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Shortlisted for the Maritime Foundation's Mountbatten Award 2018 This book, by a leading expert in the field, is the first major history of yachting for over a quarter of a century. Setting developments within political, social and economic changes, the book tells the story of yachting from Elizabethan times to ...
A New History of Yachting
Shortlisted for the Maritime Foundation's Mountbatten Award 2018 This book, by a leading expert in the field, is the first major history of yachting for over a quarter of a century. Setting developments within political, social and economic changes, the book tells the story of yachting from Elizabethan times to the present day: the first uses of yachts, by monarchs, especially Charles II; yacht clubs and yacht racing in the eighteenth century; the early years of the Royal Yacht Squadron at Cowes and an analysis of the America Cup challenges; the pioneering developments in Ireland and the exporting of yachting to the colonies and trading outposts of the Empire; the expansion of yachting in Victorian times; the Golden Age of Yachting in the years before the First World War, when it was the sport of the crowned heads of Europe; the invention of the dinghy and the keelboat classes and, after the Second World War, the massive numbers of home-built dinghies; the breaking of new boundaries by risk-taking single-handers from the mid-1960s; the expansion of leisure sailing that came in the 1980s with the use of moulded plastic yachts; and current trends and pressures within the sport. Well-referenced yet highly readable, this book will be of interest both to the scholar and the sailing enthusiast. MIKE BENDER is an experienced yachtsman and qualified Ocean Yachtmaster, with some forty thousand miles, mostly singlehanded, under the keel. He is an Honorary Research Fellow in History at the University of Exeter.
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51.19 USD

A New History of Yachting

by Mike Bender
Hardback
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2017 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title A terrific piece of work . JANE HUMPHRIES, Professor of Economic History and Fellow of All Souls College, University of Oxford Widows are often viewed as being marginalised in society, struggling to make a living and in need of financial and other support. However, as ...
Widows in European Economy and Society, 1600-1920
2017 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title A terrific piece of work . JANE HUMPHRIES, Professor of Economic History and Fellow of All Souls College, University of Oxford Widows are often viewed as being marginalised in society, struggling to make a living and in need of financial and other support. However, as this extensively researched and wide-ranging book reveals, widows did, in fact, engage very effectively in economic activity, often being in charge of families, households and commercial enterprises. The book outlines how extensive widowhood was; examines the provisions made for the support of widows, including in the form of marriage contracts, dowries and charitable assistance; and provides numerous examples of widows being economically active, paying their way and involving themselves energetically in society - one notable example being Barbe-Nicole Clicquot, who established a very successful company producing La Veuve Clicquot champagne. Using statistical analysis and individual case studies, the book contrasts the situation in different parts of Europe, and between rural and urban areas, and shows how provision for widows both in law and in practice evolved over time. Overall, it contributes a great deal to women's history, helping to correct the image that women were victims of male society, and to family history, showing that exceptions to the ideal nuclear family were very common. BEATRICE MORING is Associate Professor in the Department of Political and Economic Studies at the University of Helsinki. RICHARD WALL was a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of History at the University of Essex.
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126.000000 USD

Widows in European Economy and Society, 1600-1920

by Richard Wall, Beatrice Moring
Hardback
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Christopher Brooke's account of the history of Gonville and Caius, founded in 1348, describes the workings and development of the institution, the home of men such as William Lyndwood, Jeremy Taylor, Charles Sherrington and seven other Nobel laureates -and of Titus Oates. For the more recent centuries, his rapidly moving ...
A History of Gonville and Caius College
Christopher Brooke's account of the history of Gonville and Caius, founded in 1348, describes the workings and development of the institution, the home of men such as William Lyndwood, Jeremy Taylor, Charles Sherrington and seven other Nobel laureates -and of Titus Oates. For the more recent centuries, his rapidly moving narrative provides sketches and anecdotes of its central characters set in the wider context of the history of education, religion, learning and research. The Epilogue to this new edition describes the major events in the history of the College in the late twentieth century. Reissue; first published in 1985. CHRISTOPHER BROOKE, Fellow of Gonville and Caius, is Dixie Professor of Ecclesiastical history, University of Cambridge.
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103.950000 USD

A History of Gonville and Caius College

by Christopher Brooke
Hardback
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Until recently almost all histories of historiography have focused on national developments or at best introduced a comparative note from a limited Western perspective. Only in the last few years have there been serious attempts to transcend these borders. The present volume examines turning points in historical thought in a ...
Turning Points in Historiography: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
Until recently almost all histories of historiography have focused on national developments or at best introduced a comparative note from a limited Western perspective. Only in the last few years have there been serious attempts to transcend these borders. The present volume examines turning points in historical thought in a variety of cultures. The essays in the first half of the book deal with fundamental reorientations in historical thinking in the pre-modern period since Antiquity, specifically in ancient Greece and China and in medieval Christian Europe, the Islamic world and again China. The essays all proceed from the premise that historical thought in none of these cultures was static but underwent profound changes over time. The essays in the second part deal with historical writing beginning with the professionalization of history in the nineteenth century. National history researched and composed around a master narrative constituted a major turning point in this period. Although the new paradigm emerged in the West, it was broadly accepted by historians throughout the world.in the twentieth century. Individual chapters deal with conceptions of scientific history in the West, a comparison of national histories in Japan, France, and the United States, and the invention of Chinese, African and Indian national histories; finally the critiques of the modern paradigm in postmodernist and postcolonial theory and a consideration of the shortcomings of these critiques. Georg Iggers is Professor Emeritus of History at the State University of New York at Buffalo; Q. Edward Wang is Associate Professor of History at Rowan University.
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47.250000 USD

Turning Points in Historiography: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

Paperback / softback
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The great majority of today's wars take place within rather than between states and are often explained and justified by participants as the result of deep and ineradicable differences between 'them' and 'us'. The contributors to this book, whose disciplinary backgrounds include history, political science, international relations and anthropology, explore ...
War and Ethnicity: Global Connections and Local Violence
The great majority of today's wars take place within rather than between states and are often explained and justified by participants as the result of deep and ineradicable differences between 'them' and 'us'. The contributors to this book, whose disciplinary backgrounds include history, political science, international relations and anthropology, explore the growing importance of such 'ethnic' differences in a world that is also becoming more unified, politically, economically and culturally. They discuss the causes of internal war, the techniques used by nationalist politicians and intellectuals to turn ethnicity into a powerful political resource, the response of the UN and of non-governmental agencies to such 'complex' political emergencies as those in former Yugoslavia and Somalia and the constitutional strategies that can be used to acknowledge and accommodate ethnic diversity. Taken together, the papers demonstrate that the relationship between ethnicity and war is not a simple matter of cause and effect. Ethnic differences are not given in nature, ethnicity does not arise suddenly andspontaneously but only in specific historical circumstances and it is unlikely to become a lethal force in human affairs except through the deliberate calculation of political elites.DAVID TURTON is Director of the Refugee Studies Programme, University of Oxford. CONTRIBUTORS: TOM GALLAGHER, STEFAN TROEBST, THOMAS ZITELMANN, KLAUS JUERGEN GANTZEL, JAKOB ROESEL, HARRY GOULBOURNE, IOAN LEWIS, MARK DUFFIELD.
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47.250000 USD

War and Ethnicity: Global Connections and Local Violence

Paperback / softback
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In the last third of the nineteenth century, the language of patriotism and national identity was appropriated by the political right. However, the British left did not give up ideas about patriotism and national identity after the emergence of socialism in the 1880s, which was rather presented as a restoration ...
Red Flag and Union Jack: Englishness, Patriotism and the British Left, 1881-1924
In the last third of the nineteenth century, the language of patriotism and national identity was appropriated by the political right. However, the British left did not give up ideas about patriotism and national identity after the emergence of socialism in the 1880s, which was rather presented as a restoration of an English past lost to industrial capitalism. This book traces the complex relationship between the British left and national identity in socialism's formative years, showing how some socialists used ideas of Englishness to legitimate their own form of socialism and to repudiate others, such as anarchism, syndicalism and Marxism, as 'foreign'. This Whiggish view of history was essentially English, yet many who held it were Scottish, Welsh and Irish, and they played a full role in creating a 'British socialism'. The First World War dealt a severe blow to radical patriotism. Pro-war sections of the labour movement were brought into the state, reinforcing their belief in parliamentarism and a consensual patriotism. The anti-war left continued to use radical patriotic language in the early years of the war, for example against the 'foreign yoke' of conscription, but the war degraded patriotism generally and the Russian Revolution gave internationalism a new focus. It also threatened the dominant concept of British socialism, and the post-war years saw a bitter debate over the forms of socialism. Moderate Labour, convinced that office could only be achieved on terms set by the British constitution, sought to prove their fitness to govern, and concentrated on the 'national interest' rather than oppositional Englishness. The left of the labour movement looked to soviet Russia rather than the English past for models for a future socialist society. The hold of radical patriotism on the British left was broken, but that of patriotism was not. It would take another world war to re-unite the two.PAUL WARD is lecturer in Modern British History at Royal Holloway College, University of London, and Visiting Lecturer at the University of Westminster.
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94.500000 USD

Red Flag and Union Jack: Englishness, Patriotism and the British Left, 1881-1924

by Paul Ward
Hardback
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Fruitfully combining approaches from economic history and the cultural history of commerce, this book examines the role of interpersonal trust in underpinning trade, amid the challenges and uncertainties of the eighteenth-century Atlantic. It focuses on the nature of mercantile activity in two parts of Spain: Cadiz in the south, and ...
Trade and Trust in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World: Spanish Merchants and their Overseas Networks
Fruitfully combining approaches from economic history and the cultural history of commerce, this book examines the role of interpersonal trust in underpinning trade, amid the challenges and uncertainties of the eighteenth-century Atlantic. It focuses on the nature of mercantile activity in two parts of Spain: Cadiz in the south, and its trade with Spain's American empire; and Bilbao in the north, and its trade with western and northern Europe. In particular, it explores the processes of trade, trading networks and communications, seeking to understand merchant behaviour, especially the choices made by individuals when conducting business - and specifically with whom they chose to deal. Drawing from a broad range of Spanish, Peruvian and British archival sources, the book reveals merchants' experiences of trusting their agents and correspondents, and shows how different factors, from distance to legal frameworks and ethnicity, affected their ability to rely on their contacts. Xabier Lamikiz is Associate Professor of Economic History at the University of the Basque Country. .
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94.500000 USD

Trade and Trust in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World: Spanish Merchants and their Overseas Networks

by Xabier Lamikiz
Hardback
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This book examines the development of British commercial, financial and political relations with India and the Far East during the final period of the East India Company's reign as the sovereign power in India. This was a most turbulent period for British commerce with India. The period began with the ...
The Twilight of the East India Company: The Evolution of Anglo-Asian Commerce and Politics, 1790-1860
This book examines the development of British commercial, financial and political relations with India and the Far East during the final period of the East India Company's reign as the sovereign power in India. This was a most turbulent period for British commerce with India. The period began with the renewal of the East India Company's Charter and its component monopolies of trade with India and China, but this was quickly followed by the outbreak of the Napoleonic Wars, which spread to the east and saw the completion of Britain's assertion of power over India and much of Southeast Asia. However, the war also strengthened those political forces in Britain campaigning against the Company's monopolies of trade with India and China, which were consequently abolished under the Charter Acts of 1813 and 1833. The spectacular growth of the British economy following industrialisation brought new forces to bear upon India, with the rise of manufactured exports to the east. But the course of commercial relations did not run smoothly, and economic crises in Britain and India in 1833 and 1848 swept away commercial firms in both countries, and caused severe economic retrenchments. This instability severely hampered efforts to facilitate the export of capital to India during the first half of the century. Finally the rebellion of 1857 spelt the death knell for the Company, and ushered in a new phase of Anglo-Indian economic relations, in which British foreign investment grew substantially. Anthony Webster is Head of the History Department at Liverpool John Moores University.
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94.500000 USD

The Twilight of the East India Company: The Evolution of Anglo-Asian Commerce and Politics, 1790-1860

by Anthony Webster
Hardback
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'I have at last reached the desired haven', exclaimed Belfast-born Bessie Macready in 1878, the year of her arrival at Lyttelton, when writing home to cousins in County Down. There was a huge amount of worldwide European migration between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, a phenomenon which this book examines. ...
Irish Migrants in New Zealand, 1840-1937: 'The Desired Haven'
'I have at last reached the desired haven', exclaimed Belfast-born Bessie Macready in 1878, the year of her arrival at Lyttelton, when writing home to cousins in County Down. There was a huge amount of worldwide European migration between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, a phenomenon which this book examines. Making close use of personal correspondence exchanged between Ireland and New Zealand, the author addresses a number of central questions in migration history, including the circumstances of departure; why some connections chose to stay; how migrant letter writers depicted their voyage out, the environment, work, family and neighbours, politics, and faith; and the prevalence of return and repeat migration. Throughout, the book gives significant attention to the social networks constraining and enabling migrants. It also considers broader debates in the history of European migration, relating to the use of personal testimony to chart the experiences of emigrants and the uncertain processes of adaptation, incorporation, and adjustment that migrants underwent in new and sometimes unfamiliar environments.
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103.950000 USD

Irish Migrants in New Zealand, 1840-1937: 'The Desired Haven'

by Angela McCarthy
Hardback
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The political, social and economic changes which overtook England in the early seventeenth century were both powerful and dramatic, forcing Parliament to adapt from a medieval institution into one with authority over all facets of society. Dynastic change, union with Scotland, fiscal reform, civil war, revolution and Restoration required Parliament ...
Parliament at Work: Parliamentary Committees, Political Power and Public Access in Early Modern England
The political, social and economic changes which overtook England in the early seventeenth century were both powerful and dramatic, forcing Parliament to adapt from a medieval institution into one with authority over all facets of society. Dynastic change, union with Scotland, fiscal reform, civil war, revolution and Restoration required Parliament not only to be at work, but also to discover how to work. These studies focus on change and development in three areas: firstly, the institution of Parliament itself, exploring its growing institutional sophistication and the problems connected with attendance, workload and physical environment; secondly, on Parliament's role within the institutional set-up of the constitution, and the structure and relationships of power within the governance of the country; and thirdly, on the public perception of Parliament, and the practicalities of the relationship between Parliament and the wider world. Contributors: JOHN ADAMSON, ROBERT ARMSTRONG, DAVID DEAN, MICHAEL GRAVES, PAUL M. HUNNYBALL, SEAN KELSEY, CHRISTOPHER KYLE, JASON PEACEY, PAUL SEAWARD.
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89.78 USD
Hardback
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Revolutionary France gave the modern world the concept of the 'nation-in-arms', a potent combination of nationalism, militarism and republicanism embodied in the figure of the conscript. But it was not a concept shared by those most affected by conscription, the peasantry, who regarded the soldier as representative of an entirely ...
Soldier and Peasant in French Popular Culture, 1766-1870
Revolutionary France gave the modern world the concept of the 'nation-in-arms', a potent combination of nationalism, militarism and republicanism embodied in the figure of the conscript. But it was not a concept shared by those most affected by conscription, the peasantry, who regarded the soldier as representative of an entirely different way of life. Concentrating on the militarised borderlands of eastern France, this book examines the disjuncture between the patriotic expectations of elites and the sentiments expressed in popular songs, folktales and imagery. Hopkin follows the soldier through his life-cycle to show how the peasant recruit was separated from his previous life and re-educated in military mores; and he demonstrates how the state-sponsored rituals of conscription and the popular imagery aimed at adolescent males portrayed the army as a place where young men could indulge in adventure far from parental and communal restraints. The popular idea of moustachioed military folk-heroes contributed more to the process of turning 'peasants into Frenchmen' than the mythology of the 'nation-in-arms'. WINNER OF THE 2002 RHS GLADSTONE PRIZE.D AVID HOPKIN received his Ph D from Cambridge University in 1997. He is tutor and fellow in history at Hertford College, Oxford University.
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94.500000 USD

Soldier and Peasant in French Popular Culture, 1766-1870

by David M. Hopkin
Hardback
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Dr William Stukeley (1687-1765) was the most renowned English antiquary of the eighteenth century. This study discusses his life and achievements, placing him firmly within his intellectual milieu, which he shared with his illustrious friend Isaac Newton and with other natural philosophers, theologians and historians. Stukeley's greatest memorial was his ...
William Stukeley: Science, Religion and Archaeology in Eighteenth-Century England
Dr William Stukeley (1687-1765) was the most renowned English antiquary of the eighteenth century. This study discusses his life and achievements, placing him firmly within his intellectual milieu, which he shared with his illustrious friend Isaac Newton and with other natural philosophers, theologians and historians. Stukeley's greatest memorial was his work on the stone circles of Stonehenge and Avebury: at a time when most historians believed they were Roman or medieval monuments, he proved that they were of much greater antiquity, and his influence on subsequent interpretations of these monuments and their builders was enormous. For Stukeley, these stone circles - the work of Celtic Druids , were a link in the chain that connected the pristine religion of Adam and Noah with the modern Anglican Church. Historians today belittle such speculations, but Stukeley shared his vision of lost religious and scientific knowledge with many of the great minds of his day; this account shows how throughout his distinguished career his antiquarian researches fortified his response to Enlightenment irreligion and the threat he believed it posed to science and society. DAVID BOYD HAYCOCK is a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford.
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103.950000 USD

William Stukeley: Science, Religion and Archaeology in Eighteenth-Century England

by David Boyd Haycock
Hardback
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Covering the hilly north-west part of the county from the Cheshire border to the valley of the river Trent south of Newcastle-under-Lyme, this volume treats parishes that lie mostly on the North Staffordshire coalfield and where both coal and ironstone mining and iron-making became important, especially in the nineteenth century. ...
A History of the County of Staffordshire: XI: Audley, Keele and Trentham
Covering the hilly north-west part of the county from the Cheshire border to the valley of the river Trent south of Newcastle-under-Lyme, this volume treats parishes that lie mostly on the North Staffordshire coalfield and where both coal and ironstone mining and iron-making became important, especially in the nineteenth century. A rich archive has been used to illustrate the origins of this industrial activity in the Middle Ages, when the area was characterised by scattered settlements, with an important manorial complex and a grand fourteenth-century church at Audley, a hunting lodge for the Stafford lords at Madeley, a small borough at Betley, and at Keele and Trentham religious houses which became landed estates with mansion houses after the Dissolution. In the nineteenth century Trentham gained fame for its spectacular gardens created by the immensely rich dukes of Sutherland, and Keele rose to prominence in 1950 as the site of Britain's first campus university. After coalmining ceased in the twentieth century several villages and mining hamlets acquired large housing estates, which in Trentham parish were absorbed into Stoke-on-Trent. Nigel Tringham is a Senior Lecturer in History at Keele University, with special responsibility for researching and writing the volumes of the Staffordshire Victoria County History.
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162.10 USD

A History of the County of Staffordshire: XI: Audley, Keele and Trentham

Hardback
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The early voyages into the deep waters of the Atlantic rank among the greatest feats of exploration. In tiny, fragile vessels the Irish monks searched for desolate places in the ocean in which to pursue their vocation; their successors, the Vikings, with their superb ship-building skills, created fast, sea-worthy craft ...
The Conquest of the North Atlantic
The early voyages into the deep waters of the Atlantic rank among the greatest feats of exploration. In tiny, fragile vessels the Irish monks searched for desolate places in the ocean in which to pursue their vocation; their successors, the Vikings, with their superb ship-building skills, created fast, sea-worthy craft which took them far out into the unknown, until they finally reached Greenland and America. G.J. Marcus looks at the history of these expeditions not only as a historian, but also as a practical sailor. Besides the problem of what these early explorers actually achieved, he poses the even more fascinating question of how they did it, without compass, quadrant, or astrolabe. From the opening descriptions of the launching of a curach on the Aran Islands, through the great pages of the Norse Sagas describing the first recorded sighting of America, the author brilliantly conveys the excitement and danger of the conquest of the North Atlantic in a narrative that is based equally on scholarly research and sound seamanship. G.J. MARCUS's previous books include The Maiden Voyage, on the sinking of the Titanic.
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26.200000 USD

The Conquest of the North Atlantic

by G.J. Marcus
Paperback / softback
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This book examines the effects of medical publishing on the momentous theoretical and jurisdictional controversies in health care in early modern England. The simultaneous collapse of medical orthodoxy and the control of medicine in London by the Royal College of Physicians occurred when reform-minded doctors who were trained on the ...
Publishing and Medicine in Early Modern England
This book examines the effects of medical publishing on the momentous theoretical and jurisdictional controversies in health care in early modern England. The simultaneous collapse of medical orthodoxy and the control of medicine in London by the Royal College of Physicians occurred when reform-minded doctors who were trained on the continent, in tandem with surgeons and apothecaries, successfully challenged the professional monopoly held by Oxbridge-educated elites. This work investigates the book trade, the role it played in medicine, and the impact of the debate itself on the public sphere. Chapters analyze the politics and religious preferences of printers and sellers, gender as a factor in medical publishing, and the location of London bookshops, for clues to the business of well-being. Advertisements for remedies and therapeutic skills, the subject of another essay, became commonplace in 17th-century England; moreover, publishers and bookshop owners sometimes held the rights to proprietary medicines, undercutting licensed doctors. The final chapter surveys a variety of medical illustrations and their influence on the relationship between patient and physician. An epilogue considers the English medical scene and the world of print after the famous Rose decision of 1702, when the House of Lords gave apothecaries the legal right to practice medicine, ratifying the reality of a changed marketplace. Elizabeth Lane Furdell is Professor of History at the University of North Florida, and author of The Royal Doctors, 1485-1714 .
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94.500000 USD

Publishing and Medicine in Early Modern England

by Elizabeth Lane Furdell
Hardback
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This book is a detailed study of a village community during the first half of the sixteenth century, concentrating particularly on the little-researched relationship between the villagers and their resident landlord. Using contemporary records it looks at all aspects of the lives of the people living in the village and ...
Lordship and Community: The Lestrange Family and the Village of Hunstanton, Norfolk, in the First Half of the Sixteenth Century
This book is a detailed study of a village community during the first half of the sixteenth century, concentrating particularly on the little-researched relationship between the villagers and their resident landlord. Using contemporary records it looks at all aspects of the lives of the people living in the village and attempts to recreate the framework in which they lived and operated and which shaped their physical and emotional existence. Respectively both the gentry and the ordinary people of the early modern period have frequently been subjects of historical research: Dr Oestmann uses many of the techniques and ideas developed by these studies to analyse the interaction of these groups -here the Lestrange family with the inhabitants of Hunstanton. He discusses what drove the relationship and how the presence of the Lestrange family affected the village community. CORD OESTMANN studied at the Centre of East Anglian Studies, Norwich (M.A.), and Gottingen University (Ph.D).
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94.500000 USD

Lordship and Community: The Lestrange Family and the Village of Hunstanton, Norfolk, in the First Half of the Sixteenth Century

by Cord Oestmann
Hardback
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This book offers important new insights into the relationship between crime and gender in Scotland during the Enlightenment period. Against the backdrop of significant legislative changes that fundamentally altered the face of Scots law, Anne-Marie Kilday examines contemporary attitudes towards serious offences against the person committed by women. She draws ...
Women and Violent Crime in Enlightenment Scotland
This book offers important new insights into the relationship between crime and gender in Scotland during the Enlightenment period. Against the backdrop of significant legislative changes that fundamentally altered the face of Scots law, Anne-Marie Kilday examines contemporary attitudes towards serious offences against the person committed by women. She draws particularly on rich and varied court records to explores female criminality and judicial responses to it in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.Through a series of case studies of homicide, infanticide, assault, popular disturbances and robbery, she argues that Scottish women were more predisposed to violence than their counterparts south of the border and considers how this relates to the contemporary drive to `civilise' popular behaviour and to promote a more ordered society. The book thus challenges conventional feminist interpretations that see women principally as the victims of male-controlled economies, institutions and power structures, and calls for a major re-evaluation of the scope and significance of female criminality in this era. It will be of interest to scholars, students and those interested in the fields of gender studies, social history and the history of crime. ANNE-MARIE KILDAY is Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor of Criminal History at Oxford Brookes University.
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27.250000 USD

Women and Violent Crime in Enlightenment Scotland

by Anne-Marie Kilday
Paperback / softback
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A very important analysis of British naval victualling, with wide implications for economic as well as naval history. N.A.M. RODGER, All Souls College, Oxford This book, by a leading French maritime historian, discusses how Britain's success in the Seven Years War (1756-63) was made possible by the creation of a ...
The British Navy, Economy and Society in the Seven Years War
A very important analysis of British naval victualling, with wide implications for economic as well as naval history. N.A.M. RODGER, All Souls College, Oxford This book, by a leading French maritime historian, discusses how Britain's success in the Seven Years War (1756-63) was made possible by the creation of a superb victualling system for the British navy. It shows how this system had been developed over the preceding centuries, how it balanced carefully the advantages of state control with the flexibility of commercial contracting, and how the system was designed to mesh with and support British strategic ambitions. It provides rich detail on how the system worked, how it was administered, how key products were priced, bought, stored and transported, and how it compared, very favourably, to equivalent systems in France and elsewhere. The book shows how the increasing efficiency of the Victualling Board enabled the navy to take advantage of agricultural, commercial and financial advances in the British economy to supply its front line fighting forces over ever longer distances and ever longer periods. The Victualling Board was one of a number of interfaces between the demands of the State and the supply facilities of the economy, to their mutual benefit. As a major purchaser through competitive tender, the Board made a positive contribution to the entrepreneurial spirit of British society. The book goes beyond maritime history by discussing how naval supply provided a huge stimulus for British finance, agriculture, trade and manufacturing, and argues that all this together was one of the principal causes of Britain's later Industrial Revolution. CHRISTIAN BUCHET is Professor of Modern History and Director of the Centre d'Etudes de la Mer at the Institut Catholique de Paris. Besides comparative studies of the British and French navies 1688-1783, he has written extensively on maritime environmental issues and is Secretary General of the National Council of the French Archipelago.
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120.750000 USD
Hardback
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`Individually excellent and scholarly essays... most illuminating and thought-provoking. A conspicuous feature of the collection is the heterogeneity of the scientific topics discussed.' ENGLISH HISTORICAL REVIEW `Essential reading for all students of Hooke and of the context of Restoration science.' Stephen Pumfrey BRITISH JNL FOR HISTORY OF SCIENCERobert Hooke (1635 ...
Robert Hooke: New Studies
`Individually excellent and scholarly essays... most illuminating and thought-provoking. A conspicuous feature of the collection is the heterogeneity of the scientific topics discussed.' ENGLISH HISTORICAL REVIEW `Essential reading for all students of Hooke and of the context of Restoration science.' Stephen Pumfrey BRITISH JNL FOR HISTORY OF SCIENCERobert Hooke (1635 1703) is best known for his Micrographia, which combined an exposition of the findings of the microscopewith speculations on a variety of scientific topics. He also made major contributions to an astonishing range of subjects, from pneumatics to geology. Equally important was his ingenuity and skill in inventing and refining scientific instruments, clocks and other technological devices.
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103.950000 USD

Robert Hooke: New Studies

Hardback
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The reconstitution of the royal court in 1660 brought with it the restoration of fears that had been associated with earlier Stuart courts: disorder, sexual liberty, popery and arbitrary government. This book - the first full examination of its subject - illustrates the ways in which court culture was informed ...
Culture and Politics at the Court of Charles II, 1660-1685
The reconstitution of the royal court in 1660 brought with it the restoration of fears that had been associated with earlier Stuart courts: disorder, sexual liberty, popery and arbitrary government. This book - the first full examination of its subject - illustrates the ways in which court culture was informed by the heady politics of Britain between 1660 and 1685. In political theory and practice the decades that preceded and included Charles II's reign witnessed profound interrogation of British kingship. Individuals at the heart of royal government - court preachers, poets, playwrights, courtesans, diplomats, and politicians - were assertive participants in this scrutiny. This book looks beyond the prurient interest in the sexual antics of Restoration courtiers that has characterised previous works. It engages in a genuine and sophisticated attempt to show how the complex dynamics of Charles II's court culture ran beneath the surface of show and ceremony. Ultimately it shows that the attempts to stabilise and strengthen the Stuart monarchy after the Restoration of Charles II were undercut by the cultural materials emanating from the royal court itself. MATTHEW JENKINSON completed his PhD at Merton College, Oxford.
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103.950000 USD

Culture and Politics at the Court of Charles II, 1660-1685

by Matthew Jenkinson
Hardback
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From the 1820s the Essex seaside towns of Walton, and later Clacton and Frinton, were promoted as high-class residential and holiday resorts. After a slow start, hampered by poor communications and low demand, growth was stimulated by steam-ship companies which landed visitors on newly built piers in Walton and Clacton ...
A History of the County of Essex: XI: Clacton, Walton and Frinton: North-East Essex Seaside Resorts
From the 1820s the Essex seaside towns of Walton, and later Clacton and Frinton, were promoted as high-class residential and holiday resorts. After a slow start, hampered by poor communications and low demand, growth was stimulated by steam-ship companies which landed visitors on newly built piers in Walton and Clacton and by the railways that reached Walton in 1867, Clacton in 1882 and Frinton in 1888. The contemporary emphasis upon the health advantages of the seaside also led to the establishment of many convalescent homes. However, working-class excursionists newly attracted to Clacton, and to a lesser extent Walton, then irrevocably changed the social tone of the resorts. By the 1920s and 1930s Clacton was a commercialized holiday destination and the funfair-style facilities of its pier rivalled those of any other resort. Nearby Jaywick was established as a cheap and cheerful chalet development. While Walton remained popular with families, Frinton continued as a select resort, with building development and commerce strictly controlled. The town remains famous for its wide unspoilt greensward facing the sea and its resistance to any threats to its exclusive character. Camping, caravanning and holiday camps replaced the traditional seaside holiday after 1945, but from the later 1960s the increase in overseas holidays led to a steep decline of the seaside resorts. The economy has, however, since diversified with large dormitory-style housing developments, light industry and new shopping centres, and the coast becoming increasingly popular for retirement homes. This volume presents an authoritative account of the growth and development of these towns on the so-called Sunshine Coast .
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162.10 USD

A History of the County of Essex: XI: Clacton, Walton and Frinton: North-East Essex Seaside Resorts

Hardback
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In the late nineteenth century Britain was one of the most urbanised societies in the world, yet land reform remained an important element in its politics. This book explores this paradox through an examination of the Liberal Party's increasing interest in the English dimension of the land question. Most historians ...
Lloyd George, Liberalism and the Land: The Land Issue and Party Politics in England, 1906-1914
In the late nineteenth century Britain was one of the most urbanised societies in the world, yet land reform remained an important element in its politics. This book explores this paradox through an examination of the Liberal Party's increasing interest in the English dimension of the land question. Most historians have dismissed this phenomenon as a product of romantic views about the English countryside and Liberalism's failure to engage with the problems of urban society. In contrast, the author argues that English land reform was important to Liberals because it both expressed their deeply-held hostility to landowners and functioned as a variety of strategies to win electoral support and deal with pressing political issues. Moreover, while Liberals did not always benefit from their association with the land question, it became a matter of crucial significance in 1909-14, when Lloyd George unlocked its potential as an election-winning asset and used it to form a bridge between traditional radicalism and the New Liberalism.Dr IAN PACKER teaches in the School of Modern History at the Queen's University, Belfast.
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94.500000 USD

Lloyd George, Liberalism and the Land: The Land Issue and Party Politics in England, 1906-1914

by Ian Packer
Hardback
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The then Labour government's efforts to promote East-West detente and to improve Anglo-Soviet relations from 1964 to 1970 have been largely overlooked; yet they were of huge significance. This book offers a major reappraisal. It challenges the caricature of Harold Wilson's rigid subservience to America, demonstrating that as a Prime ...
Harold Wilson's Cold War: The Labour Government and East-West Politics, 1964-1970
The then Labour government's efforts to promote East-West detente and to improve Anglo-Soviet relations from 1964 to 1970 have been largely overlooked; yet they were of huge significance. This book offers a major reappraisal. It challenges the caricature of Harold Wilson's rigid subservience to America, demonstrating that as a Prime Minister he intended to develop closer contacts with the Soviet leadership, and to foster co-operation on arms control, conflict resolution in Vietnam and East-West trade. It illustrates how the Labour government reconciled its policy towards the USSR and Warsaw Pact states with its alignment with the USA and NATO membership. And it concludes that Wilson's failure to improve relations between the UK and USSR was due to both the impact of crises in Vietnam, the Middle East and Czechoslovakia, and to the unwillingness of the Soviet government to alter its fundamentally adversarial attitude to the West. GERAINT HUGHES teaches at the Joint Services Command and Staff College at Shrivenham.
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27.250000 USD

Harold Wilson's Cold War: The Labour Government and East-West Politics, 1964-1970

by Geraint Hughes
Paperback / softback
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England's first Protestant foreign policy venture took place under Henry VIII, who in the wake of the break with Rome pursued diplomatic contacts with the League of Schmalkalden, the German Protestant alliance. This venture was supported by evangelically-inclined counsellors such as Thomas Cromwell and Thomas Cranmer, while religiously conservative figures ...
Henry VIII, the League of Schmalkalden, and the English Reformation
England's first Protestant foreign policy venture took place under Henry VIII, who in the wake of the break with Rome pursued diplomatic contacts with the League of Schmalkalden, the German Protestant alliance. This venture was supported by evangelically-inclined counsellors such as Thomas Cromwell and Thomas Cranmer, while religiously conservative figures such as Cuthbert Tunstall, John Stokesley and Stephen Gardiner sought to limit such contacts. The king's own involvement reflected these opposed reactions: he was interested in the Germans as alliance partners and as a consultative source in establishing the theology of his own Church, but at the same time he was reluctant to accept all the religious innovations proposed by the Germans and their English advocates. This study breaks new ground in presenting religious ideology, rather than secular diplomacy, as the motivation behind Anglo-Schmalkaldic negotiations. Relations between England and the League exerted a considerable influence on the development of the king's theology in the second half of the reign, and hence affected the redirection of religious policy in 1538, the passing of the Act of Six Articles, the marriage of Henry to Anne of Cleves and the fall of Thomas Cromwell. The examination of the development of Henry's religious thinking is set in the wider context of the foreign policy imperatives of the German Protestants, the ministerial priorities of Thomas Cromwell and factional politics at the court of Henry VIII. RORY McENTEGART is Academic Director of American College Dublin.
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94.500000 USD

Henry VIII, the League of Schmalkalden, and the English Reformation

by Rory McEntegart
Hardback
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The militia in eighteenth century Ireland was a contentious issue: initially only those of a certain social and political class could participate, dissenters and catholics being excluded, and the degree of enthusiasm with which people participated was an indication of their commitment, or otherwise, to the regime. However, as this ...
The Militia in Eighteenth-Century Ireland: In Defence of the Protestant Interest
The militia in eighteenth century Ireland was a contentious issue: initially only those of a certain social and political class could participate, dissenters and catholics being excluded, and the degree of enthusiasm with which people participated was an indication of their commitment, or otherwise, to the regime. However, as this book demonstrates, the militia as an issue changed over the course of the eighteenth century, with, from about 1760, demands for the reform of the militia being a key issue spearheading demands for wider constitutional reform. The book traces the militia in Ireland from early Protestant militia forces in the sixteenth century, through formal establishment in 1716, to demise in 1776 and re-formation in 1793. It shows how the militia played a larger role in the defence of Ireland than has hitherto been realised, and how its reliability was therefore a key point for government. It discusses how political debates about the militia reflected changing views about the nature of the Irish establishment and how these changing views were incorporated in legislation. It examines how the militia operated as an institution; considers how the militia reflected social and political divisions; and compares the militia in Ireland with similar bodies in England, Scotland and Europe more widely, relating debates about the militia in Ireland to wider debates about whether a country is best defended by a professional soldiery or a citizen army. NEAL GARNHAM is a Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Ulster and the author of two books and more than twenty articles published in refereed academic journals.
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127.97 USD

The Militia in Eighteenth-Century Ireland: In Defence of the Protestant Interest

by Neal Garnham
Hardback
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The Protectorate is arguably the Cinderella of Interregnum studies: it lacks the immediate drama of the Regicide, the Republic or the Restoration, and is often dismissed as a 'retreat from revolution', a short period of conservative rule before the inevitable return of the Stuarts. The essays in this volume present ...
The Cromwellian Protectorate
The Protectorate is arguably the Cinderella of Interregnum studies: it lacks the immediate drama of the Regicide, the Republic or the Restoration, and is often dismissed as a 'retreat from revolution', a short period of conservative rule before the inevitable return of the Stuarts. The essays in this volume present new research that challenges this view. They argue instead that the Protectorate was dynamic and progressive, even if the policies put forward were not always successful, and often created further tensions within the government and between Whitehall and the localities. Particular topics include studies of Oliver Cromwell and his relationship with Parliament, and the awkward position inherited by his son, Richard; the role of art and architecture in creating a splendid protectoral court; and the important part played by the council, as a law-making body, as a political cockpit, and as part of a hierarchy of government covering not just England but also Ireland and Scotland. There are also investigations of the reactions to Cromwellian rule in Wales, in the towns and cities of the Severn/Avon basin, and in the local communities of England faced with a far-reaching programme of religious reform. PATRICK LITTLE is Senior Research Fellow at the History of Parliament Trust. Contributors: BARRY COWARD, DAVID L. SMITH, JASON PEACEY, PAUL HUNNEYBALL, BLAIR WORDEN, PETER GAUNT, LLOYD BOWEN, STEPHEN K. ROBERTS, CHRISTOPHER DURSTON.
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103.950000 USD

The Cromwellian Protectorate

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The Moravian Church became widely known and respected for its missions to the heathen , achieving a high reputation among the pious and with government. This study looks at its connections with evangelical networks, and its indirect role in the great debate on the slave trade, as well as the ...
The Moravian Church and the Missionary Awakening in England, 1760-1800
The Moravian Church became widely known and respected for its missions to the heathen , achieving a high reputation among the pious and with government. This study looks at its connections with evangelical networks, and its indirect role in the great debate on the slave trade, as well as the operations of Moravian missionaries in the field. The Moravians' decision, in 1764, to expand and publicise their foreign missions (largely to the British colonies) coincided with the development of relations between their British leaders and evangelicals from various denominations, among whom were those who went on to found, in the last decade of the century, the major societies which were the cornerstone of the modern missionary movement. These men were profoundly influenced by the Moravian Church's apparent progress, unique among Protestants, in making real Christians among the heathen overseas, and this led to the adoption of Moravian missionary methods by the new societies. Dr Mason draws on a wide range of primary documents to demonstrate the influences of the Moravian Church on the missionary awakening in England and its contribution to the movement. Dr J.C.S. Mason first became aware of both the International Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) and his La Trobe forebears, who appear in the book, whilst working for his degree as a mature student at Birkbeck College, University of London; he later completed his thesis at King's College London.
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36.700000 USD

The Moravian Church and the Missionary Awakening in England, 1760-1800

by J. C. S. Mason
Paperback / softback
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A well-researched and well-argued monograph contributing significantly to our understanding of juvenile delinquency. CRIME, HISTOIRE ET SOCIETESA fine book... based on a wide range of well-marshalled primary evidence that emphasizes the voice of young offenders - highly readable. AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEWThe early nineteenth century witnessed an increasing concern about the ...
Artful Dodgers: Youth and Crime in Early Nineteenth-Century London
A well-researched and well-argued monograph contributing significantly to our understanding of juvenile delinquency. CRIME, HISTOIRE ET SOCIETESA fine book... based on a wide range of well-marshalled primary evidence that emphasizes the voice of young offenders - highly readable. AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEWThe early nineteenth century witnessed an increasing concern about the incidence of juvenile crime. Youthful delinquency was not new, but it was not until then that the foundations were laid for a juvenile justice system which would serve, with amendments, for the next century and more. Separate trial, separate penal provision, and an emphasis on reform rather than punishment were all enshrined in the new legislation.Heather Shore explores the processes and context of these legislative strategies, in which consideration of juvenile crime in London - with its close streets and alleys and conspicuous juxtaposition of poverty and wealth - played a major part, influencing elite perceptions of offending by children and young people. At the heart of this study is a critical consideration of the lives of young offenders. Dr Shore examines the process of offending, from the initial foray into crime, through apprehension and passage through the judicial system, to punishment and experience of penal and reform measures: prison, houses of correction, transportation and colonial emigration. HEATHER SHORE is Lecturer in Social and Cultural History, University of Portsmouth.
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27.250000 USD

Artful Dodgers: Youth and Crime in Early Nineteenth-Century London

by Heather Shore
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This is the history of one of the great battles of the world, written by a private soldier who was an eye-witness. The siege of Malta was a crucial moment in the long struggle between Islam and Christendom for domination of the Mediterranean, fought out by unequal forces on the ...
The Siege of Malta, 1565: Translated from the Spanish edition of 1568
This is the history of one of the great battles of the world, written by a private soldier who was an eye-witness. The siege of Malta was a crucial moment in the long struggle between Islam and Christendom for domination of the Mediterranean, fought out by unequal forces on the small island which commands the sea-routes at the centre of that sea. The Knights of St John were a survival from the medieval world, the largest of the surviving crusading orders, and they had been driven out of their base on Rhodes in the eastern Mediterranean after a great onslaught by the Turks in 1522. Now, forty-three years later, the Turkish ruler, Suleyman the Magnificent, who had been the victor at Rhodes, was determined to finish them off. He sent out a huge armada, carrying the pick of his army, under two commanders. Against this powerful force, the Knights could only raise a handful of men and mercenaries, and had to depend on the fortifications they had raised in the thirty-five years since they first came to Malta, which bore no comparison to the massive walls and ditches on Rhodes. Francisco Balbi di Correggio was a humble soldier of fortune who enlisted under the charismatic command of the Grand Master of the Order, Jean de la Valette. The extraordinary drama that unfolded after the first appearance of the Turkish fleet in the summer of 1565 is told in his own words, giving equal credit to the courage and leadership of the Knights and the grim determination of the ordinary people of Malta.
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25.58 USD

The Siege of Malta, 1565: Translated from the Spanish edition of 1568

by Ernle Bradford, Francisco Balbi di Correggio
Paperback / softback
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The 1790s saw a lively French Revolution Debate in England, with much space and intellectual energy, in classic texts by men such as Burke and Paine, and ensuing pamphlet literature, devoted characterisations and representations of the aristocracy; yet this is the first full-scale survey of the subject. Dr Goodrich takes ...
Debating England's Aristocracy in the 1790s: Pamphlets, Polemics and Political Ideas
The 1790s saw a lively French Revolution Debate in England, with much space and intellectual energy, in classic texts by men such as Burke and Paine, and ensuing pamphlet literature, devoted characterisations and representations of the aristocracy; yet this is the first full-scale survey of the subject. Dr Goodrich takes a fresh approach to the topic, illustrating the complexities of the bitter battle fought out in such texts between radicals and loyalists, and highlighting the persistent viciousness and vitriol of a radical anti-aristocratic rhetoric. However, she demonstrates that the loyalist response contained the more innovative campaign, bringing out in particular the development of a commercial loyalism which promoted a new model of society with a modern aristocracy and an open elite; what emerges are English defences of aristocracy which are not simply reducible to ideas of an ancien regime or a Gothic institution. Amanda Goodrich is a lecturer in the history department of the Open University.
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36.700000 USD

Debating England's Aristocracy in the 1790s: Pamphlets, Polemics and Political Ideas

by Amanda Goodrich
Paperback / softback
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