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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1817. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... to Miss C likewise, if she is with you. Poor Eliza droops and languishes, but in the land ...
The Letters of the Late William Cowper to His Friends (Volume 1)
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1817. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... to Miss C likewise, if she is with you. Poor Eliza droops and languishes, but in the land to which she is going, she will hold up her head and droop no more. A sickness that leads the way to everlasting life is better than the health of an antediluvian. Accept our united love. My dear friend, Sincerely yours, W. C. to the rev. john newton. Sept. 2.1,1783. my dear friend, . We are glad that having been attacked by a fever, which has often proved fatal, and almost always leaves the sufferer debilitated to the last degree, you find yourself so soon restored to health, and your strength recovered. Your health and strength are useful to others, and in that view important in his account who dispenses both, and by your means a more precious gift than either. For my own part, though I have not been laid np, I have never been perfectly well since you left us. A smart fever, which lasted indeed but a few hours, succeeded by lassitude and want of spirits, that seemed still to indicate a feverish habit, has made for some time, and still makes me very unfit for ray favourite occupations, writing and reading so that even a letter, and even a letter to you, is not without its burthen. John has bad the epidemic, and has it still but grows better. When he was first seized with it, he gave notice that he should die, but in this only instance of prophetic exertion he seems to have been mistaken: he has however been very near it. I should have told you, that poor John has been very ready to depart, and much comforted through his whole illness. He, you know, though a silent, has been a very steady professor. He indeed tights battles, and gains victories, but makes no noise. Europe is not astonished at his feats, foreign academies do not seek him for a member; he will never discover...
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30.43 USD

The Letters of the Late William Cowper to His Friends (Volume 1)

by John Johnson, William Cowper
Paperback / softback
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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1885. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER X. ON THE ELABORATION OP IDEAS. I. JUDGMENT. "if intelligence cannot exercise itself without distinguishing and comparing, ...
The First Three Years of Childhood
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1885. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER X. ON THE ELABORATION OP IDEAS. I. JUDGMENT. "if intelligence cannot exercise itself without distinguishing and comparing, neither can it do so without affirming, either explicitly or implicitly, verbally or otherwise. In other words, every intellectual operation presupposes a judgment; for judgment, according to the definition of Aristotle, is an operation which consists in affirming something about something. We cannot declare anything without believing it; and to believe, to affirm, to judge, are all one. What is it to perceive an object? It is to cognize its shape, position, distance, dimensions, etc., etc. To know, for example, the distance at which an object stands from us, is this not to bring to bear on this object, mentally at any rate, a certain affirmation? Can we form a general idea, without affirming that this idea extends to such and such individuals, and comprehends such and such qualities? We see, indeed, that imagination makes us conceive fictions or chimeras; but even then we affirm either the possibility of the things which we conceive, or the desire that-we have to see them realized. In short, we affirm the subjective fact of these dreams, even when we do not think that they correspond to anything external. Thus, in a word, we can neither perceive, nor compare, nor abstract, nor generalize, nor remember nor imagine, without making an affirmation or a judgment."1 1 Joly, Cours de Fhilosophie, p. 94. The above is a psychologist's definition of judgment. A physiologist will perhaps explain, up to a certain point, its origin and working. Judgment, according to M. Luys, is only the reaction, the repercussion, the affirmation of our personality "in the presence of an excitation from the external world, either moral or physical. The action o...
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31.67 USD

The First Three Years of Childhood

by Bernard Prez, Bernard Perez
Paperback
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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1871. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER III. CATEGORIES OF CLASSIFICATION. From the time that Linnaeus showed us the necessity of a scientific system ...
Methods of Study in Natural History
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1871. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER III. CATEGORIES OF CLASSIFICATION. From the time that Linnaeus showed us the necessity of a scientific system as a framework for the arrangement of scientific facts in Natural History, the number of divisions adopted by zoologists and botanists increased steadily. Not only were families, orders, and classes added to genera and species, but these were further multiplied by subdivisions of the different groups. But as the number of divisions increased, they lost in precise meaning, and it became more and more doubtful how far they were true to Nature. Moreover, these divisions were not taken in the same sense by all naturalists: what were called families by some were called orders by others, while the orders of some were the classes of others, till it began to be doubted whether these scientific systems had any foundation in Nature, or signified anything more than that it had pleased Linnaeus, for instance, to call certain groups of animals by one name, while Cuvier had chosen to call them by another. These divisions are, first, the most comprehensive groups, the primary divisions, called branches by some, types by others, and divided by some naturalists into so-called sub-types, meaning only a more limited circumscription of the same kind of group; next we have classes, and these also have been divided into sub-classes; then orders and sub-orders; families and sub-families or tribes; then genera, species, and varieties. With reference to the question whether these groups really exist in Nature, or are merely the expression of individual theories and opinions, it is worth while to study the works of the early naturalists, in order to trace the natural process by which scientific classification has been reached; for in this, as in other departments of learn...
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28.02 USD
Paperback / softback
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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1921. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... chapter xvi Kathleen Pattison straightened suddenly from the wall against which she was leaning and glanced down sharply ...
The House of Night
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1921. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... chapter xvi Kathleen Pattison straightened suddenly from the wall against which she was leaning and glanced down sharply to where, fifty feet below her, the main Villista camp lay. Moving slowly amongst the throng of lean, brown little Mexicans she had caught the glint of a paler-tinted face. Presently the man moved closer, but he did not raise his eyes and as yet did not seem to have seen her. He was a big heavily built man with something comfortable and prosperous about his bulk; further, he was a white man, the only white man she had seen since the ill-fated night, just thirty-six hours ago, when she had shot King Caird. Held in the rear of the Villista raiding party, under the guard, first of Esteban, then of Pablo, she had not actually seen anything of the sacking of Los Vientos, but, though she had not seen, she 'had heard. First had come the noise of battle and conflict and then the lingering cry of the tortured town. At that last sound her self-control had for the moment deserted her; she had known from repeated stealthy attempts that she could not free herself from the saddle, but with a sudden striking of her heels against the horse's flanks she had attempted to spur it into a sudden plunge which would tear the bridle from Esteban's hand. The attempt had failed; Esteban had tied the bridle to his own saddle-horn and she had got nothing for her pains except blows from a quirt laid twice sharply across her shoulders. The sting of the blows had revived her better sense; the knowledge of the futility of attempted escape along these lines had returned to her and she had sat passive. Hours afterwards, it seemed, the raiders had returned and the cold grip of horror which had fastened on her heart when she had seen the nature of the greater proportion of their...
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17.84 USD

The House of Night

by Leslie Howard Gordon
Paperback / softback
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1867 Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VL THE PRODUCTS OF THOUGHT.--III. REASONINGS.- 55. The Third gradation of Thought is the Reasoning. Like the ...
Elements of Logic; Comprising the Doctrine of the Laws and Products of Thought, and the Doctrine of Method, Together with a Logical Praxis
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1867 Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VL THE PRODUCTS OF THOUGHT.--III. REASONINGS.- 55. The Third gradation of Thought is the Reasoning. Like the Concept, it is derived from the Judgment. neaS0I1inK_ It diifers from the Concept in its form, as, unlike what"tathat, it retains the full forms of the Judgment, and accordingly, also, to a certain extent, it differs from it in the mode of its derivation. It differs from the Judgment proper in this respect, that it is a derivation from a Judgment--a traced movement of Thought, superadded to that which constitutes the Judgment. It is not the derived Judgment, not the mere terminus, the point at the end of the line over which the Thought has moved, but the line itself as traced in the movement of the Thought. When viewed as a resultant product of Thought, therefore, it must be regarded as the track of Thought left marked by the movement, not the mere attained object or goal of the movement, which is nothing more than a Judgment. We are carefully to distinguish, therefore, a Reasoning from the Conclusion--from the Judgment which is attained by the reasoning. A Reasoning, thus, i3 a derivation of a Judgment from another Judgment or Judgments. 56. The term Reasoning is ambiguously employed to denote both the act, and, also, the product of the _., .., . Denomina act. In its different gradations, this process of tions of the Droccss Thought has obtained a variety of other designations, which may here for convenience be summarily enumerated and explained. "Considered as an act, Reasoning, or Discourse of Reason (to oyC er6tu, aytr/Aos, Stavoto, To SiavoeicrOai), is, likewise, called the act or process of Argumentation (argumentationis), of Ratiocination (ratiocinationis, ) of Inference or Illation (inferendi), of Collecting (colligendi...
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30.68 USD
Paperback
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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1903. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... Ill the man-animal story but the race-man was not content with the general and broader recognition of the ...
Symbol-Psychology; A New Interpretation of Race-Traditions
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1903. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... Ill the man-animal story but the race-man was not content with the general and broader recognition of the fact that man has two natures--an inner and an outer, a spiritual and a natural--a soul and a mind. It continued its research. When once it had drawn the broad distinci tions between the inner and the outer, it next elaborated the idea that the inner nature is human and that the outer is animal. Thus was the man-animal story born. The man-animal stories are quite familiar to every one; every reader of legends and myths is familiar with the fact that there are combinations of animals and of men of various kinds and in various orders. It is true of these forms, as it is of everything else, that there seems to be no connection between the different stories as they are told, but when they are more closely examined they yield certain quite definite results. The familiar idea of man setting forth upon his journey and associating with animals early in that journey, comes to the surface; that is to say, as we watch the hero of a fairy tale start out upon his pilgrimage he at first comes across certain animals, for whom he performs certain services. Usually the animal is in some sort of difficulty, and the hero helps it out of its distress. As a reward for such service he is given by the animal a certain part of its own substance; usually the substance is a part of an antenna, a wing, a claw, a hair, a feather, according to the nature of the animal. The hero treasures these things which are given to him, and usually at the end of his journey the service is returned to him in kind. If he liberated some one at the beginning of the story, he is liberated at the end; if he simply assisted some one at the beginning of the story, he is assisted at the end. In a number of i...
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21.57 USD
Paperback
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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1913. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... THE GOLD-BUG* By EDGAR ALLAN POE What ho! what ho! this fellow is dancing mad! He hath been ...
A Study of the Short Story
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1913. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... THE GOLD-BUG* By EDGAR ALLAN POE What ho! what ho! this fellow is dancing mad! He hath been bitten by the Tarantula. --All in the Wrong. Many years ago, I contracted an intimacy with a Mr. William Legrand. He was of an ancient Huguenot 5 family, and had once been wealthy; but a series of misfortunes had reduced him to want. To avoid the mortification consequent upon his disasters, he left New Orleans, the city of his forefathers, and took up his residence at Sullivan's Island, near Charleston, South Carolina. 10 This island is a very singular one. It consists of little else than the sea sand, and is about three miles long. Its breadth at no point exceeds a quarter of a mile. It is separated from the mainland by a scarcely perceptible creek, oozing its way through a wilderness of reeds and 15 slime, a favorite resort of the marsh-hen. The vegetation, as might be supposed, is scant, or at least dwarfish. No trees of any magnitude are to be seen. Near the western extremity, where Fort Moultrie stands, and where are some miserable frame buildings, tenanted dur- 20 ing summer by the fugitives from Charleston dust and fever, may be found, indeed, the bristly palmetto; but the * See note to The Masque of the Red Death. The Gold-Bug was first published in 1843. whole island, with the exception of this western point, and a line of hard white beach on the seacoast, is covered with a dense undergrowth of the sweet myrtle, so much prized by the horticulturists of England. The shrub 5 here often attains the height of fifteen or twenty feet, and forms an almost impenetrable coppice, burdening the air with its fragrance. In the utmost recesses of this coppice, not far from the eastern or more remote end of the island, Legrand 10 had built himself a small hut, which he occupied...
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30.07 USD

A Study of the Short Story

by Henry Seidel Canby
Paperback / softback
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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1882. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER IV. THE RELATIVITY OF KNOWLEDGE ACCORDING TO SIR W. HAMILTON AND MR MILL. The Relativity of ...
Modern Physical Fatalism and the Doctrine of Evolution; Including an Examination of H. Spencer's First Principles
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1882. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER IV. THE RELATIVITY OF KNOWLEDGE ACCORDING TO SIR W. HAMILTON AND MR MILL. The Relativity of Knowledge, I have shewn in the last chapter, has a different meaning in each of the three philosophers, whose seeming verbal agreement, and high reputation, are at first sight a strong presumption in favour of its truth. Sir W. Hamilton, Mr Spencer, Mr Mill, all directly affirm it in the most emphatic terms. The last of them pronounces it to be true, fundamental, and full of important consequences. Sir W. Hamilton, whose immense reading in metaphysics is well known, claims for it the general assent of all great thinkers of former days, and speaks of a few German theorizers, such as Schelling and Hegel, as the only exceptions. Mr Spencer adopts from him both the historical statement, and the exposition of the doctrine, and places it at the foundation of his own laboriously constructed scheme of philosophy. But when we look more closely, we find that Mr Mill reduces Sir W. Hamilton's seventeen authorities to two only, though he would gladly have learned that there had been so wide an acceptance of what he calls "a philosophical truth destructive of a great mass of misleading speculation;" and of these two, Newton, the more weighty, may be shewn, by the context of the quotation, to be as far as the others from affirming the real doctrine in debate. Also Mr Mill proceeds to prove, through six or seven chapters, that the Natural Realism of Sir W. Hamilton, and his doctrine of Belief, as distinct from knowledge, amount to a practical surrender and reversal of the doctrine of Relativity, which in words he so strongly affirms. In like manner he corrects his first impressions of Mr Spencer's view, and concludes that it is really no less inconsistent than the Scot...
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29.01 USD
Paperback
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