Filter
(found 322 products)
Book cover image
This book provides readers with a valuable and concise introduction to the work and ideas of world renowned Mexican writer, and Nobel Prize winner, Octavio Paz. Written and edited by Alberto Ruy Sanchez, a well-respected and awarding winning writer whom Paz considered one of Mexicos best essayists, this book offers ...
Introduction to Octavio Paz
This book provides readers with a valuable and concise introduction to the work and ideas of world renowned Mexican writer, and Nobel Prize winner, Octavio Paz. Written and edited by Alberto Ruy Sanchez, a well-respected and awarding winning writer whom Paz considered one of Mexicos best essayists, this book offers a comprehensive overview of the vast literary, intellectual and poetic legacy of Mexicos greatest writer. Paz thought of poetry as revelatory creation and activity, and Ruy Sanchez takes this idea as a guide for his book, as he unravels Pazs complex life and huge bibliography. For every reader who wants to look deep into the literary labyrinth of Mexicos emblematic writer, this concise and solid book proves an indispensable handbook.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781771611503.jpg
19.900000 USD

Introduction to Octavio Paz

by Alberto Ruy Sanchez
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In American Westerns, the main characters are most often gunfighters, lawmen, ranchers and dancehall girls. Civil professionals such as doctors, engineers and journalists have been given far less representation, appearing as background characters in most films and fiction. However, in Westerns about the 1910 Mexican Revolution, civil professionals also feature ...
Professionals in Western Film and Fiction: The Portrayal of Doctors, Lawyers, Journalists, Clergymen and Others
In American Westerns, the main characters are most often gunfighters, lawmen, ranchers and dancehall girls. Civil professionals such as doctors, engineers and journalists have been given far less representation, appearing as background characters in most films and fiction. However, in Westerns about the 1910 Mexican Revolution, civil professionals also feature prominently in the narrative, often as members of the intelligentsia-an important force in Mexican politics. This book compares the roles of civil professionals in most American Westerns to those in work on the 1910 Mexican Revolution. Included are studies on the Santiago Toole novels by Richard Wheeler, Strange Lady in Town with Greer Garson and La sombra del Caudillo by Martin Luis Guzman.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780786497294.jpg
41.950000 USD

Professionals in Western Film and Fiction: The Portrayal of Doctors, Lawyers, Journalists, Clergymen and Others

by Kenneth E Hall
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
West Indian Literature, as a body of work, is a fairly recent phenomenon; and literary criticism has not always acknowledged the diversity of approaches to writing effectively. In Making West Indian Literature poet and critic Mervyn Morris explores examples of West Indian creativity shaping a range of responses to experience, ...
Making West Indian Literature
West Indian Literature, as a body of work, is a fairly recent phenomenon; and literary criticism has not always acknowledged the diversity of approaches to writing effectively. In Making West Indian Literature poet and critic Mervyn Morris explores examples of West Indian creativity shaping a range of responses to experience, which often includes colonial traces. Appreciating various kinds of making and a number of West Indian makers, these engaging essays and interviews display a recurrent interest in the processes of composition. Some of the prices highlight writer-performers who have not often been examined. This very readable book, often personal in tone, makes a distinctive contribution to the knowledge and understanding of West Indian Literature.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789766371746.jpg
17.800000 USD

Making West Indian Literature

by Mervyn Morris
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
What was it like to be a small boy growing up in Kingston, Jamaica in the 1930's? When Me Was A Boy tells exactly what it was like. Charles Hyatt remembers his boyhood in vivid detail, and is his own inimitable voice talked about it in his radio programme When ...
When Me Was a Boy
What was it like to be a small boy growing up in Kingston, Jamaica in the 1930's? When Me Was A Boy tells exactly what it was like. Charles Hyatt remembers his boyhood in vivid detail, and is his own inimitable voice talked about it in his radio programme When Me Was A Boy. In his selection from those pieces, Hyatt brings his school days to life: the tramcar and horse-and-buggy days when cars were few and far between and taking a walk was a social occasion. These are hilarious moments look out for the Black Heart Man and historic ones, and Hyatt's sharp observation and remarkable memory put us right on the spot sharing his feelings and experiences.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789766402020.jpg
26.250000 USD

When Me Was a Boy

by Charles Hyatt
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Caribbean Political Thought: The Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms uncovers, collects and reflects on the wealth of political thought produced in the Caribbean region. It traces the political thought of the Caribbean from the debate between Bartolome de Las Casas and Gines de Sepulveda on the categorization of Native people ...
Caribbean Political Thought: The Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms
Caribbean Political Thought: The Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms uncovers, collects and reflects on the wealth of political thought produced in the Caribbean region. It traces the political thought of the Caribbean from the debate between Bartolome de Las Casas and Gines de Sepulveda on the categorization of Native people in the New World, through the Haitian Revolution, to the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. The ideas of revolutionaries and intellectuals are counterposed with manifestos, constitutional excerpts and speeches to give a view of the range of political options, questions, and immense choices that have faced the region's people over the last 500 years. Includes Contributions from: Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrius, Trevor Munroe, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, Aviva Chomsky, Barry Carr and Pamela Maria Smorkaloff, Amy Jacques Garvey, Dantes Bellegarde, Jacques Roumain, W. Burghart Turner and Joyce Moore Turner Fidel Castro, Walter Rodney, Maurice Bishop, Sylvia Wynter, Gordon Lewis, Anthony Bogues, Hilary Beckles, Bechu, Roy Augier, David Scott, Antenor Firmin, Jose Marti , J.J. Thomas, Hubert Harrison, Marcus Garvey, Rhoda Reddock, Pedro Albizu Campos, George Padmore, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Claudia Jones, Cheddi Jagan, Lloyd Best, Frantz Fanon, C.L.R. James, Che Guevara, Lewis R. Gordon.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789766376185.jpg
41.950000 USD

Caribbean Political Thought: The Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Written in vivid, colourful detail, these rich, compelling stories recreate with sensitivity and wit a whole range of emotions, from childhood hope to brooding melancholy.
Summer Lightning & Other Stories
Written in vivid, colourful detail, these rich, compelling stories recreate with sensitivity and wit a whole range of emotions, from childhood hope to brooding melancholy.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780582786271.jpg
21.39 USD

Summer Lightning & Other Stories

by Olive Senior
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The idea of world literature has served as a crucial though underappreciated interlocutor for African diasporic writers, informing their involvement in processes of circulation, translation, and revision that have been identified as the hallmarks of the contemporary era of world literature. Yet in spite of their participation in world systems ...
Sounding the Break: African American and Caribbean Routes of World Literature
The idea of world literature has served as a crucial though underappreciated interlocutor for African diasporic writers, informing their involvement in processes of circulation, translation, and revision that have been identified as the hallmarks of the contemporary era of world literature. Yet in spite of their participation in world systems before and after European hegemony, Africa and the African diaspora have been excluded from the networks and archives of world literature. In Sounding the Break, Jason Frydman attempts to redress this exclusion by drawing on historiography, ethnography, and archival sources to show how writers such as W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Alejo Carpentier, Derek Walcott, Maryse Conde, and Toni Morrison have complicated both Eurocentric and Afrocentric categories of literary and cultural production. Through their engagement with and revision of the European world literature discourse, he contends, these writers conjure a deep history of literary traffic whose expressions are always already cosmopolitan, embedded in the long histories of cultural and economic exchange between Africa, Asia, and Europe. It is precisely the New World American location of these writers, Frydman concludes, that makes possible this revisionary perspective on the idea of (Old) World literature.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813935737.jpg
25.720000 USD

Sounding the Break: African American and Caribbean Routes of World Literature

by Jason Frydman
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
During the colonial period in Guyana, the country's coastal lands were worked by enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In Creole Indigeneity, Shona N. Jackson investigates how their descendants, collectively called Creoles, have remade themselves as Guyana's new natives, displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes ...
Creole Indigeneity: Between Myth and Nation in the Caribbean
During the colonial period in Guyana, the country's coastal lands were worked by enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In Creole Indigeneity, Shona N. Jackson investigates how their descendants, collectively called Creoles, have remade themselves as Guyana's new natives, displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes and policies. Looking particularly at the nation's politically fraught decades from the 1950s to the present, Jackson explores aboriginal and Creole identities in Guyanese society. Through government documents, interviews, and political speeches, she reveals how Creoles, though unable to usurp the place of aboriginals as First Peoples in the New World, nonetheless managed to introduce a new, more socially viable definition of belonging, through labor. The very reason for bringing enslaved and indentured workers into Caribbean labor became the organizing principle for Creoles' new identities. Creoles linked true belonging, and so political and material right, to having performed modern labor on the land; labor thus became the basis for their subaltern, settler modes of indigeneity-a contradiction for belonging under postcoloniality that Jackson terms Creole indigeneity. In doing so, her work establishes a new and productive way of understanding the relationship between national power and identity in colonial, postcolonial, and anticolonial contexts.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816677764.jpg
26.250000 USD

Creole Indigeneity: Between Myth and Nation in the Caribbean

by Shona N. Jackson
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
While postcolonial discourse in the Caribbean has drawn attention to colonialism's impact on space and spatial hierarchy, Stanka Radovic asks both how ordinary people as users of space have been excluded from active and autonomous participation in shaping their daily spatial reality and how they challenge this exclusion. In a ...
Locating the Destitute: Space and Identity in Caribbean Fiction
While postcolonial discourse in the Caribbean has drawn attention to colonialism's impact on space and spatial hierarchy, Stanka Radovic asks both how ordinary people as users of space have been excluded from active and autonomous participation in shaping their daily spatial reality and how they challenge this exclusion. In a comparative interdisciplinary reading of anglophone and francophone Caribbean literature and contemporary spatial theory, she focuses on the house as a literary figure and the ways that fiction and acts of storytelling resist the oppressive hierarchies of colonial and neocolonial domination. The author engages with the theories of Henri Lefebvre, Michel Foucault, and contemporary critical geographers, in addition to selected fiction by V. S. Naipaul, Patrick Chamoiseau, Beryl Gilroy, and Rafael Confiant, to examine the novelists' construction of narrative houses to reclaim not only actual or imaginary places but also the very conditions of self-representation. Radovic ultimately argues for the power of literary imagination to contest the limitations of geopolitical boundaries by emphasizing space and place as fundamental to our understanding of social and political identity. The physical places described in these texts crystallize the protagonists' ambiguous and complex relationship to the New World. Space is, then, as the author shows, both a political fact and a powerful metaphor whose imaginary potential continually challenges its material limitations.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813936291.jpg
25.720000 USD

Locating the Destitute: Space and Identity in Caribbean Fiction

by Stanka Radovi
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Master of magic realism, distinguished journalist and film critic, friend of world leaders ranging from Fidel Castro to Pres. Bill Clinton, Gabriel Garcia Marquez improbably emerged from obscure beginnings to become an author more beloved of readers worldwide than any other living writer. His plots and protean characters plunge readers ...
Gabriel Garcia Marquez: A Biography
Master of magic realism, distinguished journalist and film critic, friend of world leaders ranging from Fidel Castro to Pres. Bill Clinton, Gabriel Garcia Marquez improbably emerged from obscure beginnings to become an author more beloved of readers worldwide than any other living writer. His plots and protean characters plunge readers into the world of fable, yet their universal appeal, as this biography shows, is deeply rooted in the particularity of Garcia Marquez's own idiosyncratic early life and his later wide travels, all undertaken with the restless curiosity and zest for life that he manages to evoke in his readers.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780313346309.jpg
40.950000 USD

Gabriel Garcia Marquez: A Biography

by Ruben Pelayo
Hardback
Book cover image
Hybridity is a term that has been applied to Latin American politics, literature, and intellectual life for more than a century. During the past two decades, it has figured in-and been transfigured by-the work of prominent postcolonialist writers and thinkers throughout the Americas. In this pathbreaking work, Joshua Lund offers ...
The Impure Imagination: Toward A Critical Hybridity In Latin American Writing
Hybridity is a term that has been applied to Latin American politics, literature, and intellectual life for more than a century. During the past two decades, it has figured in-and been transfigured by-the work of prominent postcolonialist writers and thinkers throughout the Americas. In this pathbreaking work, Joshua Lund offers a thoughtful critique of hybridity by reading contemporary theories of cultural mixing against their historical precursors. The Impure Imagination is the first book to systematically analyze today's dominant theories in relation to earlier, narrative manifestations of hybridity in Latin American writing, with a particular focus on Mexico and Brazil. Generally understood as the impurification of standard or canonized forms, hybridity has historically been embraced as a basic marker of Latin American regional identity and as a strategy of resistance to cultural imperialism. Lund contends that Latin American theories and narratives of hybridity have been, and continue to be, underwritten by a structure of colonial power. Here he provides an informed critique and cogent investigation of this connection, its cultural effects, and its political implications. Using the emergence of hybridity as an analytical frame for thinking about culture in the Americas, Lund examines the contributions of influential thinkers, including Nestor Garcia Canclini, Homi Bhabha, Jacques Derrida, Giorgio Agamben, Jorge Luis Borges, Antonio Candido, and many others. Distinguished by its philosophical grounding and underpinned with case studies, The Impure Imagination employs postcolonial theory and theories of race as it explores Latin American history and culture. The result is an original and interrogative study of hybridity that exposes surprising-and unsettling-similarities with nationalistic discourses. Joshua Lund is assistant professor of Spanish at the University of Pittsburgh. His essays have appeared in A Contracorriente, Race & Class, Cultural Critique, and the Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816647866.jpg
23.620000 USD

The Impure Imagination: Toward A Critical Hybridity In Latin American Writing

by Joshua Lund
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
By the end of the twentieth century, Argentina's complex identity-tango and chimichurri, Eva Peron and the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo, the Falklands and the Dirty War, Jorge Luis Borges and Maradona, economic chaos and a memory of vast wealth-has become entrenched in the consciousness of the Western world. ...
Argentina: Stories for a Nation
By the end of the twentieth century, Argentina's complex identity-tango and chimichurri, Eva Peron and the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo, the Falklands and the Dirty War, Jorge Luis Borges and Maradona, economic chaos and a memory of vast wealth-has become entrenched in the consciousness of the Western world. In this wide-ranging and at times poetic new work, Amy K. Kaminsky explores Argentina's unique national identity and the place it holds in the minds of those who live beyond its physical borders. To analyze the country's meaning in the global imagination, Kaminsky probes Argentina's presence in a broad range of literary texts from the United States, Poland, England, Western Europe, and Argentina itself, as well as internationally produced films, advertisements, and newspaper features. Kaminsky's examination reveals how Europe consumes an image of Argentina that acts as a pivot between the exotic and the familiar. Going beyond the idea of suffocating Eurocentrism as a theory of national identity, Kaminsky presents an original and vivid reading of national myths and realities that encapsulates the interplay among the many meanings of Argentina and its place in the world's imagination. Amy Kaminsky is professor of gender, women, and sexuality studies and global studies at the University of Minnesota and author of After Exile (Minnesota, 1999).
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816649495.jpg
23.620000 USD

Argentina: Stories for a Nation

by Amy K Kaminsky
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This collection is painful, disturbing, and rewarding. Freeman and three other translators transform Storni's razor-sharp poetry into English versions that invite constant rereading. This is a poetry of fatal beauty that leads toward unavoidable death, but not before freeing the poet to leave everything she can behind. --Ray Gonzalez, Bloomsbury ...
Alfonsina Storni: Selected Poems
This collection is painful, disturbing, and rewarding. Freeman and three other translators transform Storni's razor-sharp poetry into English versions that invite constant rereading. This is a poetry of fatal beauty that leads toward unavoidable death, but not before freeing the poet to leave everything she can behind. --Ray Gonzalez, Bloomsbury Review
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780934834162.jpg
14.700000 USD

Alfonsina Storni: Selected Poems

by Alfonsina Storni
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Studies of sexuality in Caribbean culture are on the rise, focusing mainly on homosexuality and homophobia or on regional manifestations of normative and nonnormative sexualities. The Cross-Dressed Caribbean extends this exploration by using the trope of transvestism not only to analyse texts and contexts from anglophone, francophone, Spanish, Dutch, and ...
The Cross-Dressed Caribbean: Writing, Politics, Sexualities
Studies of sexuality in Caribbean culture are on the rise, focusing mainly on homosexuality and homophobia or on regional manifestations of normative and nonnormative sexualities. The Cross-Dressed Caribbean extends this exploration by using the trope of transvestism not only to analyse texts and contexts from anglophone, francophone, Spanish, Dutch, and diasporic Caribbean literature and film but also to highlight reinventions of sexuality and resistance to different forms of exploitation and oppression. Contributors: Roberto del Valle Alcala, University of Alcala * Lee Easton, Sheridan College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning * Odile Ferly, Clark University * Kelly Hewson, Mount Royal University * Isabel Hoving, Leiden University * Wendy Knepper, Brunel University * Carine Mardorossian, University at Buffalo, SUNY * Shani Mootoo * Michael Niblett, University of Warwick * Kerstin Oloff, Durham University * Lizabeth Paravisini, Vassar College * Mayra Santos-Febres, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras * Paula Sato, Kent State University * Lawrence Scott * Karina Smith, Victoria University * Roberto Strongman, University of California, Santa Barbara * Chantal Zabus, University of Paris 13
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813935232.jpg
36.750000 USD

The Cross-Dressed Caribbean: Writing, Politics, Sexualities

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The literature of Cuba, argues Eduardo Gonzalez in this new book, takes on quite different features depending on whether one is looking at it from the inside or from the outside, a view that in turn is shaped by official political culture and the authors it sanctions or by those ...
Cuba and the Fall: Christian Text and Queer Narrative in the Fiction of Jose Lezama Lima and Reinaldo Arenas (New World Studies) (New World Studies (Paperback))
The literature of Cuba, argues Eduardo Gonzalez in this new book, takes on quite different features depending on whether one is looking at it from the inside or from the outside, a view that in turn is shaped by official political culture and the authors it sanctions or by those authors and artists who exist outside state policies and cultural politics. Gonzalez approaches this issue by way of two twentieth-century writers who are central to the canon of gay homoerotic expression and sensibility in Cuban culture: Jose Lezama Lima (1910-1976) and Reinaldo Arenas (1943-1990). Drawing on the plots and characters in their works, Gonzalez develops both a story line and a moral tale, revolving around the Christian belief in the fall from grace and the possibility of redemption, that bring the writers into a unique and revealing interaction with one another. The work of Lezama Lima and Arenas is compared with that of fellow Cuban author Virgilio Pinera (1912-1979) and, in a wider context, with the non-Cuban writers John Milton, Nathaniel Hawthorne, William Faulkner, John Ruskin, and James Joyce to show how their themes get replicated in Gonzalez's selected Cuban fiction. Also woven into this interaction are two contemporary films--The Devil's Backbone (2004) and Pan's Labyrinth (2007)--whose moral and political themes enhance the ethical values and conflicts of the literary texts. Referring to this eclectic gathering of texts, Gonzalez charts a cultural course in which Cuba moves beyond the Caribbean and into a latitude uncharted by common words, beyond the tyranny of place.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813929828.jpg
38.320000 USD

Cuba and the Fall: Christian Text and Queer Narrative in the Fiction of Jose Lezama Lima and Reinaldo Arenas (New World Studies) (New World Studies (Paperback))

by GONZALEZ
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Clorinda Matto de Turner was one of the major literary figures of nineteenth-century Peru. Her first novel, Aves Sin Nido (Torn from the Nest) was a landmark work in the indigenismo genre which depicts the lives of contemporary Indians in the rural setting. The novel's initial success was due to ...
Torn from the Nest
Clorinda Matto de Turner was one of the major literary figures of nineteenth-century Peru. Her first novel, Aves Sin Nido (Torn from the Nest) was a landmark work in the indigenismo genre which depicts the lives of contemporary Indians in the rural setting. The novel's initial success was due to its explicit and critical treatment of the problems of the indigenous population of Peru and because of its attack on the immorality of the priesthood. The plot involves a young couple who arrive in the Peruvian province where the Indians are exploited by landowners and public officials and the women are especially abused by local priests. The idealistic couple attempt to improve the lives of the Indians, but encounter difficulties at every turn. This novel has not been translated since 1904.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780195110067.jpg
31.490000 USD

Torn from the Nest

by Clorinda Matto de Turner
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Novelist, scholar, journalist, statesman, and leading member of Chile's Generation of 1842 -an intellectual movement so named for the founding of the National University-Jose Victorino Lastarria (1811-1888) lived his life at the forefront of nineteenth-century Chilean and Spanish American culture, literature, and politics. Recuerdos Literarios (or Literary Memoirs) is his ...
Literary Memoirs
Novelist, scholar, journalist, statesman, and leading member of Chile's Generation of 1842 -an intellectual movement so named for the founding of the National University-Jose Victorino Lastarria (1811-1888) lived his life at the forefront of nineteenth-century Chilean and Spanish American culture, literature, and politics. Recuerdos Literarios (or Literary Memoirs) is his masterpiece, encompassing the candid memories of a tireless activist, both the creative and critical sensibilities of an influential Latin American early modernist, and an eyewitness account of the development of Chilean literature and historiography. An ardent, eloquent participant in every defining artistic and ideological debate in Chile during the formative mid-1800s, Lastarria recorded his epoch as closely as he did his own origins, education, ambitions, and career. Sometimes reminiscent of Montaigne's essays, Eca de Quieroz's journalism, or Barbusse's didactic convictions, Literary Memoirs is an engrossing account of Chile's newly ordained nationhood. This addition to Oxford's prestigious Library of Latin America series is more than a retelling of things past; it is an informed yet informal testament to the idea of chilenidad (or Chileanness ) and a detailed portrait of one of Chile's cultural architects. For this new edition of Literary Memoirs, Frederick M. Nunn's introduction presents an informative historical background and R. Kelly Washbourne's translation carefully preserves Lastarria's form and content.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780195116861.jpg
29.350000 USD

Literary Memoirs

by Jose Victorino Lastarria
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Consuming Visions explores the relationship between cinema and writing in early twentieth-century Brazil, focusing on how the new and foreign medium of film was consumed by a literary society in the throes of modernisation. Maite Conde places this relationship in the specific context of turn-of-the-century Rio de Janeiro, which underwent ...
Consuming Visions: Cinema, Writing and Modernity in Rio de Janeiro
Consuming Visions explores the relationship between cinema and writing in early twentieth-century Brazil, focusing on how the new and foreign medium of film was consumed by a literary society in the throes of modernisation. Maite Conde places this relationship in the specific context of turn-of-the-century Rio de Janeiro, which underwent a radical transformation to a modern global city, becoming a concrete symbol of the country's broader processes of change and modernisation. Analysing an array of literary texts, from journalistic essays and popular women's novels to anarchist treatises and vaudeville plays, the author shows how the writers' encounters with the cinema were consistent with the significant changes taking place in the city. The arrival and initial development of the cinema in Brazil were part of the new urban landscape in which early Brazilian movies not only articulated the processes of the city's modernisation but also enabled new urban spectators - women, immigrants, a new working class, and a recently liberated slave population - to see, believe in, and participate in its future. In the process, these early movies challenged the power of the written word and of Brazilian writers, threatening the hegemonic function of writing that had traditionally forged the contours of the nation's cultural life. An emerging market of consumers of the new cultural phenomena - popular theatre, the department store, the factory, illustrated magazines - reflected changes that not only modernised literary production but also altered the very life and everyday urban experiences of the population. Consuming Visions is an ambitious and engaging examination of the ways in which mass culture can become an agent of intellectual and aesthetic transformation.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813932149.jpg
24.680000 USD

Consuming Visions: Cinema, Writing and Modernity in Rio de Janeiro

by Maite Conde
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
When Latin American writers burst on to the world literary scene in the now famous Boom of the sixties, it seemed as if an entire literature had invented itself overnight out of thin air. Not only was the writing extraordinary but its sudden and spectacular appearance itself seemed magical. In ...
The Oxford Book of Latin American Short Stories
When Latin American writers burst on to the world literary scene in the now famous Boom of the sixties, it seemed as if an entire literature had invented itself overnight out of thin air. Not only was the writing extraordinary but its sudden and spectacular appearance itself seemed magical. In fact, Latin American literature has a long and rich tradition that reaches back to the Colonial period and is filled with remarkable writers too little known in the English-speaking world. The short story has been a central part of this tradition, from Fray Bartolome de las Casas' narrative protests against the Spanish Conquistadors' abuses of Indians, to the world renowned Ficciones of Jorge Luis Borges, to the contemporary works of such masters as Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Rosario Ferre, and others. Now, in The Oxford Book of Latin American Short Stories, editor Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria brings together fifty-three stories that span the history of Latin American literature and represent the most dazzling achievements in the form. In his fascinating introduction, Gonzalez Echevarria traces the evolution of the short story in Latin American literature, explaining why the genre has flourished there with such brilliance, and illuminating the various cultural and literary tensions that resolve themselves in magical realism . The stories themselves exhibit all the inventiveness, the luxuriousness of language, the wild metaphoric leaps, and uncanny conjunctions of the ordinary with the fantastic that have given the Latin American short story its distinctive and unforgettable flavour: from the Joycean subtlety of Machado de Assis's Midnight Mass, to the brutal parable of Julio Ramon Ribeyro's Featherless Buzzards, to the startling disorientation of Alejo Carpentier's Journey Back to the Source (which is told backwards, because a sorcerer has waved his wand and made time flow in reverse), to the haunting reveries of Maria Luisa Bombal's The Tree . Readers familiar with only the most popular Latin American writers will be delighted to discover many exciting new voices here, including Catalina de Erauso, Ricardo Palma, Rubin Dario, Augusto Roa Bastos, Christina Peri Rossi, along with Borges, Garcia Marquez, Fuentes, Cortazar, Vargas Llosa, and many others. Gonzalez Echevarria also provides brief and extremely helpful headnotes for the each selection, discussing the author's influences, major works, and central themes. Short story lovers will find a wealth of satisfactions here, in terrains both familiar and uncharted. But the unique strength of The Oxford Book of Latin American Short Stories is that it allows us to see the connections between writers from Peru to Puerto Rico and from the sixteenth century to the present-and thus to view in a single, unprecedented volume one of the most diverse and fertile literary landscapes in the world.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780195130850.jpg
23.050000 USD

The Oxford Book of Latin American Short Stories

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
First published in 1890, and undoubtedly Azevedo's masterpiece, The Slum is one of the most widely read and critically acclaimed novels ever written about Brazil. Indeed, its great popularity, realistic descriptions, archetypal situations, detailed local coloring, and overall race-consciousness may well evoke Huckleberry Finn as the novel's North American equivalent. ...
The Slum
First published in 1890, and undoubtedly Azevedo's masterpiece, The Slum is one of the most widely read and critically acclaimed novels ever written about Brazil. Indeed, its great popularity, realistic descriptions, archetypal situations, detailed local coloring, and overall race-consciousness may well evoke Huckleberry Finn as the novel's North American equivalent. Yet Azevedo also exhibits the naturalism of Zola and the ironic distance of Balzac; while tragic, beautiful, and imaginative as a work of fiction, The Slum is universally regarded as one of the best, or truest, portraits of Brazilian society ever rendered. This is a vivid and complex tale of passion and greed, a story with many different strands touching on the different economic tiers of society. Mainly, however, The Slum thrives on two intersecting story lines. In one narrative, a penny-pinching immigrant landlord strives to become a rich investor and then discards his black lover for a wealthy white woman. In the other, we witness the innocent yet dangerous love affair between a strong, pragmatic, gentle giant sort of immigrant and a vivacious mulatto woman who both live in a tenement owned by said landlord. The two immigrant heroes are originally Portuguese, and thus personify two alternate outsider responses to Brazil. As translator David H. Rosenthal points out in his useful Introduction: one is the capitalist drawn to new markets, quick prestige, and untapped resources; the other, the prudent European drawn moth-like to the light and sexual heat of the tropics. A deftly told, deeply moving, and hardscrabble novel that features several stirring passages about life in the streets, the melting-pot realities of the modern city, and the oft-unstable mind of the crowd, The Slum will captivate anyone who might appreciate a more poetic, less political take on the nineteenth-century naturalism of Crane or Dreiser.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780195121872.jpg
26.240000 USD

The Slum

by Aluisio Azevedo
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
During the 1960s and 1970s, when writers such as Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Mario Vargas Llosa entered the international literary mainstream, Cold War cultural politics played an active role in disseminating their work in the United States. Deborah Cohn documents how U.S. universities, book and journal ...
The Latin American Literary Boom and U.S. Nationalism during the Cold War
During the 1960s and 1970s, when writers such as Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Mario Vargas Llosa entered the international literary mainstream, Cold War cultural politics played an active role in disseminating their work in the United States. Deborah Cohn documents how U.S. universities, book and journal publishers, philanthropic organisations, cultural centres, and authors co-ordinated their efforts to bring Latin American literature to a U.S. reading public during this period, when interest in the region was heightened by the Cuban Revolution. She also traces the connections between the endeavours of private organisations and official foreign policy goals. The high level of interest in Latin America paradoxically led the U.S. government to restrict these authors' physical presence in the United States through the McCarran-Walter Act's immigration blacklist, even as cultural organisations cultivated the exchange of ideas with writers and sought to market translations of their work for the U.S. market.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826518057.jpg
41.950000 USD

The Latin American Literary Boom and U.S. Nationalism during the Cold War

by Deborah Cohn
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Alfred H. Mendes was a member of the Beacon group of writers in Trinidad in the 1930s and friend and colleague of C.L.R. James and Ralph de Boissiere. He was a prolific writer, with a distinctive and engaging voice, and he wrote a significant number of short stories, many of ...
The Man Who Ran Away and Other Stories of Trinidad in the 1920s and 1930s
Alfred H. Mendes was a member of the Beacon group of writers in Trinidad in the 1930s and friend and colleague of C.L.R. James and Ralph de Boissiere. He was a prolific writer, with a distinctive and engaging voice, and he wrote a significant number of short stories, many of which have never been published and most of which were written between 1920 and 1940. The Man Who Ran Away is a collection of twelve stories with an introduction and short glossary of Trinidadian Creole words and phrases. The book is useful as a text for university literature courses, with an introduction designed for students unfamiliar with Mendes's work, but not so dauntingly academic as to discourage a general readership.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789766401733.jpg
36.750000 USD

The Man Who Ran Away and Other Stories of Trinidad in the 1920s and 1930s

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Between 1870 and 1930, Latin American countries were incorporated into global capitalist networks like never before, mainly as exporters of raw materials and importers of manufactured goods. During this Export Age, entire regions were given over to the cultivation of export commodities such as coffee and bananas, capital and labor ...
Capital Fictions: The Literature of Latin America's Export Age
Between 1870 and 1930, Latin American countries were incorporated into global capitalist networks like never before, mainly as exporters of raw materials and importers of manufactured goods. During this Export Age, entire regions were given over to the cultivation of export commodities such as coffee and bananas, capital and labor were relocated to new production centers, and barriers to foreign investment were removed. Capital Fictions investigates the key role played by literature in imagining and interpreting the rapid transformations unleashed by Latin America's first major wave of capitalist modernization. Using an innovative blend of literary and economic analysis and drawing from a rich interdisciplinary archive, Ericka Beckman provides the first extended evaluation of Export Age literary production. She traces the emergence of a distinct set of fictions, fantasies, and illusions that accompanied the rise of export-led, dependent capitalism. These capital fictions range from promotional pamphlets for Guatemalan coffee and advertisements for French fashions, to novels about stock market collapse in Argentina and rubber extraction in the Amazon. Beckman explores how Export Age literature anticipated some of the key contradictions faced by contemporary capitalist societies, including extreme financial volatility, vast social inequality, and ever-more-intense means of exploitation. Questioning the opposition between culture and economics in Latin America and elsewhere, Capital Fictions shows that literature operated as a powerful form of political economy during this period.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816679201.jpg
26.250000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In Island Bodies, Rosamond King examines sexualities, violence, and repression in the Caribbean experience. Analyzing the sexual norms and expectations portrayed in Caribbean and diaspora literature, music, film, and popular culture, King skillfully demonstrates how many individuals contest traditional roles by maneuvering within and/or trying to change their society's binary ...
Island Bodies: Transgressive Sexualities in the Caribbean Imagination
In Island Bodies, Rosamond King examines sexualities, violence, and repression in the Caribbean experience. Analyzing the sexual norms and expectations portrayed in Caribbean and diaspora literature, music, film, and popular culture, King skillfully demonstrates how many individuals contest traditional roles by maneuvering within and/or trying to change their society's binary gender systems. These transgressions have come to better represent Caribbean culture than the official representations perpetuated by governmental elites and often codified into laws that reinforce patriarchal, heterosexual stereotypes. Unique in its breadth as well as its multilingual and multidisciplinary approach, Island Bodies addresses homosexuality, interracial relations, transgender people, and women's sexual agency in Dutch, Francophone, Anglophone, and Hispanophone works of Caribbean literature. Additionally, King explores the paradoxical nature of sexuality across the region: discussing sexuality in public is often considered taboo, yet the tourism economy trades on portraying Caribbean residents as hypersexualized. Ultimately King reveals that despite the varied national specificity, differing colonial legacies, and linguistic diversity across the islands, there are striking similarities in the ways Caribglobal cultures attempt to restrict sexuality and in the ways individuals explore and transgress those boundaries.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813062068.jpg
26.200000 USD

Island Bodies: Transgressive Sexualities in the Caribbean Imagination

by Rosamond S King
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica's work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jesus Lara, ...
The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism
The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica's work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jesus Lara, Jose Maria Arguedas, and Rosario Castellanos, among other thinkers, Tarica explores the rhetorical and ideological aspects of interethnic affinity and connection. In her examination, she demonstrates that these connections posed a challenge to existing racial hierarchies in Spanish America by celebrating a new kind of national self at the same time that they contributed to new forms of subjection and discrimination. Going beyond debates about the relative merits of indigenismo and mestizaje, Tarica puts forward a new perspective on indigenista literature and modern mestizo identities by revealing how these ideologies are symptomatic of the dilemmas of national subject formation. The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism offers insight into the contemporary resurgence and importance of indigenista discourses in Latin America. Estelle Tarica is associate professor of Latin American literature and culture at the University of California, Berkeley.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816650057.jpg
23.620000 USD

The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism

by Estelle Tarica
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Mexico's leading poet, essayist, and cultural critic writes of a Mexican poet of another time and another world, the world of seventeenth-century New Spain. His subject is Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, the most striking figure in all of Spanish-American colonial literature and one of the great poets of ...
Sor Juana: Or, the Traps of Faith
Mexico's leading poet, essayist, and cultural critic writes of a Mexican poet of another time and another world, the world of seventeenth-century New Spain. His subject is Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, the most striking figure in all of Spanish-American colonial literature and one of the great poets of her age. Her life reads like a novel. A spirited and precocious girl, one of six illegitimate children, is sent to live with relatives in the capital city. She becomes known for her beauty, wit, and amazing erudition, and is taken into the court as the Vicereine's protegee. For five years she enjoys the pleasures of life at court--then abruptly, at twenty, enters a convent for life. Yet, no recluse, she transforms the convent locutory into a literary and intellectual salon; she amasses an impressive library and collects scientific instruments, reads insatiably, composes poems, and corresponds with literati in Spain. To the consternation of the prelates of the Church, she persists in circulating her poems, redolent more of the court than the cloister. Her plays are performed, volumes of her poetry are published abroad, and her genius begins to be recognized throughout the Hispanic world. Suddenly she surrenders her books, forswears all literary pursuits, and signs in blood a renunciation of secular learning. The rest is silence. She dies two years later, at forty-six. Octavio Paz has long been intrigued by the enigmas of Sor Juana's personality and career. Why did she become a nun? How could she renounce her lifelong passion for writing and learning? Such questions can be answered only in the context of the world in which she lived. Paz gives a masterly portrayal of the life and culture of New Spain and the political and ideological forces at work in that autocratic, theocratic, male-dominated society, in which the subjugation of women was absolute. Just as Paz illuminates Sor Juana's life by placing it in its historical setting, so he situates her work in relation to the traditions that nurtured it. With critical authority he singles out the qualities that distinguish her work and mark her uniqueness as a poet. To Paz her writings, like her life, epitomize the struggle of the individual, and in particular the individual woman, for creative fulfillment and self-expression.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780674821064.jpg
38.320000 USD

Sor Juana: Or, the Traps of Faith

by Octavio Paz
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
A classic first novel about growing up in colonial Barbados. In the Castle of my Skin is a brilliant, sensitive record of the evolving consciousness of a poor village boy, at a time of rapid social change.
In the Castle of My Skin
A classic first novel about growing up in colonial Barbados. In the Castle of my Skin is a brilliant, sensitive record of the evolving consciousness of a poor village boy, at a time of rapid social change.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780582642676.jpg
21.85 USD

In the Castle of My Skin

by Mr George Lamming
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
A modernist urban novel in the tradition of James Joyce, Adam Buenosayres is a tour-de-force that does for Buenos Aires what Carlos Fuentes did for Mexico City or Jose Lezama Lima did for Havana - chronicles a city teeming with life in all its clever and crass, rude and intelligent ...
Adam Buenosayres: A Novel
A modernist urban novel in the tradition of James Joyce, Adam Buenosayres is a tour-de-force that does for Buenos Aires what Carlos Fuentes did for Mexico City or Jose Lezama Lima did for Havana - chronicles a city teeming with life in all its clever and crass, rude and intelligent forms. Employing a range of literary styles and a variety of voices, Leopoldo Marechal parodies and celebrates Argentina's most brilliant literary and artistic generation, the martinfierristas of the 1920s, among them Jorge Luis Borges. First published in 1948 during the polarizing reign of Juan Peron, the novel was hailed by Julio Cortazar as an extraordinary event in twentieth-century Argentine literature. Set over the course of three break-neck days, Adam Buenosayres follows the protagonist through an apparent metaphysical awakening, a battle for his soul fought by angels and demons, and a descent through a place resembling a comic version of Dante's hell. Presenting both a breathtaking translation and thorough explanatory notes, Norman Cheadle captures the limitless language of Marechal's original and guides the reader along an unmatched journey through the culture of Buenos Aires. This first-ever English translation brings to light Marechal's masterwork with an introduction outlining the novel's importance in various contexts - Argentine, Latin American, and world literature - and with notes illuminating its literary, cultural, and historical references. A salient feature of the Argentine canon, Adam Buenosayres is both a path-breaking novel and a key text for understanding Argentina's cultural and political history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780773543096.jpg
31.450000 USD

Adam Buenosayres: A Novel

by Leopoldo Marechal, Leopoldo Marechal
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Roll at a given speed the film of your own life experiences and see them projected onto the screen of your astonished mind, Canbales offers as an explanation of what he is doing while locked in the bathroom. Rather than using flashback to escape reality, Canales uses it to face ...
In This Sacred Place
Roll at a given speed the film of your own life experiences and see them projected onto the screen of your astonished mind, Canbales offers as an explanation of what he is doing while locked in the bathroom. Rather than using flashback to escape reality, Canales uses it to face it, and in the process taps into an intriguing and skilful analysis of the rise and fall of Salvador Allende and his Popular Unity government on 11 September 1973, an event that has drawn comparisons by Latin Americans to the events of 11 September 2001 in the way it affected the lives and psyches of ordinary people.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781893996595.jpg
25.11 USD

In This Sacred Place

by Poli DeLano
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This crisp new translation by John Gledson is the only complete, unabridged, and annotated edition available of one of the most distinctive novels of the turn of the century.
Dom Casmurro
This crisp new translation by John Gledson is the only complete, unabridged, and annotated edition available of one of the most distinctive novels of the turn of the century.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780195103090.jpg
20.990000 USD

Dom Casmurro

by Machado de Assis
Paperback / softback
Page 1 of 11