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This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin AS and A-Level (Group 1) prescription of Cicero's Pro Cluentio, sections 1-7 and 10-11, and the A-Level (Group 2) prescription of sections 27-32 and 35-37, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary, with a detailed introduction that also covers the ...
Cicero, Pro Cluentio: A Selection
This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin AS and A-Level (Group 1) prescription of Cicero's Pro Cluentio, sections 1-7 and 10-11, and the A-Level (Group 2) prescription of sections 27-32 and 35-37, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary, with a detailed introduction that also covers the prescribed poems to be read in English for A Level. In 66 BC, Aulus Cluentius Habitus was tried for the attempted murder of Statius Albius Oppianicus the Elder. The prosecutor was Sassia, Cluentius' own mother. Marcus Tullius Cicero, the famous statesman, orator and lawyer, defended Cluentius in his Pro Cluentio, a persuasive oratorical tour de force. The selections in this edition prove that Cicero was not above using character assassinations in his speeches, first attacking Oppianicus the Elder, then Sassia in a vivid, melodramatic narrative which distracts and diverts the jury from Cluentius' alleged crimes. Resources are available on the Companion Website.
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24.100000 USD
Paperback / softback
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This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin A-Level (Group 4) prescription of Ovid's Heroides, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary for Heroides I lines 1-68, and Heroides VII lines 1-140, with a detailed introduction that also covers the prescribed text to be read in English. Ovid's ...
Ovid, Heroides: A Selection
This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin A-Level (Group 4) prescription of Ovid's Heroides, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary for Heroides I lines 1-68, and Heroides VII lines 1-140, with a detailed introduction that also covers the prescribed text to be read in English. Ovid's Heroides is a unique collection of poetry, in which famous mythological heroines write letters to the men who have abandoned them. They offer a new perspective on the otherwise male-centred mythological tradition. Heroides I (from Penelope) and VII (from Dido) respond to the most famous Classical epics, Homer's Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid, by presenting a new, less positive, angle on the two famous epic heroes. Through his heroines' unique voices, Ovid plays with literary tradition, inviting us all to take a side: epic heroism or loyalty in love? Resources are available on the Companion Website.
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18.850000 USD

Ovid, Heroides: A Selection

Paperback / softback
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This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin AS and A-Level (Group 1) prescription of Tacitus' Annals IV, sections 1-4 (... non adversus habebatur), 7-12, and 39-41, and the A-Level (Group 2) prescription of sections 52-54, 57-60, 67-71 and 74-75, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary, with ...
Tacitus, Annals IV: A Selection
This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin AS and A-Level (Group 1) prescription of Tacitus' Annals IV, sections 1-4 (... non adversus habebatur), 7-12, and 39-41, and the A-Level (Group 2) prescription of sections 52-54, 57-60, 67-71 and 74-75, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary, with a detailed introduction that also covers the prescribed sections to be read in English for A Level. It is AD 23 and we are in the ninth year of the reign of Rome's second emperor, Tiberius. Increasingly he has come to rely on the assistance of the Praetorian Prefect, Lucius Aelius Sejanus, in the running of Rome. But Sejanus has ambitions beyond being a mere assistant, extending even as far as the imperial throne itself. Tacitus vividly portrays the machinations of Sejanus as he attempts to manoeuvre himself into a position to assume the ultimate authority, characterising the period as one dominated by villainy, betrayal and deceit. Resources are available on the Companion Website.
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24.100000 USD
Paperback / softback
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This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin A-Level (Group 2) prescription of Livy's History of Rome, Book I, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary for chapters 53-54, 56 (haec agenti ...)-60, with a detailed introduction that also covers the prescribed text to be read in English. ...
Livy, History of Rome I: A Selection
This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin A-Level (Group 2) prescription of Livy's History of Rome, Book I, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary for chapters 53-54, 56 (haec agenti ...)-60, with a detailed introduction that also covers the prescribed text to be read in English. Livy is one of the great Roman historians. His History of Rome, written in the late-1st century BCE, covered more than 700 years from the foundation of the city to his own era. In this selection he provides an account of the reign of the last King of Rome, Tarquinius Superbus, the rape of Lucretia by the King's son, and the overthrow of the monarchy and establishment of Republican government by Brutus. These dramatic events must be read in the context of Livy's perspective as an author writing at the very beginning of the Imperial period. Resources are available on the Companion Website.
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18.850000 USD

Livy, History of Rome I: A Selection

Paperback / softback
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This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin AS and A-Level (Group 3) prescription of Aeneid Book XII, lines 1-106, 614-727, and the A-Level (Group 4) prescription of Aeneid Book XII, lines 728-952, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary, with a detailed introduction that also covers the ...
Virgil Aeneid XII: A Selection
This is the OCR-endorsed publication from Bloomsbury for the Latin AS and A-Level (Group 3) prescription of Aeneid Book XII, lines 1-106, 614-727, and the A-Level (Group 4) prescription of Aeneid Book XII, lines 728-952, giving full Latin text, commentary and vocabulary, with a detailed introduction that also covers the prescribed text to be read in English for A Level. Aeneid XII is the final book of Virgil's Roman epic. The war fought between Aeneas' refugee Trojans and the people of Latium here reaches a bloody, moving climax. The OCR selection contains two scenes of rich emotion focussed on the Italian war-leader Turnus as he reacts to military defeat and crisis, followed by the full narrative of the decisive single combat between Turnus and Aeneas with which the poem concludes. This is one of the great passages in Latin literature - grand in content and style, complex and challenging in its subject matter. Resources are available on the Companion Website.
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24.100000 USD
Paperback / softback
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The only exam-board approved book for OCR's Greek AS and A-Level set text prescriptions for 2021-23 giving full Greek text, commentary and vocabulary and a detailed introduction for each text that also covers the prescription to be read in English for A Level. The texts covered are: AS and A ...
OCR Anthology for Classical Greek AS and A Level: 2021-2023
The only exam-board approved book for OCR's Greek AS and A-Level set text prescriptions for 2021-23 giving full Greek text, commentary and vocabulary and a detailed introduction for each text that also covers the prescription to be read in English for A Level. The texts covered are: AS and A Level Groups 1&3 Thucydides, Histories, Book 6, 19 to 6.32 Plato, Symposium, 189c2 to 194e2 Homer, Odyssey 1, lines 213-444 Sophocles, Ajax, lines 1-133, 284-347, 748-783 A Level Groups 2&4 Thucydides, Histories, Book 6, 47 to 50.1 and 53 to 61 Plato, Symposium, 201d to end of 206b Plutarch, Alcibiades, X.1.1 to XVI.5 Homer, Odyssey 6, lines 85-331 Sophocles, Ajax, lines 430-582, 646-692, 815-865 Aristophanes, Clouds, lines 1-242 Resources are available on the Companion Website.
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43.000000 USD

OCR Anthology for Classical Greek AS and A Level: 2021-2023

Paperback / softback
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Walking through Elysium stresses the subtle and intricate ways writers across time and space wove Vergil's underworld in Aeneid 6 into their works. These allusions operate on many levels, from the literary and political to the religious and spiritual. Aeneid 6 reshaped prior philosophical, religious, and poetic traditions of underworld ...
Walking through Elysium: Vergil's Underworld and the Poetics of Tradition
Walking through Elysium stresses the subtle and intricate ways writers across time and space wove Vergil's underworld in Aeneid 6 into their works. These allusions operate on many levels, from the literary and political to the religious and spiritual. Aeneid 6 reshaped prior philosophical, religious, and poetic traditions of underworld descents, while offering a universalizing account of the spiritual that could accommodate prior as well as emerging religious and philosophical systems. Vergil's underworld became an archetype, a model flexible enough to be employed across genres, and periods, and among differing cultural and religious contexts. The essays in this volume speak to Vergil's incorporation of and influence on literary representations of underworlds, souls, afterlives, prophecies, journeys, and spaces, from sacred and profane to wild and civilized, tracing the impact of Vergil's underworld on authors such as Ovid, Seneca, Statius, Augustine, and Shelley, from Pagan and Christian traditions through Romantic and Spiritualist readings. Walking through Elysium asserts the deep and lasting influence of Vergil's underworld from the moment of its publication to the present day.
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78.750000 USD

Walking through Elysium: Vergil's Underworld and the Poetics of Tradition

Hardback
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Before Utopia demonstrates that Thomas More's Utopia (1516) is not, as is widely accepted, a rhetorical play of spirit but is instead built from a particular philosophy. That philosophy was not Platonism, but classical Stoicism. Deeply disturbed in his youth by the conviction that he needed to decide between a ...
Before Utopia: The Making of Thomas More's Mind
Before Utopia demonstrates that Thomas More's Utopia (1516) is not, as is widely accepted, a rhetorical play of spirit but is instead built from a particular philosophy. That philosophy was not Platonism, but classical Stoicism. Deeply disturbed in his youth by the conviction that he needed to decide between a worldly and a monastic path, Thomas More's outlook was transformed in 1504 by Erasmus' De taedio Iesu and Enchiridion. As a consequence, he married in 1505 and wholeheartedly committed himself to worldly affairs. His Lucian (1506), written after working directly with Erasmus, adopts the Stoic mindset; Erasmus' Praise of Folly (1511) shows from beginning to end the workings of More's life-changing Stoic outlook. More's Utopia then goes on to systematically illustrate the Stoic unitary two-dimensional frame of thought within an imaginary New World setting. Before Utopia is not just a book about Thomas More. It is a book about intellectual history and the movement of ideas from the ancient world to the Renaissance. Ross Dealy emphasizes the continuity between Erasmus and More in their religious and philosophical thought, and above all the decisive influence of Erasmus on More.
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126.000000 USD

Before Utopia: The Making of Thomas More's Mind

by Ross Dealy
Hardback
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Modern notions of celebrity, fame, and infamy reach back to the time of Homer's Iliad. During the Hellenistic period, in particular, the Greek understanding of fame became more widely known, and adapted, to accommodate or respond to non-Greek understandings of reputation in society and culture. This collection of essays illustrates ...
Celebrity, Fame, and Infamy in the Hellenistic World
Modern notions of celebrity, fame, and infamy reach back to the time of Homer's Iliad. During the Hellenistic period, in particular, the Greek understanding of fame became more widely known, and adapted, to accommodate or respond to non-Greek understandings of reputation in society and culture. This collection of essays illustrates the ways in which the characteristics of fame and infamy in the Hellenistic era distinguished themselves and how they were represented in diverse and unique ways throughout the Mediterranean. The means of recording fame and infamy included public art, literature, sculpture, coinage, and inscribed monuments. The ruling elite carefully employed these means throughout the different Hellenistic kingdoms, and these essays demonstrate how they operated in the creation of social, political, and cultural values. The authors examine the cultural means whereby fame and infamy entered social consciousness, and explore the nature and effect of this important and enduring sociological phenomenon.
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89.250000 USD

Celebrity, Fame, and Infamy in the Hellenistic World

Hardback
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This book is a study both of anachronism in antiquity and of anachronism as a vehicle for understanding antiquity. It explores the post-classical origins and changing meanings of the term 'anachronism' as well as the presence of anachronism in all its forms in classical literature, criticism and material objects. Contrary ...
Anachronism and Antiquity
This book is a study both of anachronism in antiquity and of anachronism as a vehicle for understanding antiquity. It explores the post-classical origins and changing meanings of the term 'anachronism' as well as the presence of anachronism in all its forms in classical literature, criticism and material objects. Contrary to the position taken by many modern philosophers of history, this book argues that classical antiquity had a rich and varied understanding of historical difference, which is reflected in sophisticated notions of anachronism. This central hypothesis is tested by an examination of attitudes to temporal errors in ancient literary texts and chronological writings and by analysing notions of anachronistic survival and multitemporality. Rather than seeing a sense of anachronism as something that separates modernity from antiquity, the book suggests that in both ancient writings and their modern receptions chronological rupture can be used as a way of creating a dialogue between past and present. With a selection of case-studies and theoretical discussions presented in a manner suitable for scholars and students both of classical antiquity and of modern history, anthropology, and visual culture, the book's ambition is to offer a new conceptual map of antiquity through the notion of anachronism.
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36.700000 USD

Anachronism and Antiquity

by Tom Phillips, Carol Atack, Tim Rood
Paperback / softback
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Bringing together an international team of historians, classicists, and scholars of religion, this volume provides the first comprehensive overview of the extant Greek and Latin letter collections of late antiquity (ca. 300-600 c.e.). Each chapter addresses a major collection of Greek or Latin literary letters, introducing the social and textual ...
Late Antique Letter Collections: A Critical Introduction and Reference Guide
Bringing together an international team of historians, classicists, and scholars of religion, this volume provides the first comprehensive overview of the extant Greek and Latin letter collections of late antiquity (ca. 300-600 c.e.). Each chapter addresses a major collection of Greek or Latin literary letters, introducing the social and textual histories of each collection and examining its assembly, publication, and transmission. Contributions also reveal how collections operated as discrete literary genres, with their own conventions and self-presentational agendas. This book will fundamentally change how people both read these texts and use letters to reconstruct the social history of the fourth, fifth, and sixth centuries.
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100.42 USD

Late Antique Letter Collections: A Critical Introduction and Reference Guide

Paperback / softback
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The works of Virgil (70-19 BCE) define the 'golden age' of Latin poetry and have inspired a long tradition of interpretation and adaptation that starts in his own time and extends to important modern authors. His ascent from the lesser genre of pastoral (the Bucolics) through a more ambitious didactic ...
Virgil
The works of Virgil (70-19 BCE) define the 'golden age' of Latin poetry and have inspired a long tradition of interpretation and adaptation that starts in his own time and extends to important modern authors. His ascent from the lesser genre of pastoral (the Bucolics) through a more ambitious didactic mode (the Georgics) to the soaring heights of epic (the incomparable Aeneid) shaped the canonical writings of other authors, from his younger contemporary Ovid through the medieval writers Dante and Petrarch to the early modern poets Spenser and Milton and well beyond. Virgil, as Alison Keith shows, has never gone out of critical or popular fashion. This wide-ranging introduction appraises a figure of central importance in the history of Western music, art and literature. Offering close readings of the Bucolics, Georgics and Aeneid, Keith places Virgil and his poetry in historical context before tracing their impact at key moments in the culture of the West. Emphasis is placed on Virgil's reception of the classical literary and philosophical traditions, and on how his poetry has attracted modern interest from writers as diverse as T. S. Eliot and Ursula K. Le Guin.
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31.59 USD

Virgil

by Alison Keith
Paperback / softback
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This study provides a critical edition of the Pervigilium Veneris with a Latin text, translation and commentary. This late-antique poem, the 'Vigil of Venus', is of unknown date and authorship. It exists in four heavily corrupted manuscripts, including the Codex Salmasianus, as part of a collection of later Latin poetry ...
The Pervigilium Veneris: A New Critical Text, Translation and Commentary
This study provides a critical edition of the Pervigilium Veneris with a Latin text, translation and commentary. This late-antique poem, the 'Vigil of Venus', is of unknown date and authorship. It exists in four heavily corrupted manuscripts, including the Codex Salmasianus, as part of a collection of later Latin poetry compiled around the 6th Century AD. Considerable attention has been paid to the piece since its first edition in the 16th century, largely on account of its singularity, mysterious origins and enigmatic final stanza, in which the poet suddenly bursts into the piece lamenting his 'lost muse'. Despite this scholarly interest, much work remained to be done in order to arrive at a more solid text of the poem and a more complete understanding of its meaning. This new edition, with detailed commentary notes and a full introduction to the historical and literary contexts of the poem, furthers our knowledge by offering new perspectives and analysis, incorporating existing scholarship and reviving ideas that had previously been set aside.
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53.92 USD

The Pervigilium Veneris: A New Critical Text, Translation and Commentary

by William M Barton
Paperback / softback
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This book demonstrates the rich and varied ways in which heavy metal music draws on the ancient Greek and Roman world. Contributors examine bands from across the globe, including: Blind Guardian (Germany), Therion (Sweden), Celtic Frost, Eluveitie (Switzerland), Ex Deo (Canada/Italy), Heimdall, Stormlord, Ade (Italy), Kawir (Greece), Theatre of Tragedy ...
Classical Antiquity in Heavy Metal Music
This book demonstrates the rich and varied ways in which heavy metal music draws on the ancient Greek and Roman world. Contributors examine bands from across the globe, including: Blind Guardian (Germany), Therion (Sweden), Celtic Frost, Eluveitie (Switzerland), Ex Deo (Canada/Italy), Heimdall, Stormlord, Ade (Italy), Kawir (Greece), Theatre of Tragedy (Norway), Iron Maiden, Bal-Sagoth (UK), and Nile (US). These and other bands are shown to draw inspiration from Classical literature and mythology such as the Homeric Hymns, Vergil's Aeneid, and Caesar's Gallic Wars, historical figures from Rome and ancient Egypt, and even pagan and occult aspects of antiquity. These bands' engagements with Classical antiquity also speak to contemporary issues of nationalism, identity, sexuality, gender, and globalization. The contributors show how the genre of heavy metal brings its own perspectives to Classical reception, and demonstrate that this music-often dismissed as lowbrow-engages in sophisticated dialogue with ancient texts, myths, and historical figures. The authors reveal aspects of Classics' continued appeal while also arguing that the engagement with myth and history is a defining characteristic of heavy metal music, especially in countries that were once part of the Roman Empire.
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126.000000 USD

Classical Antiquity in Heavy Metal Music

Hardback
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In this new volume, Jan Haywood and Naoise Mac Sweeney investigate the position of Homer's Iliad within the wider Trojan War tradition through a series of detailed case studies. From ancient Mesopotamia to twenty-first century America, these examples are drawn from a range of historical and cultural contexts; and from ...
Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War: Dialogues on Tradition
In this new volume, Jan Haywood and Naoise Mac Sweeney investigate the position of Homer's Iliad within the wider Trojan War tradition through a series of detailed case studies. From ancient Mesopotamia to twenty-first century America, these examples are drawn from a range of historical and cultural contexts; and from Athenian pot paintings to twelfth-century German scholarship, they engage with a range of different media and genres. Inspired by the dialogues inherent in the process of reception, the book adopts a dialogic structure. In each chapter, paired essays by Haywood and Mac Sweeney offer contrasting authorial voices addressing a single theme, thereby drawing out connections and dissonances between a diverse suite of classical and post-classical Iliadic receptions. The resulting book offers new insights, both into individual instances of Iliadic reception in particular historical contexts, but also into the workings of a complex story tradition. The centrality of the Iliad within the wider Trojan War tradition is shown to be a function of conscious engagement not only with Iliadic content, but also with Iliadic status and the iconic idea of the Homeric.
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53.92 USD

Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War: Dialogues on Tradition

by Naoise Mac Sweeney, Jan Haywood
Paperback / softback
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The Ocean of Mirth brings together an English translation and an analytical interpretation of a singularly crucial, but obscure, Sanskrit medieval text, the Hasyarnava-Prahasanam of Jagadesvara Bhattacharya. As a political satire, the volume finds significant resonances among contemporary questions of politics and society across the world, and examines the tension ...
The Ocean of Mirth: Reading Hasyarnava-Prahasanam of Jagadesvara Bhattacharya, A Political Satire for All Times
The Ocean of Mirth brings together an English translation and an analytical interpretation of a singularly crucial, but obscure, Sanskrit medieval text, the Hasyarnava-Prahasanam of Jagadesvara Bhattacharya. As a political satire, the volume finds significant resonances among contemporary questions of politics and society across the world, and examines the tension inherent in the clash of ideas such as freedom and order. In an unabashed celebration of disorder as the only way to fight violence, tyranny and autocratic impulses, Hasyarnava suggests no return to a Golden Age or to the rule of an iconic king; nor is there a promise of a saviour-a political farce that ends without any denouement in sight. One of the first authentic English translations of a neglected Sanskrit text from medieval India, this translation throws up interesting questions regarding values such as freedom, violence, order, chaos and disorder. This volume will be a major intervention in the discovery of a significant non-canonical text of classical literature and will be indispensable for students, scholars and researchers of politics, philosophy, sociology, Indian literatures, Indology, comparative literature and culture studies.
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65.07 USD

The Ocean of Mirth: Reading Hasyarnava-Prahasanam of Jagadesvara Bhattacharya, A Political Satire for All Times

by Jyotirmaya Sharma
Paperback / softback
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Books V-IX of the Confessions trace five crucial years in the life of Augustine, from his debut as a teacher of rhetoric in North Africa to his baptism as a Christian and the renunciation of a worldly career in Milan. This commentary will be invaluable for those wishing to read ...
Augustine: Confessions Books V-IX
Books V-IX of the Confessions trace five crucial years in the life of Augustine, from his debut as a teacher of rhetoric in North Africa to his baptism as a Christian and the renunciation of a worldly career in Milan. This commentary will be invaluable for those wishing to read his story in the original Latin. Through careful glosses and notes, Augustine's Latin is made accessible to students of patristics and of classics. His extensive quotations from Scripture are translated and explained in light of the variant Bible texts and the interpretative assumptions through which he came to understand them. The unfolding of his career is set against the background of political, cultural, and religious change in the fourth century, and the art with which he created a form of narrative without precedent in earlier Latin literature is illustrated in close detail.
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33.590000 USD

Augustine: Confessions Books V-IX

by Augustine
Paperback / softback
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The Ocean of Mirth brings together an English translation and an analytical interpretation of a singularly crucial, but obscure, Sanskrit medieval text, the Hasyarnava-Prahasanam of Jagadesvara Bhattacharya. As a political satire, the volume finds significant resonances among contemporary questions of politics and society across the world, and examines the tension ...
The Ocean of Mirth: Reading Hasyarnava-Prahasanam of Jagadesvara Bhattacharya, A Political Satire for All Times
The Ocean of Mirth brings together an English translation and an analytical interpretation of a singularly crucial, but obscure, Sanskrit medieval text, the Hasyarnava-Prahasanam of Jagadesvara Bhattacharya. As a political satire, the volume finds significant resonances among contemporary questions of politics and society across the world, and examines the tension inherent in the clash of ideas such as freedom and order. In an unabashed celebration of disorder as the only way to fight violence, tyranny and autocratic impulses, Hasyarnava suggests no return to a Golden Age or to the rule of an iconic king; nor is there a promise of a saviour-a political farce that ends without any denouement in sight. One of the first authentic English translations of a neglected Sanskrit text from medieval India, this translation throws up interesting questions regarding values such as freedom, violence, order, chaos and disorder. This volume will be a major intervention in the discovery of a significant non-canonical text of classical literature and will be indispensable for students, scholars and researchers of politics, philosophy, sociology, Indian literatures, Indology, comparative literature and culture studies.
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162.750000 USD

The Ocean of Mirth: Reading Hasyarnava-Prahasanam of Jagadesvara Bhattacharya, A Political Satire for All Times

by Jyotirmaya Sharma
Hardback
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Fides in Flavian Literature explores the ideology of good faith (fides) during the time of the emperors Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian (69-96 CE), the new imperial dynasty that gained power in the wake of the civil wars of the period. The contributors to this volume consider the significance and semantic ...
Fides in Flavian Literature
Fides in Flavian Literature explores the ideology of good faith (fides) during the time of the emperors Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian (69-96 CE), the new imperial dynasty that gained power in the wake of the civil wars of the period. The contributors to this volume consider the significance and semantic range of this Roman value in works that deal in myth, contemporary poetry, and history in both prose and verse. Though it does not claim to offer the comprehensive last word on fides in Flavian Rome, the book aims to show that fides in this period was subjected to a particularly striking and special brand of contestation and reconceptualization, used to interrogate the broad cultural changes and anxieties of the Flavian period as well as connect to a republican and imperial past. The editors argue that fides was both a vehicle for reconciliation and a means to test the nature of good faith in the wake of a devastating and divisive period in Roman history.
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105.99 USD

Fides in Flavian Literature

Hardback
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This bold new set of interpretations of tragedy offers innovative analyses of the dynamic between politics and youth in the ancient world. By exploring how tragedy responded to the fluctuating attitudes to young people at a highly turbulent time in the history of Athens, Shipton sheds new light on ancient ...
The Politics of Youth in Greek Tragedy: Gangs of Athens
This bold new set of interpretations of tragedy offers innovative analyses of the dynamic between politics and youth in the ancient world. By exploring how tragedy responded to the fluctuating attitudes to young people at a highly turbulent time in the history of Athens, Shipton sheds new light on ancient attitudes to youth. Focusing on famous plays, such as Sophocles' Antigone and Euripides' Bacchae, alongside lesser known tragedies such as Euripides' Heraclidae and Orestes, Shipton uncovers compelling evidence to show that the complex and often paradoxical views we hold about youth today can also be found in the ancient society of classical Athens. Shipton argues that the prominence of young people in tragedy throughout the fifth century reflects the persistent uncertainty as to what their role in society should be. As the success of Athens rose and then fell, young characters were repeatedly used by tragic playwrights as a way to explore political tensions and social upheaval in the city. Throughout his text, Shipton reflects on how negative conceptualisations of youth, often expressed via the socially constructed 'gang' are formed as a way in which paradoxical views on youth can be contained.
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41.950000 USD

The Politics of Youth in Greek Tragedy: Gangs of Athens

by Matthew Shipton
Paperback / softback
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Ancient and medieval labyrinths embody paradox, according to Penelope Reed Doob. Their structure allows a double perspective-the baffling, fragmented prospect confronting the maze-treader within, and the comprehensive vision available to those without. Mazes simultaneously assert order and chaos, artistry and confusion, articulated clarity and bewildering complexity, perfected pattern and hesitant ...
The Idea of the Labyrinth from Classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages
Ancient and medieval labyrinths embody paradox, according to Penelope Reed Doob. Their structure allows a double perspective-the baffling, fragmented prospect confronting the maze-treader within, and the comprehensive vision available to those without. Mazes simultaneously assert order and chaos, artistry and confusion, articulated clarity and bewildering complexity, perfected pattern and hesitant process. In this handsomely illustrated book, Doob reconstructs from a variety of literary and visual sources the idea of the labyrinth from the classical period through the Middle Ages. Doob first examines several complementary traditions of the maze topos, showing how ancient historical and geographical writings generate metaphors in which the labyrinth signifies admirable complexity, while poetic texts tend to suggest that the labyrinth is a sign of moral duplicity. She then describes two common models of the labyrinth and explores their formal implications: the unicursal model, with no false turnings, found almost universally in the visual arts; and the multicursal model, with blind alleys and dead ends, characteristic of literary texts. This paradigmatic clash between the labyrinths of art and of literature becomes a key to the metaphorical potential of the maze, as Doob's examination of a vast array of materials from the classical period through the Middle Ages suggests. She concludes with linked readings of four labyrinths of words : Virgil's Aeneid, Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy, Dante's Divine Comedy, and Chaucer's House of Fame, each of which plays with and transforms received ideas of the labyrinth as well as reflecting and responding to aspects of the texts that influenced it. Doob not only provides fresh theoretical and historical perspectives on the labyrinth tradition, but also portrays a complex medieval aesthetic that helps us to approach structurally elaborate early works. Readers in such fields as Classical literature, Medieval Studies, Renaissance Studies, comparative literature, literary theory, art history, and intellectual history will welcome this wide-ranging and illuminating book.
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10.450000 USD

The Idea of the Labyrinth from Classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages

by Penelope Reed Doob
Paperback / softback
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Ritual Irony is a critical study of four problematic later plays of Euripides: the Iphigenia in Aulis, the Phoenissae, the Heracles, and the Bacchae. Examining Euripides' representation of sacrificial ritual against the background of late fifth-century Athens, Helene P. Foley shows that each of these plays confronts directly the difficulty ...
Ritual Irony: Poetry and Sacrifice in Euripides
Ritual Irony is a critical study of four problematic later plays of Euripides: the Iphigenia in Aulis, the Phoenissae, the Heracles, and the Bacchae. Examining Euripides' representation of sacrificial ritual against the background of late fifth-century Athens, Helene P. Foley shows that each of these plays confronts directly the difficulty of making an archaic poetic tradition relevant to a democratic society. She explores the important mediating role played by choral poetry and ritual in the plays, asserting that Euripides' sacrificial metaphors and ritual performances link an anachronistic mythic ideal with a world dominated by chance or an incomprehensible divinity. Foley utilizes the ideas and methodology of contemporary literary theory and symbolic anthropology, addressing issues central to the emerging dialogue between the two fields. Her conclusions have important implications for the study of Greek tragedy as a whole and for our understanding of Euripides' tragic irony, his conception of religion, and the role of his choral odes. Assuming no specialized knowledge, Ritual Irony is aimed at all readers of Euripidean tragedy. It will prove particularly valuable to students and scholars of classics, comparative literature, and symbolic anthropology.
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10.450000 USD

Ritual Irony: Poetry and Sacrifice in Euripides

by Helene P. Foley
Paperback / softback
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In this ambitious and venturesome book, Peter W. Rose applies the insights of Marxist theory to a number of central Greek literary and philosophical texts. He explores major points in the trajectory from Homer to Plato where the ideology of inherited excellence-beliefs about descent from gods or heroes-is elaborated and ...
Sons of the Gods, Children of Earth: Ideology and Literary Form in Ancient Greece
In this ambitious and venturesome book, Peter W. Rose applies the insights of Marxist theory to a number of central Greek literary and philosophical texts. He explores major points in the trajectory from Homer to Plato where the ideology of inherited excellence-beliefs about descent from gods or heroes-is elaborated and challenged. Rose offers subtle and penetrating new readings of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Pindar's Tenth Pythian Ode, Aeschylus's Oresteia, Sophokles' Philoktetes, and Plato's Republic. Rose rejects the view of art as a mere reflection of social and political reality-a view that is characteristic not only of most Marxist but of most historically oriented treatments of classical literature. He applies instead a Marxian hermeneutic derived from the work of the Frankfurt School and Fredric Jameson. His readings focus on illuminating a politics of form within the text, while responding to historically specific social, political, and economic realities. Each work, he asserts, both reflects contemporary conflicts over wealth, power, and gender roles and constitutes an attempt to transcend the status quo by projecting an ideal community. Following Marx, Rose maintains that critical engagement with the limitations of the utopian dreams of the past is the only means to the realization of freedom in the present. Classicists and their students, literary theorists, philosophers, comparatists, and Marxist critics will find Sons of the Gods, Children of Earth challenging reading.
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10.450000 USD

Sons of the Gods, Children of Earth: Ideology and Literary Form in Ancient Greece

by Peter W. Rose
Paperback / softback
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Andrew Ford here addresses, in a manner both engaging and richly informed, the perennial questions of what poetry is, how it came to be, and what it is for. Focusing on the critical moment in Western literature when the heroic tales of the Greek oral tradition began to be preserved ...
Homer: The Poetry of the Past
Andrew Ford here addresses, in a manner both engaging and richly informed, the perennial questions of what poetry is, how it came to be, and what it is for. Focusing on the critical moment in Western literature when the heroic tales of the Greek oral tradition began to be preserved in writing, he examines these questions in the light of Homeric poetry. Through fresh readings of the Iliad and the Odyssey, and referring to other early epics as well, Ford deepens our understanding of what poetry was at a time before written texts, before a developed sense of authorship, and before the existence of institutionalized criticism. Placing what is known about Homer's art in the wider context of Homer's world, Ford traces the effects of the oral tradition upon the development of the epic and addresses such issues as the sources of the poet's inspiration and the generic constraints upon epic composition. After exploring Homer's poetic vocabulary and his fictional and mythical representations of the art of singing, Ford reconstructs an idea of poetry much different from that put forth by previous interpreters. Arguing that Homer grounds his project in religious rather than literary or historical terms, he concludes that archaic poetry claims to give a uniquely transparent and immediate rendering of the past. Homer: The Poetry of the Past will be stimulating and enjoyable reading for anyone interested in the traditions of poetry, as well as for students and scholars in the fields of classics, literary theory and literary history, and intellectual history.
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10.450000 USD

Homer: The Poetry of the Past

by Andrew Ford
Paperback / softback
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A radical reexamination of the textual and archaeological evidence about Augustus and the Palatine Caesar Augustus (63 BC-AD 14), who is usually thought of as the first Roman emperor, lived on the Palatine Hill, the place from which the word palace originates. A startling reassessment of textual and archaeological evidence, ...
The House of Augustus: A Historical Detective Story
A radical reexamination of the textual and archaeological evidence about Augustus and the Palatine Caesar Augustus (63 BC-AD 14), who is usually thought of as the first Roman emperor, lived on the Palatine Hill, the place from which the word palace originates. A startling reassessment of textual and archaeological evidence, The House of Augustus demonstrates that Augustus was never an emperor in any meaningful sense of the word, that he never had a palace, and that the so-called Casa di Augusto excavated on the Palatine was a lavish aristocratic house destroyed by the young Caesar in order to build the temple of Apollo. Exploring the Palatine from its first occupation to the present, T. P. Wiseman proposes a reexamination of the Augustan Age, including much of its literature. Wiseman shows how the political and ideological background of Augustus' rise to power offers a radically different interpretation of the ancient evidence about the Augustan Palatine. Taking a long historical perspective in order to better understand the topography, Wiseman considers the legendary stories of Rome's origins-in particular Romulus' foundation and inauguration of the city on the summit of the Palatine. He examines the new temple of Apollo and the piazza it overlooked, as well as the portico around it with its library used as a hall for Senate meetings, and he illustrates how Commander Caesar, who became Caesar Augustus, was the champion of the Roman people against an oppressive oligarchy corrupting the Republic. A decisive intervention in a critical debate among ancient historians and archaeologists, The House of Augustus recalibrates our views of a crucially important period and a revered public space.
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55.79 USD

The House of Augustus: A Historical Detective Story

by T. P. Wiseman
Hardback
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'What is poetry, how many kinds of it are there, and what are their specific effects?' Aristotle's Poetics is the most influential book on poetry ever written. A founding text of European aesthetics and literary criticism, from it stems much of our modern understanding of the creation and impact of ...
Poetics
'What is poetry, how many kinds of it are there, and what are their specific effects?' Aristotle's Poetics is the most influential book on poetry ever written. A founding text of European aesthetics and literary criticism, from it stems much of our modern understanding of the creation and impact of imaginative writing, including poetry, drama, and fiction. For Aristotle, the art of representation conveys universal truths which we can appreciate more easily than the lessons of history or philosophy. In his short treatise Aristotle discusses the origins of poetry and its early development, the nature of tragedy and plot, and offers practical advice to playwrights. This new translation by Anthony Kenny is accompanied by associated material from Plato and a range of responses from more modern literary practitioners: Sir Philip Sidney, P. B. Shelley, and Dorothy L. Sayers. The book includes a wide-ranging introduction and notes, making this the most accessible and attractive modern edition. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
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14.86 USD

Poetics

by Aristotle
Paperback / softback
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Longus' Daphnis and Chloe is arguably our finest surviving Greek novel. Written under the Roman Empire and engaging with romantic, pastoral and rhetorical themes, the story and characterisation have captured the imaginations of artists over the centuries. Despite a growing interest in ancient novels over the past half-century, this is ...
Longus: Daphnis and Chloe
Longus' Daphnis and Chloe is arguably our finest surviving Greek novel. Written under the Roman Empire and engaging with romantic, pastoral and rhetorical themes, the story and characterisation have captured the imaginations of artists over the centuries. Despite a growing interest in ancient novels over the past half-century, this is the first full commentary to address Longus' linguistic texture and its implications for his literary aspirations, as well as his narrative skills and intertextuality with earlier Greek writers. The commentary provides a detailed analysis of Longus' Greek and its relation to other Greek prose and poetry of the second century AD and earlier, and emphasises the construction and style of the original text, drawing out key points for clarification and discussion. A wide-ranging introduction ensures that this book will be an indispensable guide for teachers and students of all levels who are looking to engage with Longus' writing.
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34.640000 USD

Longus: Daphnis and Chloe

by Longus
Paperback / softback
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The book explores the extent to which aspects of Julius Caesar's self-representation in his commentaries, constituent themes and characterization have been appropriated or contested across the English dramatic canon from the late 1500s until the end of the 19th century. Caesar, in his own words, constructs his image as a ...
Julius Caesar's Self-Created Image and Its Dramatic Afterlife
The book explores the extent to which aspects of Julius Caesar's self-representation in his commentaries, constituent themes and characterization have been appropriated or contested across the English dramatic canon from the late 1500s until the end of the 19th century. Caesar, in his own words, constructs his image as a supreme commander characterised by exceptional celerity and mercifulness; he is also defined by the heightened sense of self-dramatization achieved by the self-referential use of the third person and emerges as a quasi-divine hero inhabiting a literary-historical reality. Channelled through Lucan's epic Bellum Civile and ancient historiography, these Caesarean qualities reach drama and take the shape of ambivalent hubris, political role-playing, self-institutionalization, and an exceptional relationship with temporality. Focusing on major dramatic texts with rich performance history, such as Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Handel's opera Giulio Cesare in Egitto and Bernard Shaw's Caesar and Cleopatra but also a number of lesser known early modern plays, the book encompasses different levels of drama's active engagement with the process of reception of Caesar's iconic and controversial personality.
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53.92 USD

Julius Caesar's Self-Created Image and Its Dramatic Afterlife

by Miryana Dimitrova
Paperback / softback
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Addressed to readers of modern literature as well as to those interested in Greco-Roman literature and in religious history, Auctor and Actor examines Apuleius's The Golden Ass as an early example of self-consciousness in narrative. Entering into the spirit of the novel's crafty playfulness, John J. Winkler carries the reader ...
Auctor and Actor: A Narratological Reading of Apuleius's <i>The Golden Ass</i>
Addressed to readers of modern literature as well as to those interested in Greco-Roman literature and in religious history, Auctor and Actor examines Apuleius's The Golden Ass as an early example of self-consciousness in narrative. Entering into the spirit of the novel's crafty playfulness, John J. Winkler carries the reader on a journey that is, like that of the hero Lucius, both entertaining and enlightening. This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1986.
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41.950000 USD

Auctor and Actor: A Narratological Reading of Apuleius's <i>The Golden Ass</i>

by John J. Winkler
Paperback / softback
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This new study of Menander casts fresh light not only on the techniques of the playwright but also on the literary and historical contexts of the plays. Menander (342/1-292/1 BCE) wrote over a hundred popular comedies, several of which were adapted by Plautus and Terence. Through them, he was a ...
Behind the Mask: Character and Society in Menander
This new study of Menander casts fresh light not only on the techniques of the playwright but also on the literary and historical contexts of the plays. Menander (342/1-292/1 BCE) wrote over a hundred popular comedies, several of which were adapted by Plautus and Terence. Through them, he was a major influence on Shakespeare and Moliere. However, his work survived only in excerpts and quotation until some significant texts reappeared in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries on papyrus. The mystery of their loss and rediscovery has raised key questions surrounding the transmission of these and other Greek texts. Theatrical masks from the fourth century BCE discovered on the island of Lipari now also provide important material with which this book examines how the plays were originally performed. A detailed investigation of their historical setting is offered which engages with recent debates on the importance of social status and citizenship in Menander's plays. The techniques of characterization are also examined, with particular focus on women, slaves and power relationships in his Epitrepontes. It appears that the audience was invited, sometimes subversively, behind the mask of this sophisticated comedy to discover that people do not always conform to literary expectations and social norms.
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126.000000 USD

Behind the Mask: Character and Society in Menander

by Angela M Heap
Hardback
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