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In the English language, World War I has largely been analysed and understood through the lens of the Western Front. This book addresses this imbalance by examining the war in Central and Eastern Europe. The historiography of the war in the West has increasingly focused on the experience of ordinary ...
World War I in Central and Eastern Europe: Politics, Conflict and Military Experience
In the English language, World War I has largely been analysed and understood through the lens of the Western Front. This book addresses this imbalance by examining the war in Central and Eastern Europe. The historiography of the war in the West has increasingly focused on the experience of ordinary soldiers and civilians, the relationships between them and the impact of war at the time and subsequently. This book takes up these themes and, engaging with the approaches and conclusions of historians of the Western Front, examines wartime experiences and the memory of war in the East. Analysing soldiers' letters and diaries to discover the nature and impact of displacement and refugeedom on memory, this volume offers a basis for comparison between experiences in the two areas. It also provides material for intra-regional comparisons that are still missing from the current research. Was the war in the East wholly `other'? Were soldiers in this region as alienated as those in the West? Did they see themselves as citizens and was there continuity between their pre-war or civilian and military identities? And if, in the Eastern context, these identities were fundamentally challenged, was it the experience of war itself or its consequences (in the shape of imprisonment and displacement, and changing borders) that mattered most? How did soldiers and citizens in this region experience and react to the traumas and upheavals of war and with what consequences for the postwar era? In seeking to answer these questions and others, this volume significantly adds to our understanding of World War I as experienced in Central and Eastern Europe.
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127.97 USD

World War I in Central and Eastern Europe: Politics, Conflict and Military Experience

Hardback
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The writer and poet Robert Graves suppressed virtually all of the poems he had published during and just after the First World War. Until his son, William Graves, reprinted almost all the Poems About War in 1988, Graves's status as a `war poet' seems to have depended mainly on his ...
Robert Graves: From Great War Poet to Good-bye to All That (1895-1929)
The writer and poet Robert Graves suppressed virtually all of the poems he had published during and just after the First World War. Until his son, William Graves, reprinted almost all the Poems About War in 1988, Graves's status as a `war poet' seems to have depended mainly on his prose memoir (and bestseller), Good-bye to All That. None of the previous biographies written on Graves, however excellent, attempt to deal with this paradox in any depth. Robert Graves the war poet and the suppressed poems themselves have been largely neglected - until now. Jean Moorcroft Wilson, celebrated biographer of poets Siegfried Sassoon, Isaac Rosenberg and Edward Thomas, relates Graves's fascinating life during this period, his experiences in the war, his being left for dead at the Battle of the Somme, his leap from a third-storey window after his lover Laura Riding's even more dramatic jump from the fourth storey, his move to Spain and his final `goodbye' to `all that'. In this deeply-researched new book, containing startling material never before brought to light, Dr Moorcroft Wilson traces not only Graves's compelling life, but also the development of his poetry during the First World War, his thinking about the conflict and his shifting attitude towards it. Robert Graves: From Great War Poet to Good-bye to All That casts new light on the life, prose and poetry of Graves, without which the story of Great War poetry is incomplete.
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42.66 USD

Robert Graves: From Great War Poet to Good-bye to All That (1895-1929)

by Jean Moorcroft Wilson
Hardback
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By 1915, the Western Front was a 450 mile line of trenches, barbed wire and concrete bunkers, stretching across Europe. Attempts to break the stalemate were murderous and futile. Press censorship was extreme-no one wanted the carnage reported. Remarkably, the Allied command gave two intrepid American women, Edith Wharton and ...
Edith Wharton and Mary Roberts Rinehart at the Western Front, 1915
By 1915, the Western Front was a 450 mile line of trenches, barbed wire and concrete bunkers, stretching across Europe. Attempts to break the stalemate were murderous and futile. Press censorship was extreme-no one wanted the carnage reported. Remarkably, the Allied command gave two intrepid American women, Edith Wharton and Mary Roberts Rinehart, permission to visit the front and report on what they saw. Their travels are reconstructed from their own published accounts, Rinehart's unpublished day-by-day notes, and the writings of other journalists who toured the front in 1915. The authors' explorations of the places Wharton and Rinehart visited serves as a travel guide to the Western Front.
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52.450000 USD

Edith Wharton and Mary Roberts Rinehart at the Western Front, 1915

by Libby Klekowski, Ed Klekowski
Paperback / softback
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Revealing the little-known facts of Harry Truman's remarkable military performance, as a soldier and as a politician, The Soldier from Independence adds a whole new dimension to the already fascinating character of the thirty-third president of the United States. D. M. Giangreco shows how, as a field artillery battery commander ...
The Soldier from Independence: A Military Biography of Harry Truman, Volume 1, 1906-1919
Revealing the little-known facts of Harry Truman's remarkable military performance, as a soldier and as a politician, The Soldier from Independence adds a whole new dimension to the already fascinating character of the thirty-third president of the United States. D. M. Giangreco shows how, as a field artillery battery commander in World War I, Truman was already making the hard decisions that he knew to be right, regardless of personal consequences. Truman oversaw the conclusion of the Second World War, stood up to Stalin, and met the test of North Korea's invasion of the South. He also had the fortitude to defy Gen. Douglas MacArthur, one of America's most revered wartime leaders, and ultimately fired the Far East commander, often characterized as the American Caesar. Filling in the details behind these world-changing events, this military biography supplies a heretofore missing - and critical - chapter in the story of one of the nation's most important presidents. The Soldier from Independence recounts the World War I military adventure that would mark a turning point in the life of a humble man who would go on to become commander in chief.
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24.100000 USD

The Soldier from Independence: A Military Biography of Harry Truman, Volume 1, 1906-1919

by D M Giangreco
Paperback / softback
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2018 sees the centenary commemorations for the end of WW1 This book looks at the human detail of WW1 and the collapse of Germany due to the blockade created to starve the country into submission Major UK publicity and marketing campaign
Sound of Hunger: One German family's chronicle of the chivalry, politics, lies, murder and aftermath of war
2018 sees the centenary commemorations for the end of WW1 This book looks at the human detail of WW1 and the collapse of Germany due to the blockade created to starve the country into submission Major UK publicity and marketing campaign
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51.19 USD

Sound of Hunger: One German family's chronicle of the chivalry, politics, lies, murder and aftermath of war

by Chris Heal
Hardback
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An extraordinary history of French lives under occupation in the First and Second World Wars, this is an intimate, unforgettable meditation on the strange mixture of compromise and betrayal, collaboration and resistance that marks defeat, written by one of the greatest historians of France. 'A splendid book for comprehending human ...
French and Germans, Germans and French: A Personal Interpretation of France under Two Occupations, 1914-1918/1940-1944
An extraordinary history of French lives under occupation in the First and Second World Wars, this is an intimate, unforgettable meditation on the strange mixture of compromise and betrayal, collaboration and resistance that marks defeat, written by one of the greatest historians of France. 'A splendid book for comprehending human kind ... Cobb has a strong sense of how ordinary life has to go on, even through disasters, and a sensitivity for what it was like at the time, matched by a gift for the telling phrase' Economist 'Prophet of the past, Richard Cobb is a visionary' New York Review of Books 'His France - urban, northern, provincial, pedestrian, noisy, unpuritanical, festive - was in contrast to, and predicated upon, another France: bureaucratic, official, suburban, safe' Julian Barnes
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18.75 USD

French and Germans, Germans and French: A Personal Interpretation of France under Two Occupations, 1914-1918/1940-1944

by Richard Cobb
Paperback / softback
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For Canadians, the First World War was a dynamic period of literary activity. Almost every poet wrote about the war, critics made bold predictions about the legacy of the periods poetry, and booksellers were told it was their duty to stock shelves with war poetry. Readers bought thousands of volumes ...
Battle Lines: English-Canadian Poetry & the First World War
For Canadians, the First World War was a dynamic period of literary activity. Almost every poet wrote about the war, critics made bold predictions about the legacy of the periods poetry, and booksellers were told it was their duty to stock shelves with war poetry. Readers bought thousands of volumes of poetry. Twenty years later, by the time Canada went to war again, no one remembered any of it. Battle Lines traces the rise and disappearance of Canadian First World War poetry, and offers a striking and comprehensive account of its varied and vexing poetic gestures. As eagerly as Canadians took to the streets to express their support for the war, poets turned to their notebooks, and shared their interpretations of the global conflict, repeating and reshaping popular conceptions of, among other notions, national obligation, gendered responsibility, aesthetic power, and deathly presence. The book focuses on the poetic interpretations of the Canadian soldier. He emerges as a contentious poetic subject, a figure of battle romance, and an emblem of modernist fragmentation and fractiousness. Centring the work of five exemplary Canadian war poets (Helena Coleman, John McCrae, Robert Service, Frank Prewett, and W.W.E. Ross), the book reveals their latent faith in collective action as well as conflicting recognition of modernist subjectivities. Battle Lines identifies the Great War as a long-overlooked period of poetic ferment, experimentation, reluctance, and challenge.
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89.250000 USD

Battle Lines: English-Canadian Poetry & the First World War

by Joel Baetz
Hardback
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At the beginning of 1917, the three empires fighting on the Eastern Front were reaching their breaking points, but none was closer than Russia. After the February Revolution, Russia's ability to wage war faltered and her last desperate gamble, the Kerensky Offensive, saw the final collapse of her army. This ...
The Splintered Empires: The Eastern Front 1917-21
At the beginning of 1917, the three empires fighting on the Eastern Front were reaching their breaking points, but none was closer than Russia. After the February Revolution, Russia's ability to wage war faltered and her last desperate gamble, the Kerensky Offensive, saw the final collapse of her army. This helped trigger the Bolshevik Revolution and a crippling peace, but the Central Powers had no opportunity to exploit their gains and, a year later, both the German and Austro-Hungarian empires surrendered and disintegrated. Concluding his acclaimed series on the Eastern Front in World War I, Prit Buttar comprehensively details not only these climactic events, but also the `successor wars' that raged long after the armistice of 1918. New states rose from the ashes of empire, and war raged as German forces sought to keep them under the aegis of the Fatherland. These unresolved tensions between the former Great Powers and the new states would ultimately lead to the rise of Hitler and a new, terrible world war only two decades later.
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25.58 USD

The Splintered Empires: The Eastern Front 1917-21

by Prit Buttar
Paperback / softback
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Produced in association with Imperial War Museums, 1918: How the First World War Was Won gives a detailed account of the final year of the war. It examines each battle in turn, from the German Spring Offensives on the Western Front, through the Battle of Amiens that heralded the start ...
1918: How the First World War Was Won
Produced in association with Imperial War Museums, 1918: How the First World War Was Won gives a detailed account of the final year of the war. It examines each battle in turn, from the German Spring Offensives on the Western Front, through the Battle of Amiens that heralded the start of the Hundred Days campaign, to the Battle of Megiddo at the start of the final British-led offensive. Major General Julian Thompson's authoritative text is illustrated with contemporary photographs and full-colour maps. It tells the story of the US entry in to the war, the tactical command of Allied Supreme Commander Ferdinand Foch, and the final push that gave the Allies total victory.
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42.66 USD

1918: How the First World War Was Won

by Julian Thompson
Hardback
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In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people world-wide. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers referred to it as Flanders Grippe, but ...
Pandemic 1918: Eyewitness Accounts from the Greatest Medical Holocaust in Modern History
In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people world-wide. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers referred to it as Flanders Grippe, but world-wide, the pandemic gained the notorious title of Spanish Flu . Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded 550,000 deaths (five times its total military fatalities in the war) while European deaths totaled over two million. Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Even as entire battalions were decimated, with both the Allies and the Germans suffering massive casualties, the details of many service men's deaths were hidden to protect public morale. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. The City of Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels. Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of 1348 and the great plague of 1665, while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy. Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of the terrible epidemic.
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29.390000 USD

Pandemic 1918: Eyewitness Accounts from the Greatest Medical Holocaust in Modern History

by Catharine Arnold
Hardback
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This book charts ideas European intellectuals (mostly from Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy) put forward to solve the problem of war during the first half of the twentieth century: a period that began with the Anglo-Boer war and that ended with the explosion of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima ...
The Peace Discourse in Europe, 1900-1945
This book charts ideas European intellectuals (mostly from Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy) put forward to solve the problem of war during the first half of the twentieth century: a period that began with the Anglo-Boer war and that ended with the explosion of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Such ideas do not belong to a homogeneous tradition of thought, but can be understood as a unique discourse that takes different characteristics according to the point of view of each author and of the specific historical situation.
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196.22 USD

The Peace Discourse in Europe, 1900-1945

by Alberto Castelli
Hardback
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Published in commemoration of the centennial of America's entry into World War I, the story of the USS Leviathan, the legendary liner turned warship that ferried U.S. soldiers to Europe-a unique war history that offers a fresh, compelling look at this epic time. When war broke out in Europe in ...
The Great Rescue: American Heroes, an Iconic Ship, and the Race to Save Europe in WWI
Published in commemoration of the centennial of America's entry into World War I, the story of the USS Leviathan, the legendary liner turned warship that ferried U.S. soldiers to Europe-a unique war history that offers a fresh, compelling look at this epic time. When war broke out in Europe in August 1914, the new German luxury ocean liner SS Vaterland was interned in New York Harbor, where it remained docked for nearly three years-until the United States officially entered the fight to turn the tide of the war. Seized by authorities for the U.S. Navy once war was declared in April 2017, the liner was renamed the USS Leviathan by President Woodrow Wilson, and converted into an armed troop carrier that transported thousands of American Expeditionary Forces to the battlefields of France. For German U-Boats hunting Allied ships in the treacherous waters of the Atlantic, no target was as prized as the Leviathan, carrying more than 10,000 Doughboys per crossing. But the Germans were not the only deadly force threatening the ship and its passengers. In 1918, a devastating influenza pandemic-the Spanish flu-spread throughout the globe, predominantly striking healthy young adults, including soldiers. Peter Hernon tells the ship's story across multiple voyages and through the experiences of a diverse cast of participants, including the ship's captain, Henry Bryan; General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force; Congressman Royal Johnson, who voted against the war but enlisted once the resolution passed; Freddie Stowers, a young black South Carolinian whose heroism was ignored because of his race; Irvin Cobb, a star war reporter for the Saturday Evening Post; and Elizabeth Weaver, an army nurse who saw the war's horrors firsthand; as well as a host of famous supporting characters, including a young Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Thoroughly researched, dramatic, and fast-paced, The Great Rescue is a unique look at the Great War and the diverse lives it touched.
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20.46 USD

The Great Rescue: American Heroes, an Iconic Ship, and the Race to Save Europe in WWI

by Peter Hernon
Paperback
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This book examines processes of military, political and cultural transformation from the perspective of officers in two countries: Germany and Turkey in the 1930s. The national fates of both countries interlocked during the Great War years and their close alliance dictated their joint defeat in 1918. While the two countries ...
Order and Insecurity in Germany and Turkey: Military Cultures of the 1930s
This book examines processes of military, political and cultural transformation from the perspective of officers in two countries: Germany and Turkey in the 1930s. The national fates of both countries interlocked during the Great War years and their close alliance dictated their joint defeat in 1918. While the two countries were manifestly different in their politics and culture, both had lost the war and both went through powerful changes in its immediate aftermath. They painted themselves as the victims of a new imperialist order, whose chief representatives were Britain and France. The result was a radical militarism that unleashed violent currents in these countries - developments that were to be more transformative than the impact of the war experience itself.
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59.72 USD

Order and Insecurity in Germany and Turkey: Military Cultures of the 1930s

by Emre Sencer
Paperback
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For many British visitors, the fighting in the Somme starts on 1 July 1916 and few consider what happened in the area before the British took over the line, part in later 1915 and some in 1916. In fact there was extensive fighting during the opening phase of he war, ...
The French on the Somme: August 1914-30 June 1916: From Serre to the River Somme
For many British visitors, the fighting in the Somme starts on 1 July 1916 and few consider what happened in the area before the British took over the line, part in later 1915 and some in 1916. In fact there was extensive fighting during the opening phase of he war, as both the French and Germans tried to outflank each other. Through the autumn and winter there was a struggle to hold the best tactical ground, with small scale but ferocious skirmishes from Beaumont Hamel to the Somme. The conflict in what became known as the Glory Hole, close to the well known Lochnagar Crater, was particularly prolonged. Evidence of the fighting, mainly in the form of a large mine crater field, is visible today. The underground war was not confined to la Boisselle, with a similar crater field developing on Redan Ridge; whilst south of the Somme, to be covered in a future volume, great lengths of No Man's Land were dominated by mine craters. Serre, best known to British readers for its association with the Pals Battalions on 1 July 1916, witnessed a significant, if local, French offensive in June 1915, with casualties running into the several thousands. It is a battle that has left its mark on the landscape today, with a French national cemetery and a commemorative chapel acting as memorials to the battle. The book is introduced by a chapter describing the role of the area in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71, a war which arguably provided the seed bed for the outbreak of war in 1914. Several battles were fought in Somme villages that were to become the victims of war all over again forty plus years later.
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25.58 USD

The French on the Somme: August 1914-30 June 1916: From Serre to the River Somme

by David O'Mara
Paperback
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They knew it was the end. Weakened by four years of war, the reality had finally dawned on the Germans that their armies could never stop the combined might of the Allied forces, now bolstered by the fresh, enthusiastic Americans, who were now determined to be involved in the conflict ...
Hero on the Western Front: Discovering Sergeant York's WWI Battlefield
They knew it was the end. Weakened by four years of war, the reality had finally dawned on the Germans that their armies could never stop the combined might of the Allied forces, now bolstered by the fresh, enthusiastic Americans, who were now determined to be involved in the conflict that had engulfed the world. The US effort in 1918, in what became known as the Hundred Days Offensive, was focused on the Argonne Forest. It was there that 1,200,000 men were deployed in what was to be the largest offensive in the United States' military history. It was in the fighting in the Argonne Forest that one of the most remarkable incidents in the entire First World War took place. In October 1918, Corporal Alvin Cullum York single-handedly captured 132 Germans and killed twenty-one in a desperate fire-fight. York's battalion of the 328th Infantry Regiment had become pinned down by heavy machine-gun and artillery fire. Its commander sent Sergeant Bernard Early, four non-commissioned officers, including the recently promoted Corporal York, and thirteen privates to infiltrate the German positions and neutralise the machine-guns. The small American force came upon a large group of enemy troops having breakfast, and these were taken prisoner. They then came under fire from German machine-guns which left eight men were killed or wounded and York as the senior NCO. York and the survivors returned fire and silenced the enemy, allowing the Americans to rejoin their battalion with the 132 prisoners in tow. York was promoted to Sergeant and he received the Congressional Medal of Honor. The site of this famous action was believed to have been identified in 2009 and a memorial erected by the French authorities. However, a team of archaeologists, with help from the French Department of Archaeology and the use of modern day Geographic Information Science, believe that the memorial is incorrectly situated, and have uncovered thousands of exhibits to support their claim. Complete with detailed plans and diagrams, and a rich variety of photographs of locations and artefacts, Michael Kelly presents not only a fascinating account of York's determined courage, but also a detective story as the team unravels the evidence to reveal the exact ravine where the most famous US military action of the First World War took place.
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42.66 USD

Hero on the Western Front: Discovering Sergeant York's WWI Battlefield

by Michael Kelly
Hardback
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British women of the Eastern Front explores the experiences of a range of women from the early days of 1914, through the big events of the war on the Eastern Front. Their diaries, letters, memoirs and journalism are used to investigate the extraordinary role played by British women during the ...
British Women of the Eastern Front: War, Writing and Experience in Serbia and Russia, 1914-20
British women of the Eastern Front explores the experiences of a range of women from the early days of 1914, through the big events of the war on the Eastern Front. Their diaries, letters, memoirs and journalism are used to investigate the extraordinary role played by British women during the fall of Serbia, the Russian Revolution and the final push, and their role in reconstruction following the Armistice. These women, and their writings, are examined through the multiple lenses of gender, nationality, patriotism, imperialism and legacy, but the book also tells the stories of individuals, and will appeal across audiences to students, researchers and general readers. This is the first book to examine the war in the East through the eyes of British women and as such makes an important contribution to First World War Studies. -- .
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42.66 USD

British Women of the Eastern Front: War, Writing and Experience in Serbia and Russia, 1914-20

by Angela Smith
Paperback / softback
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Analysis of two recently discovered diaries affords a new way of looking at Catholic chaplain's roles, responsibilities, fears, and dilemmas. Accompanying the fighting soldiers in Picardy, Flanders, and Artois, these diarist-chaplains daily recorded their first-hand experiences; telling us much about life at the Front, the nature of war, the Catholic ...
Faith of Our Fathers: Catholic Chaplains with the British Army on the Western Front 1916-19
Analysis of two recently discovered diaries affords a new way of looking at Catholic chaplain's roles, responsibilities, fears, and dilemmas. Accompanying the fighting soldiers in Picardy, Flanders, and Artois, these diarist-chaplains daily recorded their first-hand experiences; telling us much about life at the Front, the nature of war, the Catholic Church in action, the post-Armistice civil state of affairs. Daily accounts are punctuated by the deaths of colleagues, often a short distance away, and in this manner creating surreal situations in the same time frame and location by simple comparison. A range of emotions and incidents expose the absurdity, yet profundity, of war from the unlikely source of clergymen: from being arrested as a spy, to attending a soldier to be shot at dawn, from being allegedly drunk on duty, to a cover up of an officer's suicide. Chaplains as men are assessed from those who left primary and authenticated evidence, thereby minimalising the dangers of post-war sentimentalism or triumphalism, thus avoiding those studies which concentrate on the famous and ignore `ordinary' chaplains who had become anonymous. Drawing from Catholic chaplaincy evidence at large, historical and geographical contexts are accompanied by real day-to-day experiences. Paintings by a Catholic chaplain at the front add to the milieu. The diarist's encounters provide much of the data as they served on the Somme in 1916, then Ypres and Arras in 1917. These tests of physical and mental endurance were nothing to compare with 1918, and particularly the German Spring Offensive. Each day of the assault will show the fear, desperation and panic of not only the military, but also the civilian population. The Catholic Church at war was uniquely universal; this meant that soldiers from all countries including Germany were catered for, as were French and Belgian civilians, and anybody who sought Catholic services. A universal Church requires a broad social composition, accordingly and fortunately, both diarists occupied opposite ends of the Catholic social spectrum. Their personalities were diverse and colourful and together ought to dovetail with their counterparts in the British Army from soldier to officer. But given the prevailing contemporary climate where sectarianism and secularism, class snobbery and racism, were deeply embedded, would accommodation for both sides be possible? This raises the fundamental question within Catholic circles: was it possible to balance the responsibilities and duties of a priest in khaki with an officer in the British Army, and if so to what degree? Were they `True to Thee Till Death'? Fr Gill sets the tone for a chaplain's life: `Not the kind of life to select as an amusement - but there will be plenty to do'. This study uniquely reveals the roles and dilemmas of Catholic chaplains after the Armistice to demobilisation. Despite the Armistice of November 11th the Army did not melt away. Clearing up operations and potential military dangers needed to be addressed before the conclusion of war on June 28th 1919. Gillett and Steuart provide insights of this period. The former in France, witnessed the civil efforts of reconstruction and the British Army's own role, whilst enjoying French joie de vivre and religious culture but always empathising with `ordinary folk'. The latter in Germany, prepared for military intervention in the eventuality of non-compliance to treaty terms and contented himself with the officer class, mess duties, and high culture. Their contrasting personalities are striking, their spiritual consistency remarkable, defining their missions as successful within the Catholic project.
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59.72 USD

Faith of Our Fathers: Catholic Chaplains with the British Army on the Western Front 1916-19

by Stephen Bellis
Hardback
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The follow-up to Bloody April 1917 continues fifteen months later into World War I. Much had happened over this period. More battles had been fought, won and lost on both sides, but now the American strength was feeding in to France with both men and material. With the mighty push ...
Black September 1918: WWI's Darkest Month in the Air
The follow-up to Bloody April 1917 continues fifteen months later into World War I. Much had happened over this period. More battles had been fought, won and lost on both sides, but now the American strength was feeding in to France with both men and material. With the mighty push on the French/American Front at St Mihiel on 12 September and then along the Meuse-Argonne Front from the 26th, once more masses of men and aircraft were put into the air. They were opposed by no less a formidable German fighter force than had the squadrons in April 1917 although the numbers were not in their favour. Nevertheless, the German fighter pilots were able to inflict an even larger toll of British, French and American aircraft shot down, making this the worst month for the Allied flyers during the whole of World War I - and this just a mere six weeks from the war's bloody finale. As with their previous book, the authors of Black September 1918 have analysed the daily events throughout September with the use of lists of casualties and claims from both sides. The book also contains seven detailed appendices examining the victory claims of all the air forces that fought during September 1918. Although it is difficult to pin-point exactly who was fighting who high above the trenches, by pouring over maps and carefully studying almost all the surviving records, the picture of `who got who' in the air slowly begins to emerge with deadly accuracy. Coinciding with the centenary of the end of World War I, Black September 1918 is a profusely illustrated and essential reference piece to understanding one of the crucial months of war in the skies.
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34.12 USD

Black September 1918: WWI's Darkest Month in the Air

by Norman Franks
Paperback / softback
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Striking where the enemy is weakest and melting away into the darkness before he can react. Never confronting a stronger force directly, but willing to use audacity and surprise to confound and demoralize an opponent. Operations driven by good intelligence, area knowledge, mobility, speed, firepower, and detailed planning and executed ...
Masters of Mayhem: Lawrence of Arabia and the British Military Mission to the Hejaz
Striking where the enemy is weakest and melting away into the darkness before he can react. Never confronting a stronger force directly, but willing to use audacity and surprise to confound and demoralize an opponent. Operations driven by good intelligence, area knowledge, mobility, speed, firepower, and detailed planning and executed by a few specialists with indigenous warriors - this is unconventional warfare. T. E. Lawrence was one of the earliest practitioners of modern unconventional warfare. His tactics and strategies were used by men like Mao and Giap in their wars of liberation. Both kept Lawrence's Seven Pillars of Wisdom close at hand. This book looks at the creation of the HEDGEHOG force, the formation of armoured car sections and other units, and focuses the Hejaz Operations Staff, the Allied officers and men who took Lawrence's idea and prosecuted it against the Ottoman Turkish army assisting Field Marshal Allenby to achieve victory in 1918. Stejskal concludes with an examination of how HEDGEHOG has influenced special operations and unconventional warfare, including Field Marshal Wavell, the Long Range Desert Group, and David Stirling's SAS.
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34.11 USD

Masters of Mayhem: Lawrence of Arabia and the British Military Mission to the Hejaz

by James Stejskal
Hardback
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An advertisement in the sheet music of the song Goodbye Broadway, Hello France (1917) announces: Music will help win the war! This ad hits upon an American sentiment expressed not just in advertising, but heard from other sectors of society during the American engagement in the First World War. It ...
Singing, Soldiering, and Sheet Music in America during the First World War
An advertisement in the sheet music of the song Goodbye Broadway, Hello France (1917) announces: Music will help win the war! This ad hits upon an American sentiment expressed not just in advertising, but heard from other sectors of society during the American engagement in the First World War. It was an idea both imagined and practiced, from military culture to sheet music writers, about the power of music to help create a strong military and national community in the face of the conflict; it appears straightforward. Nevertheless, the published sheet music, in addition to discourse about gender, soldiering and music, evince a more complex picture of society. This book presents a study of sheet music and military singing practices in America during the First World War that critically situates them in the social discourses, including issues of segregation and suffrage, and the historical context of the war. The transfer of musical styles between the civilian and military realm was fluid because so many men were enlisted from homes with the sheet music while they were also singing songs in their military training. Close musical analysis brings the meaningful musical and lyrical expressions of this time period to the forefront of our understanding of soldier and civilian music making at this time.
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51.10 USD

Singing, Soldiering, and Sheet Music in America during the First World War

by Christina Gier
Paperback / softback
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Although civilian internment has become associated with the Second World War in popular memory, it has a longer history. The turning point in this history occurred during the First World War when, in the interests of `security' in a situation of total war, the internment of `enemy aliens' became part ...
Internment during the First World War: A Mass Global Phenomenon
Although civilian internment has become associated with the Second World War in popular memory, it has a longer history. The turning point in this history occurred during the First World War when, in the interests of `security' in a situation of total war, the internment of `enemy aliens' became part of state policy for the belligerent states, resulting in the incarceration, displacement and, in more extreme cases, the death by neglect or deliberate killing of hundreds of thousands of people throughout the world. This pioneering book on internment during the First World War brings together international experts to investigate the importance of the conflict for the history of civilian incarceration.
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179.16 USD

Internment during the First World War: A Mass Global Phenomenon

Hardback
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Patented in 1898 and produced from 1900, Georg Luger's iconic semi-automatic pistol became synonymous with Germany's armed forces throughout both world wars. Initially chambered for the 7.65x21mm round, from 1902 the Luger was designed for DWM's 9x19mm round, which even today remains the most popular military handgun cartridge. It was ...
The Luger
Patented in 1898 and produced from 1900, Georg Luger's iconic semi-automatic pistol became synonymous with Germany's armed forces throughout both world wars. Initially chambered for the 7.65x21mm round, from 1902 the Luger was designed for DWM's 9x19mm round, which even today remains the most popular military handgun cartridge. It was adopted by the Imperial German Navy in 1904, followed by the German Army in 1908, receiving the name Pistole 08. Despite being supplanted by the Walther P38, the Luger remained in widespread service with all arms of Nazi Germany's armed forces throughout World War II, and even equipped East Germany's Volkpolizei in the years after 1945. Featuring full-colour artwork, expert analysis and archive and present-day photographs, this engaging study tells the story of the Luger, the distinctive and deadly semi-automatic pistol that has come to symbolize Germany's armed forces in the 20th century.
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22.17 USD

The Luger

by Neil Grant
Paperback / softback
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Hans Rose was one of Germany's most successful WWI U-boat aces, and her most successful ace during the convoy period when attacks by U-boats were most difficult and dangerous. Acknowledging his chivalry, Admiral Sims USN declared `Allied naval officers would be willing today to shake [his] hand.' This book is ...
Der Kapitan: U-Boat Ace Hans Rose
Hans Rose was one of Germany's most successful WWI U-boat aces, and her most successful ace during the convoy period when attacks by U-boats were most difficult and dangerous. Acknowledging his chivalry, Admiral Sims USN declared `Allied naval officers would be willing today to shake [his] hand.' This book is the only time the Rose family has agreed to make Hans Rose's personal papers available to any researcher or biographer. The authors present new information from the Krupp archives and naval archives in Britain, US, and Germany.
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34.12 USD

Der Kapitan: U-Boat Ace Hans Rose

by Markus Robinson
Hardback
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* This is a true story. * Percy, the protagonist, was sent to the front in 1918 and was dead three weeks later. * Written by Peter Doyle, well know historical author and WW1 historian
Percy A Story of 1918
* This is a true story. * Percy, the protagonist, was sent to the front in 1918 and was dead three weeks later. * Written by Peter Doyle, well know historical author and WW1 historian
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25.58 USD

Percy A Story of 1918

by Peter Doyle
Paperback
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2018 sees the centenary commemorations for the end of WW1 Seen as one of the most important and successful battles of WW1 lasting only 90 minutes with very few casualties Also this was the first time the Americans were engaged in fighting in WW1 Full UK publicity and marketing campaign
Hamel 4th July 1918: The Australian & American Triumph
2018 sees the centenary commemorations for the end of WW1 Seen as one of the most important and successful battles of WW1 lasting only 90 minutes with very few casualties Also this was the first time the Americans were engaged in fighting in WW1 Full UK publicity and marketing campaign
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25.58 USD

Hamel 4th July 1918: The Australian & American Triumph

by John Hughes-Wilson
Paperback / softback
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In 1930 wealthy Scottish socialite Dorothy Brooke followed her new husband to Cairo, where she discovered thousands of suffering former British war horses leading lives of toil and misery. Brought to the Middle East by British forces during the Great War, these ex-cavalry horses had been left behind at the ...
The Lost War Horses of Cairo: The Passion of Dorothy Brooke
In 1930 wealthy Scottish socialite Dorothy Brooke followed her new husband to Cairo, where she discovered thousands of suffering former British war horses leading lives of toil and misery. Brought to the Middle East by British forces during the Great War, these ex-cavalry horses had been left behind at the war's end, abandoned as used equipment too costly to send home. Grant Hayter-Menzies chronicles not only the lives and eventual rescue of these noble creatures, who after years of deprivation and suffering found respite in the Old War Horse Memorial Hospital established by Dorothy, but also the story of the challenges of founding and maintaining an animal-rescue institution on this scale. The legacy of the Old War Horse Memorial Hospital and its founder endures today in the dozens of international Brooke animal-welfare facilities dedicated to improving the lives of working horses, donkeys and mules across Africa, Asia and Latin America.
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15.34 USD

The Lost War Horses of Cairo: The Passion of Dorothy Brooke

by Grant Hayter-Menzies
Paperback / softback
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1918: The Fight for Victory. The Decisive Year in Soldiers' Own Words and Photographs is the next volume in the remarkable series of books from the best-selling First World War historian Richard van Emden. Revisiting the winning formula of diaries and memoirs, and above all original photographs taken on illegally-held ...
1918: The Final Year of the Great War to Armistice
1918: The Fight for Victory. The Decisive Year in Soldiers' Own Words and Photographs is the next volume in the remarkable series of books from the best-selling First World War historian Richard van Emden. Revisiting the winning formula of diaries and memoirs, and above all original photographs taken on illegally-held cameras by the soldiers themselves, Richard tells the story of 1918, of both the ferocious spring offensive that so nearly brought victory for the Germans in the West, and the tenacious British rearguard fight that thwarted them. The book also tells the vivid story of the Allied breakthrough and the return to open warfare that was to bring victory in November 1918. His previous books, The Road to Passchendaele and The Somme have sold over 30,000 copies in hardback and softback, proving that the public appetite is undiminished for new, original stories illustrated with over 150 rarely or never-before-seen battlefield images. The author has an outstanding collection of over 5,000 privately-taken and overwhelmingly unpublished photographs, revealing the war as it was seen by the men involved, an existence that was sometimes exhilarating, too often terrifying, and occasionally even fun. This book will be published in September 2018, in time for the 100th anniversary of the Armistice and the national commemorations that will mark the end of the four-year-long series of centennial events to mark the Great War.
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42.66 USD

1918: The Final Year of the Great War to Armistice

by Richard Van Emden
Hardback
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First World War commemoration in Europe has been framed as a moment of national trial and as a collective European tragedy. But the `Great War for Civilisation' was more than just a European conflict. It was in fact a global war, a clash of empires that began a process of ...
Commemorating Race and Empire in the First World War Centenary
First World War commemoration in Europe has been framed as a moment of national trial and as a collective European tragedy. But the `Great War for Civilisation' was more than just a European conflict. It was in fact a global war, a clash of empires that began a process of nationalist agitation against imperial polities and the racisms that underpinned them in Asia, Africa and beyond. Despite the global context of Centenary commemorative activity these events remain framed by national and state imaginaries and ones in which the ideas about nation, race and imperialism that animated and dominated men and women during the Great War sit uncomfortably with modern sensibilities. By drawing on original archival research, translations from French and Mandarin into English and by employing multidisciplinary conceptual frames of analysis this exciting and innovative volume explores how race and empire, and racism and imperialism, were commemorated or forgotten during the First World War Centenary.
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59.72 USD

Commemorating Race and Empire in the First World War Centenary

Paperback / softback
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Volume 3 carries the story of the XIV Reserve Corps through the momentous Battle of the Somme and into 1917, a period of transition for the German Army. The old tactics and strategy of trench warfare would undergo great changes as the German Army was transformed from a military force ...
The Other Side of the Wire Volume 3: With the XIV Reserve Corps: the Period of Transition 2 July 1916-August 1917
Volume 3 carries the story of the XIV Reserve Corps through the momentous Battle of the Somme and into 1917, a period of transition for the German Army. The old tactics and strategy of trench warfare would undergo great changes as the German Army was transformed from a military force rooted in the 19th Century into a modern 20th Century fighting force with new strategies and tactics. The concept of a continuous trench system was being transformed into a defense in depth as a direct result of a shortage of men in the German Army. The reader will experience the withdrawal to the Siegfried Stellung (Hindenburg Line) and the subsequent fighting by Arras and trench warfare by Verdun and in the Champagne. What was not known to the rank and file during this time were the difficulties facing the German High Command in regard to manpower problems, and the huge consumption of critical resources resulting from fighting on numerous battle fronts. It was a time when Germany began to realize that something needed to change otherwise the war could be lost. It was a time for bold ideas and new strategies, tactics and weapons that could sustain the German Army as the war entered its third year. The reader will follow the men of the XIV Reserve Corps in their own words as they experienced the transformation of the German Army through Feldpost letters and previously unseen first-hand accounts. They will also see how the Allies changed the way they fought the war as new weapons and tactics appeared on the battlefield. It would be a volatile period during the war that became the basis for the final act of the war, the preparation and execution of the German offensives of 1918 and the eventual end of the war that will be covered in the fourth and final volume of this series.
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94.450000 USD

The Other Side of the Wire Volume 3: With the XIV Reserve Corps: the Period of Transition 2 July 1916-August 1917

by Ralph Whitehead
Hardback
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Sandwiched between the better-known Battles of the Somme and Passchendaele, the Battle of Arras has scarcely received the attention it deserves. It was an important battle on several levels. It was conceived and fought in support of the French effort to win the war with one gigantic offensive initially targeting ...
A Battle Too Far: Arras 1917
Sandwiched between the better-known Battles of the Somme and Passchendaele, the Battle of Arras has scarcely received the attention it deserves. It was an important battle on several levels. It was conceived and fought in support of the French effort to win the war with one gigantic offensive initially targeting the Chemin des Dames. Preparations for it were sidetracked by the replacement of French Commander-in-Chief Joffre by General Robert Nivelle and the unsuccessful attempt by Prime Minister Lloyd George to subordinate Field Marshal Haig and the BEF to the new French C-in-C. Preparations were further slowed down by inter-allied disagreements over the sharing of railway facilities, BEF takeover of French-manned sectors of the Front and the appalling weather of the worst winter of the war. They were further thrown into confusion by the German decision to withdraw to the newly constructed Hindenburg Line, thereby not only conserving manpower but also forcing the Allies to maintain contact by advancing uncertainly over ground laid waste and booby-trapped. When the British finally attacked on 9 April 1917, that day proved to be the most successful of the war to that date for the BEF. The First Army's Canadian Corps all but completed the capture of the allegedly impregnable Vimy Ridge and the Third Army advanced further in one day than had ever previously been achieved. It would not last. The attack lost momentum and the Germans quickly began to recover from their early shocks. It proved more difficult than had been expected to capture and cling on to Monchy-le-Preux; the Fifth Army, launching its operation to capture Bullecourt village to assist Third Army's main thrust, found itself embroiled in a bitter struggle that would extend over the following five weeks. Over the course of the same period the First and Third Armies renewed their assaults on several occasions with the gains, if any, counted only in yards. The French launched their massive assault on 16 April. Although it achieved some success it soon became obvious that it was not going to deliver on the extravagant promises made for it by General Nivelle. It was this disappointment of expectations rather than anything else that led to the serious outbreaks of indiscipline in the French Army, amounting in many cases to mutiny. The implications for the BEF were significant. Nivelle had promised Haig that, if his offensive had not succeeded in 48 hours, he would call it off and throw his support behind Haig's planned offensive in Flanders to clear the Belgian coast. Nivelle now showed no inclination to fulfil this promise, seemingly content to revert to the familiar Western Front attritional battles. Fully aware of his ally's disciplinary crisis, Haig felt the need to support the French by prolonging the Battle of Arras well past the date when it would achieve anything of value. This led to the assaults described above and casualty lists that on a per day basis were the worst recorded in any battle fought by the British in World War One. With Haig's attention being increasingly distracted by his growing focus on Flanders, the Battle of Arras drifted to a close, a catalogue of unfulfilled promise and failure. There were several reasons for the final disappointing outcome. The tanks proved almost entirely ineffective, not surprisingly considering they consisted of obsolescent models with inadequate protection from German artillery, which had learnt of their vulnerability. The artillery had still not overcome the problem of getting forward over self-churned up ground in time to offer adequate support to follow-up infantry assaults. They were not helped by the damage being wrought on the RFC by the all-conquering German fighter squadrons, especially during `Bloody April'. The cavalry once again demonstrated that it was largely unsuited for use on a modern battlefield. The author has examined in some detail the political, military and inter-allied aspects of the lead up to the Battle. He has then looked closely at the BEF and French plans and operations within the framework of the Battle of Arras and the Second Battle of the Aisne (Chemin des Dames). He evaluates the performances of the involved Allied armies and their leaders. Finally he looks at their careers and lives following the events of April-May 1917.
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52.450000 USD

A Battle Too Far: Arras 1917

by Don Farr
Hardback
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