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At first glance, Barbara Kalish fit the stereotype of a 1950s wife and mother. Married at eighteen, Barbara lived with her husband and two daughters in a California suburb, where she was president of the Parent-Teacher Association. At a PTA training conference in San Francisco, Barbara met Pearl, another PTA ...
Her Neighbor's Wife: A History of Lesbian Desire Within Marriage
At first glance, Barbara Kalish fit the stereotype of a 1950s wife and mother. Married at eighteen, Barbara lived with her husband and two daughters in a California suburb, where she was president of the Parent-Teacher Association. At a PTA training conference in San Francisco, Barbara met Pearl, another PTA president who also had two children and happened to live only a few blocks away from her. To Barbara, Pearl was the most gorgeous woman in the world, and the two began an affair that lasted over a decade. Through interviews, diaries, memoirs, and letters, Her Neighbor's Wife traces the stories of hundreds of women, like Barbara Kalish, who struggled to balance marriage and same-sex desire in the postwar United States. In doing so, Lauren Jae Gutterman draws our attention away from the postwar landscape of urban gay bars and into the homes of married women, who tended to engage in affairs with wives and mothers they met in the context of their daily lives: through work, at church, or in their neighborhoods. In the late 1960s and 1970s, the lesbian feminist movement and the no-fault divorce revolution transformed the lives of wives who desired women. Women could now choose to divorce their husbands in order to lead openly lesbian or bisexual lives; increasingly, however, these women were confronted by hostile state discrimination, typically in legal battles over child custody. Well into the 1980s, many women remained ambivalent about divorce and resistant to labeling themselves as lesbian, therefore complicating a simple interpretation of their lives and relationship choices. By revealing the extent to which marriage has historically permitted space for wives' relationships with other women, Her Neighbor's Wife calls into question the presumed straightness of traditional American marriage.
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41.950000 USD

Her Neighbor's Wife: A History of Lesbian Desire Within Marriage

by Lauren Jae Gutterman
Hardback
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U.S. immigration and naturalization laws tracked shifting power dynamics in the Pacific as the United States emerged as a major world power during World War II and the Cold War. Much is known about America's long history of Asian immigrant exclusion laws, but how did these laws end? Why did ...
Opening the Gates to Asia: A Transpacific History of How America Repealed Asian Exclusion
U.S. immigration and naturalization laws tracked shifting power dynamics in the Pacific as the United States emerged as a major world power during World War II and the Cold War. Much is known about America's long history of Asian immigrant exclusion laws, but how did these laws end? Why did the United States begin opening its borders to Asians after barring them for decades? Jane H. Hong argues that the transpacific movement to repeal Asian exclusion was part of U.S. empire-building efforts in the region and the rise of a new informal U.S. empire in Asia. Drawing on archives in the United States, India, and the Philippines, she traces the relationship between exclusion and empire. The dismantling of formal empire across the Asia-Pacific region underpinned postwar Asian immigration to the Unites States, even as advocates on both sides of the Pacific worked to redraw the ethnic and racial boundaries of the American nation. Positioning repeal at the intersection between U.S. civil rights struggles and international developments in Asia, Hong raises thorny questions about the meanings of nation, diaspora, and citizenship on the global stage.
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94.500000 USD

Opening the Gates to Asia: A Transpacific History of How America Repealed Asian Exclusion

by Jane H Hong
Hardback
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This remarkable history of a beloved Upper West Side church is in many respects a microcosm of the history of the Catholic Church in New York City. Here is a captivating study of a distinctive Catholic community on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, an area long noted for its ...
Upper West Side Catholics: Liberal Catholicism in a Conservative Archdiocese
This remarkable history of a beloved Upper West Side church is in many respects a microcosm of the history of the Catholic Church in New York City. Here is a captivating study of a distinctive Catholic community on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, an area long noted for its liberal Catholic sympathies in contrast to the generally conservative attitude that has pervaded the archdiocese of New York. The author traces this liberal Catholic dimension of Upper West Side Catholics to a long if slender line of progressive priests that stretches back to the Civil War era, casting renewed light on their legacy: liturgical reform, concern for social justice, and a preferential option for the poor long before this phrase found its way into official church documents. In recent years this progressivism has demonstrated itself in a willingness to extend a warm welcome to LGBT Catholics, most notably at the Church of the Ascension on West 107th Street. Ascension was one of the first diocesan parishes in the archdiocese to offer a spiritual home to LGBT Catholics and continues to sponsor the Ascension Gay Fellowship Group. Exploring the dynamic history of the Catholic Church of the Ascension, this engaging and accessible book illustrates the unusual characteristics that have defined Catholicism on the Upper West Side for the better part of the last century and sheds light on similar congregations within the greater metropolis. In many respects, the history of Ascension parish exemplifies the history of Catholicism in New York City over the past two centuries because of the powerful presence of two defining characteristics: immigration and neighborhood change. The Church of the Ascension, in fact, is a showcase of the success of urban ethnic Catholicism. It was founded as a small German parish, developed into a large Irish parish, suffered a precipitous decline during the crime wave that devastated the Upper West Side from the 1960s to the 1980s, and was rescued from near-extinction by the influx of Puerto Rican and Dominican Catholics. It has emerged during the last several decades as a flourishing multi-ethnic, bilingual parish that is now experiencing the restored prosperity and prominence of the Upper West Side as one of Manhattan's most integrated and popular residential neighborhoods.
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31.450000 USD

Upper West Side Catholics: Liberal Catholicism in a Conservative Archdiocese

by Thomas J. Shelley
Hardback
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What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? That was the question posed by the curators, artists, scholars, and students who comprise the Philadelphia-based public art and history studio Monument Lab. And in 2017, along with Mural Arts Philadelphia, they produced and organized a groundbreaking, city-wide exhibition ...
Monument Lab: Creative Speculations for Philadelphia
What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? That was the question posed by the curators, artists, scholars, and students who comprise the Philadelphia-based public art and history studio Monument Lab. And in 2017, along with Mural Arts Philadelphia, they produced and organized a groundbreaking, city-wide exhibition of temporary, site-specific works that engaged directly with the community. The installations, by a cohort of diverse artists considering issues of identity, appeared in iconic public squares and neighborhood parks with research and learning labs and prototype monuments. Monument Lab is a fabulous compendium of the exhibition and a critical reflection of the proceedings, including contributions from interlocutors and collaborators. The exhibition and this handbook were designed to generate new ways of thinking about monuments and public art as well as to find new, critical perspectives to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and to imagine those we have yet to build. Monument Lab energizes acivic dialogue about place and history as forces for a deeper questioning of what it means to be Philadelphian in a time of renewal and continuing struggle.Contributors: Alexander Alberro, Alliyah Allen, Laurie Allen, Andrew Friedman, Justin Geller, Kristen Giannantonio, Jane Golden, Aviva Kapust, Fariah Khan, Homay King, Stephanie Mach, Trapeta B. Mayson, Nathaniel Popkin, Ursula Rucker, Jodi Throckmorton, Salamishah Tillet, Jennifer Harford Vargas, Naomi Waltham-Smith, Bethany Wiggin, Mariam I. Williams, Leslie Willis-Lowry, and the editors. Artists: Tania Bruguera, Mel Chin, Kara Crombie, Tyree Guyton, Hans Haacke, David Hartt, Sharon Hayes, King Britt and Joshua Mays, Klip Collective, Duane Linklater, Emeka Ogboh, Karyn Olivier, Michelle Angela Ortiz, Kaitlin Pomerantz, RAIR, Alexander Rosenberg, Jamel Shabazz, Hank Willis Thomas, Shira Walinsky and Southeast by Southeast, and Marisa Williamson.
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36.750000 USD

Monument Lab: Creative Speculations for Philadelphia

Hardback
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Co-founder of The Carlyle Group and patriotic philanthropist David M. Rubenstein takes readers on a sweeping journey across the grand arc of the American story through revealing conversations with our greatest historians. In these lively dialogues, the biggest names in American history explore the subjects they've come to so intimately ...
The American Story: Conversations with Master Historians
Co-founder of The Carlyle Group and patriotic philanthropist David M. Rubenstein takes readers on a sweeping journey across the grand arc of the American story through revealing conversations with our greatest historians. In these lively dialogues, the biggest names in American history explore the subjects they've come to so intimately know and understand. - David McCullough on John Adams - Jon Meacham on Thomas Jefferson - Ron Chernow on Alexander Hamilton - Walter Isaacson on Benjamin Franklin - Doris Kearns Goodwin on Abraham Lincoln - A. Scott Berg on Charles Lindbergh - Taylor Branch on Martin Luther King - Robert Caro on Lyndon B. Johnson - Bob Woodward on Richard Nixon -And many others, including a special conversation with Chief Justice John Roberts Through his popular program The David Rubenstein Show, David Rubenstein has established himself as one of our most thoughtful interviewers. Now, in The American Story, David captures the brilliance of our most esteemed historians, as well as the souls of their subjects. The book features introductions by Rubenstein as well a foreword by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, the first woman and the first African American to lead our national library. Richly illustrated with archival images from the Library of Congress, the book is destined to become a classic for serious readers of American history. Through these captivating exchanges, these bestselling and Pulitzer Prize-winning authors offer fresh insight on pivotal moments from the Founding Era to the late 20th century.
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31.500000 USD
Hardback
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In the summer of 1579 Francis Drake and all those aboard the Golden Hind were in peril. The ship was leaking and they were in search of a protected beach to careen the ship to make repairs. They searched the coast and made landfall in what they called a Fair ...
Thunder Go North: The Hunt for Sir Francis Drake's Fair and Good Bay
In the summer of 1579 Francis Drake and all those aboard the Golden Hind were in peril. The ship was leaking and they were in search of a protected beach to careen the ship to make repairs. They searched the coast and made landfall in what they called a Fair and Good Bay , generally thought to be in California. They stacked the treasure they had recently captured from the Spanish onto on this sandy shore, repaired the ship, explored the country, and after a number of weeks they set sail for home. When they returned to England, they became the second expedition to circumnavigate the earth, after Magellan's voyage in 1522, and the first to return with its commander. Thunder Go North unravels the mysteries surrounding Drake's famous voyage and summer sojourn in this bay. Comparing Drake's observations of the Natives' houses, dress, foods, language, and lifeways with ethnographic material collected by early anthropologists, Melissa Darby makes a compelling case that Drake and his crew landed not in California but on the Oregon coast. She also uncovers the details of how an early twentieth-century hoax succeeded in maintaining the California landing theory and silencing contrary evidence. Presented here in an engaging narrative, Darby's research beckons for history to be rewritten.
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26.200000 USD
Hardback
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A comprehensive look at Williamsburg's evolution and important role in defining our understanding of 18th-century America Today best known as the world's largest living history museum, Williamsburg was the capital of the colony of Virginia in the 1700s and the setting for key debates leading to the American Revolution. Inspired ...
Restoring Williamsburg
A comprehensive look at Williamsburg's evolution and important role in defining our understanding of 18th-century America Today best known as the world's largest living history museum, Williamsburg was the capital of the colony of Virginia in the 1700s and the setting for key debates leading to the American Revolution. Inspired by growing interest in America's colonial heritage, W. A. R. Goodwin, supported by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., initiated a major restoration in the 1920s and 1930s that has allowed visitors to see how Williamsburg looked in the 18th century. Restoring Williamsburg expands on Williamsburg Before and After, a now-classic book with more than 200,000 copies in print, offering an updated and nuanced look at the continuing process of restoration. In addition to capturing moments throughout the site's transformation, the book offers important considerations about modern curatorial practices and changing approaches to historic preservation. Lavishly illustrated with more than 350 photographs, watercolors, sketches, maps, and other illustrations, Restoring Williamsburg features new images from both before and after the restoration. This is an important contribution not only to architectural history and restoration practices but also to our understanding of the town that continues to inspire Americans to think about their history.
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74.38 USD

Restoring Williamsburg

by Carl R. Lounsbury, George Humphrey Yetter
Hardback
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As the newly appointed commander of the Southern Continental Army in December 1780, Nathanael Greene quickly realized victory would not only require defeating the British Army, but also subduing the region's brutal civil war. 'The division among the people is much greater than I imagined, and the Whigs and the ...
The Quaker and the Gamecock: Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter, and the Revolutionary War for the Soul of the South
As the newly appointed commander of the Southern Continental Army in December 1780, Nathanael Greene quickly realized victory would not only require defeating the British Army, but also subduing the region's brutal civil war. 'The division among the people is much greater than I imagined, and the Whigs and the Tories persecute each other, with little less than savage fury,' wrote Greene. Part of Greene's challenge involved managing South Carolina's determined but unreliable Patriot militia, led by Thomas Sumter, the famed 'Gamecock'. Though Sumter would go on to a long political career, it was as a defiant partisan that he first earned the respect of his fellow backcountry settlers, a command that would compete with Greene for status and stature in the Revolutionary War's 'Southern Campaign'. Despite these challenges, Greene was undaunted. Born to a devout Quaker family, and influenced by the faith's tenets, Greene instinctively understood the war's Southern theater involved complex political, personal, and socioeconomic challenges, not just military ones. Though never a master of the battlefield, Greene's mindful leadership style established his historic legacy. The Quaker and the Gamecock tells the story of these two wildly divergent leaders against the backdrop of the American Revolution's last gasp, the effort to extricate a British occupation force from the wild and lawless South Carolina frontier. For Greene, the campaign meant a last chance to prove his capabilities as a general, not just a talented administrator. For Sumter, it was a quest of personal revenge that showcased his innate understanding of the backcountry character. Both men needed the other to defeat the British, yet their forceful personalities, divergent leadership styles, and opposing objectives would clash again and again, a fascinating story of the United States' bloody birth that still influences our political culture.
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46.49 USD

The Quaker and the Gamecock: Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter, and the Revolutionary War for the Soul of the South

by Andrew Waters
Hardback
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This book examines the idea of fake news through an analysis of the work of early to mid-twentieth century press critic George Seldes. By examining fake news - also known as propaganda and misinformation - from this period it becomes evident that it is a phenomenon that emerges in response ...
George Seldes' War for the Public Good: Weaponising a Free Press
This book examines the idea of fake news through an analysis of the work of early to mid-twentieth century press critic George Seldes. By examining fake news - also known as propaganda and misinformation - from this period it becomes evident that it is a phenomenon that emerges in response to particular social, political and economic conditions. It is, therefore, not a new process but always a feature of the media ecosystem. Seldes' work makes evident that contemporary anxieties about the role, function, future and credibility of journalism were expressed in the 1930s and 1940s. The same fears were circulated about the consequences of fake news and propaganda on democratic debate. The same concerns were also expressed about how technology extends the circulation of propaganda and fake news, and affects journalism practices. An analysis of Seldes' media criticism of the fake news, lies and propaganda in daily newspapers in the 1930s and 1940s exposes the historical nature and impact of fake news on public debate, and affirms the critical role of journalists in exposing fake news.
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62.990000 USD

George Seldes' War for the Public Good: Weaponising a Free Press

by Helen Fordham
Hardback
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An Everlasting Circle presents the Civil War correspondence of the Haskells, a prominent family of Abbeville, South Carolina. This outstanding collection of eloquent, compelling letters is unusual in that it includes the correspondence of seven brothers in arms. The Haskell brothers were literate, well-educated men, most of whom became officers ...
An Everlasting Circle: Letters of the Haskell Family of Abbeville, South Carolina, 1861-1865
An Everlasting Circle presents the Civil War correspondence of the Haskells, a prominent family of Abbeville, South Carolina. This outstanding collection of eloquent, compelling letters is unusual in that it includes the correspondence of seven brothers in arms. The Haskell brothers were literate, well-educated men, most of whom became officers highly regarded for their ability, courage, and character. Their letters are particularly strong in documenting the beginning days of the war in Charleston, as well as many significant battles in Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. They also tell the love story of Alexander C. Haskell and his bride Decca Singleton, a poignant romance chronicled by Mary Chesnut in her famous diary. At the center of the story is Sophia Haskell, the mother whose unfailing love and Christian faith was a source of strength for the family through many extraordinary trials. One of the worst of those trials occurred the day she received news of the death of her brother and two of her sons, but she took consolation in knowing that she would be reunited someday with all those she loved. The messages of condolence sent to her and her husband are some of the most moving writings of their kind, and a letter that Alexander C. Haskell penned to his mother after his wife's death has been called one of the noblest and most beautiful of the war. This is the story of a Southern family's faith, patriotism, and devotion to each other through the most tragic, tumultuous period in American history.
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36.750000 USD

An Everlasting Circle: Letters of the Haskell Family of Abbeville, South Carolina, 1861-1865

by Karen Stokes
Hardback
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Often overlooked, former vice president Spiro T. Agnew is typically a maligned figure in American political history. Largely remembered for his alliterative speeches, attacks on the media and Eastern intellectuals, and his resignation from office in 1973 in the wake of tax-evasion charges, Agnew's larger impact on the modern Republican ...
Republican Populist: Spiro Agnew and the Origins of Donald Trump's America
Often overlooked, former vice president Spiro T. Agnew is typically a maligned figure in American political history. Largely remembered for his alliterative speeches, attacks on the media and Eastern intellectuals, and his resignation from office in 1973 in the wake of tax-evasion charges, Agnew's larger impact on the modern Republican Party is significant and underappreciated. It is impossible, in fact, to understand the current internal struggles of the Republican Party without understanding this populist everyman and prototypical middle-class striver who was one of the first proponents of what would become the ideology of Donald Trump's GOP. Republican Populist examines Agnew's efforts to make the Republican Party representative of the silent majority. Under the tutelage of President Richard Nixon and a group of talented speechwriters including Pat Buchanan and William Safire, Agnew crafted the populist-tinged, antiestablishment rhetoric that helped turn the Republican Party into a powerful national electoral force that has come to define American politics into the current era. A fascinating political portrait of Agnew from his pre-vice presidential career through and beyond his scandal-driven fall from office, this book is above all a revelatory examination of Agnew's role as one of the founding fathers of the modern Republican Party and of the link between Agnew's people's party and his fraught party of populists and businessmen today.
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30.980000 USD

Republican Populist: Spiro Agnew and the Origins of Donald Trump's America

by Jerald E. Podair, Zach Messitte, Charles J. Holden
Hardback
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In order to nurture and build a competitive, successful modern city and region in which vital industries could thrive, civic leaders had to struggle with a complex topography, extractive energy resources, mass transportation demands, and the limitations of laissez faire capitalism. When the deleterious effects of massive industrialization threatened civic ...
Making Industrial Pittsburgh Modern: Environment, Landscape, Transportation, and Planning
In order to nurture and build a competitive, successful modern city and region in which vital industries could thrive, civic leaders had to struggle with a complex topography, extractive energy resources, mass transportation demands, and the limitations of laissez faire capitalism. When the deleterious effects of massive industrialization threatened civic life and thereby economic success, civic leaders, and institutions searched for ways to mitigate the problems but also preserve private prerogatives. Although historians have frequently addressed the politics, private-public relationships and the social inequalities of labor, immigrants, race and gender, we focus on the needs of city-building, similarly attempting to balance economic imperatives and civic life.
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42.000000 USD

Making Industrial Pittsburgh Modern: Environment, Landscape, Transportation, and Planning

by Edward K. Muller, Joel A. Tarr
Hardback
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A fresh, comprehensive, and critical look at the California gold rush through the lens of the daguerreotype camera The California gold rush was the first major event in American history to be documented in depth by photography. This fascinating volume offers a fresh, comprehensive, and critical look at the people, ...
Golden Prospects: Daguerreotypes of the California Gold Rush
A fresh, comprehensive, and critical look at the California gold rush through the lens of the daguerreotype camera The California gold rush was the first major event in American history to be documented in depth by photography. This fascinating volume offers a fresh, comprehensive, and critical look at the people, places, and culture of that historical episode as seen through daguerreotypes and ambrotypes of the era. After gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill in 1848, thousands made the journey to California, including daguerreotypists who established studios in cities and towns and ventured into the gold fields in specially outfitted photographic wagons. Their images, including portraits, views of cities and gold towns, and miners at work in the field, provide an extraordinary glimpse into the evolution of mining culture and technology, the variety of nationalities and races involved in the mining industry, and the growth of cities such as San Francisco and Sacramento. Including numerous images published here for the first time, this book provides an extraordinary glimpse into the transformation of the American West.
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52.500000 USD

Golden Prospects: Daguerreotypes of the California Gold Rush

by Jane L. Aspinwall
Hardback
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From the late 1950s to 1976 the U.S. manned spaceflight program advanced as it did largely due to the extraordinary efforts of Austrian immigrant George M. Low. Described as the ultimate engineer during his career at NASA, Low was a visionary architect and leader from the agency's inception in 1958 ...
The Ultimate Engineer: The Remarkable Life of NASA's Visionary Leader George M. Low
From the late 1950s to 1976 the U.S. manned spaceflight program advanced as it did largely due to the extraordinary efforts of Austrian immigrant George M. Low. Described as the ultimate engineer during his career at NASA, Low was a visionary architect and leader from the agency's inception in 1958 to his retirement in 1976. As chief of manned spaceflight at NASA, Low was instrumental in the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs. Low's pioneering work paved the way for President Kennedy's decision to make a lunar landing NASA's primary goal in the 1960s. After the tragic 1967 Apollo 1 fire that took the lives of three astronauts and almost crippled the program, Low took charge of the redesign of the Apollo spacecraft, and he helped lead the program from disaster and toward the moon. In 1968 Low made the bold decision to go for lunar orbit on Apollo 8 before the lunar module was ready for flight and after only one Earth orbit test flight of the command and service modules. Under Low there were five manned missions, including Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing. Low's clandestine negotiations with the Soviet Union resulted in a historic joint mission in 1975 that was the precursor to the Shuttle-Mir and International Space Station programs. At the end of his NASA career, Low was one of the leading figures in the development of the space shuttle in the early 1970s, and he was instrumental in NASA's transition into a post-Apollo world. Afterward, he embarked on a distinguished career in higher education as a transformational president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, his alma mater. Chronicling Low's escape from Nazi-occupied Austria to his helping land a man on the moon, The Ultimate Engineer sheds new light on one of the most fascinating and complex personalities of the golden age of U.S. manned space travel.
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34.600000 USD

The Ultimate Engineer: The Remarkable Life of NASA's Visionary Leader George M. Low

by Richard Jurek
Hardback
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Powerfully and thoroughly rebuts-claim by claim-the consistently errant assertions by a never-ending stream of prominent and popular commentators who report that the American Founding was a wholly secular and enlightenment affair. -BARRY ALAN SHAIN, professor of political science, Colgate University, and author of The Myth of American Individualism A fresh ...
Did America Have a Christian Founding?: Separating Modern Myth from Historical Truth
Powerfully and thoroughly rebuts-claim by claim-the consistently errant assertions by a never-ending stream of prominent and popular commentators who report that the American Founding was a wholly secular and enlightenment affair. -BARRY ALAN SHAIN, professor of political science, Colgate University, and author of The Myth of American Individualism A fresh look at the very real extent to which Christian thought and belief played a vital role in the making of our country. -MAT THEW J. FRANCK, associate director, James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, Princeton University Hall's lucid volume . . . corrects many modern misconceptions about [the founders'] political philosophy and achievements. -GEORGE H. NASH, historian, lecturer, and author of The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945 Hall's beautifully written and immensely thoughtful new book should be read by anyone interested in the role of religion in the founding of the American Republic. -DAVID G. DALIN, senior research fellow, Brandeis University, and author of Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court, from Brandeis to Kagan Hall clearly shows what's most important: that Christian ideas profoundly influenced the Founders, and through them all of us. -DR. MARVIN OLASKY, editor in chief of World and author of Fighting for Liberty and Virtue Beautiful. . . . Fully debunks the pervasive myth that America's founders were deists. As I turned each page, my smile grew larger to know that here, in a single short book, history was being set aright. -RODNEY K. SMITH, Stirling Chair and director of the Center for Constitutional Studies, Utah Valley University, and author of James Madison: The Father of Religious Liberty A distinguished professor debunks the assertion that America's Founders were deists who desired the strict separation of church and state and instead shows that their political ideas were profoundly influenced by their Christian convictions. Many Americans have been taught a distorted, inaccurate account of our nation's founding, one that claims that the founders were deists who desired the strict separation of church and state and that the country's founding political ideas developed without reference to Christianity. In this revelatory, rigorously argued new book, Mark David Hall thoroughly debunks that modern myth and shows instead that the founders' political ideas were profoundly influenced by their Christian convictions. Drawing from hundreds of personal letters, public proclamations, early state constitutions and laws, and other original documents, Professor Hall makes the airtight case that America's founders were not deists; that they did not create a godless Constitution; that even Jefferson and Madison did not want a high wall separating church and state; that most founders believed the government should encourage Christianity; and that they embraced a robust understanding of religious liberty for biblical and theological reasons. In addition, Hall explains why and how the founders' views are absolutely relevant today. Did America Have a Christian Founding? is a compelling, utterly convincing closing argument in the debate about the role of faith in the nation's founding, making it clear that Christian thought was crucial to the nation's founding-and demonstrating that this benefits all of us, whatever our faith (or lack thereof).
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35.31 USD

Did America Have a Christian Founding?: Separating Modern Myth from Historical Truth

by Mark David Hall
Hardback
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How did enslaved African Americans in the Old South really experience Christmas? Did Christmastime provide slaves with a lengthy and jubilant respite from labor and the whip, as is generally assumed, or is the story far more complex and troubling? In this provocative, revisionist, and sometimes chilling account, Robert E. ...
Yuletide in Dixie: Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory
How did enslaved African Americans in the Old South really experience Christmas? Did Christmastime provide slaves with a lengthy and jubilant respite from labor and the whip, as is generally assumed, or is the story far more complex and troubling? In this provocative, revisionist, and sometimes chilling account, Robert E. May chides the conventional wisdom for simplifying black perspectives, uncritically accepting southern white literary tropes about the holiday, and overlooking evidence not only that countless southern whites passed Christmases fearful that their slaves would revolt but also that slavery's most punitive features persisted at holiday time.In Yuletide in Dixie, May uncovers a dark reality that not only alters our understanding of that history but also sheds new light on the breakdown of slavery in the Civil War and how false assumptions about slave Christmases afterward became harnessed to myths undergirding white supremacy in the United States. By exposing the underside of slave Christmases, May helps us better understand the problematic stereotypes of modern southern historical tourism and why disputes over Confederate memory retain such staying power today. A major reinterpretation of human bondage, Yuletide in Dixie challenges disturbing myths embedded deeply in our culture.
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36.700000 USD

Yuletide in Dixie: Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory

by Robert E. May
Hardback
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Paul Polgar recovers the racially inclusive vision of America's first abolition movement. In showcasing the activities of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, the New York Manumission Society, and their African American allies during the post-Revolutionary and early national eras, he unearths this coalition's comprehensive agenda for black freedom and equality. By ...
Standard-Bearers of Equality: America's First Abolition Movement
Paul Polgar recovers the racially inclusive vision of America's first abolition movement. In showcasing the activities of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, the New York Manumission Society, and their African American allies during the post-Revolutionary and early national eras, he unearths this coalition's comprehensive agenda for black freedom and equality. By guarding and expanding the rights of people of African descent and demonstrating that black Americans could become virtuous citizens of the new Republic, these activists, whom Polgar names first movement abolitionists, sought to end white prejudice and eliminate racial inequality. Beginning in the 1820s, however, colonization threatened to eclipse this racially inclusive movement. Colonizationists claimed that what they saw as permanent black inferiority and unconquerable white prejudice meant that slavery could end only if those freed were exiled from the United States. In pulling many reformers into their orbit, this radically different antislavery movement marginalized the activism of America's first abolitionists and obscured the racially progressive origins of American abolitionism that Polgar now recaptures. By reinterpreting the early history of American antislavery, Polgar illustrates that the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries are as integral to histories of race, rights, and reform in the United States as the mid-nineteenth century.
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41.950000 USD

Standard-Bearers of Equality: America's First Abolition Movement

by Paul J Polgar
Hardback
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Much of the confusion about a central event in United States history begins with the name: the Civil War. In reality, the Civil War was not merely civil--meaning national--and not merely a war, but instead an international conflict of ideas as well as armies. Its implications transformed the U.S. Constitution ...
The Second American Revolution: The Civil War-Era Struggle over Cuba and the Rebirth of the American Republic
Much of the confusion about a central event in United States history begins with the name: the Civil War. In reality, the Civil War was not merely civil--meaning national--and not merely a war, but instead an international conflict of ideas as well as armies. Its implications transformed the U.S. Constitution and reshaped a world order, as political and economic systems grounded in slavery and empire clashed with the democratic process of republican forms of government. And it spilled over national boundaries, tying the United States together with Cuba, Spain, Mexico, Britain, and France in a struggle over the future of slavery and of republics. Here Gregory P. Downs argues that we can see the Civil War anew by understanding it as a revolution. More than a fight to preserve the Union and end slavery, the conflict refashioned a nation, in part by remaking its Constitution. More than a struggle of brother against brother, it entailed remaking an Atlantic world that centered in surprising ways on Cuba and Spain. Downs introduces a range of actors not often considered as central to the conflict but clearly engaged in broader questions and acts they regarded as revolutionary. This expansive canvas allows Downs to describe a broad and world-shaking war with implications far greater than often recognized.
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29.350000 USD

The Second American Revolution: The Civil War-Era Struggle over Cuba and the Rebirth of the American Republic

by Gregory P Downs
Hardback
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Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as ...
Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City
Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as whites fled for the suburbs and exurbs in increasing numbers, Latin Americans immigrated to urban centres in even greater numbers. Barrio America charts the vibrant revival of American cities in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, arguing that we should attribute this revival to the influx of Latin American immigrants -- both legal and not. An award-winning historian and son of immigrants, Andrew Sandoval-Strausz recounts this untold history by focusing on the largest immigrant barrios in two of the nation's largest cities: Chicago's Little Village and Dallas's Oak Cliff. These neighbourhoods were once classic examples of urban crisis: they reached their peak prosperity around 1950, afterwards losing residents, jobs, and opportunity, which destabilised urban public order. But after 1965, when Lyndon Johnson overturned the restrictive 1924 immigration law and a major agricultural crisis was convulsing Mexico, these neighbourhoods saw a record number of incoming Latin Americans. The nation's urban barrios are regularly portrayed as decaying districts plagued by crime and disorder, but in reality, over the past several decades, areas with growing immigrant populations have become some of the most dynamic, stable, and safe neighbourhoods in their cities. The new immigrants brought with them three distinctive cultural traditions -- penchants for public spaces, walking, and small entrepreneurship -- that have changed the American city for the better. Drawing on dozens of oral histories with migrantes themselves, Sandoval-Strausz places immigrant voices at the centre of the narrative, emphasising the choices of Latin American newcomers, the motivations that brought them to the United States, and the hopes that lay before them, their families, and their communities. Barrio America demonstrates how migrants have used their labour, their capital, and their culture to build a new metropolitan America.
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33.600000 USD

Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City

by A.K. Sandoval-Strausz
Hardback
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Unnatural Resources explores the intersection of energy production and environmental regulation in Appalachia after the oil embargo of 1973. The years from 1969 to 1973 saw the passage of a number of laws meant to protect the environment from human destruction, and they initially enjoyed broad public popularity. However, the ...
Unnatural Resources: Energy and Environmental Politics in Appalachia after the 1973 Oil Embargo
Unnatural Resources explores the intersection of energy production and environmental regulation in Appalachia after the oil embargo of 1973. The years from 1969 to 1973 saw the passage of a number of laws meant to protect the environment from human destruction, and they initially enjoyed broad public popularity. However, the oil embargo, which caused lines and fistfights at gasoline stations, refocused Americans' attention on economic issues and alerted Americans to the dangers of relying on imported oil. As a drive to increase domestic production of energy gained momentum, it soon appeared that new environmental regulations were inhibiting this initiative. A backlash against environmental regulations helped inaugurate a bipartisan era of market-based thinking in American politics and discredited the idea that the federal government had a constructive role to play in addressing energy issues. This study connects political, labor, and environmental history to contribute to a growing body of literature on the decline of the New Deal and the rise of pro-market thinking in American politics.
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42.000000 USD

Unnatural Resources: Energy and Environmental Politics in Appalachia after the 1973 Oil Embargo

by Michael Camp
Hardback
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Gentrification is transforming cities, small and large, across the country. Though it's easy to bemoan the diminished social diversity and transformation of commercial strips that often signify a gentrifying neighborhood, determining who actually benefits and who suffers from this nebulous process can be much harder. The full story of gentrification ...
Newcomers: Gentrification and Its Discontents
Gentrification is transforming cities, small and large, across the country. Though it's easy to bemoan the diminished social diversity and transformation of commercial strips that often signify a gentrifying neighborhood, determining who actually benefits and who suffers from this nebulous process can be much harder. The full story of gentrification is rooted in large-scale social and economic forces as well as in extremely local specifics--in short, it's far more complicated than both its supporters and detractors allow. In Newcomers, journalist Matthew Schuerman explains how a phenomenon that began with good intentions has turned into one of the most vexing social problems of our time. He builds a national story using focused histories of northwest Brooklyn, San Francisco's Mission District, and the onetime site of Chicago's Cabrini-Green housing project, revealing both the commonalities among all three and the place-specific drivers of change. Schuerman argues that gentrification has become a too-easy flashpoint for all kinds of quasi-populist rage and pro-growth boosterism. In Newcomers, he doesn't condemn gentrifiers as a whole, but rather articulates what it is they actually do, showing not only how community development can turn foul, but also instances when a better neighborhood truly results from changes that are good. Schuerman draws no easy conclusions, using his keen reportorial eye to create sharp, but fair, portraits of the people caught up in gentrification, the people who cause it, and its effects on the lives of everyone who calls a city home.
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42.78 USD

Newcomers: Gentrification and Its Discontents

by Matthew L Schuerman
Hardback
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Revisits and updates WPA-funded archaeological research on key Oklahoma mound sites. As part of Great Depression relief projects started in the 1930s, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) sponsored massive archaeological projects across Oklahoma. The WPA crews excavated eight mound sites and dozens of nonmound residential sites in the Arkansas River ...
The Ritual Landscape of Late Precontact Eastern Oklahoma: Archaeology from the WPA Era until Today
Revisits and updates WPA-funded archaeological research on key Oklahoma mound sites. As part of Great Depression relief projects started in the 1930s, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) sponsored massive archaeological projects across Oklahoma. The WPA crews excavated eight mound sites and dozens of nonmound residential sites in the Arkansas River Valley that date between AD 1000 and 1450. These sites are considered the westernmost representations of Mississippian culture in the Southeast. The results of these excavations were documented in field journals and photographs prepared by the field supervisors and submitted in a series of quarterly reports to WPA headquarters. These reports contain a wealth of unpublished information summarizing excavations at the mound sites and residential sites, including mound profiles, burial descriptions, house maps, artifact tables, and artifact sketches. Of the excavated mound sites, results from only one, Spiro, have been extensively studied and synthesized in academic literature. The seven additional WPA-excavated mound sites-Norman, Hughes, Brackett, Eufaula, Skidgel, Reed, and Lillie Creek-are known to archaeologists outside of Oklahoma only as unlabeled points on maps of mound sites in the Southeast. The Ritual Landscape of Late Precontact Eastern Oklahoma curates and contextualizes the results of the WPA excavations, showing how they inform archaeological understanding of Mississippian occupation in the Arkansas Valley. Regnier, Hammerstedt, and Savage also relate the history and experiences of practicing archaeology in the 1930s, incorporating colorful excerpts from field journals of the young, inexperienced archaeologists. Finally, the authors update current knowledge of mound and nonmound sites in the region, providing an excellent example of historical archaeology.
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73.450000 USD

The Ritual Landscape of Late Precontact Eastern Oklahoma: Archaeology from the WPA Era until Today

by Sheila Bobalik Savage, Scott W. Hammerstedt, Amanda L. Regnier
Hardback
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Gorgeous War argues that the Nazis used the swastika as part of a visually sophisticated propaganda program that was not only modernist but also the forerunner of contemporary brand identity. When the United States military tried to answer Nazi displays of graphic power, it failed. In the end the best ...
Gorgeous War: The Branding War between the Third Reich and the United States
Gorgeous War argues that the Nazis used the swastika as part of a visually sophisticated propaganda program that was not only modernist but also the forerunner of contemporary brand identity. When the United States military tried to answer Nazi displays of graphic power, it failed. In the end the best graphic response to the Nazis was produced by the Walt Disney Company. Using numerous examples of US and Nazi military heraldry, Gorgeous War compares the way the American and German militaries developed their graphic and textile design in the interwar period. The book shows how social and cultural design movements like modernism altered and were altered by both militaries. It also explores how nascent corporate culture and war production united to turn national brands like IBM, Coca-Cola, and Disney into multinational corporations that had learned lessons on propaganda and branding that were being tested during the Second World War. What is the legacy of apparently toxic signs like the swastika? The answer may not be what we hoped. Inheritors of the post-Second World War world increasingly struggle to find an escape from an intensely branded environment--to find a place in their lives that is free of advertising and propaganda. This book suggests that we look again at how it is our culture makes that struggle into an appealing Gorgeous War.
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34.640000 USD

Gorgeous War: The Branding War between the Third Reich and the United States

by Tim Blackmore
Hardback
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As the 1950s gave way to the 1960s, we are accustomed to think, American life passed from a time of placidity to one of turbulence, from complacency to dissent, from consensus to conflict, and from behavioral conformity to the virtues or vices of individual liberation. Some have celebrated this apparent ...
At the Center: American Thought and Culture in the Mid-Twentieth Century
As the 1950s gave way to the 1960s, we are accustomed to think, American life passed from a time of placidity to one of turbulence, from complacency to dissent, from consensus to conflict, and from behavioral conformity to the virtues or vices of individual liberation. Some have celebrated this apparent transformation as a necessary change, which helped undermine oppressive racial and sexual hierarchies, challenge the unearned authority of experts, and question the aura surrounding those holding social and political power. Others, including even some critics of the order of things in the Fifties, lament America's subsequent unraveling, due to the confusion and excess that accompanied the erosion of strong foundations for social stability. Either way-viewing the time as a dark age or proud decade -historians and other observers have generally viewed the 1950s as a period noteworthy for its holism. Things hung together, before they fell apart. Over the past two decades, however, historians have documented the variations and unsettledness of experience, as well as persistent dissent and agitation, that actually marked the 1950s in the United States, despite the apparent unity and strength of the American way of life. They have noted not only the depth of the growing black freedom struggle and hints of women's emancipation underlying the seeming consensus on domesticity but also the presence of sexual rebellion, pacifism, avant-garde aesthetics, and other forms of nonconformity. Moreover, signs of fracture or strain appeared not merely at the margins but in the mainstream of American life. In her re-reading of Fifties women's magazines, for instance, Joanne Meyerowitz has shown how popular ideology operated in different registers, celebrating domesticity at one moment and independent women breaking into new fields of professional and public distinction at another. We have now become accustomed to see mass culture, often believed in that time to homogenize all it touched, as a field in which different actors, different voices, and divergent messages competed for attention. Even without exaggerating the everyday presence of hidden resistance to dominant paradigms, it has become much easier to see the midcentury as a time, like others, in which tensions, inconsistency, and uncertainty prevailed in the ways people made sense of their experience. Nonetheless, this recent sensitivity to the complexity of the 1950s cannot erase entirely that which set that time (stretched in our view to span 1948 to 1963) apart from the times before and after it. What was it exactly? Barriers and hierarchies of race and sex were painfully, often brutally real, prevailing alongside some new rhetoric of inclusion and harmony. The growth of purchasing power in prosperous times-and its unevenness-is well documented. The times witnessed the exercise of US military might in the world at large and the mobilization of civil society that accompanied it; from this in particular followed a fairly widespread sense that silence or stillness characterized public discourse, even though a few howled against it. How do we reconcile the image and reality of the decade as a time of repression with our new knowledge of how much vitality and variousness also coursed through the period? This book proposes that part of the answer lies in recognizing the pre-eminence and pursuit of centered ways of thought and imagination in that time, even as the record of experience stubbornly eluded summation in a whole, ordered existence. Intellectual life and cultural awareness (both popular and elite ) put a premium on grasping consensus, coherence, theoretical foundations, ethical universals, and wholeness in things (whether nations, persons, or bodies of knowledge). In other words, American thought and culture in the mid-twentieth century showed a penchant for making sense of things in rounded terms, focused on durable points of orientation, or centers of gravity. Moreover, this disposition held in fields far from entirely political (i.e., in the uses of power, the limits of opposition, or pressures to complicity). The urge to determine or locate centers, foundations, universals, or orienting norms prevailed across many registers of thought, imagination, and practice. In At the Center, we will explore that mode of perception and reflection as well as the varieties of argument and expression that escaped inclusion within coherent wholes. Our unit of investigation is the long Fifties -a span of time extending beyond the calendric markers of the decade, from 1948 to 1963. The socialist writer and organizer Michael Harrington once called 1948 the last year of the 1930s, in part referring to the Henry Wallace campaign (and its electoral debacle), the failure to repeal Taft Hartley, and the inability to extend social welfare legislation. In the wake of that watershed, American politics tended (despite the rightward lurch of McCarthyism and the survival of a deep conservative current thereafter) toward a decline in pitched battles over the key elements of the New Deal state. Dwight Eisenhower's emblematic remark to his brother-that anyone who aimed to undo Social Security and like protections was making a serious political blunder-signaled that measure of consensus. At the same time, although origins of the Cold War can be dated prior to 1948, that year marked both its sudden crystallization and hardening abroad and its institutionalization in national affairs. The other boundary, the year 1963, identified with events such as the March on Washington, the overthrow of Diem in South Vietnam, and the assassination of John Kennedy, signaled a kind of disturbance that would steadily undermine the assumption that centered perspectives could adequately make sense of things. Although this book rejects the old convention of a sharp, decisive break between Fifties complacency and Sixties disruption, we also disclaim any intention to depict the first as mere prelude to the second. Our mid-century period bore characteristics that justify a historical reconstruction of it as a distinctive time. Moreover, while we cite political events to mark the time, we approach this period in terms neither wholly political nor depoliticized. Apart from explicitly governmental and partisan matters, politics may be found in deep-lying and perhaps unvoiced sensitivities to war, peace, order, conflict, change, security, and freedom-at levels of experience both collective and personal. In this sense, politics burdened, provoked, and haunted nearly all avenues of American thought and culture in the long 1950s.
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89.250000 USD

At the Center: American Thought and Culture in the Mid-Twentieth Century

by Howard Brick, Daniel H. Borus, Casey Nelson Blake
Hardback
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America's Other Muslims: Imam W.D. Mohammed, Islamic Reform, and the Making of American Islam explores the oldest and perhaps the most important Muslim community in America, whose story has received little attention in the contemporary context. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim explores American Muslim Revivalist, Imam W.D. Mohammed (1933-2008) and his contribution to ...
America's Other Muslims: Imam W.D. Mohammed, Islamic Reform, and the Making of American Islam
America's Other Muslims: Imam W.D. Mohammed, Islamic Reform, and the Making of American Islam explores the oldest and perhaps the most important Muslim community in America, whose story has received little attention in the contemporary context. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim explores American Muslim Revivalist, Imam W.D. Mohammed (1933-2008) and his contribution to the intellectual, spiritual, and philosophical thought of American Muslims as well as the contribution of Islamic thought by indigenous American Muslims. The book details the intersection of the Africana experience and its encounter with race, religion, and Islamic reform. Fraser-Rahim spotlights the emergence of an American school of Islamic thought, which created and established by the son of the leader of the former Nation of Islam leader. Imam W.D. Mohammed rejected his father's teachings and embraced normative Islam on his own terms while balancing classical Islam and his lived experience of Islam in the diaspora. Likewise his interpretations of Islam were not only American - they were also modern and responded to global trends in Islamic thought. His interpretations of Blackness were not only American, but also diasporic and pan-African.
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94.500000 USD

America's Other Muslims: Imam W.D. Mohammed, Islamic Reform, and the Making of American Islam

by Muhammad Fraser-Rahim
Hardback
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In the chaotic days after Pearl Harbor, with America still reeling from Japan's surprise attack and Germany's subsequent declaration of war, the Roosevelt administration makes a hasty decision about the hundreds of Axis power diplomats remaining in the nation's capital. To encourage reciprocal treatment of U.S. diplomats held abroad, the ...
Such Splendid Prisons: Diplomatic Detainment in America During World War II
In the chaotic days after Pearl Harbor, with America still reeling from Japan's surprise attack and Germany's subsequent declaration of war, the Roosevelt administration makes a hasty decision about the hundreds of Axis power diplomats remaining in the nation's capital. To encourage reciprocal treatment of U.S. diplomats held abroad, the President's administration sends them to remote luxury hotels-a decision that enrages Americans stunned by the attack. This cause celebre rocks America and drives a fascinating yet forgotten story: the roundup, detention, and eventual repatriation of more than a thousand German, Japanese, Italian, Bulgarian and Hungarian diplomats, families, staff, servants, journalists, students, businessmen, and spies. Such Splendid Prisons follows five internees whose privileged worlds came crashing down after December 7, 1941: the suave, calculating Nazi ambassador and his charming but conflicted wife; a wily veteran Japanese journalist; the beleaguered American wife of a Japanese spy posing as a diplomat; and the spirited but naive college-aged daughter of the German military attache. The close proximity in which the Axis power emissaries were forced to live with their counterparts stripped away the veneer of false diplomatic bonhomie inspiring antagonism to erupt between delegations. Author Harvey Solomon has unearthed over 1,500 pages of memoranda, letters, cables, interviews, and unpublished memoirs that recreate this period of luxury detention, public outrage, hidden agendas, and political machinations.
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36.700000 USD

Such Splendid Prisons: Diplomatic Detainment in America During World War II

by Harvey Solomon
Hardback
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Over the course of the twentieth century, the United States emerged as a global leader in conservation policy-negotiating the first international conservation treaties, pioneering the idea of the national park, and leading the world in creating a modern environmental regulatory regime. And yet, this is a country famously committed to ...
The Conservation Constitution: The Conservation Movement and Constitutional Change, 1870-1930
Over the course of the twentieth century, the United States emerged as a global leader in conservation policy-negotiating the first international conservation treaties, pioneering the idea of the national park, and leading the world in creating a modern environmental regulatory regime. And yet, this is a country famously committed to the ideals of limited government, decentralization, and strong protection of property rights. How these contradictory values have been reconciled, not always successfully, is what Kimberly K. Smith Sets out to explain in The Conservation Constitution-a book that brings to light the roots of contemporary constitutional conflict over environmental policy. In the mid-nineteenth century, most Progressive Era conservation policies would have been considered unconstitutional. Smith traces how, between 1870 and 1930, the conservation movement reshaped constitutional doctrine to its purpose-how, specifically, courts and lawyers worked to expand government authority to manage wildlife, forest and water resources, and pollution. Her work, which highlights a number of important Supreme Court decisions often overlooked in accounts of this period, brings the history of environmental management more fully into the story of the US Constitution. At the same time, illuminating the doctrinal innovation in the Progressives' efforts, her book reveals the significance of constitutional history to an understanding of the government's role in environmental management.
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41.950000 USD

The Conservation Constitution: The Conservation Movement and Constitutional Change, 1870-1930

by Kimberly K. Smith
Hardback
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In the 1790s, the Jeffersonian Republicans were the party of no. They opposed attempts to expand the government's role in society, criticized the Washington administration's national bank, railed against a standing army, and bemoaned the spirit of the Federalist regime, which, they claimed, favored elite over ordinary Americans. Accordingly, Thomas ...
Jeffersonians in Power: The Rhetoric of Opposition Meets the Realities of Governing
In the 1790s, the Jeffersonian Republicans were the party of no. They opposed attempts to expand the government's role in society, criticized the Washington administration's national bank, railed against a standing army, and bemoaned the spirit of the Federalist regime, which, they claimed, favored elite over ordinary Americans. Accordingly, Thomas Jefferson asserted that his election as President in 1801 was a revolution : with Jeffersonians in power, the government could be stripped down in size and strength. But there was a paradox at the heart of this image. Maintaining the security, stability, and prosperity of the republic required aggressive statecraft, and as a result, Jeffersonians deployed state power to reduce taxes and the debt, enforced a shipping embargo, go to war, and ultimately to support a national bank during Madison's administration. This book explores the logic and logistics of Jeffersonian statesmanship. Focusing on Jeffersonian Republican statecraft in action, Jeffersonians in Power maps the meeting place of ideology and policy as Jeffersonians shifted from being an oppositional party to exercising power as the ruling coalition. Contributors: Andrew Burstein, Louisiana State University * Benjamin L. Carp, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York * Christa Dierksheide, University of Missouri * Kevin R. C. Gutzman, Western Connecticut State University * James E. Lewis Jr., Kalamazoo College * Martin OEhman, Gothenburg University * Robert G. Parkinson, Binghamton University * John A. Ragosta, Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello * Leonard J. Sadosky III * Richard Samuelson, California State University, San Bernardino * Brian Schoen, Ohio University * Mark Smith, John Burroughs School, St. Louis * Andrew Trees, Roosevelt University.
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41.480000 USD

Jeffersonians in Power: The Rhetoric of Opposition Meets the Realities of Governing

Hardback
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In the post-9/11 world, it is not difficult to see how important religion remains in America and around the globe. An older generation of scholars expected that America and the rest of the Western world was headed inexorably toward secularization and the end of religion. America is undoubtedly secular in ...
America's Religious History: Faith, Politics, and the Shaping of a Nation
In the post-9/11 world, it is not difficult to see how important religion remains in America and around the globe. An older generation of scholars expected that America and the rest of the Western world was headed inexorably toward secularization and the end of religion. America is undoubtedly secular in many ways, and our constitutional order requires a clear distinction between faith communities and government. Yet from the colonial era to the present, American men and women have been, and have remained, a pervasively religious people. In America's Religious History, leading historian Thomas S. Kidd traces the theological and ethnic diversity and enduring strength of American religion, with special attention to Christianity and evangelical faith. Interweaving religious history and key events from the larger narrative of American history, the book considers how faith commitments and categories have shaped the nation. Written with the student in mind, America's Religious History offers an up-to-date, narrative introduction useful for undergraduate and graduate-level courses on American religion. General readers wanting to better understand the religious background of American life and politics will also enjoy its engaging and insightful overview.
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26.240000 USD

America's Religious History: Faith, Politics, and the Shaping of a Nation

by Thomas S. Kidd
Hardback
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What does democracy look like? And when should we cause trouble to pursue it? Troublemakers fuses photography and history to demonstrate how racial and economic inequality gave rise to a decades-long struggle for justice in one American city. In dialogue with 275 of Art Shay's photographs, Erik S. Gellman takes ...
Troublemakers: Chicago Freedom Struggles Through the Lens of Art Shay
What does democracy look like? And when should we cause trouble to pursue it? Troublemakers fuses photography and history to demonstrate how racial and economic inequality gave rise to a decades-long struggle for justice in one American city. In dialogue with 275 of Art Shay's photographs, Erik S. Gellman takes a new look at major developments in postwar US history: the Second Great Migration, white flight, and neighborhood and street conflicts, as well as shifting party politics and the growth of the carceral state. The result is a visual and written history that complicates--and even upends--the morality tales and popular memory of postwar freedom struggles. Shay himself was a troublemaker, seeking to unsettle society by illuminating truths that many middle-class, white, media, political, and businesspeople pretended did not exist. Shay served as a navigator in the US Army Air Forces during World War II, then took a position as a writer for Life Magazine. But soon after his 1948 move to Chicago, he decided to become a freelance photographer. Shay wandered the city photographing whatever caught his eye--and much did. His lens captured everything from private moments of rebellion to era-defining public movements, as he sought to understand the creative and destructive energies that propelled freedom struggles in the Windy City. Shay illuminated the pain and ecstasy that sprung up from the streets of Chicago, while Gellman reveals their collective impact on the urban fabric and on our national narrative. This collaboration offers a fresh and timely look at how social conflict can shape a city--and may even inspire us to make trouble today.
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36.750000 USD

Troublemakers: Chicago Freedom Struggles Through the Lens of Art Shay

by Erik S. Gellman
Hardback
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