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The Cuban writer Nicolas Guillen has traditionally been considered a poet of mestizaje, a term that, whilst denoting racial mixture, also refers to a homogenizing nationalist discourse that proclaims the harmonious nature of Cuban identity. Yet, many aspects of Guillen's work enhance black Cuban and Afro-Cuban identities. Miguel Arnedo-Gomez explores ...
Uniting Blacks in a Raceless Nation: Blackness, Afro-Cuban Culture, and Mestizaje in the Prose and Poetry of Nicolas Guillen
The Cuban writer Nicolas Guillen has traditionally been considered a poet of mestizaje, a term that, whilst denoting racial mixture, also refers to a homogenizing nationalist discourse that proclaims the harmonious nature of Cuban identity. Yet, many aspects of Guillen's work enhance black Cuban and Afro-Cuban identities. Miguel Arnedo-Gomez explores this paradox in Guillen's pre-Cuban Revolution writings placing them alongside contemporaneous intellectual discourses that feigned adherence to the homogenizing ideology whilst upholding black interests. On the basis of links with these and other 1930s Cuban discourses, Arnedo-Gomez shows Guillen's work to contain a message of black unity aimed at the black middle classes. Furthermore, against a tendency to seek a single authorial consciousness-be it mulatto or based on a North American construction of blackness-Guillen's prose and poetry are also characterized as a struggle for a viable identity in a socio-culturally heterogeneous society.
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105.000000 USD

Uniting Blacks in a Raceless Nation: Blackness, Afro-Cuban Culture, and Mestizaje in the Prose and Poetry of Nicolas Guillen

by Miguel Arnedo-Gomez
Hardback
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Darwinism in Argentina: Major Texts (1845-1909) brings together essays, letters, short-stories, and public lectures by travelers, scientists, writers, and politicians about Darwin and the theory of evolution in nineteenth century Argentina. This selection of texts provides a thorough overview of the socio-ideological implications of the theory of evolution in South ...
Darwinism in Argentina: Major Texts (1845-1909)
Darwinism in Argentina: Major Texts (1845-1909) brings together essays, letters, short-stories, and public lectures by travelers, scientists, writers, and politicians about Darwin and the theory of evolution in nineteenth century Argentina. This selection of texts provides a thorough overview of the socio-ideological implications of the theory of evolution in South America, as well as the intellectual debate this scientific theory promoted in the discourses of fiction, law, history, and medicine in the formation of modern Argentina. Some writers in this book considered the theory of evolution to be Argentinean because Darwin first conceived his theory traveling in the Beagle, across the big cemetery of glyptodont and megatherium fossils on the pampas and in Patagonia. This anthology includes texts from William H. Hudson, Francisco Muniz, Florentino Ameghino, Eduardo Holmberg, Domingo F. Sarmiento, Hermann Burmeister, the Perito Moreno, Leopoldo Lugones, Jose Maria Ramos Mejia, and Jose Ingenieros, among others. Many of these texts have not been translated to English or reprinted until this edition, which was originally published with fewer texts in Spanish in 2008. Leila Gomez's introduction reconstructs the historical-scientific contexts of the Darwinist debate in Argentina, the role of paleontology as modern discipline in South American countries, and the tensions between metropolitan and local scientific knowledge. Both the anthology and the introduction present a panorama of Darwin and evolution in Argentina, and the complex mechanism of inclusion and exclusion of indigenous, African descendants, mestizos, and immigrants in the modern nation. Darwinism in Argentina provides critical perspectives on evolutionism in South America that will interest students and specialists in literature, history, and science.
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101.850000 USD

Darwinism in Argentina: Major Texts (1845-1909)

by Leila Gomez
Hardback
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Ricardo Palma's Tradiciones is the first full-length account of Ricardo Palma informed by theories of cultural criticism. Elisa Sampson Vera Tudela sheds new light on important aspects of Palma's work. She offers a fresh interpretation of the relations between history and literature - perhaps the most discussed aspect of Palma's ...
Ricardo Palma's Tradiciones: Illuminating Gender and Nation
Ricardo Palma's Tradiciones is the first full-length account of Ricardo Palma informed by theories of cultural criticism. Elisa Sampson Vera Tudela sheds new light on important aspects of Palma's work. She offers a fresh interpretation of the relations between history and literature - perhaps the most discussed aspect of Palma's work - engaging with new critical thinking on historicism and examining the significance of the marginal and the anecdotal in Palma's work. By using the tools of postcolonial cultural criticism, Vera Tudela considers Palma's encounter with modernity, arguing that his recuperation of colonial history plays a crucial part in imagining the modern future. Most innovatively, Vera Tudela examines the multiple and contradictory notions of femininity in nineteenth-century Latin America and in Palma's writing, showing how a historical consideration of the sexual politics of cultural production transforms our understanding of many of the assumptions about this period. Finally, by applying the insights of cultural geography in analysing the racial, sexual and political identity of domestic, urban and national space in Palma's writing, Vera Tudela demonstrates that Palma's literary maps and topographies are uniquely revelatory of questions of power and agency. In its exploration of sexual politics and nationhood, Ricardo Palma's Tradiciones presents Palma as a proto-modernist who paved the way for many of the experiments of twentieth-century Latin American narrative fiction.
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90.300000 USD

Ricardo Palma's Tradiciones: Illuminating Gender and Nation

by Elisa Sampson Vera Tudela
Hardback
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Sub-versions of the Archive: Manuel Puig's and Severo Sarduy's Alternative Identities analyzes recent theories of the archive to examine how Manuel Puig and Severo Sarduy reformulate the Latin American literary tradition. This study focuses on eclectic theories of the archive, drawing from an array of sources both within and outside ...
Sub-versions of the Archive: Manuel Puig's and Severo Sarduy's Alternative Identities
Sub-versions of the Archive: Manuel Puig's and Severo Sarduy's Alternative Identities analyzes recent theories of the archive to examine how Manuel Puig and Severo Sarduy reformulate the Latin American literary tradition. This study focuses on eclectic theories of the archive, drawing from an array of sources both within and outside the Hispanic literary tradition: Borges, Foucault, Arrom, Derrida, Gonzalez Echevarria, Guillory, digital media, and biotechnology.
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96.600000 USD

Sub-versions of the Archive: Manuel Puig's and Severo Sarduy's Alternative Identities

by Carlos Riobo
Hardback
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This book on the role of written and iconographic communication in the Atlantic World combines a broad outlook, geographically and chronologically, with the precise treatment of specific evidence extracted from the sources. The author argues that diatribes against chivalric fiction and the Index of Prohibited Books did not prevent proscribed ...
New World Literacy: Writing and Culture Across the Atlantic, 1500-1700
This book on the role of written and iconographic communication in the Atlantic World combines a broad outlook, geographically and chronologically, with the precise treatment of specific evidence extracted from the sources. The author argues that diatribes against chivalric fiction and the Index of Prohibited Books did not prevent proscribed literature from circulating freely on both sides of the Atlantic. On the contrary, he notes, such prohibitions may have increased the lure of certain books. A description of the process of registering and inspecting ships in Seville and upon reaching their destinations highlights opportunities for contraband, smuggling, fraud, and the corruption of officials entrusted with regulating the trade. Within the prominent spiritual genre, the author documents a shift from Erasmian to Tridentine thinking. The registers analyzed also suggest the growing popularity of literary works by Cervantes, Mateo Aleman, and Lope de Vega. It opens a fascinating window onto the book trade in the Americas. Different forms of participation in this culture included the use of books as fetishes and the possession of printed devotional images. The analysis of books as well as printed images supports larger contentions about their role as agents of evangelization and westernization. This book certainly opens up new worlds on the impact of books and images in the Atlantic World.
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130.18 USD

New World Literacy: Writing and Culture Across the Atlantic, 1500-1700

by Carlos Alberto Gonzalez Sanchez
Hardback
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This study explores how Spanish American modernista writers incorporated journalistic formalities and industry models through the cronica genre to advance their literary preoccupations. Through a variety of modernista writers, including Jose Marti, Amado Nervo, Manuel Gutierrez Najera and Ruben Dario, Reynolds argues that extra-textual elements-such as temporality, the material formats ...
The Spanish American Cronica Modernista, Temporality and Material Culture: Modernismo's Unstoppable Presses
This study explores how Spanish American modernista writers incorporated journalistic formalities and industry models through the cronica genre to advance their literary preoccupations. Through a variety of modernista writers, including Jose Marti, Amado Nervo, Manuel Gutierrez Najera and Ruben Dario, Reynolds argues that extra-textual elements-such as temporality, the material formats of the newspaper and book, and editorial influence-animate the modernista movement's literary ambitions and aesthetic ideology. Thus, instead of being stripped of an esteemed place in the literary sphere due to participation in the market-based newspaper industry, journalism actually brought modernismo closer to the writers' desired artistic autonomy. Reynolds uncovers an original philosophical and sociological dimension of the literary forms that govern modernista studies, situating literary journalism of the movement within historical, economic and temporal contexts. Furthermore, he demonstrates that journalism of the movement was eventually consecrated in book form, revealing modernista intentionality for their mass-produced, seemingly utilitarian journalistic articles. The Spanish American Cronica Modernista, Temporality, and Material Culture thereby enables a better understanding of how the material textuality of the cronica impacts its interpretation and readership.
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101.850000 USD

The Spanish American Cronica Modernista, Temporality and Material Culture: Modernismo's Unstoppable Presses

by Andrew Reynolds
Hardback
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In Orphan Narratives , Valerie Loichot investigates the fiction and poetry of four writers who emerged from the postslavery plantation world of the Americas - William Faulkner (USA), Edouard Glissant (Martinique), Toni Morrison (USA), and Saint-John Perse (Guadeloupe) - to show how these descendants from slaves and from slaveholders wrote ...
Orphan Narratives: The Postplantation Literature of Faulkner, Glissant, Morrison, and Saint-John Perse
In Orphan Narratives , Valerie Loichot investigates the fiction and poetry of four writers who emerged from the postslavery plantation world of the Americas - William Faulkner (USA), Edouard Glissant (Martinique), Toni Morrison (USA), and Saint-John Perse (Guadeloupe) - to show how these descendants from slaves and from slaveholders wrote both in relation and in resistance to the violence of plantation slavery. She uses the term orphan narrative to capture the ways in which this violence servered the child, the text, and history from a traceable origin. Black or white, male or female, Antillean or American, these writers share a common inheritance and transnational connection through which their texts maintain familial, temporal, and narrative patterns without having any central authority figure. The author specifically cites Saint-John Perse's Eloges (1911), Faulkner's Light in August (1932), Morrison's Song of Solomon (1977), and Glissant's La Case du commandeur (1981) as postslavery texts. Where the actual family is dismembered, these narrative accounts invent new familian links. Reciprocally, biological family ties endure despite the literal and discursive violence inflicted upon them. Breaking new ground in trans-American studies by juxtaposing texts from the francophone Lesser Antilles and the U.S. South, Orphan Narratives will be a valuable addition to Caribbean, American, and postcolonial studies, not to mention its appeal to scholars and students of Faulkner, Glissant, Morrison, and Saint-John Perse.
51.980000 USD

Orphan Narratives: The Postplantation Literature of Faulkner, Glissant, Morrison, and Saint-John Perse

by Valerie Loichot
Hardback
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Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams uses Elena Garro's eccentric life and work as a lens through which to examine mid-twentieth-century Mexican intellectuals' desire to reconcile mexicanidad with modernidad. The famously scandalous first wife of Nobel Prize winner poet Octavio Paz, and an award-winning author in her own right, Garro ...
Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams
Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams uses Elena Garro's eccentric life and work as a lens through which to examine mid-twentieth-century Mexican intellectuals' desire to reconcile mexicanidad with modernidad. The famously scandalous first wife of Nobel Prize winner poet Octavio Paz, and an award-winning author in her own right, Garro constructed a mysterious and often contradictory persona through her very public participation in Mexican political conflicts. Herself an anxious and contentious Mexican writer, Elena Garro elicited profound political and aesthetic anxiety in her Mexican readers. She confused the personal and the public in her creative fictions as well as in her vision of Mexican modernity. This violation of key distinctions rendered her largely illegible to her contemporaries. That illegibility serves as a symptom of unacknowledged desires that motivate twentieth-century views of national modernity. Taken together, Garro's public persona and critical perspective expose the anxieties regarding ethnicity, gender, economic class, and professional identity that define Mexican modernity. Blending cultural studies and detailed literary analysis with political and intellectual history, Mexico's Modern Dreams argues that, in addition to the intriguing gossip she elicited in literary and political circles, Garro produced a radical critique of Mexican modernity. Her critique applies as well to the nation's twenty-first-century crisis of globalization, state power, and pervasive violence.
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114.450000 USD

Elena Garro and Mexico's Modern Dreams

by Rebecca E. Biron
Hardback
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This book is a critical study of the work of Gregory Rabassa, translator of such canonical novels as Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Cien anos de soledad, Jose Lezama Lima's Paradiso, and Julio Cortazar's Rayuela. During the past five decades, Rabassa has translated over fifty Latin American novels and to this day ...
Gregory Rabassa's Latin American Literature: A Translator's Visible Legacy
This book is a critical study of the work of Gregory Rabassa, translator of such canonical novels as Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Cien anos de soledad, Jose Lezama Lima's Paradiso, and Julio Cortazar's Rayuela. During the past five decades, Rabassa has translated over fifty Latin American novels and to this day he is one of the most prominent English translators of literature from Spanish and Portuguese. Rabassa's role was pivotal in the internationalization of several Latin American writers; it led to the formation of a canon and, significantly, to the most prevalent image of Latin American literature in the world. Even though Rabassa's legacy has been widely recognized, the extent of his work's influence and the complexity of the sociocultural circumstances surrounding his practice have remained largely unexamined. In Gregory Rabassa's Latin American Literature: A Translator's Visible Legacy, Maria Constanza Guzman examines the translator's conceptions about language, contextualizes his work in terms of the structures and conditions that have surrounded his practice, and investigates the role his translations have played in constructing collective narratives of Latin American literature in the global imaginary. By revisiting and historicizing the translator's practice, this book reveals the scale of Rabassa's legacy. The translator emerges as an active subject in the inter-American literary exchange, an agent bound to history and to the forces involved in the production of culture.
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90.300000 USD
Hardback
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The years 1909-1930, the eleven-year presidency of the businessman-turned-politician Augusto B. Leguia, mark a formative period of Peruvian modernity, witnessing the continuity of a process of reconstruction and the development of an intellectual and cultural tradition after a humbling defeat during the War of the Pacific (1879-1883). But these years ...
Jose Carlos Mariategui's Unfinished Revolution: Politics, Poetics, and Change in 1920s Peru
The years 1909-1930, the eleven-year presidency of the businessman-turned-politician Augusto B. Leguia, mark a formative period of Peruvian modernity, witnessing the continuity of a process of reconstruction and the development of an intellectual and cultural tradition after a humbling defeat during the War of the Pacific (1879-1883). But these years were also fraught with conflict generated by long-standing divisions and new rivalries. A postwar generation of intellectuals and artists, led by Jose Carlos Mariategui and galvanized by left-wing thinking and an avant-garde aesthetic, sought representation in the fields of politics and the arts to realize the modernizing potentialities opened up by a Positivist oligarchy. New political and artistic conceptions raised their awareness of the fractured sense of nationhood in Peru and the need for a new project of nation-formation based on a common political and cultural consciousness. Crucially, this gave rise to divergent political and artistic positions and practices. Mariategui's Indigenist-Marxist politics and Modernist-inspired poetics, through his influential journal Amauta, were pivotal in revitalizing, conciliating and channeling those of his cohorts and challengers. Comprising six full-length chapters, a comprehensive introduction and conclusion, this monograph is ambitious in scope and depth. It provides fresh readings of key writings of Mariategui, one of Latin America's most important and revolutionary political, cultural and aesthetic theorists, through the lens of his poetics, emphasizing the value of this approach for a fuller understanding of his work's political meaning and impact. It does so through detailed analysis of the poetic, expressive language employed in seminal political essays, aimed at forging a new Marxist position in 1920s Peru. Furthermore, it offers powerful and original critiques of under-studied intellectuals of this time, especially aprista-Futurists, Socialists and Indigenists, including female writers and artists such as Magda Portal, Angela Ramos, and Julia Codesido whose work he championed. These readings are fully contextualized in terms of detailed critical study of complex sociopolitical conditions and positions, and biographical, intellectual backgrounds of Mariategui and his contemporaries. This monograph underscores the fundamental importance of Mariategui in the development of political and artistic practices and projects that shaped a national, shared, yet also heterogeneous, political culture and cultural tradition in Peru during and after his lifetime.
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114.450000 USD

Jose Carlos Mariategui's Unfinished Revolution: Politics, Poetics, and Change in 1920s Peru

by Melisa Moore
Hardback
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In this volume Gonzalez explores how the effects of a traumatic colonial experience are (re)presented to Latin American children today, almost two centuries after the dismantling of colonialism proper. Central to this study is the argument that the historical constraints of colonialism, neocolonialism, and postcolonialism have generated certain repeating themes ...
Postcolonial Approaches to Latin American Children's Literature
In this volume Gonzalez explores how the effects of a traumatic colonial experience are (re)presented to Latin American children today, almost two centuries after the dismantling of colonialism proper. Central to this study is the argument that the historical constraints of colonialism, neocolonialism, and postcolonialism have generated certain repeating themes and literary strategies in children's literature throughout the Spanish-speaking Americas. From the outset of Spanish domination, fundamental tensions emerged between the colonizers and native groups that still exist to this day. Rather than a felicitous mixing of these two opposing groups, the mestizo is caught between contrasting worldviews, contending explanations of reality, and different values, beliefs, and epistemologies (that is, different ways of seeing and knowing). Postcolonial subjects experience these contending cultural beliefs and practices as a double bind, a no-win situation, in which they feel pressured by mutually exclusive expectations and imperatives. Latin American mestizos, therefore, are inevitably conflicted. Despite the vastness of the geography in question and the innumerable variations in regional histories, oral traditions, and natural settings, these contradictory demands create a pervasive dynamic that penetrates the very fabric of society, showing up intentionally or not in the stories passed from generation to generation as well as in new stories written or adapted for Spanish-speaking children. The goal of this study, therefore, is to examine a variety of children's texts from the region to determine how national and hemispheric perceptions of reality, identity, and values are passed to the next generation. This book will appeal to scholars in the fields of Latin American literary and cultural studies, children's literature, postcolonial studies, and comparative literature.
168.000000 USD
Hardback
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