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This is an account of the British Expeditionary Force s defensive battle in Flanders during April 1918\. It begins with the planning for Operation Georgette, the second German offensive of the year. The attack on 9 April penetrated up to 6 miles on a 20 mile wide front across the ...
Lys Offensive - April 1918
This is an account of the British Expeditionary Force s defensive battle in Flanders during April 1918\. It begins with the planning for Operation Georgette, the second German offensive of the year. The attack on 9 April penetrated up to 6 miles on a 20 mile wide front across the Lys plain but further attacks resulted in the evacuation of the town of Armenti res. For three weeks First Army and Second Army fought to stem the onslaught as GHQ struggled to find reserves to help them. The situation became so desperate that Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig had to issue his famous backs to the walls order on 11 April. Reinforcements stopped the Germans reaching Hazebrouck rail centre but they could not stop them reaching Bailleul. The French helped stem the tide but the battle climaxed with the loss of the Kemmelberg and the Scherpenberg, the two highest hills in Flandees. Each stage of the battle is given equal treatment, with detailed insights into the most talked about side of the campaign, the British side. Fifty maps chart the day by day progress of each corps on each day. This is an insight into the BEF s experience during this campaign. The men who made a difference are mentioned; those who led the advances, those who stopped the counter-attacks and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross. Discover the Cambrai campaign and learn how the British Army s brave soldiers fought and died fighting to achieve their objectives.
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34.11 USD

Lys Offensive - April 1918

by Andrew Rawson
Hardback
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Many books have looked at the effect of the war on the Home Front, but this is the first book to take a look at civilian life at home photographically from an international perspective: covering both Allied and enemy countries, juxtaposing the same situations in different countries to show a ...
The Great War Illustrated - The Home Front: Final Blows and the Year of Victory
Many books have looked at the effect of the war on the Home Front, but this is the first book to take a look at civilian life at home photographically from an international perspective: covering both Allied and enemy countries, juxtaposing the same situations in different countries to show a similar response. This fifth and final volume chronicles the events of the last year of the war and looks briefly at the beginnings of peace. At the start of the year the civilians on both sides were resigned to another year of pain and further belt-tightening as the shortages grew. Food and materials were in short-supply and the military had first-call on just about everything. People had to learn to make do with what they had. Although the U-boat campaign had been beaten by the introduction of the convoy, rationing needed to be introduced in Britain and France to even out the distribution of essential foods. No one would starve but many went hungry. However, throughout the Central Powers, because of the Allied blockade, the situation was far worse: everything was scarce or difficult to get hold of; some goods were unobtainable except from the Black Market. However, as neither side was prepared to give in, and with no end in sight, civilians just had to get on with their lives as best they could. The book follows the same format as the previous four providing the reader with a brief overview of the events of the year on the Home Front at home and abroad, a detailed timeline and a wealth of photographs, divided into themes: raids, life on the Home front, Christmas, propaganda, casualties and captivity, and home defence. Many of the, over two hundred photos, have not been seen since they were published during the war and some are published here for the first time. The photos are international and give a flavour of what life was like for the civilian during the most turbulent year of the war. This unique series of international photographic books fits in with the author s more textual books on the Home Front: Hull in the Great War, Reading in the Great War volumes 1 and 2, and The Home Front in the Great War.
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25.58 USD

The Great War Illustrated - The Home Front: Final Blows and the Year of Victory

by David Bilton
Paperback
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Admiral Beatty was beyond doubt the best known fighting Admiral, perhaps the best known military leader, of the First World War. His conduct at Heligoland Bight and Dogger Bank, and later at Jutland, caught the public imagination, while his role as Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Fleet in taking into custody ...
Admiral of the Fleet Lord Beatty: The Last Naval Hero - An Intimate Biography
Admiral Beatty was beyond doubt the best known fighting Admiral, perhaps the best known military leader, of the First World War. His conduct at Heligoland Bight and Dogger Bank, and later at Jutland, caught the public imagination, while his role as Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Fleet in taking into custody the German High Sea Fleet in November 1918 associated him with perhaps the most tangible symbol of the collapse of Germany s military might. He is probably remembered by most for his comment at Jutland that there seems to be something wrong with our bloody ships today after two of his battlecruisers were sunk in quick succession. Stephen Roskill s magnificent biography of Beatty explains so well why he has come to be seen as Britain s last naval hero, an admiral in the mould of Nelson who won the unstinting devotion of all those who served with and under him. He came from an Anglo-Irish military family who exhibited the utmost gallantry on the field of battle with a corresponding recklessness in the hunting field, while he himself was extremely handsome and courageous and exuded charisma. His early promise led to fast promotion and he was to become the youngest Admiral since Nelson. But that is only one part of the story and there are aspects of his character that were not entirely admirable. There were, and still remain, questions over his handling of the 1st battlecruiser Squadron at Jutland at which his highly aggressive approach was contrasted with the prudence of his commander, Sir John Jellicoe, and the later animosities between the Jellicoe and Beatty camps reflect poorly on Beatty himself. His turbulent marriage and his extra-marital liaisons were to be suppressed in his official biography but in some ways these aspects are as significant to our understanding of him as Nelson and Emma Hamilton s great affair is to our reading of the Napoleonic era at sea. Roskill deals with all these issues and in doing so brilliantly reassesses Beatty place in history. Access to new material at the time of writing allowed him to write a balanced and wholly credible account of an extraordinary life, and this wonderfully readable and intimate biography will appeal to a whole new generation of readers
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48.63 USD

Admiral of the Fleet Lord Beatty: The Last Naval Hero - An Intimate Biography

by Stephen Wentworth Roskill
Paperback
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The war had dragged on towards its fourth year. There seemed little prospect of any immediate end to the ceaseless slaughter. Field Marshal Haig saw the war as a continual battle of attrition until the Germans were finally battered into submission. In Germany the economic blockade that had been imposed ...
Death of a Division: Eight Days in March 1918 and the Untold Story of the 66th (2/1st East Lancashire) Division
The war had dragged on towards its fourth year. There seemed little prospect of any immediate end to the ceaseless slaughter. Field Marshal Haig saw the war as a continual battle of attrition until the Germans were finally battered into submission. In Germany the economic blockade that had been imposed upon it, enforced by the Royal Navy, was slowly strangling the country. The Kaiser and his generals knew that the longer the war dragged on the greater was the prospect of an Allied victory. At 09.35 hours on Thursday, 21 March 1918, one million German soldiers left their trenches to attack the British Expeditionary Force along a front of nearly fifty miles. It was Germany s last major effort to win the war, and it very nearly succeeded. Facing the onslaught from more than forty German divisions stood just a dozen British divisions. Though overwhelmed and compelled to retreat, the British fought a tenacious rear-guard action which hampered the German attack, allowing other BEF and Allied units to take up new defensive positions. During the retreat three British divisions bore the brunt of the fighting, suffering crippling casualties. One of those was the 66th (East Lancashire) Division which lost more than 7,000 men. Effectively destroyed, the division had to be withdrawn from the line to be rebuilt. The loss of so many men had a devastating effect on the lives and economy of cotton-manufacturing towns of East Lancashire. Illuminated with the dramatic recollections of those Lancashire lads who survived the disaster, _Death of a Division_ is one of the most stirring stories of the First World War.
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34.11 USD

Death of a Division: Eight Days in March 1918 and the Untold Story of the 66th (2/1st East Lancashire) Division

by David Martin
Hardback
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March 1917 is a riveting history of the month that transformed the world's greatest nations as Russia faced revolution and America entered World War I. Drawing on a wealth of contemporary Russian and American diaries, memoirs, oral histories, and newspaper accounts, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Will Englund creates a highly detailed ...
March 1917: On the Brink of War and Revolution
March 1917 is a riveting history of the month that transformed the world's greatest nations as Russia faced revolution and America entered World War I. Drawing on a wealth of contemporary Russian and American diaries, memoirs, oral histories, and newspaper accounts, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Will Englund creates a highly detailed and textured account of America's transformation from an isolationist nation to one that embraced an active role in shaping world affairs while at home Jim Crow still reigned. This fascinating examination considers the dreams of that year's warriors, pacifists, activists, revolutionaries, and reactionaries-from Czar Nicholas II to Woodrow Wilson, from Theodore Roosevelt to the fiery congresswoman Jeannette Rankin-and demonstrates how their successes and failures constitute the origin story of our complex modern world.
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20.950000 USD

March 1917: On the Brink of War and Revolution

by Will Englund
Paperback
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This is an account of the British Expeditionary Force s defensive battle on the Somme in March and April of 1918\. It starts with the huge German offensive along a 60 mile front on 21 March. Third and Fifth Armies then had to make a series of fighting withdrawals in ...
Somme Offensive - March 1918
This is an account of the British Expeditionary Force s defensive battle on the Somme in March and April of 1918\. It starts with the huge German offensive along a 60 mile front on 21 March. Third and Fifth Armies then had to make a series of fighting withdrawals in which some battalions had to fight their way out while others were overrun. Over the days that followed, men were called upon to fight all day against overwhelming numbers and then march all night to escape. After three years in the trenches, men had to battle in the open without tanks and often without artillery support. As communications failed, battalion and company commanders found themselves having to command in what was essentially a desperate infantry struggle. Each stage of the two week battle is given the same treatment, covering details about the most talked about side of the campaign, the British side. It explains how the British soldier time and again stood and fought. Over fifty new maps chart the day by day progress of each corps on each day. Together the narrative and the maps explain the British Army s experience during a fraught battle for survival. The men who made a difference are mentioned; those who led the advances, those who stopped the counter-attacks and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross. Discover the Somme 1918 campaign and learn how the British Army s brave soldiers fought and died trying to stop the onslaught.
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34.11 USD

Somme Offensive - March 1918

by Andrew Rawson
Hardback
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It is no exaggeration to claim that 46th North Midland Division s action on 29 September 1918 was the hammer blow that shattered the will of the German High Command. Painting the strategic picture from early 1918 and the dark weeks following the German s March offensive, the Author lays ...
The Battle That Won the War - Bellenglise: Breaching the Hindenburg Line 1918
It is no exaggeration to claim that 46th North Midland Division s action on 29 September 1918 was the hammer blow that shattered the will of the German High Command. Painting the strategic picture from early 1918 and the dark weeks following the German s March offensive, the Author lays the ground for the Allied counter-strike. Ahead of them was the mighty Hindenburg Line, the Kaiser s formidable defensive obstacle given added strength by the St Quentin Canal. Undaunted the Allies attacked using American, Australian and British formations. Led by Major General Boyd, 46 Division stormed the Canal and, thanks to a combination of sound planning and determined courageous fighting, seized their Hindenburg Line objective by the end of the day. The psychological damage to the German will, already weakened by the failure of the Spring offensive, is demonstrate by Ludendorff s collapse and opening of negotiations that led five weeks later to the Armistice.
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34.11 USD

The Battle That Won the War - Bellenglise: Breaching the Hindenburg Line 1918

by Peter Rostron
Hardback
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Although the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, which began in late September 1918 and continued through to the Armistice, was not the first major action fought by the AEF, it was the greatest in which it engaged in the Great War. Indeed, the casualty count in the fighting at the Meuse-Argonne makes it ...
American Expeditionary Forces in the Great War: The Meuse Argonne 1918: Breaking the Line
Although the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, which began in late September 1918 and continued through to the Armistice, was not the first major action fought by the AEF, it was the greatest in which it engaged in the Great War. Indeed, the casualty count in the fighting at the Meuse-Argonne makes it the bloodiest battle in American military history. The Argonne was an area that had been heavily fought over, particularly in the early part of the war; its eastern part, towards the Meuse, then became enveloped in the first great attritional battle of the war, Verdun. The area is marked by extensive woodlands and rolling countryside; however, unlike the Somme, it is interspersed with numerous waterways, deep ravines and higher ridges, along with significant hills, such as at Montfaucon. To be frank, the opening stages of the Offensive were marked by considerable unforced difficulties for the Americans, who after all were facing a far from strong enemy opposition (however formidable the defensive line might have been). Errors were made, logistical problems multiplied, command was often less than satisfactory. In many respects this should not have come as a surprise: this was an army that was relatively new to the Western Front, which was being reinforced at an awesome rate (approximately 300,000 men a month by July) and whose senior commanders had never before faced the challenges of modern warfare, themselves evolving at a dizzying rate. Maarten Otte gives a background narrative to events before the opening of the Offensive and its development. Taking each of the US corps in turn, he then provides tours that will help the visitor to understand the fighting and the problems that were faced. This opening book on the Meuse-Argonne takes the reader, more or less, to the date when General Pershing handed over command of the US First Army to Major General Liggard in mid October, a change in command that marked a significant improvement in the American performance as they pushed the Germans ever backwards. The Great War battlefield of the Argonne is marked by numerous physical remains of the war, some fine (some might argue over grandiose) monuments and by the stunning American cemetery at Romagne, the second largest in the world administered by the American Battle Monuments Commission. There is much to see in a battlefield that has been largely neglected in the decades since the Second World War.
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25.58 USD

American Expeditionary Forces in the Great War: The Meuse Argonne 1918: Breaking the Line

by Maarten Otte
Paperback
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The 'Albanian question' remains one of the major unresolved questions in south-eastern Europe, with the potential to disrupt the region, with grave consequences for the international community. The exodus of refugees from Kosovo into Albania in the late 1990s - and Kosovo's subsequent declaration of independence in February 2008 - ...
The Birth of Albania: Ethnic Nationalism, the Great Powers of World War I and the Emergence of Albanian Independence
The 'Albanian question' remains one of the major unresolved questions in south-eastern Europe, with the potential to disrupt the region, with grave consequences for the international community. The exodus of refugees from Kosovo into Albania in the late 1990s - and Kosovo's subsequent declaration of independence in February 2008 - rejuvenated interest in Albania and Kosovo and their place in the Balkans and Yet despite growing interest in the region's recent history, until now Albania's period of independence around World War I has been largely neglected.The Birth of Albania explores how an independent Albania first came into existence in the early twentieth century, following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. Nicola Guy explains how and why Albanian independence was finally achieved, in the context of the prevailing contemporary ideas of ethnicity and national identity, elaborated most famously by President Woodrow Wilson as 'national self-determination'. The Birth of Albania is the definitive account of this period and an essential contribution to our understanding of an important but often overlooked part of the world.
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30.70 USD

The Birth of Albania: Ethnic Nationalism, the Great Powers of World War I and the Emergence of Albanian Independence

by Nicola Guy
Paperback
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From an internationally acclaimed expert in the field comes a detailed, analytical and comprehensive account of the worldwide evolution of tanks, from their inception a century ago to the present day. With new ideas stemming from the latest academic research, this study presents a reappraisal of the development of tanks ...
Tanks: 100 years of evolution
From an internationally acclaimed expert in the field comes a detailed, analytical and comprehensive account of the worldwide evolution of tanks, from their inception a century ago to the present day. With new ideas stemming from the latest academic research, this study presents a reappraisal of the development of tanks and their evolution during World War I and how the surge in technological development during World War II and the subsequent Cold War drove developments in armour in Europe and America, transforming tanks into fast, resilient and powerful fighting machines. From the primitive, bizarre-looking Mark V to the Matilda and from the menacing King Tiger to the superlative M1 Abrams, Professor Ogorkiewicz shows how tanks gradually acquired the enhanced capabilities that enabled them to become what they are today - the core of combined-arms, mechanized warfare.
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18.75 USD

Tanks: 100 years of evolution

by Richard Ogorkiewicz
Paperback
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The Ottoman Empire was unprepared for the massive conflict of World War I. Lacking the infrastructure and resources necessary to wage a modern war, the empire's statesmen reached beyond the battlefield to sustain their war effort. They placed unprecedented hardships onto the shoulders of the Ottoman people: mass conscription, a ...
When the War Came Home: The Ottomans' Great War and the Devastation of an Empire
The Ottoman Empire was unprepared for the massive conflict of World War I. Lacking the infrastructure and resources necessary to wage a modern war, the empire's statesmen reached beyond the battlefield to sustain their war effort. They placed unprecedented hardships onto the shoulders of the Ottoman people: mass conscription, a state-controlled economy, widespread food shortages, and ethnic cleansing. By war's end, few aspects of Ottoman daily life remained untouched. When the War Came Home reveals the catastrophic impact of this global conflict on ordinary Ottomans. Drawing on a wide range of sources-from petitions, diaries, and newspapers to folk songs and religious texts-Yigit Akin examines how Ottoman men and women experienced war on the home front as government authorities intervened ever more ruthlessly in their lives. The horrors of war brought home, paired with the empire's growing demands on its people, fundamentally reshaped interactions between Ottoman civilians, the military, and the state writ broadly. Ultimately, Akin argues that even as the empire lost the war on the battlefield, it was the destructiveness of the Ottoman state's wartime policies on the home front that led to the empire's disintegration.
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94.500000 USD

When the War Came Home: The Ottomans' Great War and the Devastation of an Empire

by Yigit Akin
Hardback
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Walter Tull would have been a remarkable individual no matter when he had been born, but to achieve what he did, during the time that he did, makes him even more remarkable. He was an orphan at just six years of age, and despite not wanting to, his step mother, ...
Against All Odds: Walter Tull the Black Lieutenant
Walter Tull would have been a remarkable individual no matter when he had been born, but to achieve what he did, during the time that he did, makes him even more remarkable. He was an orphan at just six years of age, and despite not wanting to, his step mother, Clara, had no choice but to place him and his elder brother, Edward, in to a children's home in the East End of London. As neither Walter or Edward had ever travelled outside of Folkestone before, the upheaval must have come as quite a shock. Two years after entering the home, Walter and Edward were split up when Edward was adopted and went to live in Glasgow. Walter's sporting prowess saw him play for top local amateur side, Clapton Football club, signing for them in 1908, but it was to be a short lived affair, as by the following year he had signed as a professional for the prestigious Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, making his first team debut against Manchester United. In October 1911 Walter was transferred to Northampton Town Football Club, where he would go on to play over one hundred first team games, before the First World War brought a premature end to his career as a professional footballer. With the outbreak of war, Walter wasted no time enlisting in the British Army, initially as a Private in the newly formed 17th (Football) Battalion, Middlesex Regiment. Further promotions followed and in no time at all he had reached the rank of Sergeant. He was put forward for a commission and passed out as a 2nd Lieutenant on 29 May 1917\. He went on to become the first black officer in the British Army, to lead white troops in to battle, and was fondly regarded by the men who served under him. Walter was killed in action whilst leading his men in a counter attack against German defensive positions on Monday 25 March 1918\. He died a hero. He was well liked and respected by all who knew him. Like many men of his generation his life was cut short for the greater good whilst in the service of his country, so that others might prevail.
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28.99 USD

Against All Odds: Walter Tull the Black Lieutenant

by Stephen Wynn
Hardback
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The French air force of the First World War developed as fast as the British and German air forces, yet its history, and the enormous contribution it made to the eventual French victory, is often forgotten. So Ian Sumner's photographic history, which features almost 200 images, most of which have ...
The French Air Force in the First World War
The French air force of the First World War developed as fast as the British and German air forces, yet its history, and the enormous contribution it made to the eventual French victory, is often forgotten. So Ian Sumner's photographic history, which features almost 200 images, most of which have not been published before, is a fascinating and timely introduction to the subject. The fighter pilots, who usually dominate perceptions of the war in the air, play a leading role in the story, in particular the French aces, the small group of outstanding airmen whose exploits captured the publics imagination. Their fame, though, tends to distract attention from the ordinary unremembered airmen who formed the body of the air force throughout the war years. Ian Sumner tells their story too, as well as describing in a sequence of memorable photographs the less well-known branches of the service the bomber and reconnaissance pilots and the variety of primitive warplanes they flew.
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25.58 USD

The French Air Force in the First World War

by Ian Sumner
Paperback
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_Bayly s War_ is the story of the Royal Navy s Coast of Ireland Command (later named Western Approaches Command) during World War One. Britain was particularly vulnerable to the disruption of trade in the Western Approaches through which food and munitions (and later soldiers) from North America and the ...
Bayly's War: The Battle for the Western Approaches in the First World War
_Bayly s War_ is the story of the Royal Navy s Coast of Ireland Command (later named Western Approaches Command) during World War One. Britain was particularly vulnerable to the disruption of trade in the Western Approaches through which food and munitions (and later soldiers) from North America and the Caribbean and ores and raw materials from the Southern Americas, all passed on their way to Liverpool or the Channel ports and London. After the sinking of the _Lusitania_ in May 1915 and the introduction of unrestricted submarine warfare by the Germans, Britain found herself engaged in a fight for survival as U-boats targeted all incoming trade in an attempt to drive her into submission. Britain s naval forces, based in Queenstown on the southern Irish coast, fought a long and arduous battle to keep the seaways open, and it was only one they began to master after American naval forces joined in 1917. Vice-Admiral Sir Lewis Bayly was the man appointed to the Coast of Ireland Command. A fierce disciplinarian with a mania for efficiency, and thought by some of his colleagues to be more than a little mad, Bayly took the fight to the enemy. Utilising any vessel he could muster trawlers, tugs, yachts as well as the few naval craft at his disposal, he set out to hunt down the enemy submarines. The command also swept for mines, escorted merchantmen and fought endlessly against the harsh Atlantic weather. Relief came When America sent destroyers to Queenstown to serve under him, and Bayly, to the surprise of many, integrated the command into a homogenous fighting force. Along the way, the Command had to deal with the ambivalent attitude of the Irish population, the 1916 Easter Rising, the attempt to land arms on Ireland s west coast and the resurgence of Irish nationalism in 1917. _Bayly s War_ is a vivid account of this vigorous defence of Britain s trade and brings to life the U-boat battles, Q-ship actions, merchant ship sinkings and rescues as well as the tireless Bayly, the commander at the centre.
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42.66 USD

Bayly's War: The Battle for the Western Approaches in the First World War

by Steve Dunn
Hardback
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Jane Ainsworth's second book - Keeping their Beacons Alight:The Potter Family of Barnsley and their Service to Our Country - is a comprehensive family history inspired by the surviving letters and other memorabilia of two young brothers who were killed in action in the First World War. It concentrates on ...
Keeping Their Beacons Alight: The Potter Family of Barnsley and Their Service to Our Country
Jane Ainsworth's second book - Keeping their Beacons Alight:The Potter Family of Barnsley and their Service to Our Country - is a comprehensive family history inspired by the surviving letters and other memorabilia of two young brothers who were killed in action in the First World War. It concentrates on the military service of many of their relations during the first half of the 20th Century. Frank and Eddie Potter, sons of Barnsley Builder Charles Dalton Potter, featured in her first book published by Helion& Company in March 2016: Great Sacrifice: the Old Boys of Barnsley Holgate Grammar School in the First World War. This memorial book about the 76 men listed on the War Memorial includes a detailed history of Barnsley Grammar School. It received critical acclaim for Jane's meticulous research and use of school records to provide biographies for these well educated young men who were prevented from achieving their full potential. It emphasized their life stories within the context of their families rather than their military experiences. Keeping Their Beacons Alight has allowed Jane to make full use of her painstaking and tenacious research skills to write the biography of the Potter family, with an emphasis on their military service. She has uncovered an impressive number of relations who joined the Territorial Army before 1914 and who served during the First and Second World Wars in a wide variety of roles. Jane used her genealogical expertise to produce the extended family trees and consulted several relations, who generously shared information and photographs for use in this book; they were fascinated and surprised by many of her findings. She followed clues wherever they led, spending time searching the internet and going through collections of records to provide background information, such as Barclays Bank, Barnsley Cordwainers' Society and Freemasonry. She used War Diaries and Officer Records from The National Archives as well as visiting Regimental Archives and Museums to flesh out individuals' military service. Barnsley Chronicle provided a wealth of supplementary details. The Potter family is an extraordinary one with their zealous response to the calls to arms, but Jane hopes that it will encourage others to delve deeply into their family history and reveal hidden gems.
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42.66 USD

Keeping Their Beacons Alight: The Potter Family of Barnsley and Their Service to Our Country

by Jane Ainsworth
Paperback
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Everybody in the 21st century has a pet subject. With the rise of the internet it's easier to share our passion - Vintage collectors have benefited greatly from this. Vintage car and motorcycle enthusiasts experience theessence of `time travel' when riding in or on a vehicle from 30, 50, 70 ...
Bad Teeth No Bar: A History of Military bicycles in The Great War
Everybody in the 21st century has a pet subject. With the rise of the internet it's easier to share our passion - Vintage collectors have benefited greatly from this. Vintage car and motorcycle enthusiasts experience theessence of `time travel' when riding in or on a vehicle from 30, 50, 70 years ago. However, vintage bicycle enthusiasts can travel back even further, to a time before cars and motorcycle were invented, or to 1914 when the Great War called upon cyclists to flight. Bad Teeth No Bar takes you and your bicycle to the most challenging cycling environment of all - War. 100,000 British soldiers used bicycles in the Great war. Even more French and Belgians rode bikes, and the Germans used even more than anyone else. See the bikes, read the stories, and imagine how you would have coped if you were one of the many patriots who enlisted to fight for King and Country.
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54.60 USD

Bad Teeth No Bar: A History of Military bicycles in The Great War

by Colin Kirsch
Paperback
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Historian Virginia Bernhard has deftly woven together the memoirs and letters of three American soldiers-Henry Beston Sheahan, Mike Hogg, and George Wythe-to capture a vivid, poignant portrayal of what it was like to be over there. These firsthand recollections focus the lens of history onto one small corner of the ...
The Smell of War: Three Americans in the Trenches of World War I
Historian Virginia Bernhard has deftly woven together the memoirs and letters of three American soldiers-Henry Beston Sheahan, Mike Hogg, and George Wythe-to capture a vivid, poignant portrayal of what it was like to be over there. These firsthand recollections focus the lens of history onto one small corner of the war, into one small battlefield, and in doing so they reveal new perspectives on the horrors of trench warfare, life in training camps, transportation and the impact of technology, and the post-armistice American army of occupation. Henry Sheahan's memoir, A Volunteer Poilu, was first published in 1916. He was a Boston-born, Harvard-educated ambulance driver for the French army who later became a well-known New England nature writer, taking a family name Beston as his surname. George Wythe, from Weatherford, Texas, was a descendent of the George Wythe who signed the Declaration of Independence. Mike Hogg, born in Tyler, Texas, was the son of former Texas governor James Stephen Hogg. The Smell of War, by collecting and annotating the words of these three individuals, paints a new and revealing literary portrait of the Great War and those who served in it.
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33.600000 USD

The Smell of War: Three Americans in the Trenches of World War I

by Virginia Bernhard
Hardback
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With a few notable exceptions, the French efforts on the Somme have been largely missing or minimised in British accounts of the Battle of the Somme. And yet they held this sector of the Front from the outbreak of the war until well into 1915 and, indeed, in parts into ...
The Somme 1916: Touring the French Sector
With a few notable exceptions, the French efforts on the Somme have been largely missing or minimised in British accounts of the Battle of the Somme. And yet they held this sector of the Front from the outbreak of the war until well into 1915 and, indeed, in parts into 1916\. It does not hurt to be reminded that the French army suffered some 200,000 casualties in the 1916 offensive. David O Mara s book provides an outline narrative describing the arrival of the war on the Somme and some of the notable and quite fierce actions that took place that autumn and, indeed, into December of 1914\. Extensive mine warfare was a feature of 1915 and beyond on the Somme; for example under Redan Ridge and before Dompierre and Fay. The French limited offensive at Serre in June 1915 is reasonably well known, but there was fighting elsewhere for example the Germans launched a short, sharp, limited attack at Frise in January 1916, part of the diversionary action before the Germans launched their ill-fated offensive at Verdun. The book covers the Somme front from Gommecourt, north of the Somme, to Chaulnes, at the southern end of the battle zone of 1916\. The reader is taken around key points in various tours. For many British visitors the battlefields south of the Somme will be a revelation; there is much to see, both of cemeteries and memorials, but also substantial traces of the fighting remain on the ground, some of which is accessible to the public. It has always been something of a disgrace that there is so little available, even in French, to educate the public in an accessible written form about the substantial effort made by France s army on the Somme; this book and subsequent, more detailed volumes to be published in the coming years will go some way to rectify this. British visitors should be fascinated by the story of these forgotten men of France and the largely unknown part of the Somme battlefield.
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25.58 USD

The Somme 1916: Touring the French Sector

by David O'Mara
Paperback
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_Pioneers of Armour in the Great War_ tells the story of the only Australian mechanised units of the Great War. The 1st Australian Armoured Car Section, later the 1st Australian Light Car Patrol, and the Special Tank Section were among the trailblazers of mechanisation and represented the cutting edge of ...
Pioneers of Armour in the Great War
_Pioneers of Armour in the Great War_ tells the story of the only Australian mechanised units of the Great War. The 1st Australian Armoured Car Section, later the 1st Australian Light Car Patrol, and the Special Tank Section were among the trailblazers of mechanisation and represented the cutting edge of technology on the Great War battlefield. The 1st Armoured Car Section was raised in Melbourne in 1916, the brainchild of a group of enthusiasts who financed, designed and then built two armoured cars. Having persuaded the Australian Army of the vehicles' utility in the desert campaign, the armoured car section, later re-equipped with Model T Fords and retitled the 1st Australian Light Car Patrol, provided valuable service until well after the Armistice. The First World War also saw the emergence of the tank which, despite unpromising beginnings, was to realise its potential in the crucial 1918 battles of Hamel and Amiens. A British Mark IV tank which toured Australia in 1918 demonstrated the power of this new weapon to an awestruck Australian public. Much of the story of the armoured cars is told in the voices of the original members of the section and in newspaper articles of the time which highlight the novelty of these vehicles. Painstaking research has produced a remarkable collection of images to accompany the narrative, many never previously published. Biographies of the members of these extraordinary units are also a feature of this book, their stories told from the cradle to the grave. Appendixes provide a wealth of supporting biographical and technical information that enriches the text and adds factual detail.
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51.19 USD

Pioneers of Armour in the Great War

by Michael K Cecil, David A Finlayson
Hardback
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In 1915, the German government published a book entitled 1915 in an attempt to portray the Germans as a civilised people who were destined to win the war, who would treat their prisoners with care and compassion. _The Kaiser s First POWs_ is the first book to compare the official ...
The Kaiser's First Pows
In 1915, the German government published a book entitled 1915 in an attempt to portray the Germans as a civilised people who were destined to win the war, who would treat their prisoners with care and compassion. _The Kaiser s First POWs_ is the first book to compare the official German view to the grim reality of captivity, as experienced by the prisoners. Dozens of original photos from 1915 tell the story as seen by German eyes. Compare them to the personal accounts from former prisoners who describe the reality of falling into the hands of the German Army and life as a prisoner of the Kaiser. By the end of the war, the Germans had taken approximately 2.8 million prisoners of war. This books describes the life and times of these prisoners and the manner in which the Germans dealt with the problems involved in accommodating them.
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34.11 USD

The Kaiser's First Pows

by Philip Chinnery
Paperback
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In 1915, news of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps landing and the slaughter at Gallipoli stirred tens of thousands of young men to go to war. They answered the call and formed battalions of the Australian Imperial Force. By the time the new recruits were combat ready, the ...
Eyewitnesses at the Somme: A Muddy and Bloody Campaign 1916 1918
In 1915, news of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps landing and the slaughter at Gallipoli stirred tens of thousands of young men to go to war. They answered the call and formed battalions of the Australian Imperial Force. By the time the new recruits were combat ready, the campaign at Gallipoli had ended. Their battlefields became the muddy paddocks of France and Belgium. Based on eyewitness account, Eyewitnesses at the Somme traces the story of one of these battalions, the 55th, from its birth in the dusty camps of Egypt through three years of brutal, bloody conflict on the bitter western front. When the Great War ended in 1918, over 500 of the 3,000 men who served in the 55th had been slain and another 1,000 wounded. Eyewitnesses at the Somme, shares personal stories of Australian men as they stared down the horrors of war with determination, courage and mateship. With chapters devoted to the significant battles at Fromelles, Doignies, Polygon Wood, P ronne and Bellicourt, this book tells the story of one battalion, but in doing so it encapsulates the experiences of many Australians on the Western Front.
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51.19 USD

Eyewitnesses at the Somme: A Muddy and Bloody Campaign 1916 1918

by Tim Cook
Hardback
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Alan Smith's _Allenby's Gunners_ tells the story of artillery in the highly successful World War I Sinai and Palestine campaigns. Following Gallipoli and the reconstitution of the AIF, a shortage of Australian gunners saw British Territorial artillery allotted to the Australian Light Horse and New Zealand Mounted Rifle brigades. It ...
Allenby's Gunners
Alan Smith's _Allenby's Gunners_ tells the story of artillery in the highly successful World War I Sinai and Palestine campaigns. Following Gallipoli and the reconstitution of the AIF, a shortage of Australian gunners saw British Territorial artillery allotted to the Australian Light Horse and New Zealand Mounted Rifle brigades. It was a relationship that would prove highly successful and _Allenby's Gunners_ provides a detailed and colourful description of the artillery war, cavalry and infantry operations from the first battles of Romani and Rafa, through the tough actions of Gaza, the Palestine desert, Jordan Valley and Amman to the capture of Jerusalem. The story concludes with the superb victory of Megiddo and the taking of Damascus until the theatre armistice of 1918. Smith Covers the trials and triumphs of the gunners as they honed their art in one of the most difficult battlefield environments of the war. The desert proved hostile and unrelenting, testing the gunners, their weapons and their animals in the harsh conditions. The gunners' adversary, the wily and skilful Ottoman artillerymen, endured the same horrendous conditions and proved a tough and courageous foe. The light horsemen and gunners also owed much to the intrepid airmen of the AFC and RFC whose tactical and offensive bombing and counter-battery work from mid-1917 would prove instrumental in securing victory. This is an aspect of the campaign that is seamlessly woven throughout as the action unfolds. The Sinai and Palestine campaigns generally followed a pattern of heavy losses and setbacks for an initial period before allied forces eventually prevailed. This is a highly descriptive volume that tells and oft-neglected story and fills the gap in the record of a campaign in which Australians played a significant role. It is a welcome addition to the story of the Australians in the Middle Eastern campaigns of World War I.
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51.19 USD

Allenby's Gunners

by Alan Smith
Hardback
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Clacton-on-Sea and the surrounding coastline is part of the Sunshine Coast, an area of sandy beaches and low-level cliffs facing the North Sea. This book gives a brief history of the major nearby villages Brightlingsea, St Oysths, Clacton on Sea, Holland on Sea, Frinton and Walton on the Naze as ...
Clacton-on-Sea and the Surrounding Coastline in the Great War
Clacton-on-Sea and the surrounding coastline is part of the Sunshine Coast, an area of sandy beaches and low-level cliffs facing the North Sea. This book gives a brief history of the major nearby villages Brightlingsea, St Oysths, Clacton on Sea, Holland on Sea, Frinton and Walton on the Naze as they developed from agricultural areas, to seaside resorts in the mid to late 1800s, and then into heavily defended hives of activity. They were considered by the authorities to be convenient spots for foreign invasion and, as a result, mock invasion exercises at Clacton had taken place since the early 1900s. Being close to the sea, many of the inhabitants were heavily involved with yachting and the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, so it's not surprising that a great number joined the Royal or Merchant Navy. Brightlingsea became a major naval port and the Australian and New Zealander's Engineers trained there for four years. Clacton itself saw over a 1,000 men sign up, and it also had a number of Military and Convalescent Homes that treated injured men. Middlesex Hospital, for one, treated over 9,000 men. The local villages produced a considerable number of men who were awarded the Military Medal/Cross, and Walton on the Naze produced one VC in Herbert Columbine. The tremendous efforts of others are also covered, in particular those of the local women folk. A number of appropriate poems, many written at the time, are included throughout the book, as well as rarely seen photographs and insightful reports from the local papers of that period.
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27.29 USD

Clacton-on-Sea and the Surrounding Coastline in the Great War

by Kenneth Porter
Paperback
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This graphic collection of first-hand accounts sheds new light on the experiences of the French army during the Great War. It reveals in authentic detail the perceptions and emotions of soldiers and civilians who were caught up in the most destructive conflict the world had ever seen. Their testimony gives ...
They Shall Not Pass: The French Army on the Western Front 1914 - 1918
This graphic collection of first-hand accounts sheds new light on the experiences of the French army during the Great War. It reveals in authentic detail the perceptions and emotions of soldiers and civilians who were caught up in the most destructive conflict the world had ever seen. Their testimony gives a striking insight into the mentality of the troops and their experience of combat, their emotional ties to their relatives at home, their opinions about their commanders and their fellow soldiers, the appalling conditions and dangers they endured, and their attitude to their German enemy. In their own words they offer a fascinating inside view of the massive life-and-death struggle that took place on the Western Front.
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25.58 USD

They Shall Not Pass: The French Army on the Western Front 1914 - 1918

by Ian Sumner
Paperback
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SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE BRITISH ARMY MILITARY BOOK OF THE YEAR 2016 'Truly essential' Simon Sebag Montefiore The final destruction of the Ottoman Empire - one of the great epics of the First World War, from bestselling historian Eugene Rogan For some four centuries the Ottoman ...
The Fall Of The Ottomans: The Great War In The Middle East, 1914-1920,
SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE BRITISH ARMY MILITARY BOOK OF THE YEAR 2016 'Truly essential' Simon Sebag Montefiore The final destruction of the Ottoman Empire - one of the great epics of the First World War, from bestselling historian Eugene Rogan For some four centuries the Ottoman Empire had been one of the most powerful states in Europe as well as ruler of the Middle East. By 1914 it had been drastically weakened and circled by numerous predators waiting to finish it off. Following the Ottoman decision to join the First World War on the side of the Central Powers the British, French and Russians hatched a plan to finish the Ottomans off: an ambitious and unprecedented invasion of Gallipoli...Eugene Rogan's remarkable book recreates one of the most important but poorly understood fronts of the First World War. Despite fighting back with great skill and ferocity against the Allied onslaught and humiliating the British both at Gallipoli and in Mesopotamia (Iraq), the Ottomans were ultimately defeated, clearing the way for the making, for better or worse, of a new Middle East which has endured to the present.
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18.64 USD

The Fall Of The Ottomans: The Great War In The Middle East, 1914-1920,

by Eugene Rogan
Paperback
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In recent years the public has become aware of the Filthy Thirteen, the most notorious squad of fighting men in the 101st Airborne Division, and the true-life inspiration for the movie The Dirty Dozen . They became singular within the Screaming Eagles for their hard drinking, and savage fighting skill ...
Fighting with the Filthy Thirteen: The World War II Story of Jack Womer - Ranger and Paratrooper
In recent years the public has become aware of the Filthy Thirteen, the most notorious squad of fighting men in the 101st Airborne Division, and the true-life inspiration for the movie The Dirty Dozen . They became singular within the Screaming Eagles for their hard drinking, and savage fighting skill - and that was only in training. Just prior to the invasion of Normandy, a Stars and Stripes photographer caught U.S. paratroopers with heads shaved into Mohawks, applying war paint to their faces. Unknown to the public at the time, these men were the Filthy 13. In this long awaited work one of the squad's integral members-and probably its best soldier-reveals his own inside account of fighting as a spearhead of the Screaming Eagles in Normandy, Market Garden, and the Battle of the Bulge. Jack Womer was originally a member of the 29th Infantry Division and was selected to be part of its elite Ranger battalion. But after a year of grueling training under the eyes of British Commando instructors, the 29th Rangers were suddenly dissolved. Bitterly disappointed, Womer asked for transfer to another elite unit, the Screaming Eagles, where room was found for him among the division's most miscreant squad of brawlers, drunkards, and misfits. Beginning on June 6, 1944, however, the Filthy Thirteen began proving themselves more a menace to the German Army than they had been to their own officers and the good people of England, embarking on a year-of ferocious combat at the very tip of the Allied advance in Europe. From parachuting behind German lines on D-Day to the gritty defense of Bastogne, Womer fought beyond the breaking point of the soldiers around him. In this work, with the help of Stephen DeVito, Jack provides an amazingly frank look at close-quarters combat in Europe, as well as the almost surreal experience of dust-bowl-era GI's entering country after country in their grapple with the Wehrmacht, finally ending up in Hitler's mountaintop lair in Germany itself. Throughout his fights, Jack Womer credited his Ranger/Commando training for helping him to survive, even though most of the rest of the Filthy Thirteen did not.
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25.58 USD

Fighting with the Filthy Thirteen: The World War II Story of Jack Womer - Ranger and Paratrooper

by Stephen C DeVito, Jack Womer
Paperback
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In 1917 and 1918 Germany made her first attempt to wage long range submarine warfare against the faraway shores of the US, Canada, and West Africa. In that deadly last chapter of the Great War the Germans sent giant submarines to prey upon Allied shipping far distant from the main ...
The Kaiser's Lost Kreuzer: A History of U-156 and Germany's Long-Range Submarine Campaign Against North America, 1918
In 1917 and 1918 Germany made her first attempt to wage long range submarine warfare against the faraway shores of the US, Canada, and West Africa. In that deadly last chapter of the Great War the Germans sent giant submarines to prey upon Allied shipping far distant from the main naval war zones around Europe in a desperate gamble to save the faltering unrestricted U-boat war. This is the first time the whole story has been told from the perspective of Imperial Germany in the English language. The U-156's experiences in this barely known saga of World War I epitomize the whole campaign. The U-156 raided commerce, transported captured cargo, and terrorized coastal populations from Madeira to Cape Cod. On 19 July 1918, the USS San Diego was headed into New York harbor when an explosion occurred and the ship quickly sank close to the Long Island coast. The attack was the opening salvo in a series of record-breaking firsts undertaken by the U-156 against the US and Canada. Over a month later, after waging a humane but unrelenting war just off North America, the crew of the U-156 sailed toward home and into history.
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36.750000 USD

The Kaiser's Lost Kreuzer: A History of U-156 and Germany's Long-Range Submarine Campaign Against North America, 1918

by Paul N. Hodos
Paperback
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The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille: Told by Its Commander Captain Georges Thenault (Classic Reprint)
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12.150000 USD

The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille: Told by Its Commander Captain Georges Thenault (Classic Reprint)

by Georges Thenault
Paperback
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World War One Posters: An Anniversary Collection
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61.41 USD

World War One Posters: An Anniversary Collection

by Dover Publications,Inc.
Hardback
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On 15th April 1915, British and Dominion troops landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The campaign which followed lasted over eight months and cost the terrible total of nearly half a million Allied and Turkish casualties. The eventual failure of the Gallipoli campaign, after heart-breaking opportunities had been missed, was a ...
Gallipoli
On 15th April 1915, British and Dominion troops landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The campaign which followed lasted over eight months and cost the terrible total of nearly half a million Allied and Turkish casualties. The eventual failure of the Gallipoli campaign, after heart-breaking opportunities had been missed, was a disastrous set-back to Allied hopes. It remains one of the most engrossing and poignant tragedies in British military history. In our new edition of this classic in military writing, Robert Rhodes James was one of the first historians to work from the official archives and makes brilliant use of diaries and letters of the men who fought there and the photographs they took. Gallipoli stands the test of time, bringing vividly to life the conditions and circumstances of a campaign which has never ceased to enthral the imagination.
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34.12 USD

Gallipoli

by Robert Rhodes James
Paperback
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