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Cuban author Alejo Carpentier (1904-1980) was a key figure in the foundation of contemporary Latin American fiction. By taking a critical position vis-a-vis the restitutionary current in Latin American studies (e.g., to focus on the myths of the noble savage, lost paradises, black legends, and good revolutionaries), James Pancrazio provides ...
The Logic of Fetishism: Alejo Carpentier and the Cuban Tradition
Cuban author Alejo Carpentier (1904-1980) was a key figure in the foundation of contemporary Latin American fiction. By taking a critical position vis-a-vis the restitutionary current in Latin American studies (e.g., to focus on the myths of the noble savage, lost paradises, black legends, and good revolutionaries), James Pancrazio provides a highly innovative re-reading of Carpentier's work. Borrowing theories of psychoanalysis, gender, performance, and Cuban literature and historiography, The Logic of Fetishism argues that the structure of disavowal functions as a creative alternative to the all-encompassing meta-narratives of exile and insularity. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that transgression is written into the Cuban code: border crossings form the matrix of Cuban literature and culture. Pancrazio thus focuses on the oft-neglected transvestite, a figure who marks the entrance to the symbolic order and makes culture possible by representing representation.
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47.46 USD
Hardback
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This book analyzes the narrative and rhetorical structures of Latin American colonial texts by establishing a dialogue with contemporary studies on minority discourse, minor literatures, and colonial and postcolonial theory. The first chapter reviews the current disciplinary debate between colonial Latin American studies and early modern, transatlantic, and postcolonial studies, ...
From Lack to Excess: 'Minor' Readings of Latin American Colonial Discourse
This book analyzes the narrative and rhetorical structures of Latin American colonial texts by establishing a dialogue with contemporary studies on minority discourse, minor literatures, and colonial and postcolonial theory. The first chapter reviews the current disciplinary debate between colonial Latin American studies and early modern, transatlantic, and postcolonial studies, paying attention to the epistemic and institutional junctures that explain the current reconfiguration of these fields of scholarship. As an alternative to an exhausted debate, this study uses Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's notion of a 'minor literature' along with current studies on minority discourse to propose new close readings of canonical texts by Hernan Cortes, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, the Inca Garcilasco de la Vega, Carlos de Siguenza y Gongora and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz.
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42.72 USD
Hardback
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Magnarelli's latest contribution to the critical dialogue on Spanish-American literature offers fresh, new readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention as well as insightful analyses of others that have seldom been studied. She employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches - feminism, post-colonial theory, gender theory, postmodern ...
Home is Where the (He)art is: The Family Romance in Late Twentieth-century Mexican and Argentine Theater
Magnarelli's latest contribution to the critical dialogue on Spanish-American literature offers fresh, new readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention as well as insightful analyses of others that have seldom been studied. She employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches - feminism, post-colonial theory, gender theory, postmodern theory, and cultural theory, among others - to examine in detail ten plays written or performed between 1956 and 1999. In her analysis of works by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina Hernandez, the North American critic proffers a welcome balance between close readings of the plays in question and a provocative discussion of sociopolitical issues as well as the mechanisms of theatre itself.
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51.88 USD
Hardback
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Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams uses Elena Garro's eccentric life and work as a lens through which to examine mid-twentieth-century Mexican intellectuals' desire to reconcile mexicanidad with modernidad. The famously scandalous first wife of Nobel Prize winner poet Octavio Paz, and an award-winning author in her own right, Garro ...
Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams
Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams uses Elena Garro's eccentric life and work as a lens through which to examine mid-twentieth-century Mexican intellectuals' desire to reconcile mexicanidad with modernidad. The famously scandalous first wife of Nobel Prize winner poet Octavio Paz, and an award-winning author in her own right, Garro constructed a mysterious and often contradictory persona through her very public participation in Mexican political conflicts. Herself an anxious and contentious Mexican writer, Elena Garro elicited profound political and aesthetic anxiety in her Mexican readers. She confused the personal and the public in her creative fictions as well as in her vision of Mexican modernity. This violation of key distinctions rendered her largely illegible to her contemporaries. That illegibility serves as a symptom of unacknowledged desires that motivate twentieth-century views of national modernity. Taken together, Garro's public persona and critical perspective expose the anxieties regarding ethnicity, gender, economic class, and professional identity that define Mexican modernity. Blending cultural studies and detailed literary analysis with political and intellectual history, Mexico's Modern Dreams argues that, in addition to the intriguing gossip she elicited in literary and political circles, Garro produced a radical critique of Mexican modernity. Her critique applies as well to the nation's twenty-first-century crisis of globalization, state power, and pervasive violence.
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114.450000 USD

Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams

by Rebecca E. Biron
Hardback
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Central at the Margin examines the work of five Brazilian women writers: Julia Lopes de Almeida, and women's power within and outside the family; Rachel de Queiroz and the relation between backcountry matriarchs and city wives and workers; Lygia Fagundes Telles and the crumbling world of the coffee aristocrat; Clarice ...
Central at the Margin: Five Brazilian Women Writers
Central at the Margin examines the work of five Brazilian women writers: Julia Lopes de Almeida, and women's power within and outside the family; Rachel de Queiroz and the relation between backcountry matriarchs and city wives and workers; Lygia Fagundes Telles and the crumbling world of the coffee aristocrat; Clarice Lispector and what constitutes a Brazilian, a woman, a writer; Carolina Maria de Jesus and the definition of marginality at the margin.They lived and worked between the late nineteenth century and the 1970s. Their names are widely recognized in Brazil: they are central to the literary scene there; collectively they have received every literary honor and prize available. The book examines the meaning of such centrality for women whose work is nevertheless not included in the history of the development of Brazilian literature - their centrality is problematic in their place of origin - and by implication, it questions concepts of centrality and marginality within Brazilian literature and in the relation between Brazilian and world literatures. Renata R. M. Wasserman is a Professor of English and Comparative Literatures at Wayne State University.
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48.95 USD
Hardback
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Ambivalent Desires: Representations of Modernity and Private Life in Colombia (1890s-1950s) is a literary and cultural study of the reception of modernity in Colombia. Unlike previous studies of Latin American modernization, which have usually focused on the public aspect of the process, this book discusses the intersection between modernity and ...
Ambivalent Desires: Representations of Modernity and Private Life in Colombia (1890s-1950s)
Ambivalent Desires: Representations of Modernity and Private Life in Colombia (1890s-1950s) is a literary and cultural study of the reception of modernity in Colombia. Unlike previous studies of Latin American modernization, which have usually focused on the public aspect of the process, this book discusses the intersection between modernity and the private sphere. It analyzes canonical and noncanonical works that reflect the existing ambivalence toward the modernizing project being implemented in the country at the time, and it discusses how the texts in question reinterpret, adapt, and even reject the ideology of modernity. The focus of the study is how the understanding of the relationship between modernity and private life relates to the project of constructing a modern nation, and the discontinuities and contradictions that appear in the process. The question of what modernity is, its implications for everyday life, and its desirability or undesirability as a new cultural paradigm were central issues in Colombian texts from the end of the nineteenth century through the first half of the twentieth. At stake was the definition of the nation's identity and the project of breaking away from the cultural patterns of the colonial past. Considering that the apparently peaceful process of modernization in Colombia was interrupted in the 1950s by the eruption of political violence across the country, this study situates itself on the eve of a crisis and asks how representations of modernity in texts from the period evidence the social fragmentation that may have led to it.
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42.72 USD
Hardback
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This book analyzes the narrative and rhetorical structures of Latin American colonial texts by establishing a dialogue with contemporary studies on minority discourse, minor literatures, and colonial and postcolonial theory. The first chapter reviews the current disciplinary debate between colonial Latin American studies and early modern, transatlantic, and postcolonial studies, ...
From Lack to Excess: Minor Reading of Latin American Colonial Discourse
This book analyzes the narrative and rhetorical structures of Latin American colonial texts by establishing a dialogue with contemporary studies on minority discourse, minor literatures, and colonial and postcolonial theory. The first chapter reviews the current disciplinary debate between colonial Latin American studies and early modern, transatlantic, and postcolonial studies, paying attention to the epistemic and institutional junctures that explain the current reconfiguration of these fields of scholarship. As an alternative to an exhausted debate, this study uses Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's notion of a 'minor literature' along with current studies on minority discourse to propose new close readings of canonical texts by Hernan Cortes, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, the Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Carlos de Siguenza y Gongora and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel is Associate Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania.
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48.44 USD
Hardback
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Exemplary Ambivalence in Late Nineteenth-Century Spanish America: Narrating Creole Subjectivity casts new light on the role of exemplary narrative in nineteenth-century Spanish America, highlighting the multiplicity of didactic writing and its dynamic relationship with readers as interpretive agents. Drawing on literary and historical models of creole heterogeneity, Austin's study probes ...
Exemplary Ambivalence in Late Nineteenth-Century Spanish America: Narrating Creole Subjectivity
Exemplary Ambivalence in Late Nineteenth-Century Spanish America: Narrating Creole Subjectivity casts new light on the role of exemplary narrative in nineteenth-century Spanish America, highlighting the multiplicity of didactic writing and its dynamic relationship with readers as interpretive agents. Drawing on literary and historical models of creole heterogeneity, Austin's study probes the unstable social and ethnic fictions of the creole elite as they portray themselves through the flawed canvas of exemplary discourse. Exemplary Ambivalence examines creole subjectivity through postcolonial and Latin American theoretical lenses to show that Spanish American creole subjects, always multiple, reveal their ideological ambivalence through exemplary narrative. This study examines a cross-section of canonical and lesser-known texts written toward the end of the nineteenth-century by authors across Spanish America, including Eugenio Cambaceres (Argentina), Jose Asuncion Silva (Colombia), Jose Marti (Cuba), Clorinda Matto de Turner (Peru), and Juana Manuela Gorriti (Argentina). These texts range from realist and modernist novels to a cookbook of multiple authorship, and engage issues of nationalism, citizenship, gender, indigenous rights, and liberal ideologies within the historical context of Spanish America's weakened democracies and modernizing economies at the end of the nineteenth-century. Austin's research fills a critical gap within studies of the nineteenth-century in Spanish America as it explores the inconsistencies of exemplary texts and emphasizes the forms, sources, and implications of creole ideological and narrative multiplicity. By recognizing the inherent ambivalence of exemplary discourse, along with creole writing and reading subjectivities, Exemplary Ambivalence opens fresh perspectives on canonical texts while it also engages some of the non-canonical, hybrid, and fragmentary texts of nineteenth-century reading culture.
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102.900000 USD
Hardback
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Interiors and Narrative shows how crucial interiors are for our understanding of the nature of narrative. A growing cultural fascination with interior dwelling so prevalent in the late nineteenth century parallels an intensification of the rhetorical function interior architecture plays in the development of fiction. The existential dimension of dwelling ...
Interiors and Narrative: The Spatial Poetics of Machado de Assis, Eca de Queiros, and Leopoldo Alas
Interiors and Narrative shows how crucial interiors are for our understanding of the nature of narrative. A growing cultural fascination with interior dwelling so prevalent in the late nineteenth century parallels an intensification of the rhetorical function interior architecture plays in the development of fiction. The existential dimension of dwelling becomes so intimately tied to the novelistic project that fiction surfaces as a way of inhabiting the world. This study illustrates this through a comparative reading of three realist masterpieces of the Luso-Hispanic nineteenth century: Machado de Assis's Quincas Borba (1891), Eca de Queiros's The Maias (1888), and Leopoldo Alas's La Regenta (1884-1885). The first full-length study to juxtapose the renowned writers, Interiors and Narrative analyzes the authors' spatial poetics while offering new readings of their work. The book explores the important links between interiors and narrative by explaining how rooms, furnishings, and homes function as metaphors for the writing of the narrative, reflecting on the complex relation between private dwellings and human interiority, and arguing that the interior design of rooms becomes a language that gives furnishings and decorative objects a narrative life of their own. The story of homes and furnishings in these narratives creates a semiotic language that both readers and characters rely on in order to make sense of fiction and reality.
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101.850000 USD

Interiors and Narrative: The Spatial Poetics of Machado de Assis, Eca de Queiros, and Leopoldo Alas

by Estela Vieira
Hardback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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60.29 USD
Hardback
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This book is a critical study of the work of Gregory Rabassa, translator of such canonical novels as Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Cien anos de soledad, Jose Lezama Lima's Paradiso, and Julio Cortazar's Rayuela. During the past five decades, Rabassa has translated over fifty Latin American novels and to this day ...
Gregory Rabassa's Latin American Literature: A Translator's Visible Legacy
This book is a critical study of the work of Gregory Rabassa, translator of such canonical novels as Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Cien anos de soledad, Jose Lezama Lima's Paradiso, and Julio Cortazar's Rayuela. During the past five decades, Rabassa has translated over fifty Latin American novels and to this day he is one of the most prominent English translators of literature from Spanish and Portuguese. Rabassa's role was pivotal in the internationalization of several Latin American writers; it led to the formation of a canon and, significantly, to the most prevalent image of Latin American literature in the world. Even though Rabassa's legacy has been widely recognized, the extent of his work's influence and the complexity of the sociocultural circumstances surrounding his practice have remained largely unexamined. In Gregory Rabassa's Latin American Literature: A Translator's Visible Legacy, Maria Constanza Guzman examines the translator's conceptions about language, contextualizes his work in terms of the structures and conditions that have surrounded his practice, and investigates the role his translations have played in constructing collective narratives of Latin American literature in the global imaginary. By revisiting and historicizing the translator's practice, this book reveals the scale of Rabassa's legacy. The translator emerges as an active subject in the inter-American literary exchange, an agent bound to history and to the forces involved in the production of culture.
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90.300000 USD
Hardback
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Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba ...
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World: Silvestre De Balboa's Espejo De Paciencia
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba on April 29, 1604. Marrer-Fente argues that the disappearance of the Espejo de paciencia manuscript during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries did not prevent the poetic world described in the text from founding a trope of enduring possibilities in Cuban literature. Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World makes a salient contribution to Cuban colonial studies by offering a comparison between Balboa's poem and the works of other contemporary authors from the Canary Islands, Spain, Spanish America, emphasizing the relevance of transatlantic relations in the poetic production of the period.
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38.21 USD
Hardback
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This book offers a richly detailed panorama of contemporary Spanish Caribbean literature and culture, as well as a compelling theoretical exploration of how authors of the Spanish Caribbean (Cuba, Santo Domingo, and Puerto Rico) have incorporated the cultural legacy of Africa into their narrative fictions. The book offers an in-depth ...
Voices Out of Africa in Twentieth-century Spanish Caribbean Literature
This book offers a richly detailed panorama of contemporary Spanish Caribbean literature and culture, as well as a compelling theoretical exploration of how authors of the Spanish Caribbean (Cuba, Santo Domingo, and Puerto Rico) have incorporated the cultural legacy of Africa into their narrative fictions. The book offers an in-depth analysis of cultural and religious expressions associated with Africa in the Caribbean and of the complex codification associated with the representation of those expressions. Voices Out of Africa explores how literary representations of Africa in the Spanish Caribbean construct a self-referential discourse about Africa in a Caribbean landscape, and examines how Afro-Caribbean practices, rituals, local memories, and belief systems inform such discourse. It is a textual journey through the multiple layers of the region's cultural expressions. It is also a work of scholarship and theory accessible to scholars and to interested laypersons in Afro-Caribbean lore and culture. Julia Cuervo Hewitt is Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Pennsylvania State University.
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67.22 USD
Hardback
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Verses Against the Darkness: offers a new assessment of Pablo Neruda's poetry by looking at the intersection of his aesthetic method and political radicalism from 1925 to 1954. It challenges the canonical view that Neruda was a gifted verse maker who, in 1936, let himself be carried away by the ...
Verses Against the Darkness: Pablo Neruda's Poetry and Politics
Verses Against the Darkness: offers a new assessment of Pablo Neruda's poetry by looking at the intersection of his aesthetic method and political radicalism from 1925 to 1954. It challenges the canonical view that Neruda was a gifted verse maker who, in 1936, let himself be carried away by the excesses of communist politics. Instead, by focusing primarily on Tercera residencia (1935-1945), Greg Dawes argues for an uneven yet steady evolution and continuity in Neruda's work, politics, and morality. Dawes relies on historical accounts, biographies, literary history, and criticism - and on Neruda's political and aesthetic theory - to prove that his poetry became, contrary to received critical opinion, more sophisticated literarily and politically as he became more radicalized during the Spanish Civil War and World War II and as he developed his dialectical realism or guided spontaneity. Greg Dawes is Associate Professor of Latin American and World Literatures at North Carolina State University and is the editor of the on-line journal A contracorriente.
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Hardback
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Moving Forward, Looking Back: Trains, Literature, and the Arts in the River Plate by Sarah M. Misemer argues that the train is paradoxically an anachronistic and modern indicator of River Plate national identity when seen in the literature and film of the region. The train's connections with new concepts of ...
Moving Forward, Looking Back
Moving Forward, Looking Back: Trains, Literature, and the Arts in the River Plate by Sarah M. Misemer argues that the train is paradoxically an anachronistic and modern indicator of River Plate national identity when seen in the literature and film of the region. The train's connections with new concepts of time and space, as well as the rise of the industrial age, make it a symbol loaded with cultural meanings. This project traces the importance of the train as a marker of key moments in Argentine and Uruguayan history from 1854 to the present (nation-building, neo-colonialism, modernization/industrialization, dictatorship, privatization, and debt crisis). Through textual, filmic, and historical accounts this study demonstrates that the train is not simply an icon of the nineteenth-century's Naturalist movement, but rather a powerful contemporary metaphor for authors and directors of the River Plate as they communicate/create collective memory and cultural values in a region mired in uneven spurts of modernization and progress.
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42.72 USD
Hardback
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The years 1909-1930, the eleven-year presidency of the businessman-turned-politician Augusto B. Leguia, mark a formative period of Peruvian modernity, witnessing the continuity of a process of reconstruction and the development of an intellectual and cultural tradition after a humbling defeat during the War of the Pacific (1879-1883). But these years ...
Jose Carlos Mariategui's Unfinished Revolution: Politics, Poetics, and Change in 1920s Peru
The years 1909-1930, the eleven-year presidency of the businessman-turned-politician Augusto B. Leguia, mark a formative period of Peruvian modernity, witnessing the continuity of a process of reconstruction and the development of an intellectual and cultural tradition after a humbling defeat during the War of the Pacific (1879-1883). But these years were also fraught with conflict generated by long-standing divisions and new rivalries. A postwar generation of intellectuals and artists, led by Jose Carlos Mariategui and galvanized by left-wing thinking and an avant-garde aesthetic, sought representation in the fields of politics and the arts to realize the modernizing potentialities opened up by a Positivist oligarchy. New political and artistic conceptions raised their awareness of the fractured sense of nationhood in Peru and the need for a new project of nation-formation based on a common political and cultural consciousness. Crucially, this gave rise to divergent political and artistic positions and practices. Mariategui's Indigenist-Marxist politics and Modernist-inspired poetics, through his influential journal Amauta, were pivotal in revitalizing, conciliating and channeling those of his cohorts and challengers. Comprising six full-length chapters, a comprehensive introduction and conclusion, this monograph is ambitious in scope and depth. It provides fresh readings of key writings of Mariategui, one of Latin America's most important and revolutionary political, cultural and aesthetic theorists, through the lens of his poetics, emphasizing the value of this approach for a fuller understanding of his work's political meaning and impact. It does so through detailed analysis of the poetic, expressive language employed in seminal political essays, aimed at forging a new Marxist position in 1920s Peru. Furthermore, it offers powerful and original critiques of under-studied intellectuals of this time, especially aprista-Futurists, Socialists and Indigenists, including female writers and artists such as Magda Portal, Angela Ramos, and Julia Codesido whose work he championed. These readings are fully contextualized in terms of detailed critical study of complex sociopolitical conditions and positions, and biographical, intellectual backgrounds of Mariategui and his contemporaries. This monograph underscores the fundamental importance of Mariategui in the development of political and artistic practices and projects that shaped a national, shared, yet also heterogeneous, political culture and cultural tradition in Peru during and after his lifetime.
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114.450000 USD

Jose Carlos Mariategui's Unfinished Revolution: Politics, Poetics, and Change in 1920s Peru

by Melisa Moore
Hardback
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Littoral of the Letter is the first full-fledged study in English of the work of the late Argentine author Juan Jose Saer (1937-2005), who was highly regarded as Argentina's best living novelist, a continuator of Burgess' literary legacy. Characterized by an uncommon coherence and rigor, Juan Jose Saer's writing defies ...
Littoral of the Letter: Saer's Art of Narration
Littoral of the Letter is the first full-fledged study in English of the work of the late Argentine author Juan Jose Saer (1937-2005), who was highly regarded as Argentina's best living novelist, a continuator of Burgess' literary legacy. Characterized by an uncommon coherence and rigor, Juan Jose Saer's writing defies simple categories. In both his fictional and essayistic writing, Saer defamiliarizes the reader by questioning some of his most cherished certainties, especially those having to do with the role ascribed to Latin American literature, the uses of prose and poetry in the present, and the relation between language and the mass media. By questioning the assimilation of prose theory and the novel theory dictated by pragmatic needs of the state and the market, Saer produces a change in the function of narrative language that allows him to start where more traditional forms of realism end: the unsayable. The purpose of the book is to make explicit Saer's procedures, the main coordinates of his poetics and to reflect on the situation of literature in an age dominated by images and the total cultural phenomenon. Gabriel Riera is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University.
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Hardback
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The End of the World as They Knew It maps the shifting constructions of the space of the South in Argentine discourses of identity, nation, and self-fashioning. In works by Domingo F. Sarmiento, Lucio V. Mansilla, Francisco P. Moreno, Jorge Luis Borges, Ricardo Piglia, and Cesar Aira, Eva-Lynn Alicia Jagoe ...
The End of the World as They Knew it: Writing Experiences of the Argentine South
The End of the World as They Knew It maps the shifting constructions of the space of the South in Argentine discourses of identity, nation, and self-fashioning. In works by Domingo F. Sarmiento, Lucio V. Mansilla, Francisco P. Moreno, Jorge Luis Borges, Ricardo Piglia, and Cesar Aira, Eva-Lynn Alicia Jagoe examines how representations of the South - as primitive, empty, violent, or a place of potential - inform Argentine liberal ideology. Part of this process entails the reception of travel narratives by Francis Bond Head, Charles Darwin, and W.H. Hudson, which served the purpose of ratifying the gaze of the criollo, and of appropriating the South through civilized discourses.Focusing on crucial moments in Argentine cultural history, such as the 1871 Conquest of the Desert and the military dictatorship of the 1970s, Jagoe compellingly argues that these intensely experiential narrations of the South are inextricably linked to questions of collective memory and the construction of an Argentine history and tradition. Well written and thoroughly researched, The End of the World as They Knew It will appeal to scholars of Argentine literature and culture, as well as those interested in travel writing and nation building.
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52.99 USD
Hardback
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This study examines Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian women writers, as well as analyzing the roles of women of African descent in Cuban and Brazilian literature. Initially, literary imagination locked women into circumscribed roles, a result of hierarchies embedded in slavery and coloniality, and sustained by hierarchical theories on race and gender. ...
Literary Passion, Ideological Commitment
This study examines Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian women writers, as well as analyzing the roles of women of African descent in Cuban and Brazilian literature. Initially, literary imagination locked women into circumscribed roles, a result of hierarchies embedded in slavery and coloniality, and sustained by hierarchical theories on race and gender. The discussion illustrates how these negative aspects have influenced the mainstream literary imagination that contrasts with the 'self-portrayals' created by women writers themselves. Even as there continues to be disadvantageous constructions, there is no doubt that a modification has occurred over time in images, representation, and articulation. It is a change directly associated with the instances when women themselves are the writers. The historiographic image of the Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian woman as a written object is ideologically replaced by a vision of her as a writing subject. It is here that the vision of a creative, multifaceted, and diversified literature becomes important.
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47.46 USD
Hardback
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In Out of Bounds, Dara E. Goldman teases out the intricacies of a territorial conception of nationhood in the context of a global reorganization that ostensibly renders historical boundaries irrelevant. Hispanic Caribbean writers have traditionally pointed toward the supposed purpose equivalence of island and nation and have explained local culture ...
Out of Bounds: Islands and the Demarcation of Identity in the Hispanic Caribbean
In Out of Bounds, Dara E. Goldman teases out the intricacies of a territorial conception of nationhood in the context of a global reorganization that ostensibly renders historical boundaries irrelevant. Hispanic Caribbean writers have traditionally pointed toward the supposed purpose equivalence of island and nation and have explained local culture as a direct consequence of that equation. The major social, political, and demographic shifts of the twentieth century increasingly call this equation into question, yet authors continue to assert its existence and its centrality in the evolution of Caribbean identity. Goldman contends that traditional forms of identification have not been eviscerated by globalization; instead, they have persisted and, in some cases, have been intensified by recent geopolitical shifts. Out of Bounds underscores the ongoing role of the nation as the site of identity formation.
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42.72 USD
Hardback
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