Filter
(found 24998 products)
Book cover image
An anthology exploring the modernization of the South Carolina upcountry and the region's role in creating the New South. Continuing the theme of unexplored moments introduced in Recovering the Piedmont Past: Unexplored Moments in Nineteenth-Century Upcountry South Carolina History, Timothy P. Grady joins with Andrew H. Myers to edit this ...
Recovering the Piedmont Past, Volume 2: Bridging the Centuries in the South Carolina Upcountry, 1877-1941
An anthology exploring the modernization of the South Carolina upcountry and the region's role in creating the New South. Continuing the theme of unexplored moments introduced in Recovering the Piedmont Past: Unexplored Moments in Nineteenth-Century Upcountry South Carolina History, Timothy P. Grady joins with Andrew H. Myers to edit this second anthology that uncovers the microhistory of this northwest region of the state. Topics include the influence of railroads on traveling circuses, tourist resorts and visits by Booker T. Washington during the rise of Jim Crow, pioneering efforts by progressives to identify the cause of pellagra disease, a debate over populism involving Pitchfork Ben Tillman, the acculturation of Greek immigrants, and the daily lives of Civilian Conservation Corps workers during the New Deal. After years of being overshadowed by the coastal elite, upcountry South Carolinians began to play a vital role in modernizing the region and making it an integral part of the New South. In a study of this shift in the balance of power, the contributors examine religious history, the economic boom and bust, popular recreational activities, and major trends that played out in small places. By providing details and nuance that illuminate the historical context of the New South and engaging with the upcountry from fresh angles, this second volume expresses a deep local interest while also speaking to broader political and social issues. Melissa Walker, the George Dean Johnson, Jr. Professor of History Emerita at Converse College and coeditor of Recovering the Piedmont Past: Unexplored Moments in Nineteenth-Century South Carolina History, provides a foreword.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781611179224.jpg
41.990000 USD

Recovering the Piedmont Past, Volume 2: Bridging the Centuries in the South Carolina Upcountry, 1877-1941

Hardback
Book cover image
In the decades following World War II, municipal leaders and ordinary citizens embraced San Francisco's identity as the Gateway to the Pacific, using it to reimagine and rebuild the city. The city became a cosmopolitan center on account of its newfound celebration of its Japanese and other Asian American residents, ...
The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco
In the decades following World War II, municipal leaders and ordinary citizens embraced San Francisco's identity as the Gateway to the Pacific, using it to reimagine and rebuild the city. The city became a cosmopolitan center on account of its newfound celebration of its Japanese and other Asian American residents, its economy linked with Asia, and its favorable location for transpacific partnerships. The most conspicuous testament to San Francisco's postwar transpacific connections is the Japanese Cultural and Trade Center in the city's redeveloped Japanese-American enclave. Focusing on the development of the Center, Meredith Oda shows how this multilayered story was embedded within a larger story of the changing institutions and ideas that were shaping the city. During these formative decades, Oda argues, San Francisco's relations with and ideas about Japan were being forged within the intimate, local sites of civic and community life. This shift took many forms, including changes in city leadership, new municipal institutions, and especially transformations in the built environment. Newly friendly relations between Japan and the United States also meant that Japanese Americans found fresh, if highly constrained, job and community prospects just as the city's African Americans struggled against rising barriers. San Francisco's story is an inherently local one, but it also a broader story of a city collectively, if not cooperatively, reimagining its place in a global economy.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780226592749.jpg
46.07 USD

The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco

by Meredith Oda
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
A personal portrayal of rural and small-town Westerners adhering to Old West values while resisting or assimilating to New West global realities. Drawing from his San Joaquin Valley childhood, a career devoted to studying the West, and attentive interviews with a wide range of ethnically diverse people from the greater ...
Two-Buck Chuck and The Marlboro Man: The New Old West: Essays
A personal portrayal of rural and small-town Westerners adhering to Old West values while resisting or assimilating to New West global realities. Drawing from his San Joaquin Valley childhood, a career devoted to studying the West, and attentive interviews with a wide range of ethnically diverse people from the greater area, Bergen presents an intimate portrait of an Old West in conflict with the New, and traces the way traditional values-the code of the cowboy, the work ethic of the farmers-sometimes clash with and at other times adjust to a changing world. Set in California's Great Central Valley, the book offers a personal portrayal of rural and small-town Westerners, several with ties to Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, New Mexico, Arizona, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Texas, but all shaped as was the author by California's Great Valley. All are immigrants, migrants, their children, or grandchildren whose lives intertwine with the author's-rich, poor, and in-between, as well as those of several races and ethnicities: Chicanos, Mexicans, African Americans, Italians, Asians, Native Americans, Scots-Irish descendants of Steinbeck's Okies, and Basques of the author's own heritage.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781948908061.jpg
26.200000 USD

Two-Buck Chuck and The Marlboro Man: The New Old West: Essays

by Frank Bergon
Hardback
Book cover image
On a cold day in early January 1864, Robert E. Lee wrote to Confederate president Jefferson Davis The time is at hand when, if an attempt can be made to capture the enemy's forces at New Berne, it should be done. Over the next few months, Lee's dispatch would precipitate ...
The Fight for the Old North State: The Civil War in North Carolina, January-May 1864
On a cold day in early January 1864, Robert E. Lee wrote to Confederate president Jefferson Davis The time is at hand when, if an attempt can be made to capture the enemy's forces at New Berne, it should be done. Over the next few months, Lee's dispatch would precipitate a momentous series of events as the Confederates, threatened by a supply crisis and an emerging peace movement, sought to seize Federal bases in eastern North Carolina. This book tells the story of these operations-the late war Confederate resurgence in the Old North State. Using rail lines to rapidly consolidate their forces, the Confederates would attack the main Federal position at New Bern in February, raid the northeastern counties in March, hit the Union garrisons at Plymouth and Washington in late April, and conclude with another attempt at New Bern in early May. The expeditions would involve joint-service operations, as the Confederates looked to support their attacks with powerful, homegrown ironclad gunboats. These offensives in early 1864 would witness the failures and successes of southern commanders including George Pickett, James Cooke, and a young, aggressive North Carolinian named Robert Hoke. Likewise they would challenge the leadership of Union army and naval officers such as Benjamin Butler, John Peck, and Charles Flusser. Newsome does not neglect the broader context, revealing how these military events related to a contested gubernatorial election; the social transformations in the state brought on by the war; the execution of Union prisoners at Kinston; and the activities of North Carolina Unionists. Lee's January proposal triggered one of the last successful Confederate offensives. The Fight for the Old North State captures the full scope, as well as the dramatic details of this struggle for North Carolina.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780700627462.jpg
36.700000 USD

The Fight for the Old North State: The Civil War in North Carolina, January-May 1864

by Hampton Newsome
Hardback
Book cover image
In this social and ecological account of the Chicago River, Libby Hill tells the story of how a sluggish waterway emptying into Lake Michigan became central to the creation of Chicago as a major metropolis and transportation hub. This widely acclaimed volume weaves the perspectives of science, engineering, commerce, politics, ...
The Chicago River: A Natural and Unnatural History
In this social and ecological account of the Chicago River, Libby Hill tells the story of how a sluggish waterway emptying into Lake Michigan became central to the creation of Chicago as a major metropolis and transportation hub. This widely acclaimed volume weaves the perspectives of science, engineering, commerce, politics, economics, and the natural world into a chronicle of the river from its earliest geologic history through its repeated adaptations to the city that grew up around it. While explaining the river's role in massive public works, such as drainage and straightening, designed to address the infrastructure needs of a growing population, Hill focuses on the synergy between the river and the people of greater Chicago, whether they be the tribal cultures that occupied the land after glacial retreat, the first European inhabitants, or more recent residents. In the first edition, Hill brought together years of original research and the contributions of dozens of experts to tell the Chicago River's story up until 2000. This revised edition features discussions of disinfection, Asian carp, green strategies, the evolution of the Chicago Riverwalk, and the river's rejuvenation. It also explores how earlier solutions to problems challenge today's engineers, architects, environmentalists, and public policy agencies as they address contemporary issues. Revealing the river to be a microcosm of the uneasy relationship between nature and civilization, The Chicago River offers the tools and knowledge for the city's residents to be champions on the river's behalf.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780809337071.jpg
25.720000 USD

The Chicago River: A Natural and Unnatural History

by Libby Hill
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In the decades following World War II, municipal leaders and ordinary citizens embraced San Francisco's identity as the Gateway to the Pacific, using it to reimagine and rebuild the city. The city became a cosmopolitan center on account of its newfound celebration of its Japanese and other Asian American residents, ...
The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco
In the decades following World War II, municipal leaders and ordinary citizens embraced San Francisco's identity as the Gateway to the Pacific, using it to reimagine and rebuild the city. The city became a cosmopolitan center on account of its newfound celebration of its Japanese and other Asian American residents, its economy linked with Asia, and its favorable location for transpacific partnerships. The most conspicuous testament to San Francisco's postwar transpacific connections is the Japanese Cultural and Trade Center in the city's redeveloped Japanese-American enclave. Focusing on the development of the Center, Meredith Oda shows how this multilayered story was embedded within a larger story of the changing institutions and ideas that were shaping the city. During these formative decades, Oda argues, San Francisco's relations with and ideas about Japan were being forged within the intimate, local sites of civic and community life. This shift took many forms, including changes in city leadership, new municipal institutions, and especially transformations in the built environment. Newly friendly relations between Japan and the United States also meant that Japanese Americans found fresh, if highly constrained, job and community prospects just as the city's African Americans struggled against rising barriers. San Francisco's story is an inherently local one, but it also a broader story of a city collectively, if not cooperatively, reimagining its place in a global economy.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780226592602.jpg
134.80 USD

The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco

by Meredith Oda
Hardback
Book cover image
This new edition of Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance, originally published in 1987, is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Peter ...
Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance
This new edition of Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance, originally published in 1987, is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Peter S. Onuf reviews important new work on the progress of colonization and territorial expansion in the rising American empire.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780268105464.jpg
31.500000 USD

Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance

by Peter S. Onuf
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The award-winning story of the century-and-half-long attempt to control nature in the American wilderness, told through the prism of a tragic death at Yellowstone--now in paperback In the summer of 1972, 25-year-old Harry Eugene Walker hitchhiked away from his family's northern Alabama dairy farm to see America. Nineteen days later ...
Engineering Eden
The award-winning story of the century-and-half-long attempt to control nature in the American wilderness, told through the prism of a tragic death at Yellowstone--now in paperback In the summer of 1972, 25-year-old Harry Eugene Walker hitchhiked away from his family's northern Alabama dairy farm to see America. Nineteen days later he was killed by an endangered grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park. The ensuing civil trial, brought against the US Department of the Interior for alleged mismanagement of the park's grizzly population, emerged as a referendum on how America's most beloved wild places should be conserved. Two of the twentieth century's greatest wildlife biologists testified--on opposite sides. Moving across decades and among Yellowstone, Yosemite, Glacier, and Sequoia National Parks, author and former park ranger Jordan Fisher Smith has crafted an epic, emotionally wrenching account of America's fraught, century-and-a-half-long attempt to remake Eden--in the name of saving it.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781615195459.jpg
17.800000 USD

Engineering Eden

by Jordan Fisher Smith
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
How two centuries of Indigenous resistance created the movement proclaiming Water is Life --and how it points the way to a new Indigenous future In 2016, a small protest encampment at the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota, initially established to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, grew ...
Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance
How two centuries of Indigenous resistance created the movement proclaiming Water is Life --and how it points the way to a new Indigenous future In 2016, a small protest encampment at the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota, initially established to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, grew to be the largest Indigenous protest movement in the twenty-first century, attracting tens of thousands of Indigenous and non-Native allies from around the world. Its slogan Mni Wiconi --Water is Life--was about more than just a pipeline. Water Protectors knew this battle for Native sovereignty had already been fought many times before, and that, even after the encampment was gone, their anti-colonial struggle would continue. In Our History is the Future, Nick Estes traces traditions of Indigenous resistance leading to the #NoDAPL movement from the days of the Missouri River trading forts through the Indian Wars, the Pick-Sloan dams, the American Indian Movement, and the campaign for Indigenous rights at the United Nations. While a historian by trade, Estes also draws on observations from the encampments and from growing up as a citizen of the Oceti Sakowin (the Nation of the Seven Council Fires), making Our History is the Future at once a work of history, a personal story, and a manifesto.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781786636720.jpg
28.99 USD

Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance

by Nick Estes
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press's Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. In the post-World War I American climate of isolationism, nativism, democratic expansion of civic rights, and consumerism, Italian-born star Rodolfo Valentino and Italy's dictator Benito Mussolini ...
The Divo and the Duce: Promoting Film Stardom and Political Leadership in 1920s America
A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press's Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. In the post-World War I American climate of isolationism, nativism, democratic expansion of civic rights, and consumerism, Italian-born star Rodolfo Valentino and Italy's dictator Benito Mussolini became surprising paragons of authoritarian male power and mass appeal. Drawing on extensive archival research in the United States and Italy, Giorgio Bertellini's work shows how their popularity, both political and erotic, largely depended on the efforts of public opinion managers, including publicists, journalists, and even ambassadors. Beyond the democratic celebrations of the Jazz Age, the promotion of their charismatic masculinity through spectacle and press coverage inaugurated the now-familiar convergence of popular celebrity and political authority. This is the first volume in the new Cinema Cultures in Contact series, coedited by Giorgio Bertellini, Richard Abel, and Matthew Solomon.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780520301368.jpg
36.700000 USD

The Divo and the Duce: Promoting Film Stardom and Political Leadership in 1920s America

by Giorgio Bertellini
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This new edition of Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance, originally published in 1987, is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Peter ...
Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance
This new edition of Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance, originally published in 1987, is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Peter S. Onuf reviews important new work on the progress of colonization and territorial expansion in the rising American empire.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780268105457.jpg
105.000000 USD

Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance

by Peter S. Onuf
Hardback
Book cover image
The Gault archaeological complex, located in Central Texas, is one of the most important and extensive sites for the study of Clovis culture in North America, commonly dated between 11,000 and 13,500 years ago. Indeed, according to author Mary S. Black, recent discoveries at the site by veteran archaeologist Michael ...
Secrets in the Dirt: Uncovering the Ancient People of Gault
The Gault archaeological complex, located in Central Texas, is one of the most important and extensive sites for the study of Clovis culture in North America, commonly dated between 11,000 and 13,500 years ago. Indeed, according to author Mary S. Black, recent discoveries at the site by veteran archaeologist Michael Collins may suggest that Texas has been a good place for people to live for as much as 20,000 years. Secrets in the Dirt examines this important site and highlights the significant archaeological research that has been carried out there since its discovery in 1929. In 2007, Collins, who has been working at the Gault site since 1998, and his colleagues discovered an unusual stone tool assemblage that predated Clovis, suggesting the possibility that they were made by some of the earliest inhabitants in the Americas. Black provides a reader-friendly account of how these and many other artifacts were uncovered and what they may represent. She also offers absorbing vignettes, extrapolated from the painstaking research of Collins and others, that portray some of the ways these early Americans may have adapted to the location, its resources, and to one another, thousands of years before Europeans arrived. This generously illustrated, engaging book introduces readers to the Gault site, its fascinating prehistory, and the important research that continues to uncover even more secrets in the dirt.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781623497491.jpg
31.500000 USD

Secrets in the Dirt: Uncovering the Ancient People of Gault

by Mary S. Black
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
What is the nature of place, and how does one undertake to write about it? To answer these questions, geographer and poet Tim Cresswell looks to Chicago's iconic Maxwell Street market area. Maxwell Street was for decades a place where people from all corners of the city mingled to buy ...
Maxwell Street: Writing and Thinking Place
What is the nature of place, and how does one undertake to write about it? To answer these questions, geographer and poet Tim Cresswell looks to Chicago's iconic Maxwell Street market area. Maxwell Street was for decades a place where people from all corners of the city mingled to buy and sell goods, play and listen to the blues, and encounter new foods and cultures. Now, redeveloped and renamed University Village, it could hardly be more different. In Maxwell Street, Cresswell advocates approaching the study of place as an assemblage of things, meanings, and practices. In exploring the neighborhood, he models this innovative approach through a montage format that exposes the different types of texts-primary, secondary, and photographic sources-that have attempted to capture the essence of the area. Cresswell studies his historical sources just as he explores the different elements of Maxwell Street-exposing them layer by layer. Brilliantly interweaving words and images, Maxwell Street sheds light on a historic Chicago neighborhood and offers a new model for how to write about place that will interest anyone in the fields of geography, urban studies, or cultural history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780226604251.jpg
36.750000 USD

Maxwell Street: Writing and Thinking Place

by Tim Cresswell
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The history of New York City's urban development often centers on titanic municipal figures like Robert Moses and on prominent inner Manhattan sites like Central Park. New York Recentered boldly shifts the focus to the city's geographic edges--the coastlines and waterways--and to the small-time unelected locals who quietly shaped the ...
New York Recentered: Building the Metropolis from the Shore
The history of New York City's urban development often centers on titanic municipal figures like Robert Moses and on prominent inner Manhattan sites like Central Park. New York Recentered boldly shifts the focus to the city's geographic edges--the coastlines and waterways--and to the small-time unelected locals who quietly shaped the modern city. Kara Murphy Schlichting details how the vernacular planning done by small businessmen and real estate operators, performed independently of large scale governmental efforts, refigured marginal locales like Flushing Meadows and the shores of Long Island Sound and the East River in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The result is a synthesis of planning history, environmental history, and urban history that recasts the story of New York as we know it.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780226613024.jpg
42.000000 USD

New York Recentered: Building the Metropolis from the Shore

by Kara Murphy Schlichting
Hardback
Book cover image
Even without the right to vote, members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy proved to have enormous social and political influence throughout the South--all in the name of preserving Confederate culture. Karen L. Cox's history of the UDC, an organization founded in 1894 to vindicate the Confederate generation and ...
Dixie's Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture
Even without the right to vote, members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy proved to have enormous social and political influence throughout the South--all in the name of preserving Confederate culture. Karen L. Cox's history of the UDC, an organization founded in 1894 to vindicate the Confederate generation and honor the Lost Cause, shows why myths surrounding the Confederacy continue to endure.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813064130.jpg
46.92 USD

Dixie's Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture

by Karen L Cox
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Community is an evolving and complex concept that historians have applied to localities, counties, and the South as a whole in order to ground larger issues in the day-to-day lives of all segments of society. These social networks sometimes unite and sometimes divide people, they can mirror or transcend political ...
Southern Communities: Identity, Conflict, and Memory in the American South
Community is an evolving and complex concept that historians have applied to localities, counties, and the South as a whole in order to ground larger issues in the day-to-day lives of all segments of society. These social networks sometimes unite and sometimes divide people, they can mirror or transcend political boundaries, and they may exist solely within the cultures of like-minded people. This volume explores the nature of southern communities during the long nineteenth century. The contributors build on the work of scholars who have allowed us to see community not simply as a place but instead as an idea in a constant state of definition and redefinition. They reaffirm that there never has been a singular southern community. As editors Steven E. Nash and Bruce E. Stewart reveal, southerners have constructed an array of communities across the region and beyond. Nor do the contributors idealize these communities. Far from being places of cooperation and harmony, southern communities were often rife with competition and discord. Indeed, conflict has constituted a vital part of southern communal development. Taken together, the essays in this volume remind us how community-focused studies can bring us closer to answering those questions posed to Quentin Compson in Absalom, Absalom!: Tell [us] about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780820355122.jpg
34.600000 USD

Southern Communities: Identity, Conflict, and Memory in the American South

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
What is the nature of place, and how does one undertake to write about it? To answer these questions, geographer and poet Tim Cresswell looks to Chicago's iconic Maxwell Street market area. Maxwell Street was for decades a place where people from all corners of the city mingled to buy ...
Maxwell Street: Writing and Thinking Place
What is the nature of place, and how does one undertake to write about it? To answer these questions, geographer and poet Tim Cresswell looks to Chicago's iconic Maxwell Street market area. Maxwell Street was for decades a place where people from all corners of the city mingled to buy and sell goods, play and listen to the blues, and encounter new foods and cultures. Now, redeveloped and renamed University Village, it could hardly be more different. In Maxwell Street, Cresswell advocates approaching the study of place as an assemblage of things, meanings, and practices. In exploring the neighborhood, he models this innovative approach through a montage format that exposes the different types of texts-primary, secondary, and photographic sources-that have attempted to capture the essence of the area. Cresswell studies his historical sources just as he explores the different elements of Maxwell Street-exposing them layer by layer. Brilliantly interweaving words and images, Maxwell Street sheds light on a historic Chicago neighborhood and offers a new model for how to write about place that will interest anyone in the fields of geography, urban studies, or cultural history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780226604114.jpg
110.250000 USD

Maxwell Street: Writing and Thinking Place

by Tim Cresswell
Hardback
Book cover image
The English settlers who staked their claims in the Chesapeake Bay were drawn to it for a variety of reasons. Some sought wealth from the land, while others saw it as a place of trade, a political experiment, or a potential spiritual sanctuary. But like other European colonizers in the ...
Urban Dreams, Rural Commonwealth: The Rise of Plantation Society in the Chesapeake
The English settlers who staked their claims in the Chesapeake Bay were drawn to it for a variety of reasons. Some sought wealth from the land, while others saw it as a place of trade, a political experiment, or a potential spiritual sanctuary. But like other European colonizers in the Americas, they all aspired to found, organize, and maintain functioning towns--an aspiration that met with varying degrees of success, but mostly failure. Yet this failure became critical to the economy and society that did arise there. As Urban Dreams, Rural Commonwealth reveals, the agrarian plantation society that eventually sprang up around the Chesapeake Bay was not preordained--rather, it was the necessary product of failed attempts to build cities. Paul Musselwhite details the unsuccessful urban development that defined the region from the seventeenth century through the Civil War, showing how places like Jamestown and Annapolis--despite their small size--were the products of ambitious and cutting-edge experiments in urbanization comparable to those in the largest port cities of the Atlantic world. These experiments, though, stoked ongoing debate about commerce, taxation, and self-government. Chesapeake planters responded to this debate by reinforcing the political, economic, and cultural authority of their private plantation estates, with profound consequences for the region's laborers and the political ideology of the southern United States. As Musselwhite makes clear, the antebellum economy around this well-known waterway was built not in the absence of cities, but upon their aspirational wreckage.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780226585284.jpg
64.84 USD

Urban Dreams, Rural Commonwealth: The Rise of Plantation Society in the Chesapeake

by Paul Musselwhite
Hardback
Book cover image
The California coastline has long been of interest to archaeologists. This book directs attention to the largely ignored Pecho Coast, a rugged, isolated 20 km long peninsula between modern-day Morro Bay and Pismo Beach. Archaeological work along this stretch was last synthesized in 1972. Jones and Codding now bring together ...
Foragers on America's Western Edge: The Archaeology of California's Pecho Coast
The California coastline has long been of interest to archaeologists. This book directs attention to the largely ignored Pecho Coast, a rugged, isolated 20 km long peninsula between modern-day Morro Bay and Pismo Beach. Archaeological work along this stretch was last synthesized in 1972. Jones and Codding now bring together the extensive contract work and field school studies of the intervening years, shedding new light on the region's early inhabitants. The first people of the Pecho Coast were part-time residents who exploited shellfish, fish, and marine birds, including the flightless duck, Chendytes lawi, which sustained hunting drove to extinction ca. 2800 cal BP. This marked the only unequivocal case of prehistoric, human-caused extinction in western North America. Cold, productive seas allowed inhabitants to weather droughts of the Medieval Climatic Anomaly (950-600 cal BP), after which shell beads became increasingly abundant, representing either the initial appearance of Chumash-speaking peoples or attempts by Chumash leaders to consolidate power through gifting, reciprocal exchange, or forced conquest. During the mission era, fishing sustained the Native community as, for the first time, individuals became fully sedentary, foraging within a limited radius to avoid contact with the Spanish. This record reveals a unique story of local adaptation, anthropogenic habitat change, social differentiation and, ultimately, resistance to colonial invasion.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781607816430.jpg
52.500000 USD

Foragers on America's Western Edge: The Archaeology of California's Pecho Coast

Hardback
Book cover image
The Dred Scott suit for freedom, argues Kelly M. Kennington, was merely the most famous example of a phenomenon that was more widespread in antebellum American jurisprudence than is generally recognized. The author draws on the case files of more than three hundred enslaved individuals who, like Dred Scott and ...
In the Shadow of the Chinatis: A History of Pinto Canyon in the Big Bend
The Dred Scott suit for freedom, argues Kelly M. Kennington, was merely the most famous example of a phenomenon that was more widespread in antebellum American jurisprudence than is generally recognized. The author draws on the case files of more than three hundred enslaved individuals who, like Dred Scott and his family, sued for freedom in the local legal arena of St. Louis. Her findings open new perspectives on the legal culture of slavery and the negotiated processes involved in freedom suits. As a gateway to the American West, a major port on both the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, and a focal point in the rancorous national debate over slavery's expansion, St. Louis was an ideal place for enslaved individuals to challenge the legal systems and, by extension, the social systems that held them in forced servitude. Kennington offers an in-depth look at how daily interactions, webs of relationships, and arguments presented in court shaped and reshaped legal debates and public attitudes over slavery and freedom in St. Louis. Kennington also surveys more than eight hundred state supreme court freedom suits from around the United States to situate the St. Louis example in a broader context. Although white enslavers dominated the antebellum legal system in St. Louis and throughout the slaveholding states, that fact did not mean that the system ignored the concerns of the subordinated groups who made up the bulk of the American population. By looking at a particular example of one group's encounters with the law-and placing these suits into conversation with similar en-counters that arose in appellate cases nationwide-Kennington sheds light on the ways in which the law responded to the demands of a variety of actors.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781623497354.jpg
36.750000 USD

In the Shadow of the Chinatis: A History of Pinto Canyon in the Big Bend

by David W Keller
Hardback
Book cover image
Community is an evolving and complex concept that historians have applied to localities, counties, and the South as a whole in order to ground larger issues in the day-to-day lives of all segments of society. These social networks sometimes unite and sometimes divide people, they can mirror or transcend political ...
Southern Communities: Identity, Conflict, and Memory in the American South
Community is an evolving and complex concept that historians have applied to localities, counties, and the South as a whole in order to ground larger issues in the day-to-day lives of all segments of society. These social networks sometimes unite and sometimes divide people, they can mirror or transcend political boundaries, and they may exist solely within the cultures of like-minded people. This volume explores the nature of southern communities during the long nineteenth century. The contributors build on the work of scholars who have allowed us to see community not simply as a place but instead as an idea in a constant state of definition and redefinition. They reaffirm that there never has been a singular southern community. As editors Steven E. Nash and Bruce E. Stewart reveal, southerners have constructed an array of communities across the region and beyond. Nor do the contributors idealize these communities. Far from being places of cooperation and harmony, southern communities were often rife with competition and discord. Indeed, conflict has constituted a vital part of southern communal development. Taken together, the essays in this volume remind us how community-focused studies can bring us closer to answering those questions posed to Quentin Compson in Absalom, Absalom!: Tell [us] about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780820355115.jpg
104.950000 USD

Southern Communities: Identity, Conflict, and Memory in the American South

Hardback
Book cover image
Installed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1921 to commemorate the tercentenary of the landing of the Pilgrims, Cyrus Dallin's statue Massasoit was intended to memorialize the Pokanoket Massasoit (leader) as a welcoming diplomat and participant in the mythical first Thanksgiving. But after the statue's unveiling, Massasoit began to move and proliferate ...
Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit
Installed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1921 to commemorate the tercentenary of the landing of the Pilgrims, Cyrus Dallin's statue Massasoit was intended to memorialize the Pokanoket Massasoit (leader) as a welcoming diplomat and participant in the mythical first Thanksgiving. But after the statue's unveiling, Massasoit began to move and proliferate in ways one would not expect of generally stationary monuments tethered to place. The plaster model was donated to the artist's home state of Utah and prominently displayed in the state capitol; half a century later, it was caught up in a surprising case of fraud in the fine arts market. Versions of the statue now stand on Brigham Young University's campus; at an urban intersection in Kansas City, Missouri; and in countless homes around the world in the form of souvenir statuettes. As Lisa Blee and Jean M. O'Brien show in this thought-provoking book, the surprising story of this monumental statue reveals much about the process of creating, commodifying, and reinforcing the historical memory of Indigenous people. Dallin's statue, set alongside the historical memory of the actual Massasoit and his mythic collaboration with the Pilgrims, shows otherwise hidden dimensions of American memorial culture: an elasticity of historical imagination, a tight-knit relationship between consumption and commemoration, and the twin impulses to sanitize and grapple with the meaning of settler-colonialism.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781469648408.jpg
56.23 USD

Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit

by Jean M O'Brien, Lisa Blee
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Beginning with Frank Hamilton Cushing's famous excavations at Key Marco in 1896, a large and diverse collection of animal carvings, dugout canoes, and other wooden objects has been uncovered from Florida's watery landscapes. Iconography and Wetsite Archaeology of Florida's Watery Realms explores new discoveries and reexamines existing artifacts to reveal ...
Iconography and Wetsite Archaeology of Florida's Watery Realms
Beginning with Frank Hamilton Cushing's famous excavations at Key Marco in 1896, a large and diverse collection of animal carvings, dugout canoes, and other wooden objects has been uncovered from Florida's watery landscapes. Iconography and Wetsite Archaeology of Florida's Watery Realms explores new discoveries and reexamines existing artifacts to reveal the influential role of water in the daily lives of Florida's early inhabitants. Among other topics, contributors compare anthropomorphic wooden carvings such as the Key Marco cat statuette to figures found elsewhere in the Southeast. They use ethnographic data to argue that Newnans Lake was once an intersection between major watersheds and that the more than 100 canoes unearthed there likely facilitated travel throughout the peninsula. Other sites discussed include Fort Center, Chassahowitzka Springs, Weedon Island Preserve, Pineland, and Hontoon Island. Essays address the challenges of excavating and preserving perishable artifacts from waterlogged sites, especially those in saltwater environments, and highlight the value of revisiting museum collections to ask new questions and employ new analytical techniques. This volume demonstrates that, despite the difficulties faced by archaeologists working with saturated deposits, these sites are vital for understanding Florida's prehistory. A volume in the Florida Museum of Natural History: Ripley P. Bullen Series
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781683400783.jpg
94.500000 USD

Iconography and Wetsite Archaeology of Florida's Watery Realms

Hardback
Book cover image
This collection of essays profiles a diverse array of North Carolinians, all of whom had a hand in the founding of the state and the United States of America. It includes stories of how men who stood together to fight the British soon chose opposing sides in political debates over ...
North Carolina's Revolutionary Founders
This collection of essays profiles a diverse array of North Carolinians, all of whom had a hand in the founding of the state and the United States of America. It includes stories of how men who stood together to fight the British soon chose opposing sides in political debates over the ratification of the supreme law of the land, the Constitution. It also includes accounts of women, freedmen, and Native Americans, whose narratives shed light on the important roles of marginalized peoples in the Revolutionary South. Together, the essays reveal the philosophical views and ideology of North Carolina's revolutionaries. Contributors: Jeff Broadwater, Jennifer Davis-Davis, Lloyd Johnson, Benjamin R. Justesen, Troy L. Kickler, Scott King-Owen, James MacDonald, Maggie Hartley Mitchell, Karl Rodabaugh, Kyle Scott, Jason Stroud, Michael Toomey, and Willis P. Whichard.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781469651194.jpg
94.500000 USD

North Carolina's Revolutionary Founders

Hardback
Book cover image
In 1700, a young man named John Lawson left London and landed in Charleston, South Carolina, hoping to make a name for himself. For reasons unknown, he soon undertook a two-month journey through the still-mysterious Carolina backcountry. His travels yielded A New Voyage to Carolina in 1709, one of the ...
A Delicious Country: Rediscovering the Carolinas along the Route of John Lawson's 1700 Expedition
In 1700, a young man named John Lawson left London and landed in Charleston, South Carolina, hoping to make a name for himself. For reasons unknown, he soon undertook a two-month journey through the still-mysterious Carolina backcountry. His travels yielded A New Voyage to Carolina in 1709, one of the most significant early American travel narratives, rich with observations about the region's environment and Indigenous people. Lawson later helped found North Carolina's first two cities, Bath and New Bern; became the colonial surveyor general; contributed specimens to what is now the British Museum; and was killed as the first casualty of the Tuscarora War. Yet despite his great contributions and remarkable history, Lawson is little remembered, even in the Carolinas he documented. In 2014, Scott Huler made a surprising decision: to leave home and family for his own journey by foot and canoe, faithfully retracing Lawson's route through the Carolinas. This is the chronicle of that unlikely voyage, revealing what it's like to rediscover your own home. Combining a traveler's curiosity, a naturalist's keen observation, and a writer's wit, Huler draws our attention to people and places we might pass regularly but never really see. What he finds are surprising parallels between Lawson's time and our own, with the locals and their world poised along a knife-edge of change between a past they can't forget and a future they can't quite envision.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781469648286.jpg
29.400000 USD

A Delicious Country: Rediscovering the Carolinas along the Route of John Lawson's 1700 Expedition

by Scott Huler
Hardback
Book cover image
Collected letters of a Confederate officer and his family detail daily life and loss on the battlefield. Hope, sacrifice, and restoration: throughout the American Civil War and its aftermath, the Foster family endured all of these in no small measure. Drawing from dozens of public and privately owned letters, A. ...
A South Carolina Upcountry Saga: The Civil War Letters of Barham Bobo Foster and His Family, 1860-1863
Collected letters of a Confederate officer and his family detail daily life and loss on the battlefield. Hope, sacrifice, and restoration: throughout the American Civil War and its aftermath, the Foster family endured all of these in no small measure. Drawing from dozens of public and privately owned letters, A. Gibert Kennedy recounts the story of his great-great-grandfather and his family in A South Carolina Upcountry Saga: The Civil War Letters of Barham Bobo Foster and His Family, 1860-1863. Barham Bobo Foster was a gentleman planter from the Piedmont who signed the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession and served as a lieutenant colonel in the Third South Carolina Volunteers alongside his two sons. Kennedy's primary sources are letters written by Foster and his sons, but he also references correspondence involving Foster's daughters and his wife, Mary Ann. The letters describe experiences on the battlefields of Virginia and South Carolina, vividly detailing camp life, movements, and battles along with stories of bravery, loss, and sacrifice. The Civil War cost Foster his health, all that he owned, and his two sons, though he was able to rebuild with the help of his wife and three daughters. Supplementing the correspondence with maps, illustrations, and genealogical information, Kennedy shows the full arc of the Foster family's struggle and endurance in the Civil War era.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781611179248.jpg
52.490000 USD

A South Carolina Upcountry Saga: The Civil War Letters of Barham Bobo Foster and His Family, 1860-1863

Hardback
Book cover image
Installed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1921 to commemorate the tercentenary of the landing of the Pilgrims, Cyrus Dallin's statue Massasoit was intended to memorialize the Pokanoket Massasoit (leader) as a welcoming diplomat and participant in the mythical first Thanksgiving. But after the statue's unveiling, Massasoit began to move and proliferate ...
Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit
Installed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1921 to commemorate the tercentenary of the landing of the Pilgrims, Cyrus Dallin's statue Massasoit was intended to memorialize the Pokanoket Massasoit (leader) as a welcoming diplomat and participant in the mythical first Thanksgiving. But after the statue's unveiling, Massasoit began to move and proliferate in ways one would not expect of generally stationary monuments tethered to place. The plaster model was donated to the artist's home state of Utah and prominently displayed in the state capitol; half a century later, it was caught up in a surprising case of fraud in the fine arts market. Versions of the statue now stand on Brigham Young University's campus; at an urban intersection in Kansas City, Missouri; and in countless homes around the world in the form of souvenir statuettes. As Lisa Blee and Jean M. O'Brien show in this thought-provoking book, the surprising story of this monumental statue reveals much about the process of creating, commodifying, and reinforcing the historical memory of Indigenous people. Dallin's statue, set alongside the historical memory of the actual Massasoit and his mythic collaboration with the Pilgrims, shows otherwise hidden dimensions of American memorial culture: an elasticity of historical imagination, a tight-knit relationship between consumption and commemoration, and the twin impulses to sanitize and grapple with the meaning of settler-colonialism.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781469648392.jpg
94.500000 USD

Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit

by Jean M O'Brien, Lisa Blee
Hardback
Book cover image
Benjamin Forsythe Buckner (1836--1901) faced a dire choice as the flames of Civil War threatened his native Kentucky. As an ambitious Bluegrass aristocrat, he was sympathetic to fellow slave owners, but was also convinced that the Peculiar Institution could not survive a war for Southern independence. Defying the wishes of ...
For Slavery and Union: Benjamin Buckner and Kentucky Loyalties in the Civil War
Benjamin Forsythe Buckner (1836--1901) faced a dire choice as the flames of Civil War threatened his native Kentucky. As an ambitious Bluegrass aristocrat, he was sympathetic to fellow slave owners, but was also convinced that the Peculiar Institution could not survive a war for Southern independence. Defying the wishes of his Rebel fiancee and her powerful family -- yet still hoping to impress them with his resolve, independence, and courage -- Buckner joined the Twentieth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry in 1861 as a Union soldier. President Abraham Lincoln's issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 ultimately destroyed Buckner's faith in his cause, however, and he resigned his commission. In For Slavery and Union, Patrick A. Lewis uses Benjamin Buckner's story to illuminate the origins and perspectives of Kentucky's conservative proslavery Unionists, and explain why this group eventually became a key force in repressing social and political change during the Reconstruction era and beyond. Free from the constraints and restrictions imposed on the former Confederate states, men like Buckner joined with other proslavery forces to work in the interest of the New South's brand of economic growth and racial control. Other studies have explored how Kentucky cultivated a Confederate identity after the Civil War, but For Slavery and Union is the first major work to personify this transformation. Lewis's important book transcends biography to provide a deeply nuanced look at the history of the commonwealth in the nineteenth century and the development of the New South.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813177519.jpg
31.450000 USD

For Slavery and Union: Benjamin Buckner and Kentucky Loyalties in the Civil War

by Patrick A Lewis
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
On July 20, 1969, humanity paused with attention locked to television and radio broadcasts as the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission dramatically touched down on the dusty face of the moon. The first word from the lunar surface: Houston. Houston, Space City USA is a visual celebration of the ...
Houston, Space City USA
On July 20, 1969, humanity paused with attention locked to television and radio broadcasts as the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission dramatically touched down on the dusty face of the moon. The first word from the lunar surface: Houston. Houston, Space City USA is a visual celebration of the city's historic ties to the US human space program. When President Kennedy declared, We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, he did so from the campus of Rice University. More than half a century later, Houston continues to serve as the nerve center of the American human space program. Author and photographer Ray Viator, a longtime Houstonian, has lovingly captured the spirit of a city's devotion to space exploration from then to now. Using striking photographs of the full moon as a visual motif of Houston's connection to spaceflight, Viator also weaves together historic images to show how former cow pastures transformed into mission control. Some connections are obvious-the Houston Astros or the Houston Rockets. Others are hidden in plain sight, like the arm patches on the uniform of every Houston police officer that read, Space City U.S.A. Viator's lens captures this and more. Houston, Space City USA not only marks the important milestone of the first lunar landing, but it also helps readers discover and rediscover a city's constellation of connections to one of humankind's greatest achievements.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781623497729.jpg
66.46 USD

Houston, Space City USA

by Ray Viator
Hardback
Book cover image
This collection of essays profiles a diverse array of North Carolinians, all of whom had a hand in the founding of the state and the United States of America. It includes stories of how men who stood together to fight the British soon chose opposing sides in political debates over ...
North Carolina's Revolutionary Founders
This collection of essays profiles a diverse array of North Carolinians, all of whom had a hand in the founding of the state and the United States of America. It includes stories of how men who stood together to fight the British soon chose opposing sides in political debates over the ratification of the supreme law of the land, the Constitution. It also includes accounts of women, freedmen, and Native Americans, whose narratives shed light on the important roles of marginalized peoples in the Revolutionary South. Together, the essays reveal the philosophical views and ideology of North Carolina's revolutionaries. Contributors: Jeff Broadwater, Jennifer Davis-Davis, Lloyd Johnson, Benjamin R. Justesen, Troy L. Kickler, Scott King-Owen, James MacDonald, Maggie Hartley Mitchell, Karl Rodabaugh, Kyle Scott, Jason Stroud, Michael Toomey, and Willis P. Whichard.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781469651200.jpg
31.450000 USD

North Carolina's Revolutionary Founders

Paperback / softback
Page 1 of 40