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This volume, which includes essays on Catalonia, the Basque country, Galicia, and literature written by African immigrants, focuses on issues of difference that are at the center of current debates in Spain and elsewhere--the emergence of minoritized literatures, multilingualism and identity, new relationships between culture and institutions, the negotiation of ...
New Spain, New Literatures
This volume, which includes essays on Catalonia, the Basque country, Galicia, and literature written by African immigrants, focuses on issues of difference that are at the center of current debates in Spain and elsewhere--the emergence of minoritized literatures, multilingualism and identity, new relationships between culture and institutions, the negotiation of historical memories, the connections between migrations and the redefinition of nationhood, and the impact of global trends on local symbolic systems.
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104.950000 USD

New Spain, New Literatures

Hardback
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In Mexico, the confluence of the 1992 Quincentennial commemoration of Columbus's voyages and the neo-liberal sexenio, or presidency, of Carlos Salinas de Gortari spurred artistic creations that capture the decade like no other source does. In the 1990s, Mexican artists produced an inordinate number of works that revise and rewrite ...
Mexico, from Mestizo to Multicultural: National Identity and Recent Representations of the Conquest
In Mexico, the confluence of the 1992 Quincentennial commemoration of Columbus's voyages and the neo-liberal sexenio, or presidency, of Carlos Salinas de Gortari spurred artistic creations that capture the decade like no other source does. In the 1990s, Mexican artists produced an inordinate number of works that revise and rewrite the events of the sixteenth-century conquest and colonization. These works and their relationship to, indeed their mirroring of, the intellectual and cultural atmosphere in Mexico during the Salinas presidency are of paramount importance if we are to understand the subtle but deep shifts within Mexico's national identity that took place at the end of the last century. Throughout the twentieth century, the post-revolutionary Mexican State had used mestizaje as a symbol of national unity and social integration. By the end of the millennium, however, Mexico had gone from a PRI-dominated, economically protectionist nation to a more democratic, economically globalizing one. More importantly, the homogenizing, mestizophile national identity that pervaded Mexico throughout the past century had given way to official admission of Mexico's ethnic and linguistic diversity - or 'pluriculture' according to President Salinas's 1992 constitutional revision. This book is the first interdisciplinary study of literary, cinematic, and graphic images of Mexican national identity in the 1980s and '90s. Discussing, in depth, writings, films, and cartoons from a vast array of contemporary sources, Carrie C. Chorba creates a social history of this important shift.
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104.950000 USD

Mexico, from Mestizo to Multicultural: National Identity and Recent Representations of the Conquest

by Carrie C. Chorba
Hardback
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The literature of Cuba, argues Eduardo Gonzalez in this new book, takes on quite different features depending on whether one is looking at it from the inside or from the outside, a view that in turn is shaped by official political culture and the authors it sanctions or by those ...
Cuba and the Fall: Christian Text and Queer Narrative in the Fiction of Josa(c) Lezama Lima and Reinaldo Arenas (New World Studies) (New World Studies (Hardcover))
The literature of Cuba, argues Eduardo Gonzalez in this new book, takes on quite different features depending on whether one is looking at it from the inside or from the outside, a view that in turn is shaped by official political culture and the authors it sanctions or by those authors and artists who exist outside state policies and cultural politics. Gonzalez approaches this issue by way of two twentieth-century writers who are central to the canon of gay homoerotic expression and sensibility in Cuban culture: Jose Lezama Lima (1910-1976) and Reinaldo Arenas (1943-1990). Drawing on the plots and characters in their works, Gonzalez develops both a story line and a moral tale, revolving around the Christian belief in the fall from grace and the possibility of redemption, that bring the writers into a unique and revealing interaction with one another. The work of Lezama Lima and Arenas is compared with that of fellow Cuban author Virgilio Pinera (1912-1979) and, in a wider context, with the non-Cuban writers John Milton, Nathaniel Hawthorne, William Faulkner, John Ruskin, and James Joyce to show how their themes get replicated in Gonzalez's selected Cuban fiction. Also woven into this interaction are two contemporary films--The Devil's Backbone (2004) and Pan's Labyrinth (2007)--whose moral and political themes enhance the ethical values and conflicts of the literary texts. Referring to this eclectic gathering of texts, Gonzalez charts a cultural course in which Cuba moves beyond the Caribbean and into a latitude uncharted by common words, beyond the tyranny of place.
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78.750000 USD

Cuba and the Fall: Christian Text and Queer Narrative in the Fiction of Josa(c) Lezama Lima and Reinaldo Arenas (New World Studies) (New World Studies (Hardcover))

by Gonzalex
Hardback
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The Purloined Islands offers the first book-length exploration of literary and cultural exchanges between the United States and the Caribbean during the roughly eighty-year period of their greatest interaction, from the close of the Spanish-American War to the Cuban Revolution. The interconnected histories of colonization, migration, slavery, and political struggle ...
The Purloined Islands: Caribbean-U.S. Crosscurrents in Literature and Culture, 1880-1959
The Purloined Islands offers the first book-length exploration of literary and cultural exchanges between the United States and the Caribbean during the roughly eighty-year period of their greatest interaction, from the close of the Spanish-American War to the Cuban Revolution. The interconnected histories of colonization, migration, slavery, and political struggle thrust writers from both regions into a vibrant literary conversation across national borders. Jeff Karem charts this dialogue and its patterns of influence through an analysis of key literary and cultural sources in English, French, and Spanish, including a large body of rare archival evidence. What the author identifies in this wide-ranging exchange is the Caribbean's vital contribution not only to the literatures of the American hemisphere but also to the literary and intellectual culture of the United States itself. Specifically, he shows how such movements as pan-Africanism, the New Negro Renaissance, and pan-American modernism have significant Caribbean roots, although the United States has often failed to recognize them, effectively purloining those resources without acknowledgment. As his title's allusion to Poe's The Purloined Letter suggests, Karem argues that the contributions of the Caribbean have been borrowed, appropriated, and nationalized by U.S. culture but are hidden in plain sight. Both its multilingual character and its emphasis on the reciprocity in cultural cross-currents will make the book of interest to readers not only in Caribbean and American cultural and literary studies but also in pan-American or border studies, Black Atlantic studies, and African American studies.
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78.750000 USD

The Purloined Islands: Caribbean-U.S. Crosscurrents in Literature and Culture, 1880-1959

by Jeff Karem
Hardback
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This is the first book in English on Horacio Quiroga (Uruguay 1878-Argentina 1937), a canonical author whose works are read by all advanced students of Spanish in the US and many other countries. The study examines Quiroga's work through the theoretical lens of the heroic-a lens elaborated in part by ...
Pariah in the Desert: The Heroic and the Monstrous in Horacio Quiroga
This is the first book in English on Horacio Quiroga (Uruguay 1878-Argentina 1937), a canonical author whose works are read by all advanced students of Spanish in the US and many other countries. The study examines Quiroga's work through the theoretical lens of the heroic-a lens elaborated in part by means of Quiroga's own disquisitions on the subject-and the complementary phenomenon of the monstrous. This lens serves to elucidate many evidently obscure and self-contradictory aspects of Quiroga's work and its relation to the context in which he lived. That context included the neo-colonial social and economic milieu of Argentina's fast-changing, immigrant-charged, increasingly materialistic society; the growing influence of foreign cultural discourses, particularly Hollywood film; the conflict between the genders in a society that embraced modernity but resisted changes in gender roles; the weight of new scientific discourses, especially Darwinian evolution, in social and political thought; and the impact on pedagogical theory and practice of these multiple changing discourses. This study discloses the extraordinary range of Quiroga's work, which includes erotic romance, science fiction and fantasy, psychological occult, social satire, a great variety of juvenile literature, outdoor adventure and-most familiar to readers in the United States-gothic and naturalist horror. The book concludes that Quiroga's consistent imperative of the heroic is essential to reconciling these various, evidently incompatible aspects of Quiroga's poetics, revealing its theoretical and ethical coherence.
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88.200000 USD

Pariah in the Desert: The Heroic and the Monstrous in Horacio Quiroga

by Todd S. Garth
Hardback
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Imagine the tension that existed between the emerging nations and governments throughout the Latin American world and the cultural life of former enslaved Africans and their descendants. A world of cultural production, in the form of literature, poetry, art, music, and eventually film, would often simultaneously contravene or cooperate with ...
Black Writing, Culture, and the State in Latin America
Imagine the tension that existed between the emerging nations and governments throughout the Latin American world and the cultural life of former enslaved Africans and their descendants. A world of cultural production, in the form of literature, poetry, art, music, and eventually film, would often simultaneously contravene or cooperate with the newly established order of Latin American nations negotiating independence and a new political and cultural balance. In Black Writing, Culture, and the State in Latin America, Jerome Branche presents the reader with the complex landscape of art and literature among Afro-Hispanic and Latin artists. Branche and his contributors describe individuals such as Juan Francisco Manzano, who wrote an antislavery novel in Cuba during the nineteenth century. The reader finds a thriving Afro-Hispanic theatrical presence throughout Latin America and even across the Atlantic. The role of black women in poetry and literature comes to the forefront in the Caribbean, presenting a powerful reminder of the diversity that defines the region. All too often, the disciplines of film studies, literary criticism, and art history ignore the opportunity to collaborate in a dialogue. Branche and his contributors present a unified approach, however, suggesting that cultural production should not be viewed narrowly, especially when studying the achievements of the Afro-Latin world.
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104.950000 USD

Black Writing, Culture, and the State in Latin America

Hardback
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In Market Aesthetics, Elena Machado Saez explores the popularity of Caribbean diasporic writing within an interdisciplinary, comparative, and pan-ethnic framework. She contests established readings of authors such as Junot Diaz, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, and Robert Antoni while showcasing the work of emerging writers such as David Chariandy, Marlon James, ...
Market Aesthetics: The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction
In Market Aesthetics, Elena Machado Saez explores the popularity of Caribbean diasporic writing within an interdisciplinary, comparative, and pan-ethnic framework. She contests established readings of authors such as Junot Diaz, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, and Robert Antoni while showcasing the work of emerging writers such as David Chariandy, Marlon James, and Monique Roffey. By reading these writers as part of a transnational literary trend rather than within isolated national ethnic traditions, the author is able to show how this fiction adopts market aesthetics to engage the mixed blessings of multiculturalism and globalization via the themes of gender and sexuality.
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68.250000 USD

Market Aesthetics: The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction

by Elena Machado Saez
Hardback
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This book offers to rethink identities within contemporary Judeo-Argentinean fiction by dealing with the transforming notion of Jewishness and of national identity in Argentina. It focuses on the dialogue (and confrontation) between the narrative text and the imaginary national space it questions. By reviewing the new material conditions within Argentina ...
Made of Shores: Judeo-Argentinean Fiction Revisited
This book offers to rethink identities within contemporary Judeo-Argentinean fiction by dealing with the transforming notion of Jewishness and of national identity in Argentina. It focuses on the dialogue (and confrontation) between the narrative text and the imaginary national space it questions. By reviewing the new material conditions within Argentina and its diasporic communities, this book imposes a new reflection on what Judeo-Argentinean fiction is all about. It reflects on the shifting notion of identity, abandoning traditional definitions, in order to rather analyze how feelings of alienation and nostalgia echo an era of transculturation and floating borders. The novels that this book studies return to the past from a certain distance created by time and space. This distance leads the reader to question the relevance of geographical, cultural, and linguistic differences within identity formation. Since its beginning, the research of Jewish Latin America has focused on the quest of Jewish immigrants for a consolidated identity, social, and cultural integration in their receiving societies, and recognition within the official and canonical national history. Traditional scholarship has paid special attention to the construction of collective memory and the dilemma of double identity. Nonetheless, the transforming notion of otherness in the last few decades, associated traditionally with the Jewish character, requires a new approach when discussing contemporary affiliations of Jews in Argentina and their narrative representations. New waves of emigration from Argentina at the beginning of the new millennium, economic and social disintegration, general disillusion with the state apparatus, and the gaps left in the collective memory following the years of the military dictatorship redefine personal and collective identities and demand a careful reexamination of the concept of argentinidad and its cultural significances.
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90.300000 USD

Made of Shores: Judeo-Argentinean Fiction Revisited

by Amalia Ran
Hardback
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The Historical Dictionary of Latin American Literature and Theater provides users with an accessible single-volume reference tool covering Portuguese-speaking Brazil and the 16 Spanish-speaking countries of continental Latin America (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela). Entries for ...
Historical Dictionary of Latin American Literature and Theater
The Historical Dictionary of Latin American Literature and Theater provides users with an accessible single-volume reference tool covering Portuguese-speaking Brazil and the 16 Spanish-speaking countries of continental Latin America (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela). Entries for authors, ranging from the early colonial period to the present, give succinct biographical data and an account of the author's literary production, with particular attention to their most prominent works and where they belong in literary history. The introduction provides a review of Latin American literature and theater as a whole while separate dictionary entries for each country offer insight into the history of national literatures. Entries for literary terms, movements, and genres serve to complement these commentaries, and an extensive bibliography points the way for further reading. The comprehensive view and detailed information obtained from all these elements will make this book of use to the general-interest reader, Latin American studies students, and the academic specialist.
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139.650000 USD

Historical Dictionary of Latin American Literature and Theater

by Odile Cisneros, Richard Young
Hardback
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As in many literatures of the New World grappling with issues of slavery and freedom, stories of racial insurrection frequently coincided with stories of cross-racial romance in nineteenth-century U.S. print culture. Colleen O'Brien explores how authors such as Harriet Jacobs, Elizabeth Livermore, and Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda imagined the expansion ...
Race, Romance and Rebellion: Literatures of the Americas in the Nineteenth Century
As in many literatures of the New World grappling with issues of slavery and freedom, stories of racial insurrection frequently coincided with stories of cross-racial romance in nineteenth-century U.S. print culture. Colleen O'Brien explores how authors such as Harriet Jacobs, Elizabeth Livermore, and Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda imagined the expansion of race and gender-based rights as a hemispheric affair, drawing together the United States with Africa, Cuba, and other parts of the Caribbean. Placing less familiar women writers in conversation with their more famous contemporaries-Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Lydia Maria Child-O'Brien traces the transnational progress of freedom through the antebellum cultural fascination with cross-racial relationships and insurrections. Her book mines a variety of sources-fiction, political rhetoric, popular journalism, race science, and biblical treatises-to reveal a common concern: a future in which romance and rebellion engender radical social and political transformation.
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68.250000 USD

Race, Romance and Rebellion: Literatures of the Americas in the Nineteenth Century

by Colleen C O'Brien
Hardback
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Innovative in its scope and conceptual frameworks, Creole America reveals how literary culture in the New Republic period is formed not only by expansionist designs on the North American continent but also by a push for commercial empire in the hemisphere via the roots and routes of the West Indian ...
Creole America: The West Indies and the Formation of Literature and Culture in the New Republic
Innovative in its scope and conceptual frameworks, Creole America reveals how literary culture in the New Republic period is formed not only by expansionist designs on the North American continent but also by a push for commercial empire in the hemisphere via the roots and routes of the West Indian trades. As Washington's Secretary of the Treasury, the chief architect of the United States as an empire for commerce, West Indian immigrant Alexander Hamilton came to embody the great uneasiness that many Americans expressed about the unpredictable, and potentially disastrous, effects on the nation and national character of extensive relations between the slave colonies of the West Indies and the putatively free and democratic states of the independent mainland. Sean X. Goudie examines such anxiety and ambivalence as characteristic of what he provocatively terms the New Republic's creole complex. Across an impressive array of genres and texts-state papers, empire tracts and political pamphlets, natural histories, autobiographies, lyric poetry, drama, and prose fiction-Goudie demonstrates how distinctions between U.S. and West Indian bodies and commodities blur amid ongoing U.S. participation in the treacherous West Indian trades. Creole America thus compels readers to come face-to-face with disturbing affiliations between U.S. and West Indian creole characters and cultures at the turn of the nineteenth century.
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68.250000 USD

Creole America: The West Indies and the Formation of Literature and Culture in the New Republic

by Sean X Goudie
Hardback
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The critical essays in this volume are dedicated to the works of Argentine writer Silvina Ocampo (1903-1993) and introduce readers more fully to a figure who has long been a kind of insider's secret among intellectuals of her country. As the title suggests, the purpose of the volume is to ...
New Readings of Silvina Ocampo: Beyond Fantasy
The critical essays in this volume are dedicated to the works of Argentine writer Silvina Ocampo (1903-1993) and introduce readers more fully to a figure who has long been a kind of insider's secret among intellectuals of her country. As the title suggests, the purpose of the volume is to move beyond the codification of Ocampo's use of the supernatural, an early oversimplification of her work. The essays address the quirkiness, cruelty, violence, and overt sexuality of her works, elements which have impeded a full understanding of her creative vision. Here it becomes clear that Silvina Ocampo was a co-contributor to the literary enterprise of the Sur generation, which produced Jorge Luis Borges, Adolfo Bioy Casares, and Victoria Ocampo, and had a profound influence on writers of the younger generation, such as Alejandra Pizarnik, Sylvia Molloy, Marjorie Agosin and others. Patricia N. Klingenberg is Professor of Latin American literature at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. Fernanda Zullo-Ruiz is Associate Professor of Spanish at Hanover College in Hanover, Indiana.
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103.950000 USD

New Readings of Silvina Ocampo: Beyond Fantasy

by Fernanda Zullo-Ruiz, Patricia Nisbet Klingenberg
Hardback
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Focusing on the literary representation of performance practices in anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean literature, Jeannine Murray-Roman shows how a shared regional aesthetic emerges from the descriptions of music, dance, and oral storytelling events. Because the historical circumstances that led to the development of performance traditions supersede the geopolitical and ...
Performance and Personhood in Caribbean Literature: From Alexis to the Digital Age
Focusing on the literary representation of performance practices in anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean literature, Jeannine Murray-Roman shows how a shared regional aesthetic emerges from the descriptions of music, dance, and oral storytelling events. Because the historical circumstances that led to the development of performance traditions supersede the geopolitical and linguistic divisions of colonialism, the literary uses of these traditions resonate across the linguistic boundaries of the region. The author thus identifies the aesthetic that emerges from the act of writing about live arts and moving bodies as a practice that is grounded in the historically, geographically, and culturally specific features of the Caribbean itself. Working with twentieth- and twenty-first-century sources ranging from theatrical works and novels to blogs, Murray-Roman examines the ways in which writers such as Jacques Stephen Alexis, Zoe Valdes, Rosario Ferre, Patrick Chamoiseau, and Marlon James experiment with textually compensating for the loss of the corporeality of live relationship in performance traditions. Through their exploration of the interaction of literature and performance, she argues, Caribbean writers themselves offer a mode of bridging the disjunction between cultural and philosophical approaches within Caribbean studies.
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62.480000 USD

Performance and Personhood in Caribbean Literature: From Alexis to the Digital Age

by Jeannine Murray-Roman
Hardback
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A scientist's exploration of the working of memory begins with a story by Borges about a man who could not forget. Imagine the astonishment felt by neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga when he found a fantastically precise interpretation of his research findings in a story written by the great Argentinian fabulist ...
Borges and Memory: Encounters with the Human Brain
A scientist's exploration of the working of memory begins with a story by Borges about a man who could not forget. Imagine the astonishment felt by neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga when he found a fantastically precise interpretation of his research findings in a story written by the great Argentinian fabulist Jorge Luis Borges fifty years earlier. Quian Quiroga studies the workings of the brain-in particular how memory works-one of the most complex and elusive mysteries of science. He and his fellow neuroscientists have at their disposal sophisticated imaging equipment and access to information not available just twenty years ago. And yet Borges seemed to have imagined the gist of Quian Quiroga's discoveries decades before he made them. The title character of Borges's Funes the Memorious remembers everything in excruciatingly particular detail but is unable to grasp abstract ideas. Quian Quiroga found neurons in the human brain that respond to abstract concepts but ignore particular details, and, spurred by the way Borges imagined the consequences of remembering every detail but being incapable of abstraction, he began a search for the origins of Funes. Borges's widow, Maria Kodama, gave him access to her husband's personal library, and Borges's books led Quian Quiroga to reread earlier thinkers in philosophy and psychology. He found that just as Borges had perhaps dreamed the results of Quian Quiroga's discoveries, other thinkers-William James, Gustav Spiller, John Stuart Mill-had perhaps also dreamed a story like Funes. With Borges and Memory, Quian Quiroga has given us a fascinating and accessible story about the workings of the brain that the great creator of Funes would appreciate.
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33.38 USD

Borges and Memory: Encounters with the Human Brain

by Rodrigo Quian Quiroga
Hardback
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Chicano Poetics: Heterotexts and Hybridities examines the crossing of literary and social forces - be they linguistic, political, poetic - that forms the context for being Chicano. It reveals how a poetry of the cross can influence identity, in readings ranging from the poetry of gender and race by Sor ...
Chicano Poetics: Heterotexts and Hybridities
Chicano Poetics: Heterotexts and Hybridities examines the crossing of literary and social forces - be they linguistic, political, poetic - that forms the context for being Chicano. It reveals how a poetry of the cross can influence identity, in readings ranging from the poetry of gender and race by Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz to that of the fragmentary, postmodern subject of Juan Felipe Herrara. How the text of Spanish and Indian miscegenation and the story of Aztlan propagate identity is demonstrated in texts from Bernal Diaz del Castillo to Gloria Anzaldua. The international space and the interlingual language of the borderlands are read as factors of nationalism and postcoloniality in discussion ranging from cowboy lingo to the essential Mexicanism of Octavio Paz. Heterotextuality is the medium in which xicanismo is articulated and comes to be a hybrid subject of textual difference.
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111.250000 USD

Chicano Poetics: Heterotexts and Hybridities

by Alfred Arteaga
Hardback
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This book argues for a new attention to the importance of beauty and the aesthetic in our response to poetry. Charles Martindale explores ways in which Kant's aesthetic theory, as set out in the Critique of Judgement, remains of fundamental importance for the modern critic. He argues that the Kantian ...
Latin Poetry and the Judgement of Taste: An Essay in Aesthetics
This book argues for a new attention to the importance of beauty and the aesthetic in our response to poetry. Charles Martindale explores ways in which Kant's aesthetic theory, as set out in the Critique of Judgement, remains of fundamental importance for the modern critic. He argues that the Kantian 'judgement of taste' is not formalist, and explores the relationship between the aesthetic and the political in our responses to art. Finally he urges the value of aesthetic criticism as pioneered by Walter Pater and others. The (mainly Latin) poems discussed are all translated, and the book will be of interest not only to classicists but to anyone interested in aesthetics, aestheticism, poetry, reception, comparative literature, and critical theory.
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178.500000 USD

Latin Poetry and the Judgement of Taste: An Essay in Aesthetics

by Charles Martindale
Hardback
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This is the first study to examine the representation of illness, disability, and cultural pathologies in modern and contemporary Iberian and Latin American literature. Innovative and interdisciplinary, the collection situates medicine as an important and largely overlooked discourse in these literatures, while also considering the social, political, religious, symbolic, and ...
Latin American and Iberian Perspectives on Literature and Medicine
This is the first study to examine the representation of illness, disability, and cultural pathologies in modern and contemporary Iberian and Latin American literature. Innovative and interdisciplinary, the collection situates medicine as an important and largely overlooked discourse in these literatures, while also considering the social, political, religious, symbolic, and metaphysical dimensions underpinning illness. Investigating how Hispanic and Lusophone writers have reflected on the personal and cultural effects of illness, it raises central questions about how medical discourses, cultural pathologies, and the art of healing in general are represented. Essays pay particular attention to the ways in which these interdisciplinary dialogues chart new directions in the study of Hispanic and Lusophone cultures, and emerging disciplines such as the medical humanities. Addressing a wide range of themes and subjects including bioethics, neuroscience, psychosurgery, medical technologies, Darwinian evolution, indigenous herbal medicine, the rising genre of the pathography, and the 'illness as metaphor' trope, the collection engages with the discourses of cultural studies, gender studies, disability studies, comparative literature, and the medical humanities. This book enriches and stimulates scholarship in these areas by showing how much we still have to gain from interdisciplinary studies working at the intersections between the humanities and the sciences.
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178.500000 USD

Latin American and Iberian Perspectives on Literature and Medicine

Hardback
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Quince Duncan is one of the most significant yet understudied Black writers in the Americas. A third-generation Afro-Costa Rican of West Indian heritage, he is the first novelist of African descent to tell the story of Jamaican migration to Costa Rica. Duncan's work has been growing in popularity among scholars ...
Quince Duncan's Weathered Men and The Four Mirrors: Two Novels of Afro-Costa Rican Identity
Quince Duncan is one of the most significant yet understudied Black writers in the Americas. A third-generation Afro-Costa Rican of West Indian heritage, he is the first novelist of African descent to tell the story of Jamaican migration to Costa Rica. Duncan's work has been growing in popularity among scholars and teachers of Afro-Latin American literature and African Diaspora Studies. This translation brings two of his major novels to English-speaking audiences for the first time, Weathered Men and The Four Mirrors. The book will be invaluable for those eager to develop further their background in Afro-Latin American literature, and it will enable students and faculty members in other fields such as comparative literature to engage with the burgeoning area of Afro-Latin American literary studies.
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120.87 USD

Quince Duncan's Weathered Men and The Four Mirrors: Two Novels of Afro-Costa Rican Identity

by Dorothy E. Mosby
Hardback
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In the postdictatorial era, Latin American cultural production and criticism have been defined by a series of assumptions about politics and art-expecially the claim that political freedom can be achieved by promoting a more direct experience between the textual subject (often a victim) and the reader by eliminating the division ...
The Vanishing Frame: Latin American Culture and Theory in the Postdictatorial Era
In the postdictatorial era, Latin American cultural production and criticism have been defined by a series of assumptions about politics and art-expecially the claim that political freedom can be achieved by promoting a more direct experience between the textual subject (often a victim) and the reader by eliminating the division between art and life. The Vanishing Frame argues against this conception of freedom, demonstrating how it is based on a politics of human rights complicit with economic injustices. Presenting a provocative counternarrative, Eugenio Claudio Di Stefano examines literary, visual, and interdisciplinary artists who insist on the autonomy of the work of art in order to think beyond the politics of human rights and neoliberalism in Latin American theory and culture. Di Stefano demonstrates that while artists such as Diamela Eltit, Ariel Dorfman, and Albertina Carri develop a concept of justice premised on recognizing victims' experiences of torture or disappearance, they also ignore the injustice of economic inequality and exploitation. By examining how artists such as Roberto Bolano, Alejandro Zambra, and Fernando Botero not only reject an aesthetics of experience (and the politics it entails) but also insist on the work of art as a point of departure for an anticapitalist politics, this new reading of Latin American cultural production offers an alternative understanding of recent developments in Latin American aesthetics and politics that puts art at its center and the postdictatorship at its end.
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94.500000 USD

The Vanishing Frame: Latin American Culture and Theory in the Postdictatorial Era

by Eugenio Claudio Di Stefano
Hardback
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In a highly original and interdisciplinary work bridging French and Francophone studies, cultural studies, media studies, and gender and sexuality studies, Luis Navarro-Ayala examines the transnational queer body as a physical and symbolic entity intrinsically connected with space. Through a transcultural and intersectional approach to bodily representations, socioeconomic conditions, and ...
Queering Transcultural Encounters: Bodies, Image, and Frenchness in Latin America and North Africa
In a highly original and interdisciplinary work bridging French and Francophone studies, cultural studies, media studies, and gender and sexuality studies, Luis Navarro-Ayala examines the transnational queer body as a physical and symbolic entity intrinsically connected with space. Through a transcultural and intersectional approach to bodily representations, socioeconomic conditions, and postcolonial politics, Navarro-Ayala analyzes queerness and Frenchness in narratives from North Africa and Latin America, revealing that Frenchness is coded to represent a sexually deviant Other. France and Frenchness, in two distinct regions of the global South, have come to represent an imagined queer space enabling sexual exploration, even in social conditions that would have otherwise prevented queer agency.
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89.240000 USD

Queering Transcultural Encounters: Bodies, Image, and Frenchness in Latin America and North Africa

by Luis Navarro-Ayala
Hardback
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An introduction to contemporary Latin American narrative published in the 1970s, presenting ten major writers. Each chapter covers the biography, career of the author and one important novel in depth while attempting to summarize major critical opinions about the development of Latin American narrative. The authors presented are Cabrera Infante, ...
Nomads, Exiles, & Emigres: The Rebirth of Latin American Narrative, 1960-80
An introduction to contemporary Latin American narrative published in the 1970s, presenting ten major writers. Each chapter covers the biography, career of the author and one important novel in depth while attempting to summarize major critical opinions about the development of Latin American narrative. The authors presented are Cabrera Infante, Carpentier, Cortazar, Donoso, Fuentes, Gardia Marquez, Lezama Lima, Puig, Sarduy, and Vargas Llosa.
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66.150000 USD

Nomads, Exiles, & Emigres: The Rebirth of Latin American Narrative, 1960-80

by Ronald Schwartz
Hardback
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Writing for Inclusion is a study of some of the ways the idea of national identity developed in the nineteenth century in two neighboring nations, Cuba and The United States. The book examines symbolic, narrative, and sociological commonalities in the writings of four Afro-Cuban and African American writers: Juan Francisco ...
Writing for Inclusion: Literature, Race, and National Identity in Nineteenth-Century Cuba and the United States
Writing for Inclusion is a study of some of the ways the idea of national identity developed in the nineteenth century in two neighboring nations, Cuba and The United States. The book examines symbolic, narrative, and sociological commonalities in the writings of four Afro-Cuban and African American writers: Juan Francisco Manzano and Frederick Douglass, fugitive slaves during mid-century; and Martin Morua Delgado and Charles W. Chesnutt from the post-slavery period. All four share sensitivity to their imperfect inclusion as full citizens, engage in an examination of the process of racialization that hinders them in seeking such inclusion, and contest their definition as non-citizens. Works discussed include the slave narratives of Manzano and Douglass, Manzano's poetry and play Zafira, and Douglass's oratory and novella The Heroic Slave. Also considered, within the context provided by Manzano and Douglass, are Morua and Chesnutt's non-fiction writings about race and nation as well as their second-generation tragic mulata novels Sofia and The House Behind the Cedars. Based on an examination of the works of these four authors, Writing for Inclusion provides a detailed examination of examples of self-emancipation, the authors' symbolic use of language, their expression of social anxieties or irony within the quest for recognition, and their arguments for an inclusive vision of national identity beyond the quagmires of race. By focusing on the process of racialization and ideas of race and national identity in a comparative context, the study seeks to highlight the artificial and contested nature of both terms and suggest new ways to interrogate them in our present day.
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94.500000 USD

Writing for Inclusion: Literature, Race, and National Identity in Nineteenth-Century Cuba and the United States

by Karen Ruth Kornweibel
Hardback
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In Spain, the two hundred years that elapsed between the beginning of the early modern period and the final years of the Habsburg Empire saw a profusion of works written by women. Whether secular or religious, noble or middle class, early modern Spanish women actively composed creative works such as ...
The Routledge Research Companion to Early Modern Spanish Women Writers
In Spain, the two hundred years that elapsed between the beginning of the early modern period and the final years of the Habsburg Empire saw a profusion of works written by women. Whether secular or religious, noble or middle class, early modern Spanish women actively composed creative works such as poetry, prose narratives, and plays. The Routledge Research Companion to Early Modern Spanish Women Writers covers the broad array of different kinds of writings - literary as well as extra-literary - that these women wrote, taking into consideration their subject positions and the cultural and historical contexts that influenced and were influenced by them. Beyond merely recognizing the individual women authors who had influence in literary, religious, and intellectual circles, this Research Companion investigates their participation in these circles through their writings, as well as the ways in which their texts informed Spain's cultural production during the early modern period. In order to contextualize women's writings across the historical and cultural spectrum of early modern Spain, the Research Companion is divided into six sections of general thematic interest: Women's Worlds; Conventual Spaces; Secular Literature; Women in the Public Sphere; Private Circles; Women Travelers. Each section is subdivided into chapters that focus on specific issues or topics.
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297.55 USD

The Routledge Research Companion to Early Modern Spanish Women Writers

Hardback
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Grappling with the contemporary Latin American literary climate and its relationship to the pervasive technologies that shape global society, this book visits Latin American literature, technology, and digital culture from the post-boom era to the present day. The volume examines literature in dialogue with the newest media, including videogames, blogs, ...
Technology, Literature, and Digital Culture in Latin America: Mediatized Sensibilities in a Globalized Era
Grappling with the contemporary Latin American literary climate and its relationship to the pervasive technologies that shape global society, this book visits Latin American literature, technology, and digital culture from the post-boom era to the present day. The volume examines literature in dialogue with the newest media, including videogames, blogs, electronic literature, and social networking sites, as well as older forms of technology, such as film, photography, television, and music. Together, the essays interrogate how the global networked subject has affected local political and cultural concerns in Latin America. They show that this subject reflects an affective mode of knowledge that can transform the way scholars understand the effects of reading and spectatorship on the production of political communities. The collection thus addresses a series of issues crucial to current and future discussions of literature and culture in Latin America: how literary, visual, and digital artists make technology a formal element of their work; how technology, from photographs to blogs, is represented in text, and the ramifications of that presence; how new media alters the material circulation of culture in Latin America; how readership changes in a globalized electronic landscape; and how critical approaches to the convergences, boundaries, and protocols of new media might transform our understanding of the literature and culture produced or received in Latin America today and in the future.
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168.000000 USD

Technology, Literature, and Digital Culture in Latin America: Mediatized Sensibilities in a Globalized Era

Hardback
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In Orphan Narratives , Valerie Loichot investigates the fiction and poetry of four writers who emerged from the postslavery plantation world of the Americas - William Faulkner (USA), Edouard Glissant (Martinique), Toni Morrison (USA), and Saint-John Perse (Guadeloupe) - to show how these descendants from slaves and from slaveholders wrote ...
Orphan Narratives: The Postplantation Literature of Faulkner, Glissant, Morrison, and Saint-John Perse
In Orphan Narratives , Valerie Loichot investigates the fiction and poetry of four writers who emerged from the postslavery plantation world of the Americas - William Faulkner (USA), Edouard Glissant (Martinique), Toni Morrison (USA), and Saint-John Perse (Guadeloupe) - to show how these descendants from slaves and from slaveholders wrote both in relation and in resistance to the violence of plantation slavery. She uses the term orphan narrative to capture the ways in which this violence servered the child, the text, and history from a traceable origin. Black or white, male or female, Antillean or American, these writers share a common inheritance and transnational connection through which their texts maintain familial, temporal, and narrative patterns without having any central authority figure. The author specifically cites Saint-John Perse's Eloges (1911), Faulkner's Light in August (1932), Morrison's Song of Solomon (1977), and Glissant's La Case du commandeur (1981) as postslavery texts. Where the actual family is dismembered, these narrative accounts invent new familian links. Reciprocally, biological family ties endure despite the literal and discursive violence inflicted upon them. Breaking new ground in trans-American studies by juxtaposing texts from the francophone Lesser Antilles and the U.S. South, Orphan Narratives will be a valuable addition to Caribbean, American, and postcolonial studies, not to mention its appeal to scholars and students of Faulkner, Glissant, Morrison, and Saint-John Perse.
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22.580000 USD

Orphan Narratives: The Postplantation Literature of Faulkner, Glissant, Morrison, and Saint-John Perse

by Valerie Loichot
Paperback / softback
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Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) was one of the great writers of the twentieth century and the most influential author in the Spanish language of modern times. He had a seminal influence on Latin American literature and a lasting impact on literary fiction in many other languages. However, Borges has been ...
The Cambridge Companion to Jorge Luis Borges
Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) was one of the great writers of the twentieth century and the most influential author in the Spanish language of modern times. He had a seminal influence on Latin American literature and a lasting impact on literary fiction in many other languages. However, Borges has been accessible in English only through a number of anthologies drawn mainly from his work of the 1940s and 1950s. The primary aim of this Companion is to provide a more comprehensive account of Borges's oeuvre and the evolution of his writing. It offers critical assessments by leading scholars of the poetry of his youth and the later poetry and fiction, as well as of the 'canonical' volumes of the middle years. Other chapters focus on key themes and interests, and on his influence in literary theory and translation studies.
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93.440000 USD

The Cambridge Companion to Jorge Luis Borges

Hardback
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This is the first comprehensive study in English of one of the most important bodies of verse in European literature. Seventeenth-century Spanish poetry represents the culmination of a rich Renaissance tradition, and Professor Terry sets out to make this accessible not only to Hispanists but to readers of English, French ...
Seventeenth-Century Spanish Poetry
This is the first comprehensive study in English of one of the most important bodies of verse in European literature. Seventeenth-century Spanish poetry represents the culmination of a rich Renaissance tradition, and Professor Terry sets out to make this accessible not only to Hispanists but to readers of English, French and Italian poetry, with which it had many points of contact. He deals both with the major poets - Gongora, Lope de Vega, Quevedo, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz - and with the impressively large number of good minor poets, from the Argensolas to Bocangel and Soto de Rojas, whose work is still relatively little read. Drawing upon recent developments in literary criticism as well as paying close attention to individual poems, the book discusses a wide range of issues including the re working of classical and Renaissance models, the importance of rhetoric, and the relationship between author, poem and reader.
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92.390000 USD

Seventeenth-Century Spanish Poetry

by Arthur Terry
Hardback
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As Andres Bello predicted in 1823, the glory of Simon Bolivar has continued to grow since the Spanish American Revolution. The Revolution is still viewed as an almost mythical quest, and the name of the Libertador has become synonymous with the region's hopes for integration. In this 1992 book, the ...
Bello and Bolivar: Poetry and Politics in the Spanish American Revolution
As Andres Bello predicted in 1823, the glory of Simon Bolivar has continued to grow since the Spanish American Revolution. The Revolution is still viewed as an almost mythical quest, and the name of the Libertador has become synonymous with the region's hopes for integration. In this 1992 book, the official history of the Revolution - the heroic history of Bolivar - is replaced by the account of Bello, who was first Bolivar's teacher and later his critic. Through a detailed study of the manuscripts of Bello's unfinished poem America, Antonio Cussen reconstructs Bello's version of the Revolution and seeks to understand its political and cultural consequences. The author argues that Bello recorded the disintegration of the Augustan model of power and intimated the inevitable approach of liberalism with a certain longing for the classical culture of his youth.
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106.040000 USD

Bello and Bolivar: Poetry and Politics in the Spanish American Revolution

by Antonio Cussen
Hardback
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The term Latin America refers to the Portuguese and Spanish-speaking states created in the early 1820s following the wars of independence, states that differed enormously in geographical and demographical scale, ethnic composition and economic resources, yet shared distinct historical and cultural traits. Specially-commissioned essays by leading experts explore the unity ...
The Cambridge Companion to Modern Latin American Culture
The term Latin America refers to the Portuguese and Spanish-speaking states created in the early 1820s following the wars of independence, states that differed enormously in geographical and demographical scale, ethnic composition and economic resources, yet shared distinct historical and cultural traits. Specially-commissioned essays by leading experts explore the unity and diversity of the region's cultural expressions. These essays analyse history and politics from the nineteenth century to the present day and consider the heritage of pre-Columbian and Colonial Latin America. There is a particular focus on narrative as well as on poetry, art and architecture, music, cinema, theatre, and broader issues of popular culture. A final chapter looks at the strong and rapidly expanding influence of latino/a culture in the United States. A chronology and guides to further reading are included, making this volume an invaluable introduction to the rich and varied culture of modern Latin America.
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92.390000 USD

The Cambridge Companion to Modern Latin American Culture

Hardback
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In this bold study, Edna Aizenberg offers a much-needed corrective to both Latin American literary scholarship and popular assumptions that the whole of Latin America served as a Nazi refuge both during and after World War II. Analyzing the treatment of the Shoah by five leading figures in Argentine, Brazilian, ...
On the Edge of the Holocaust: The Shoah in Latin American Literature and Culture
In this bold study, Edna Aizenberg offers a much-needed corrective to both Latin American literary scholarship and popular assumptions that the whole of Latin America served as a Nazi refuge both during and after World War II. Analyzing the treatment of the Shoah by five leading figures in Argentine, Brazilian, and Chilean writing - Alberto Gerchunoff, Clarice Lispector, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriela Mistral, and Joao Guimaraes Rosa - Aizenberg illuminates how Latin American intellectuals engaged with the horrific information that reached them regarding the Holocaust, including the sympathy and collaboration of their own governments with the Nazis. Aizenberg emphasizes how - through fiction, journalism, and activism - these five culture-makers opposed and fought fascism. At the same time, her readings of individual texts confront shopworn cliches about Latin American writing and literature, suggesting deeper and richer dimensions to many canonical works. This interdisciplinary book fills critical gaps in both Holocaust and Latin American studies, and will be of great interest to scholars and students in both fields.
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119.02 USD

On the Edge of the Holocaust: The Shoah in Latin American Literature and Culture

by Edna Aizenberg
Hardback