often haunting, stories of life, liberty, love, and loss.
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Hardback
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From wide-ranging overviews of the entire region to close readings of specific works, this volume opens a fascinating window on the literatures and cultures of the Caribbean, covering texts in the multiplicity of languages used in the wider Caribbean: Spanish, English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, and the region's many creoles. Authors ...
Caribbeing: Comparing Caribbean Literatures and Cultures
From wide-ranging overviews of the entire region to close readings of specific works, this volume opens a fascinating window on the literatures and cultures of the Caribbean, covering texts in the multiplicity of languages used in the wider Caribbean: Spanish, English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, and the region's many creoles. Authors and works discussed range from luminaries such as Derek Walcott to hitherto practically unknown works in Antillean creole languages. Underlying is the idea to foster the study of the Caribbean literary, artistic and visual text through a comparative lens, a firm proposal to think beyond the persisting linguistic barriers and scholarly divides in the field. As such, Caribbeing: Comparing Caribbean Literatures and Cultures brings a new approach to the Caribbean embracing the region's linguistic multiplicity and complexity without eschewing the many theoretical challenges and obstacles such a scholarly endeavor entails. Because of its ample scope this book will appeal to scholars and students working on the Caribbean and Latin America, but also to those interested in the broader fields of postcolonial and cultural studies.
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76.93 USD
Paperback / softback
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This book is the first to focus exclusively on issues of gender and sexuality in a range of post-war novels from the Anglophone Caribbean. Concentrating on the 1950s to the mid 1970s, it highlights the period's diversity of sexual concerns. New readings of seminal figures like Samuel Selvon and George ...
Sexuality, Gender and Nationalism in Caribbean Literature
This book is the first to focus exclusively on issues of gender and sexuality in a range of post-war novels from the Anglophone Caribbean. Concentrating on the 1950s to the mid 1970s, it highlights the period's diversity of sexual concerns. New readings of seminal figures like Samuel Selvon and George Lamming are offered, in tandem with discussion of innovative, lesser-studied authors such as Andrew Salkey, Oscar Dathorne and Rosa Guy. Whereas this body of work has tended to be characterised as minimally engaged with sexuality and overly reliant on patriarchal, heteronormative frameworks, the book takes a different approach. First, it unpacks the motivations behind the masculinist bent of much of this writing, emphasising the anxieties underlying such assertion. It exposes both the gendered and sexual imperatives of the nationalist project and the destabilising effects of migration on masculine performance. Second, it brings to life a range of critically neglected same-sex desires. Framing such longing as both narratively and nationally disruptive, it recovers the marginalised erotic relations that challenge fantasies of national cohesion. As a result, the book opens up existing mappings of Caribbean fiction. Drawing on queer theory, feminism and masculinity studies, it highlights the ways in which sex both exceeds and threatens the imagined unity on which the nationalist vision depends.
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168.000000 USD
Hardback
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Threshold Time provides an introductory survey of the cultural, social and political history of Mexican American and Chicano literature, as well as new in-depth analyses of a selection of works that between them span a hundred years of this particular branch of American literature. The book begins its explorations of ...
Threshold Time: Passage of Crisis in Chicano Literature
Threshold Time provides an introductory survey of the cultural, social and political history of Mexican American and Chicano literature, as well as new in-depth analyses of a selection of works that between them span a hundred years of this particular branch of American literature. The book begins its explorations of the passage of crisis with Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton's The Squatter and the Don, continues with Americo Paredes' George Washington Gomez, Tomas Rivera's ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him, Richard Rodriguez's Hunger of Memory, and ends with Helena Maria Viramontes' Under the Feet of Jesus and Benjamin Alire Saenz' Carry Me Like Water. In order to do justice to the idiosyncrasies of the individual texts and the complexities they embrace, the analyses refer to a number of other texts belonging to the tradition, and draw on a wide range of theoretical approaches. The final chapter of Threshold Time brings the various readings together in a discussion circumscribed by the negotiations of a temporality that is strongly aligned with a sense of memory peculiar to the history of the Chicano presence in the United States of America.
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33.05 USD
Paperback / softback
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The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature offers a comprehensive, critically engaging overview of this increasingly significant body of work. The volume is divided into six sections that consider: the foremost figures of the Anglophone Caribbean literary tradition and a history of literary critical debate textual turning points, identifying key ...
The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature
The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature offers a comprehensive, critically engaging overview of this increasingly significant body of work. The volume is divided into six sections that consider: the foremost figures of the Anglophone Caribbean literary tradition and a history of literary critical debate textual turning points, identifying key moments in both literary and critical history and bringing lesser known works into context fresh perspectives on enduring and contentious critical issues including the canon, nation, race, gender, popular culture and migration new directions for literary criticism and theory, such as eco-criticism, psychoanalysis and queer studies the material dissemination of Anglophone Caribbean literature and generic interfaces with film and visual art This volume is an essential text that brings together sixty-nine entries from scholars across three generations of Caribbean literary studies, ranging from foundational critical voices to emergent scholars in the field. The volume's reach of subject and clarity of writing provide an excellent resource and springboard to further research for those working in literature and cultural studies, postcolonial and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean studies, history and geography.
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141.88 USD
Hardback
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This guide was designed to help teachers and librarians identify books that will provide K-12 students with an understanding of the cultures of Latino people. The books referenced here offer insight into and appreciation for the people, history, art, and political, social, and economic problems of Central and South America, ...
The Best of the Latino Heritage: A Guide to the Best Juvenile Books about Latino People and Cultures
This guide was designed to help teachers and librarians identify books that will provide K-12 students with an understanding of the cultures of Latino people. The books referenced here offer insight into and appreciation for the people, history, art, and political, social, and economic problems of Central and South America, Mexico, Spain, Puerto Rico, and Latin-heritage people in the United States. In determining the best books, Isabel Schon used a number of criteria, including the presentation of the material, the quality of the art and writing, and the appeal to children in various age groups. In all cases, she looked for books containing information that is accurate and up-to-date, presented in a way that is entertaining and engaging for the reader. Books are listed by country and include complete bibliographic information as well as a summary of content, annotations regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the work, and notes on grade level appropriateness. Includes an author index, title index, and subject index.
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37.94 USD
Hardback
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Contemporary research on Caribbean literature displays a rich variety of themes, literary and cultural categories, forms, genres, languages. Still, the concept of a unified Caribbean literary space remains questionable, depending upon whether one strictly limits it to the islands, enlarges it to adopt a Latin-American perspective, or even grants it ...
Caribbean Interfaces
Contemporary research on Caribbean literature displays a rich variety of themes, literary and cultural categories, forms, genres, languages. Still, the concept of a unified Caribbean literary space remains questionable, depending upon whether one strictly limits it to the islands, enlarges it to adopt a Latin-American perspective, or even grants it inter-American dimensions. This book is an ambitious tentative to bring together specialists from various disciplines: neither just French, Spanish, English, or Comparative studies specialists, nor strictly Caribbean literature specialists, but also theoreticians, cultural studies scholars, historians of cultural translation and of intercultural transfers. The contributions tackle two major questions: what is the best possible division of labor between comparative literature, cultural anthropology and models of national or regional literary histories? how should one make use of transversal concepts such as: memory, space, linguistic awareness, intercultural translation, orature or hybridization? Case studies and concrete projects for integrated research alternate with theoretical and historiographical contributions. This volume is of utmost interest to students of Caribbean studies in general, but also to anyone interested in Caribbean literatures in Spanish, English and French, as well as to students in comparative literature, cultural studies and transfer research.
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80.15 USD
Paperback / softback
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Littoral of the Letter is the first full-fledged study in English of the work of the late Argentine author Juan Jose Saer (1937-2005), who was highly regarded as Argentina's best living novelist, a continuator of Burgess' literary legacy. Characterized by an uncommon coherence and rigor, Juan Jose Saer's writing defies ...
Littoral of the Letter: Saer's Art of Narration
Littoral of the Letter is the first full-fledged study in English of the work of the late Argentine author Juan Jose Saer (1937-2005), who was highly regarded as Argentina's best living novelist, a continuator of Burgess' literary legacy. Characterized by an uncommon coherence and rigor, Juan Jose Saer's writing defies simple categories. In both his fictional and essayistic writing, Saer defamiliarizes the reader by questioning some of his most cherished certainties, especially those having to do with the role ascribed to Latin American literature, the uses of prose and poetry in the present, and the relation between language and the mass media. By questioning the assimilation of prose theory and the novel theory dictated by pragmatic needs of the state and the market, Saer produces a change in the function of narrative language that allows him to start where more traditional forms of realism end: the unsayable. The purpose of the book is to make explicit Saer's procedures, the main coordinates of his poetics and to reflect on the situation of literature in an age dominated by images and the total cultural phenomenon. Gabriel Riera is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University.
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Hardback
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The End of the World as They Knew It maps the shifting constructions of the space of the South in Argentine discourses of identity, nation, and self-fashioning. In works by Domingo F. Sarmiento, Lucio V. Mansilla, Francisco P. Moreno, Jorge Luis Borges, Ricardo Piglia, and Cesar Aira, Eva-Lynn Alicia Jagoe ...
The End of the World as They Knew it: Writing Experiences of the Argentine South
The End of the World as They Knew It maps the shifting constructions of the space of the South in Argentine discourses of identity, nation, and self-fashioning. In works by Domingo F. Sarmiento, Lucio V. Mansilla, Francisco P. Moreno, Jorge Luis Borges, Ricardo Piglia, and Cesar Aira, Eva-Lynn Alicia Jagoe examines how representations of the South - as primitive, empty, violent, or a place of potential - inform Argentine liberal ideology. Part of this process entails the reception of travel narratives by Francis Bond Head, Charles Darwin, and W.H. Hudson, which served the purpose of ratifying the gaze of the criollo, and of appropriating the South through civilized discourses.Focusing on crucial moments in Argentine cultural history, such as the 1871 Conquest of the Desert and the military dictatorship of the 1970s, Jagoe compellingly argues that these intensely experiential narrations of the South are inextricably linked to questions of collective memory and the construction of an Argentine history and tradition. Well written and thoroughly researched, The End of the World as They Knew It will appeal to scholars of Argentine literature and culture, as well as those interested in travel writing and nation building.
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52.99 USD
Hardback
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While Jews figure in the work of many modern Latin American writers, the questions of how and to what end they are represented have received remarkably little critical attention. Helping to correct this imbalance, Erin Graff Zivin traces the symbolic presence of Jews and Jewishness in late-nineteenth- through late-twentieth-century literary ...
The Wandering Signifier: Rhetoric of Jewishness in the Latin American Imaginary
While Jews figure in the work of many modern Latin American writers, the questions of how and to what end they are represented have received remarkably little critical attention. Helping to correct this imbalance, Erin Graff Zivin traces the symbolic presence of Jews and Jewishness in late-nineteenth- through late-twentieth-century literary works from Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Mexico, Colombia, and Nicaragua. Ultimately, Graff Zivin's investigation of representations of Jewishness reveals a broader, more complex anxiety surrounding difference in modern Latin American culture.In her readings of Spanish American and Brazilian fiction, Graff Zivin highlights inventions of Jewishness in which the concept is constructed as a rhetorical device. She argues that Jewishness functions as a wandering signifier that while not wholly empty, can be infused with meaning based on the demands of the textual project in question. Just as Jews in Latin America possess distinct histories relative to their European and North American counterparts, they also occupy different symbolic spaces in the cultural landscape. Graff Zivin suggests that in Latin American fiction, anxiety, desire, paranoia, attraction, and repulsion toward Jewishness are always either in tension with or representative of larger attitudes toward otherness, whether racial, sexual, religious, national, economic, or metaphysical. She concludes The Wandering Signifier with an inquiry into whether it is possible to ethically represent the other within the literary text, or whether the act of representation necessarily involves the objectification of the other.
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104.950000 USD
Hardback
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De la vida y del amor: Monte Mar a
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9.980000 USD

De la vida y del amor: Monte Mar a

by Asdrubal Lopez
Paperback / softback
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Confluencias barrocas. Los pliegues de la modernidad en America Latina
43.050000 USD

Confluencias barrocas. Los pliegues de la modernidad en America Latina

by Leon Felipe Barron Rosas, Victor Hugo Pacheco Chavez
Paperback / softback
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An important contribution to the study of Walcott's poetry and plays. --Modernism/modernity Walcott, [Burnett] says, has assimilated western tradition to his own project, using it to create a new plural world of open-ended possibilities. . . . A book that should be of interest to any student of Walcott's literature. ...
Derek Walcott: Politics and Poetics
An important contribution to the study of Walcott's poetry and plays. --Modernism/modernity Walcott, [Burnett] says, has assimilated western tradition to his own project, using it to create a new plural world of open-ended possibilities. . . . A book that should be of interest to any student of Walcott's literature. --Times Higher Education Supplement This ambitious book takes in the full corpus of Walcott--plays, essays, interviews, etc., as well as the poetry--and argues the essential unity of his (humanistic) vision. --Wasafiri Burnett is very good on Walcott's aesthetic and technical strategies, particularly the mythopoeic framework of his thought, and the epic form which he frequently employs. --New West Indian Guide Convincingly suggests that Walcott's art radiates outward from St. Lucia to the West Indies, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Americas, becoming an art that honors and enlarges the English language and its multiple histories and usages. --World Literature Today A long-overdue critical assessment of Walcott's varied and extensive oeuvre. Its insightful readings and detailed historical and cultural context make it a must-read for students of contemporary Caribbean literature and culture. -- Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, Vassar College Paula Burnett offers a new interpretation of the life's work of acclaimed St. Lucian poet, playwright, and Nobel Prize winner Derek Walcott. Often regarded as the radical voice of the Third World, his drama and poetry together form a coherent project designed to create a legacy for modern Caribbean society. Illuminating his ideology and the technique that informs his writing, Burnett discusses his unique approach to myth, identity, and aesthetics. In addition to his poetry, the book draws extensively on Walcott's essays, plays, broadcasts, private interviews, and public appearances, some previously unpublished or unrecorded. What emerges is the picture of an epic poet with remarkable gifts working to impart the distinctive wisdom of Caribbean culture--a politically aware writer celebrating his people, place, and language. Burnett also reveals an artist with a message to the world: that a positive sense of identity can be built out of negative circumstances like injustice and exploitation, if only creativity is mobilized. The book serves as a critical study for more experienced scholars and as a solid introductory text for students of Walcott's work. Its readable and well-organized style also makes it appealing to anyone with a general interest in poetry.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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The border between fact and fiction has always been a porous one for Isabel Allende. Her acclaimed first novel, The House of the Spirits, began as a letter to her dying grandfather yet is filled with ghosts and green-haired and clairvoyant women; her memoir Paula, though ostensibly nonfiction, is a ...
Isabel Allende
The border between fact and fiction has always been a porous one for Isabel Allende. Her acclaimed first novel, The House of the Spirits, began as a letter to her dying grandfather yet is filled with ghosts and green-haired and clairvoyant women; her memoir Paula, though ostensibly nonfiction, is a moving and highly imaginative account of her family history and the illness and death of her daughter, Paula. Even in the many interviews she has given, Allende has embellished the details of her life to captivate and charm her readers. She has more than succeeded. Around the world, readers have flocked to both her fiction and her nonfiction, making her one of the best-selling women novelists in the world today. Edited and with an introduction by John Rodden, a celebrated Allende scholar, this volume in the Critical Insights series brings together a variety of essays on this Chilean Scheherazade. Rodden's introduction assesses the phases of Allende's career and her growth as a writer, and Michael Wood, writing on behalf of The Paris Review, considers Allende's relation to magical realism. Amanda Hopkinson, in turn, provides a comprehensive biography of Allende and a measured examination of how her life has informed her work.For students encountering Allende for the first time, four introductory essays provide a valuable framework for studying her in greater depth. Beth E. Joergenson surveys the range of critical opinions and the major strands of critical thought on Allende's work, and Charles Rossman's close reading of The House of the Spirits analyzes in depth the novel's setting, characters, and plot. Maria Roof compares Allende's use of the family saga novel to Maryse Conde's, and Carrie Sheffield describes the context in which Allende wrote her first and most popular novel, The House of the Spirits.Next, a collection of essays on key works and subjects deepens readers' understanding of Allende. The House of the Spirits is treated by Sara E. Cooper, who uses family systems theory to explicate the novel's major themes, and Barbara Foley Buedel considers the magical realist aspects of Eva Luna and The Stories of Eva Luna. Linda S. Maier and Cherie Meacham both explore Paula, with Maier focusing on how the memoir acted as a catharsis for Allende and Meacham relating the work to The House of the Spirits.Allende's prequels to The House of the Spirits-Daughter of Fortune and Portrait in Sepia-are then taken up by John Rodden and Nadia Avendano. Rodden examines the autobiographical facets of both novels while Avendano considers how Allende breaks down gender barriers in Daughter of Fortune. Linda Gould Levine extends Avendano's insights with a broad study of how Allende has transgressed boundaries of race, class, gender, and nationality throughout her career. Vincent Kling seeks to overturn the common perception of Allende as little more than a popular novelist by revealing how she continually draws on myth, archetype, and paradox to lend depth and nuance to her writing.A quartet of essays then treat a few of Allende's lesser known works. Philip Swanson examines Zorro, while Luz Maria Umpierre analyzes one of the short stories, Two Words. Don Latham discusses the magical realist facets of Allende's young adult novels, and John Rodden considers Allende's self-presentation in her interviews.Rounding out the volume are a chronology of Allende's life and a list of her principal publications as well as a bibliography for readers seeking to study this fascinating author in greater depth.Finally, the volume's appendixes offer a section of useful reference resources:A chronology of the author's lifeA complete list of the author's works and their original dates of publicationA general bibliographyA detailed paragraph on the volume's editorNotes on the individual chapter authorsA subject index
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110.250000 USD
Hardback
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With the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, during an economic crisis termed its special period in times of peace, Cuba began to court the capitalist world for the first time since its 1959 revolution. With the U.S. dollar instated as domestic currency, the island seemed suddenly accessible ...
Cuban Currency: The Dollar and Special Period Fiction
With the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, during an economic crisis termed its special period in times of peace, Cuba began to court the capitalist world for the first time since its 1959 revolution. With the U.S. dollar instated as domestic currency, the island seemed suddenly accessible to foreign consumers, and their interest in its culture boomed. Cuban Currency is the first book to address the effects on Cuban literature of the country's spectacular opening to foreign markets that marked the end of the twentieth century. Based on interviews and archival research in Havana, Esther Whitfield argues that writers have both challenged and profited from new transnational markets for their work, with far-reaching literary and ideological implications. Whitfield examines money and cross-cultural economic relations as they are inscribed in Cuban fiction. Exploring the work of Zoe Valdes, Pedro Juan Gutierrez, Antonio Jose Ponte and others, she draws out writers' engagements with the troublesome commodification of Cuban identity. Confronting the tourist and publishing industries' roles in the transformation of the Cuban revolution into commercial capital, Whitfield identifies a body of fiction peculiarly attuned to the material and political challenges of the special period. Esther Whitfield is assistant professor of comparative literature at Brown University.
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54.35 USD
Hardback
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The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica's work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jesus Lara, ...
The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism
The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica's work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jesus Lara, Jose Maria Arguedas, and Rosario Castellanos, among other thinkers, Tarica explores the rhetorical and ideological aspects of interethnic affinity and connection. In her examination, she demonstrates that these connections posed a challenge to existing racial hierarchies in Spanish America by celebrating a new kind of national self at the same time that they contributed to new forms of subjection and discrimination. Going beyond debates about the relative merits of indigenismo and mestizaje, Tarica puts forward a new perspective on indigenista literature and modern mestizo identities by revealing how these ideologies are symptomatic of the dilemmas of national subject formation. The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism offers insight into the contemporary resurgence and importance of indigenista discourses in Latin America. Estelle Tarica is associate professor of Latin American literature and culture at the University of California, Berkeley.
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54.35 USD
Hardback
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