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Troubled Memories: Iconic Mexican Women and the Traps of Representation
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34.600000 USD

Troubled Memories: Iconic Mexican Women and the Traps of Representation

by Oswaldo Estrada
Paperback / softback
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Studies in Spanish-American Literature
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29.350000 USD

Studies in Spanish-American Literature

by Isaac Goldberg, Ed.
Hardback
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Studies in Spanish-American Literature
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29.350000 USD

Studies in Spanish-American Literature

by Isaac Goldberg, Ed.
Hardback
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Adapting Gender: Mexican Feminisms from Literature to Film
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34.600000 USD

Adapting Gender: Mexican Feminisms from Literature to Film

by Ilana Dann Luna
Paperback / softback
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Studies in Spanish-American Literature
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29.350000 USD

Studies in Spanish-American Literature

by Isaac Goldberg, Ed.
Hardback
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States of Grace: Utopia in Brazilian Culture
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33.550000 USD

States of Grace: Utopia in Brazilian Culture

by Patricia I. Vieira
Paperback / softback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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19.90 USD
Paperback / softback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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60.29 USD
Hardback
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Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba ...
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World: Silvestre De Balboa's Espejo De Paciencia
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba on April 29, 1604. Marrer-Fente argues that the disappearance of the Espejo de paciencia manuscript during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries did not prevent the poetic world described in the text from founding a trope of enduring possibilities in Cuban literature. Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World makes a salient contribution to Cuban colonial studies by offering a comparison between Balboa's poem and the works of other contemporary authors from the Canary Islands, Spain, Spanish America, emphasizing the relevance of transatlantic relations in the poetic production of the period.
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38.21 USD
Hardback
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Verses Against the Darkness: offers a new assessment of Pablo Neruda's poetry by looking at the intersection of his aesthetic method and political radicalism from 1925 to 1954. It challenges the canonical view that Neruda was a gifted verse maker who, in 1936, let himself be carried away by the ...
Verses Against the Darkness: Pablo Neruda's Poetry and Politics
Verses Against the Darkness: offers a new assessment of Pablo Neruda's poetry by looking at the intersection of his aesthetic method and political radicalism from 1925 to 1954. It challenges the canonical view that Neruda was a gifted verse maker who, in 1936, let himself be carried away by the excesses of communist politics. Instead, by focusing primarily on Tercera residencia (1935-1945), Greg Dawes argues for an uneven yet steady evolution and continuity in Neruda's work, politics, and morality. Dawes relies on historical accounts, biographies, literary history, and criticism - and on Neruda's political and aesthetic theory - to prove that his poetry became, contrary to received critical opinion, more sophisticated literarily and politically as he became more radicalized during the Spanish Civil War and World War II and as he developed his dialectical realism or guided spontaneity. Greg Dawes is Associate Professor of Latin American and World Literatures at North Carolina State University and is the editor of the on-line journal A contracorriente.
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USD
Hardback
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Out of Bounds teases out the intricacies of a territorial conception of nationhood in the context of a global reorganization that ostensibly renders historical boundaries irrelevant. Hispanic Caribbean writers have traditionally pointed toward the supposed perfect equivalence of island and nation and have explained local culture as a direct consequence ...
Out of Bounds: Islands and the Demarcation of Identity in the Hispanic Caribbean
Out of Bounds teases out the intricacies of a territorial conception of nationhood in the context of a global reorganization that ostensibly renders historical boundaries irrelevant. Hispanic Caribbean writers have traditionally pointed toward the supposed perfect equivalence of island and nation and have explained local culture as a direct consequence of that equation. The major social, political, and demographic shifts of the twentieth century increasingly call this equation into question, yet authors continue to assert its existence and its centrality in the evolution of Caribbean identity.The author contends that traditional forms of identification have not been eviscerated by globalization; instead, they have persisted and, in some cases, have been intensified by recent geopolitical shifts. Out of Bounds underscores the ongoing role of the nation as the site of identity formation. In this manner, the book presents Hispanic Caribbean cultural production as a case study that acutely dramatizes the paradoxical status of traditional demarcations of self-definition in an increasingly globalized context. Dara E. Goldman is Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
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51.88 USD
Hardback
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Educating the Educators consists of two narratives. The first discusses the paradigmatic shifts that have taken place within British Hispanism in response to the historical development of capitalism, through its competitive, monopolistic, and global stages. At the ideological level, these shifts correspond to the transformation of the traditional intellectual into ...
Educating the Educators: Hispanism and Its Institutions
Educating the Educators consists of two narratives. The first discusses the paradigmatic shifts that have taken place within British Hispanism in response to the historical development of capitalism, through its competitive, monopolistic, and global stages. At the ideological level, these shifts correspond to the transformation of the traditional intellectual into a state functionary and, ultimately, into a technician or 'expert', totally subsumed under capital and charged with the management of 'cultural studies'. Running alongside, and locked into, this first narrative is a second, which, in the form of three autobiographical essays, traces the author's long trek from his childhood origins in a working class family, through the institutions of education- and the experience of embourgeoisement- to his attempts, within the Australasian, Carribean, and North American academies, to retrieve the legacy of socialism. These two narratives are brought into symbolic relation through a theory of ideological production that explores the radicalizing effects of contradiction and conflict within the otherwise unconscious reproduction of social relations.
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22.73 USD
Paperback / softback
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Recovering Lost Footprints, Volume 2: Contemporary Maya Narratives
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35.650000 USD

Recovering Lost Footprints, Volume 2: Contemporary Maya Narratives

by Arturo Arias
Paperback / softback
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