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Any observer of Dominican political and literary discourse will quickly notice the prevalence of certain notions of hyper-masculinity. In this extraordinary work, Maja Horn argues that these gender conceptions became ingrained during the dictatorship (1930-1961) of Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, as well as through the U.S. military occupation that preceded it. ...
Masculinity After Trujillo: The Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature
Any observer of Dominican political and literary discourse will quickly notice the prevalence of certain notions of hyper-masculinity. In this extraordinary work, Maja Horn argues that these gender conceptions became ingrained during the dictatorship (1930-1961) of Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, as well as through the U.S. military occupation that preceded it. Where previous studies have focused mainly on Spanish colonialism and the sharing of the island with Haiti, Horn emphasizes the underexamined and lasting influence of U.S. imperialism and how it prepared the terrain for Trujillo's hyperbolic language of masculinity. She also demonstrates how later attempts to emasculate the image of Trujillo often reproduced the same masculinist ideology popularized by his government. Through the lens of gender politics, Horn enables readers to reconsider the ongoing legacy of the Trujillato, including the relatively weak social movements formed around racial and ethnic identities, sexuality, and even labor. She offers exciting new interpretations of such writers as Hilma Contreras, Rita Indiana Hernandez, and Junot Diaz, revealing the ways they challenge dominant political and canonical literary discourses.
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73.450000 USD

Masculinity After Trujillo: The Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature

by Maja Horn
Hardback
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Costumbrismo, which refers to depictions of life in Latin America during the nineteenth century, introduced some of the earliest black themes in Cuban literature. Rafael Ocasio delves into this literature to offer up a new perspective on the development of Cuban identity, as influenced by black culture and religion, during ...
Afro-Cuban Costumbrismo: From Plantations to the Slums
Costumbrismo, which refers to depictions of life in Latin America during the nineteenth century, introduced some of the earliest black themes in Cuban literature. Rafael Ocasio delves into this literature to offer up a new perspective on the development of Cuban identity, as influenced by black culture and religion, during the sugar cane boom. Comments about the slave trade and the treatment of slaves were often censored in Cuban publications; nevertheless white Costumbrista writers reported on a vast catalogue of stereotypes, religious beliefs, and musical folklore, and on rich African traditions in major Cuban cities. Exploring rare and seldom discussed nineteenth-century texts, Ocasio offers insight into the nuances of black representation in Costumbrismo while analysing authors such as Suarez y Romero, an abolitionist who wrote from the perspective of a plantation owner. Afro-Cuban Costumbrismo expands the idea of what texts constitute Costumbrismo and debunks the traditional notion that this writing reveals little about the Afro-Cuban experience. The result is a novel examination of how white writers' representations of black culture heavily inform our current understanding of nineteenth-century Afro-Cuban culture and national identity.
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78.700000 USD

Afro-Cuban Costumbrismo: From Plantations to the Slums

by Rafael Ocasio
Hardback
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In Island Bodies, Rosamond King examines sexualities, violence, and repression in the Caribbean experience. She analyses the sexual norms and expectations portrayed in Caribbean and diaspora literature, music, film, and popular culture to show how many individuals contest traditional roles by manoeuvring within and/or trying to change their society's binary ...
Island Bodies: Transgressive Sexualities in the Caribbean Imagination
In Island Bodies, Rosamond King examines sexualities, violence, and repression in the Caribbean experience. She analyses the sexual norms and expectations portrayed in Caribbean and diaspora literature, music, film, and popular culture to show how many individuals contest traditional roles by manoeuvring within and/or trying to change their society's binary gender systems. She skilfully demonstrates that these transgressions better represent Caribbean culture than the official representations perpetuated by governmental elites and often codified into laws that reinforce patriarchal, heterosexual stereotypes. Unique in its breadth and its multilingual and multidisciplinary approach, Island Bodies addresses homosexuality, interracial relations, transgender people, and women's sexual agency in Dutch, Francophone, Anglophone, and Hispanophone works of Caribbean literature. Ultimately King reveals that despite the varied national specificity, differing colonial legacies, and linguistic diversity across the islands, there are striking similarities in the ways Caribglobal cultures attempt to restrict sexuality and in the ways individuals explore and transgress those boundaries.
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78.700000 USD

Island Bodies: Transgressive Sexualities in the Caribbean Imagination

by Rosamond S King
Hardback
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In the wake of independence from Spain in 1898, Cuba's intellectual avant-garde struggled to cast their country as a modern nation. They grappled with the challenges presented by the postcolonial situation in general and with the location of blackness within a narrative of Cuban-ness in particular. In this breakthrough study, ...
Racial Experiments in Cuban Literature and Ethnography
In the wake of independence from Spain in 1898, Cuba's intellectual avant-garde struggled to cast their country as a modern nation. They grappled with the challenges presented by the postcolonial situation in general and with the location of blackness within a narrative of Cuban-ness in particular. In this breakthrough study, Emily Maguire examines how a cadre of writers re-imagined the nation and re-valorized Afro-Cuban culture through a textual production that incorporated elements of the ethnographic with the literary. Singling out the work of Lydia Cabrera as emblematic of the experimentation with genre that characterized the age, Maguire constructs a series of counterpoints that place Cabrera's work in dialogue with that of her Cuban contemporaries-including Fernando Ortiz, Nicolas Guillen, and Alejo Carpentier. An illuminating final chapter on Cabrera and Zora Neale Hurston widens the scope to contextualize Cuban texts within a hemispheric movement to represent black culture.
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78.700000 USD

Racial Experiments in Cuban Literature and Ethnography

by Emily A. Maguire
Hardback
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From the rainforests of Costa Rica and the Amazon to the windswept lands of Tierra del Fuego, Laura Barbas-Rhoden discusses the natural settings within contemporary Latin American novels as they depict key moments of environmental change or crisis in the region from the nineteenth-century imperialism to the present. By integrating ...
Ecological Imaginations in Latin American Fiction
From the rainforests of Costa Rica and the Amazon to the windswept lands of Tierra del Fuego, Laura Barbas-Rhoden discusses the natural settings within contemporary Latin American novels as they depict key moments of environmental change or crisis in the region from the nineteenth-century imperialism to the present. By integrating the use of futuristic novels, Barbas-Rhoden pushes the ecocriticism discussion beyond the realm of nature writing. She avoids the cliches of literary nature and reminds readers that today's urban centers are also part of Latin America and its environmental crisis. One of the first writers to apply ecocriticism to Latin American fiction, Barbas-Rhoden argues that literature can offer readers a deeper understanding of the natural world and humanity's place in it. She demonstrates that ecocritical readings of Latin American topics must take into account social, racial, and gender injustices. She also addresses postapocalyptic science fiction that speaks to a fear of environmental collapse and reminds North American readers that the environments of Latin America are rich and diverse, encompassing both rural and urban extremes.
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78.700000 USD

Ecological Imaginations in Latin American Fiction

by Laura Barbas-Rhoden
Hardback
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Puerto Rican writers from the island and mainland have long used a variety of comic genres and forms to affirm an autonomous national identity and resist cultural hegemony and assimilation. The use of self-reflexive humor has allowed these writers to produce eccentric texts that reflect not only on their own ...
Humor and the Eccentric Text in Puerto Rican Literature
Puerto Rican writers from the island and mainland have long used a variety of comic genres and forms to affirm an autonomous national identity and resist cultural hegemony and assimilation. The use of self-reflexive humor has allowed these writers to produce eccentric texts that reflect not only on their own textuality but also on their role as an intervention in the literary discourse on national identity. Reyes analyzes the works of Nemesio Canales, Luis Rafael Sanchez, Ana Lydia Vega, and Pedro Pietri to argue that their works resituate the parameters of national identity by blurring the lines between the subject and object of humor, the inside and outside of the text, and the here and there of the diasporic Puerto Rican nation. Framing his discussion in the context of Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean traditions, Reyes argues that humor and the eccentric text reimagine Puerto Rican national identity from the perspective of incongruity. He demonstrates how, through self-reflexive humor, these writers expose the many incongruities in Puerto Rican national identity yet also explore the relationship between author and reader. While demonstrating the genre's own instabilities, Reyes argues, humor in Puerto Rican literature negotiates incongruity and allows for a national identity to emerge from multiple centers of articulation.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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Rafael Trujillo, dictator of the Dominican Republic from 1930 until his assassination in 1961, is still heavily mythologized among Dominicans to this day. God and Trujillo, the first book-length study of works about the Dominican dictator, seeks to explain how some of those myths were created by analyzing novels and ...
God and Trujillo: Literary and Cultural Representations of the Dominican Dictator
Rafael Trujillo, dictator of the Dominican Republic from 1930 until his assassination in 1961, is still heavily mythologized among Dominicans to this day. God and Trujillo, the first book-length study of works about the Dominican dictator, seeks to explain how some of those myths were created by analyzing novels and testimonials about Trujillo from Dominican writers to canonical Latin American authors, including Mario Vargas Llosa and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Trujillo's quasi-mythological figure created a compelling corpus of literary works. Ignacio Lopez-Calvo's study offers a vigorous analysis of 36 narrative texts. He analyzes the representation of the dictator as a mythological figure, his legacy, the role of his doubles, his favorite courtiers and acolytes, and the role of women during the so-called Era of Trujillo. He also traces the evolution and significance of these narratives from a theoretical perspective that falls within the cultural studies framework. The study of the Dominican testimonio and the unveiling of the Taino myth in the Trujillato narratives are particularly innovative. In addition, he describes class antagonism and the demythification of the leftist militant in the Trujillato narratives. He also offers an illuminating account of the Dominican left and of the anti-Trujillo resistance as contained in Dominican literature.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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In a pioneering study of male homoeroticism and gay-male identity in Latin American autobiographical writings, Robert Ellis draws upon a diverse group of writers who situate the homoerotic in a variety of contexts, highlighting the ways in which not only male homoeroticism but also male homoerotic practice and gay-male identity ...
They Dream Not of Angels But of Men: Homoeroticism, Gender and Race in Latin American Autobiography
In a pioneering study of male homoeroticism and gay-male identity in Latin American autobiographical writings, Robert Ellis draws upon a diverse group of writers who situate the homoerotic in a variety of contexts, highlighting the ways in which not only male homoeroticism but also male homoerotic practice and gay-male identity are affected by Latin American conceptions of masculinity and femininity, race, and social class. The first book to take life-writings as a primary means for exploring the lives of homoerotically inclined and gay Latin American men, They Dream Not of Angels but of Men is also the first to look at the interrelationship of homoeroticism, gender, and race in Latin America. Each chapter is an intriguing study of a different way of reading the sexually oppressed within a wider social context, including slavery, immigration, imperialism, fascism and communism, and AIDS. Ellis breaks from traditional studies of gay men by showing how male homoeroticism can function as an expression both of resistance and oppression, especially through the dynamics of Latin American machismo. One of his important discoveries is that homosexuality in Latin America is constructed differently and is therefore experienced and known differently than in North America and Europe. Among the writers included are many whose voices were until recently silenced in their own culture and in academic studies of the area; they range from the late colonial period to twentieth-century Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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Lopez examines the role of Jose Marti's writing on concepts of Cuban nationalism that fueled the 1895 colonial revolution against Spain and have since continued to inform conflicting and violently opposed visions of the Cuban nation. He examines how the same body of work has come to be equally championed ...
Jose Marti and the Future of Cuban Nationalisms
Lopez examines the role of Jose Marti's writing on concepts of Cuban nationalism that fueled the 1895 colonial revolution against Spain and have since continued to inform conflicting and violently opposed visions of the Cuban nation. He examines how the same body of work has come to be equally championed by opposing sides in the ongoing battle between the Cuban nation-state, which under Castro has consistently claimed Marti as a crucial inspiration for its Marxist revolutionary government, and the diasporic communities in Miami and elsewhere who still honor Marti as a figure of hope for the Cuban nation in exile. He also shows how, more recently, Marti has become an international as well as national icon, as postcolonial and New Americanist scholars have appropriated parts of his writings and message for use in their own self-described hemispheric and even planetary critiques of Western imperialist projects in Latin and America and beyond. As the first study to examine the impact of Martis writings on both Cubans and Cuban Americans and to consider the ongoing polemic over Marti as part of the larger postcolonial problem of nation building, Lopez's study also considers the more general issue of literature within nationalist projects. He illuminates the common concepts and ideas that underlie the ongoing ideological chasm between the Cuban nation-state and the Cuban nation in exile and offers the possibility of a new way of reading and understanding notions of national identity that have historically both enabled and delimited the ways in which Latin Americans and U.S. Hispanics have understood and defined themselves.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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Lazzara examines the political, ethical, and aesthetic implications of the diverse narrative forms Chilean artists have used to represent the memory of political violence under the Pinochet regime. By studying multiple lenses of memory through which truths about the past have been constructed, he seeks to expose the complex intersections ...
Chile in Transition: The Poetics and Politics of Memory
Lazzara examines the political, ethical, and aesthetic implications of the diverse narrative forms Chilean artists have used to represent the memory of political violence under the Pinochet regime. By studying multiple lenses of memory through which truths about the past have been constructed, he seeks to expose the complex intersections among trauma, subjectivity, and literary genres, and to question the nature of trauma's artistic rendering. Drawing on current theorizations about memory, human rights, and trauma, Lazzara analyzes a broad body of written, visual, and oral texts produced during Chile's democratic transition as representations of a set of poetics searching to connect politics and memory, achieve personal reconciliation, or depict the unspeakable personal and collective consequences of torture and disappearance. In so doing, he sets the politics of consensus and reconciliation against alternative narratives that offer an ethical counterpoint to forgetting and looking toward the future and argues that perhaps only those works that resist hasty narrative resolution to the past can stand up to the ethical and epistemological challenges facing postdictatorial societies still struggling to come to terms with their history. Grounded in Lazzara's firsthand knowledge of the post-Pinochet period and its cultural production, Chile in Transition offers groundbreaking connections and perspectives that set this period in the context of other postauthoritarian societies dealing with contested memories and conflicting memorializing practices, most notably with Holocaust studies.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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There is in this work nearly total grasp of the central concerns of . . . Anglophone Caribbean literature. Few books on the subject cover it with the breadth and depth that this has. --Isidore Okpewho, State university of New York, Binghamton An impressive range of explorations into the ways ...
Historical Thought and Literary Representation in West Indian Literature
There is in this work nearly total grasp of the central concerns of . . . Anglophone Caribbean literature. Few books on the subject cover it with the breadth and depth that this has. --Isidore Okpewho, State university of New York, Binghamton An impressive range of explorations into the ways in which the better-known male Caribbean writers of fiction, poetry, and drama reconceptualize Caribbean history. --Kathleen M. Balutansky, Saint Michael's College Nana Wilson-Tagoe argues that it is in the imaginative recasting of the past, more than in one-dimensional explanations of historical processes, that we find insights in Caribbean history and that it is this recasting that has shaped Caribbean literature in the 20th century. Looking at major Anglophone Caribbean writers in three genres--novels, short stories, and poetry--she analyzes the ways in which history has been perceived, constructed, and used in West Indian literature. In that context she explores the interplay of reality and the fantastic; history and the imagination; myth and ancestral memory; time-bound conceptions of the West Indies and the timeless values of life there. While discussion focuses on the interface between literature and historiography, it also addresses issues in sociology, political science, and philosophy. Wilson-Tagoe's work will appeal to students of Caribbean literature but also and particularly to scholars who study the black Atlantic world, both on its own terms and in its relations with Western society and Africa. Nana Wilson-Tagoe teaches African and Caribbean literature at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. She has published A Reader's Guide to West Indian and Black British Literature as well as articles in Caribbean Review, Trinidad Review, Wasafiri, and Comparative and General Literature.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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[Adds] an important voice to the national conversation on race. A 'must read' for scholars and enthusiasts of Caribbean literature. --Janet J. Hampton, George Washington University Charcoal and Cinnamon explores the continuing redefinition of women of African descent in the Caribbean, focusing on the manner in which literature has influenced ...
Charcoal and Cinnamon: The Politics and Color in Spanish Caribbean Literature
[Adds] an important voice to the national conversation on race. A 'must read' for scholars and enthusiasts of Caribbean literature. --Janet J. Hampton, George Washington University Charcoal and Cinnamon explores the continuing redefinition of women of African descent in the Caribbean, focusing on the manner in which literature has influenced their treatment and contributed to the formation of their shifting identities. While various studies have explored this subject, much of the existing research harbors a blindness to the literature of the non-English-speaking territories. Claudette Williams bases her analyses on poetry and prose from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic and enhances it by comparing these writings with the literatures of the English- and French-speaking Caribbean territories. Williams also questions the tendency of some of the established schools of feminism to de-emphasize the factor of race in their gender analyses. A novel aspect of this work, indicated by the allusion to charcoal and cinnamon in its title, is its focus on the ways in which many writers use language to point to subtle distinctions between black and brown (mulatto) women. The originality of Williams's approach is also evident in her emphasis on the writer's attitudes toward race rather than on the writer's race itself. She brings to the emotionally charged subject of the politics of color the keen analysis and sustained research of a scholar, as well as the perceptive personal insights of an African-ancestored Caribbean woman. Though the main focus is on literary works, the book will also be a valuable reference for courses on Caribbean history, sociology, and psychology. Claudette M. Williams is the author of several articles on the images of women in Caribbean literature and is currently senior lecturer in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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A clear, well-written, and cogent study of three major women intellectuals and their positions as creative writers and cultural critics in Latin America. --Francine Masiello, University of California, Berkeley Insightful and often brilliant . . . especially important in countering the traditional thought that posits the notion that women did ...
Critical Acts: Latin American Women and Cultural Criticism
A clear, well-written, and cogent study of three major women intellectuals and their positions as creative writers and cultural critics in Latin America. --Francine Masiello, University of California, Berkeley Insightful and often brilliant . . . especially important in countering the traditional thought that posits the notion that women did not engage in the production of culture and knowledge in 20th-century Latin America. --Susan C. Quinlan, University of Georgia Moving deftly across the gap between Portuguese- and Spanish-speaking Latin America, Elizabeth Marchant examines the writing of three important women intellectuals of the early 20th century: Lucia Miguel Pereira (Brazil), Victoria Ocampo (Argentina), and Gabriela Mistral (Chile). Though Marchant acknowledges the persistence of the bearded academy --referring to the male-dominated nature of literary institutions--she challenges the assumption that women did not engage in the production of culture and knowledge in modern Latin America. Looking at the broad contexts in which the three authors wrote, she explores their views on race, culture, gender, and national identity, bringing into focus women's impact on the writing of the history of ideas in Latin America as well as their traditional influence as writers of personal themes. She also examines the neglected study of the critical essay as a genre. Solidly grounded in feminist theory, cultural criticism, and social history, this book offers important ground-breaking perspectives on the issue of gender criticism and the study of Third World women writers. Elizabeth A. Marchant is assistant professor of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has written articles on contemporary Afro-Brazilian literature and cultural studies.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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In this original look at how ethnic literature enters the U.S. classroom and the literary canon, Delia Poey compares the risks facing teachers and interpreters of well-known Latina/o or Latin American texts with those run by the coyote who smuggles undocumented workers across the U.S./Mexico border: both are in danger ...
Latino American Literature in the Classroom: The Politics of Transformation
In this original look at how ethnic literature enters the U.S. classroom and the literary canon, Delia Poey compares the risks facing teachers and interpreters of well-known Latina/o or Latin American texts with those run by the coyote who smuggles undocumented workers across the U.S./Mexico border: both are in danger of erasing those cultural traits that made the border crossers important. Poey shows that these texts have yet to be fully main-streamed into the curricula, and that teachers of multicultural literature inadvertently re-colonize the texts by failing to treat them on their own terms. She goes beyond highlighting the ways a superficial understanding of Latin American literature has led to an even more superficial or problematic reception of Latina/o texts and offers solutions. In looking at such familiar books as Borderlands, Hunger of Memory, House on Mango Street, Bless Me Ultima, and One Hundred Years of Solitude, Poey not only provides teachers and critics of Latina/o literature with innovative and viable approaches to these texts but proposes new contexts for them and new ways of viewing how they have been treated in classrooms and criticism. Far more than merely an entry in the current debate over canon and curricular reform, the work combines a practical approach to teaching Latina/o literature with suggestions on diversifying curricula and revising established reading practices.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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Angel Cuadra was a prisoner of conscience, sentenced to one of Castro's gulags in 1967 for conspiracy. He became a forgotten man in his own country, expunged from contemporary Cuban letters. As a young literary figure and anti-Batista conspirator in the fifties, Cuadra participated both in the arts and in ...
Angel Cuadra: The Poet in Socialist Cuba
Angel Cuadra was a prisoner of conscience, sentenced to one of Castro's gulags in 1967 for conspiracy. He became a forgotten man in his own country, expunged from contemporary Cuban letters. As a young literary figure and anti-Batista conspirator in the fifties, Cuadra participated both in the arts and in politics. In the flush of Batista's downfall, Cuadra enjoyed a moment of recognition as an international spokesman for Castro's successful revolution and as a popular and widely translated poet. At the same time he became a government lawyer, a helpful cover when he renewed his underground activities. A short time after Castro's triumph, the artists and writers who participated in the original revolution reappraised the new government, soon establishing a new resistance. Writing under the pen name of Alejandro Almanza, Cuadra became one of the movement's leaders. Cuadra was released from prison in 1982 after serving his full sentence. Now a part of the Cuban intellectual community in exile in Miami, he works as an international jurist concerned with political prisoners. Cuadra continues to write; in 1988 he received an award from the government of Spain for his love poems and in 1990 received special recognition for his poetry from President Vaclav Havel of Czechoslovakia. This volume includes three of Cuadra's works in translation. The essay Writers in Socialist Cuba describes his final three years in Cuba, when he was free from prison but forbidden to leave the country. He tells of attempts to readjust to his beloved Havana, of reunions with friends and not-so-well-wishers, and of existence in the Castro years when all hope for a better life had evaporated. A recent postscriptgives his impressions of the Cuban artistic and intellectual climate since the mid-eighties. A Correspondence of Poems (from Jail) presents Cuadra's poetic letters to the exiled Cuban poet Juana Rosa Pita. Befitting its lyrical spirit, this poetry was smuggled out of prison in a musi
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26.200000 USD
Hardback
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An important contribution to the study of Walcott's poetry and plays. --Modernism/modernity Walcott, [Burnett] says, has assimilated western tradition to his own project, using it to create a new plural world of open-ended possibilities. . . . A book that should be of interest to any student of Walcott's literature. ...
Derek Walcott: Politics and Poetics
An important contribution to the study of Walcott's poetry and plays. --Modernism/modernity Walcott, [Burnett] says, has assimilated western tradition to his own project, using it to create a new plural world of open-ended possibilities. . . . A book that should be of interest to any student of Walcott's literature. --Times Higher Education Supplement This ambitious book takes in the full corpus of Walcott--plays, essays, interviews, etc., as well as the poetry--and argues the essential unity of his (humanistic) vision. --Wasafiri Burnett is very good on Walcott's aesthetic and technical strategies, particularly the mythopoeic framework of his thought, and the epic form which he frequently employs. --New West Indian Guide Convincingly suggests that Walcott's art radiates outward from St. Lucia to the West Indies, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Americas, becoming an art that honors and enlarges the English language and its multiple histories and usages. --World Literature Today A long-overdue critical assessment of Walcott's varied and extensive oeuvre. Its insightful readings and detailed historical and cultural context make it a must-read for students of contemporary Caribbean literature and culture. -- Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, Vassar College Paula Burnett offers a new interpretation of the life's work of acclaimed St. Lucian poet, playwright, and Nobel Prize winner Derek Walcott. Often regarded as the radical voice of the Third World, his drama and poetry together form a coherent project designed to create a legacy for modern Caribbean society. Illuminating his ideology and the technique that informs his writing, Burnett discusses his unique approach to myth, identity, and aesthetics. In addition to his poetry, the book draws extensively on Walcott's essays, plays, broadcasts, private interviews, and public appearances, some previously unpublished or unrecorded. What emerges is the picture of an epic poet with remarkable gifts working to impart the distinctive wisdom of Caribbean culture--a politically aware writer celebrating his people, place, and language. Burnett also reveals an artist with a message to the world: that a positive sense of identity can be built out of negative circumstances like injustice and exploitation, if only creativity is mobilized. The book serves as a critical study for more experienced scholars and as a solid introductory text for students of Walcott's work. Its readable and well-organized style also makes it appealing to anyone with a general interest in poetry.
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56.94 USD
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Linking Africa and the Caribbean, orality to writing, Larrier presents an important study of women's empowerment in contemporary francophone literature. --Mildred Mortimer, University of Colorado A 'page turner', well-conceptualized scholarship that surely will have a long--very long--life in the field. A wonderful resource . . . that scholars, students, and ...
Francophone Women Writers of Africa and the Caribbean
Linking Africa and the Caribbean, orality to writing, Larrier presents an important study of women's empowerment in contemporary francophone literature. --Mildred Mortimer, University of Colorado A 'page turner', well-conceptualized scholarship that surely will have a long--very long--life in the field. A wonderful resource . . . that scholars, students, and teachers will find useful. --Janis A. Mayes, Syracuse University Examining narratives from a wide variety of countries and traditions in francophone Africa and the Caribbean, Renee Larrier argues that women writers reappropriate their specific oral tradition by creating woman-centered/woman-narrated texts. Female characters telling their own stories subvert stereotypes found in literature and popular culture. Larrier discusses the inscription of women's voices on sites as varied as pot lids, wall paintings, and cloth before focusing on prose works from Cameroon, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Mali, Martinique, and Senegal. In so doing, she reconnects the authors of Africa and the diaspora who articulate women's perspectives and empower their communities. A significant comparative study, Francophone Women Writers of Africa and the Caribbean marks a major contribution to an exciting field of inquiry. Renee Larrier is associate professor of French at Rutgers University and coeditor, with E. Anthony Hurley and Joseph McLaren, of Migrating Words and Worlds: Pan-Africanism Updated.
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56.94 USD
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Through a close reading of selected poets born in the Caribbean and working from the 1910s to the present, Lee Jenkins analyzes the language and intertextuality of Caribbean poetry, revising notions of the relationship of this poetry to modernism. Focusing on how Caribbean writers respond to their literary inheritances inside ...
The Language of Caribbean Poetry: Boundaries of Expression
Through a close reading of selected poets born in the Caribbean and working from the 1910s to the present, Lee Jenkins analyzes the language and intertextuality of Caribbean poetry, revising notions of the relationship of this poetry to modernism. Focusing on how Caribbean writers respond to their literary inheritances inside and outside the region, she illuminates the interactions of Caribbean poetry with Anglo-American modernism, with English, Scottish, and Irish regional modernisms, and with postmodern avant-garde movements such as the Language Movement. Modernism emerges as a tradition that has been assimilated, transformed, and turned in fresh directions by Caribbean poets. Previous studies have stressed the influence of the African-American protest tradition on Caribbean poetry, alleging a lack of interest in formal innovation in black poetry. Jenkins counters that Caribbean poetry is informed by many textualities and accomplishes the goals of the modernist experiment through diction, metaphor, and allusion. Jenkins examines the peculiar influence of T. S. Eliot on Anglophone Caribbean poetry. She pays special attention to the early Jamaican dialect poetry of Claude McKay and the undervalued poetics and wider cultural work of Una Marson, the first major Caribbean woman poet. She evaluates the current burgeoning interest in poet and historian Kamau Brathwaite and also discusses the work of less-noticed poets David Dabydeen, Lorna Goodison, and M. NourbeSe Philip, offering the first critical discussion of Philip's poem-sequence Zong! This revisionary and groundbreaking work relates not only to the fields of Caribbean literature and 20th-century poetry but to recent reevaluations of the Harlem Renaissance; it is also relevant for students of women's poetry and African-American literature.
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56.94 USD
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Stevens illuminates the link between the pervasive image of the family in the theater and the struggle for national and cultural identity in Cuba and Puerto Rico. By focusing on two key periods of family drama productions - the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s and the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s - ...
Family and Identity in Contemporary Cuban and Puerto Rican Drama
Stevens illuminates the link between the pervasive image of the family in the theater and the struggle for national and cultural identity in Cuba and Puerto Rico. By focusing on two key periods of family drama productions - the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s and the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s - she traces the historical articulation of the concepts of family and nation in the theater. Through the close readings of 16 plays, Stevens demonstrates how onstage family quarrels between husbands and wives, parents and children, and siblings allegorize divergent views of national experience and provide insight into how and by whom communities are defined, as well as how visions of national culture change over time. While it has become commonplace to expect any cultural history of Latin America and the Hispanic Caribbean to identify the role of writing in the project of constructing and defining nationhood, the place of performance in the cultural politics of representing the nation has been less rigorously investigated. Stevens's genealogy of modern Cuban and Puerto Rican drama reveals theater and performance to be a special site and activity for imagining communities.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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From a position of urgent political engagement, this provocative book offers novel and compelling interpretations of several well-known Haitian-born authors, particularly regarding U.S. intervention in their homeland. Drawing on the diasporic cultural texts of several authors, such as Edwidge Danticat and Dany Laferriere, Jana Evans Braziel examines how writers participate ...
Duvalier's Ghosts: Race, Diaspora, and U.S. Imperialism in Haitian Literatures
From a position of urgent political engagement, this provocative book offers novel and compelling interpretations of several well-known Haitian-born authors, particularly regarding U.S. intervention in their homeland. Drawing on the diasporic cultural texts of several authors, such as Edwidge Danticat and Dany Laferriere, Jana Evans Braziel examines how writers participate in transnational movements for global social justice. In their fictional works they discuss the Unites States' many interventionist methods in Haiti, including surveillance, foreign aid, and military assistance. Through their work, they reveal that the majority of Haitians do not welcome these intrusions and actively criticize U.S. treatment of Haitians in both countries. Braziel encourages us to analyze the instability and violence of small nations like Haiti within the larger frame of international financial and military institutions and forms of imperialism. She forcefully argues that by reading these works as anti-imperialist, much can be learned about why Haitians and Haitian exiles often have negative perceptions of the U.S.
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63.27 USD
Hardback
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The Tears of Hispaniola explores the ways in which Haitian and Dominican autobiography and fiction serve as public record - documenting violence, terror, memory, and human rights violations on the island of Hispaniola, home to the two nations of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The book explores the works of ...
The Tears of Hispaniola: Haitian and Dominican Diaspora Memory
The Tears of Hispaniola explores the ways in which Haitian and Dominican autobiography and fiction serve as public record - documenting violence, terror, memory, and human rights violations on the island of Hispaniola, home to the two nations of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The book explores the works of four writers - Jean-Robert Cadet, Junot Diaz, Loida Maritza Perez, and Edwidge Danticat - all of whom were born on and subsequently left the island. The author concludes these writers use an autobiographical format as a means of coming to terms with and bringing attention to the larger injustices still occurring on the island. Stories of their torn country continue to haunt the people of Hispaniola's diaspora, Suarez writes, and at the same time present them with a path to social action. She argues that as authors and intellectuals articulate traumatic memories of their homeland, their writing transcends violence, and cries out for justice. Interpreting the literary production of the selected authors in light of contemporary events, Suarez explores human rights issues and examines recent history in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. In their images of what they left behind and what exists today, these writers engage in a process Suarez contends can transform unspeakable truths into memoirs of survival, understanding and resistance. She uses their work as a platform to consider questions of ethnic identity and social reform for the large and growing U.S.-Caribbean community, finding that citizens of the diaspora challenge prejudices, and make a distinct impact on the cultural landscape of the United States.
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62.15 USD
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Mario Vargas Llosa's work is marked by technical sophistication and by its alliance with a variety of trends in modern culture. To date, little criticism of his work has made use of the important developments in literary theory in the past two decades. This book aims to do that, analysing ...
Vargas Llosa Among the Postmodernists
Mario Vargas Llosa's work is marked by technical sophistication and by its alliance with a variety of trends in modern culture. To date, little criticism of his work has made use of the important developments in literary theory in the past two decades. This book aims to do that, analysing Vargas Llosa's place in modern and postmodern criticism. Booker begins with an analysis of The Green House within the context of modernism, using this early work to develop several hypotheses concerning the differences between modernism and postmodernism in literature. He tests these hypotheses in the remainder of the book through detailed readings of Vargas Llosa's later novels (from Captain Pantoja and the Special Service onward) and within the context of theoretical discussions of postmodernism by such critics as Fredric Jameson, Terry Eagleton, Linda Hutcheon and Andreas Huyssen. Booker's specific readings of Vargas Llosa's work are also informed by the insights of a number of critics, including Mikhail Bakhtin, Michel Foucault and Theodor Adorno. The readings focus on the formal characteristics of Vargas Llosa's writing and on the intense political engagement - characterised in later works by scepticism toward the claims of various political programmes - that marks his career. As a result, this study yields insights into both the aesthetics and the politics of postmodernism, and it should be useful to those interested in Latin-American literature and in the social and cultural landscapes of Vargas Llosa's works. The book ends with a description of published theories of modernism and postmodernism.
62.950000 USD
Hardback
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