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This study is about representation and resistance in Afro-Uruguayan culture. It explores the manner in which Afro-Uruguayans defined, and continue to affirm, their place in a country in which societal and self perceptions were/are constantly shifting. This is a continuing process to which the written records hold the key. It ...
Afro-Uruguayan Literature: Post-Colonial Perspective
This study is about representation and resistance in Afro-Uruguayan culture. It explores the manner in which Afro-Uruguayans defined, and continue to affirm, their place in a country in which societal and self perceptions were/are constantly shifting. This is a continuing process to which the written records hold the key. It has been common knowledge among literary historians that Afro-Uruguayans published a number of periodicals beginning as early as 1872. It is only now, however, with recent discoveries in the National Library in Montevideo that the extent of this production has become evident. It is primarily through these periodicals that much of the cultural legacy of Afro-Uruguayans can be reconstructed. Using post-colonialism as its theoretical framework, this study analyzes place and displacement, the drum culture, the role of periodicals, and poetry, as well as the dramatic tradition. This approach allows the reader to understand better the cultural dynamics of an important, but almost forgotten, diasporan population. Marvin A. Lewis is a Professor of Spanish and Director of the Afro-Romance Institute for Languages and Literatures of the African Diaspora of the University of Missouri-Columbia.
31.33 USD
Hardback
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In Home Is Where the (He)art Is Sharon Magnarelli employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches to examine ten dramatic works written or performed between 1956 and 1999. Focusing on plays by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina ...
Home Is Where The (He)art Is: The Family Romance in Late Twentieth-Century Mexican and Argentine Theater
In Home Is Where the (He)art Is Sharon Magnarelli employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches to examine ten dramatic works written or performed between 1956 and 1999. Focusing on plays by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina Hernandez, Magnarelli demonstrates how the playwrights engage with family relationships to comment on sociopolitical issues of national and international significance while simultaneously challenging dramatic conventions and theatrical representation. This insightful study provides fresh readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention. It also serves as a useful introduction to the modern theater of Mexico and Argentina for the interested non-specialist.
49.37 USD
Hardback
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This work examines four Latin American writers - Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Cesar Vallejo, and Ricardo Piglia - in the context of their respective national cultural traditions. The author proposes that a consideration of tragedy affords new ways of understanding the relation between literature and the modern Latin American ...
The Catastrophe of Modernity: Tragedy and the Nation in Latin American Literature
This work examines four Latin American writers - Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Cesar Vallejo, and Ricardo Piglia - in the context of their respective national cultural traditions. The author proposes that a consideration of tragedy affords new ways of understanding the relation between literature and the modern Latin American nation-state. As an interpretive index, this tragic attunement sheds new light on both the foundational works of modern Latin American literature and the counter-foundational literary critiques of modernization and nation-building. Topics include Borges's short story El Sur in relation to the Argentine civilization and barbarism debate, Juan Rulfo's novella Pedro Paramo in the context of post-revolutionary reflection on national identity in Mexico, and the lyric poetry of Cesar Vellajo's Trilce. The reading is based on a juxtaposition of aporetically incompatible terms: mourning, the avant-garde, and Andean indigenism or messianism. The final section of the book investigates two novels by Ricardo Piglia, Respiracion artificial and La ciudad ausente, in the dual context of dictatorship and the market. Piglia's writing both echoes and marks a limit for tragedy as an interpretive paradigm. Patrick Dove is Visiting Professor of Spanish at St. Mary's College of Maryland.
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Displaced Memories analyzes the representation of traumatic memories - political imprisonment, torture, survival, and exile - in the literary works of Alicia Kozameh, Alicia Partnoy, and Nora Strejilevich, survivors of Argentina's 'Dirty War (1976-1983). Beginning with an examination of the history of Argentina's last dictatorship, the conditions that led the ...
Displaced Memories: The Poetics of Trauma in Argentine Women's Writing
Displaced Memories analyzes the representation of traumatic memories - political imprisonment, torture, survival, and exile - in the literary works of Alicia Kozameh, Alicia Partnoy, and Nora Strejilevich, survivors of Argentina's 'Dirty War (1976-1983). Beginning with an examination of the history of Argentina's last dictatorship, the conditions that led the authors to exile, and the contexts in which the texts were published, Portela provides the theoretical tools for the understanding of narratives of trauma and displacement caused by political violence. The author proposes a theory that critiques post-structuralist paradigms of trauma, which present trauma as an unclaimed experience impossible to apprehend, as she argues for an analysis of the symbolic uses of language, presenting trauma as a claimed experience that can be brought into representation and therefore create the conditions of possibility for working through.
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Hybrid Nations examines the critical role that gender plays in the formation of national identities in Latin America that are negotiated and challenged within extreme gendered struggles for power. In the years following independence, many writers utilized oppositional concepts of gender in order to contest hegemonic governments and introduced in ...
Hybrid Nations: Gender Troping and the Emergence of Bigendered Subjects in Latin American Narrative
Hybrid Nations examines the critical role that gender plays in the formation of national identities in Latin America that are negotiated and challenged within extreme gendered struggles for power. In the years following independence, many writers utilized oppositional concepts of gender in order to contest hegemonic governments and introduced in their works national male subjects that would replace the more caudillista-type rulers. During the nineteenth century and throughout the nation-building era in Latin America, conceptualizations of gender fluctuated in large part due to the scientific and philosophical trends that circulated in Europe, as well as the tumultuous atmosphere provided by independence. Due to the criss-crossing of gender codes that were manipulated in order to realize the status of power, traditional perceptions based on the binary status of gender are simultaneously displaced or deconstructed, resulting in the formation of ambiguous or even androgynous male national subjects. Patricia Lapolla Swier teaches at Wake Forest University.
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Hardback
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This study explores the role of historical and fictionalized figures from the New World historiographically in eight novels (both New Historical and traditional historical) published in Mexico and the River Plate during the 1980s and 1990s. It pays particular attention to the fundamental role of fictional autobiographies and testimonials in ...
Figural Conquistadors: Rewriting the New World's Discovery and Conquest in Mexican and River Plate Novels of the 1980s and 1990s
This study explores the role of historical and fictionalized figures from the New World historiographically in eight novels (both New Historical and traditional historical) published in Mexico and the River Plate during the 1980s and 1990s. It pays particular attention to the fundamental role of fictional autobiographies and testimonials in rewriting historiographical discourses about the discovery and conquest and their relationship to contemporary politics and issues of national and cultural identity in Latin America. The writers and novels include Argentina's Antonio Elio Brailovsky ( Esta Maldita Lujuria ) and Abel Posse ( El Largo Atardecer del Caminante ); Mexico's Eugenio Aguirre ( Gonzalo Guerrero ), Armando Roa Bastos ( Vigilia del Almirante ), and Uruguay's Napoleon Baccino Ponce de Leon ( Maluco: La novela de Los Descubridores ). This study shows how these novelists use major and marginal figures to reflect upon the ways that institutional powers have invoked episodes from the discovery and conquest to explain and legitimate the present. They also revisit this period to critique the recent historical past, especially in the case of Uruguay and Argentina, which endured military dictatorships in the 1970s and 1980s.
44.39 USD
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Caribbean Ghostwriting addresses a question central to the fields of postcolonial, feminist, and African diasporic studies: how are we to know the colonial past when the lives of colonized and enslaved people were largely written out of history? Caribbean authors Michelle Cliff, Maryse Conde, and Dionne Brand address the silences ...
Caribbean Ghostwriting
Caribbean Ghostwriting addresses a question central to the fields of postcolonial, feminist, and African diasporic studies: how are we to know the colonial past when the lives of colonized and enslaved people were largely written out of history? Caribbean authors Michelle Cliff, Maryse Conde, and Dionne Brand address the silences and gaps of historiography by fleshing out overlooked historical figures in literary form. These authors do not simply reconstruct lost lives, but rather they foreground the tension between the real, material traces of people's lives and the fact of their erasure. In novels that are at once historical, biographical, and artistic, they portray real but sparsely documented and therefore haunting histories through a strategy identifiable as 'ghostwriting'. Erica L. Johnson defines ghostwriting as an important genre of Caribbean literature through which authors literally ghostwrite stories for lost historical figures even while they poetically preserve the unspeakable nature of the archival lacunae their novels engage. Erica L. Johnson teaches world literature at Wagner College.
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Caribbean Ghostwriting

by Erica L. Johnson
Hardback
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