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SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE BRITISH ARMY MILITARY BOOK OF THE YEAR 2016 'Truly essential' Simon Sebag Montefiore The final destruction of the Ottoman Empire - one of the great epics of the First World War, from bestselling historian Eugene Rogan For some four centuries the Ottoman ...
The Fall of the Ottomans: The Great War in the Middle East, 1914-1920
SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE BRITISH ARMY MILITARY BOOK OF THE YEAR 2016 'Truly essential' Simon Sebag Montefiore The final destruction of the Ottoman Empire - one of the great epics of the First World War, from bestselling historian Eugene Rogan For some four centuries the Ottoman Empire had been one of the most powerful states in Europe as well as ruler of the Middle East. By 1914 it had been drastically weakened and circled by numerous predators waiting to finish it off. Following the Ottoman decision to join the First World War on the side of the Central Powers the British, French and Russians hatched a plan to finish the Ottomans off: an ambitious and unprecedented invasion of Gallipoli... Eugene Rogan's remarkable book recreates one of the most important but poorly understood fronts of the First World War. Despite fighting back with great skill and ferocity against the Allied onslaught and humiliating the British both at Gallipoli and in Mesopotamia (Iraq), the Ottomans were ultimately defeated, clearing the way for the making, for better or worse, of a new Middle East which has endured to the present.
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17.32 USD

The Fall of the Ottomans: The Great War in the Middle East, 1914-1920

by Eugene Rogan
Paperback / softback
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Before the outbreak of the First World War, the Channel Islands were viewed as they are today; scenic, sunny and relaxing holiday destinations, where it was possible to briefly escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. As soon as the fighting began, the immediate worry was the threat ...
The Channel Islands in the Great War
Before the outbreak of the First World War, the Channel Islands were viewed as they are today; scenic, sunny and relaxing holiday destinations, where it was possible to briefly escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. As soon as the fighting began, the immediate worry was the threat of a German invasion to the Islands, which are much closer to the coast line of France than they are to the southern coast line of Great Britain. Both men and women alike played their part. Men by either joining one of the islands Militia or enlisting in one of the numerous regiments of the British Army, including the 'Jersey Pals', and the men who served with the Royal Irish Fusiliers, the Royal Irish Rifles and the Royal Irish Regiment. The book looks at the pride in the commitment and achievements of the Channel Islands' very own Royal Guernsey Light Infantry, formed in December 1916. The Islands' women volunteered in their droves to serve with the British Red Cross' Voluntary Aid Detachments, but not just throughout the Channel Islands, but to mainland Great Britain, and further afield in Belgium and France and other similar theatres of war. As far as most people are aware, the first time German soldiers stepped foot in the Channel Islands, was when their troops landed unopposed in June 1940 during the Second World War. However, between 1915 and 1917, some 2,000 German prisoners of war, were held captive at the Les Blanches Banques camp. The book closes by taking a look at the men from all of the Islands who voluntarily went off to war, and ended up paying the ultimate price and didn't make it back home to their loved ones.
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25.58 USD

The Channel Islands in the Great War

by Stephen Wynn
Paperback / softback
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Translated into English as the Winner of the Geisteswissenschaften International Translation Prize for Work in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2015. During the Great War, mass killing took place on an unprecedented scale. Violence and the German Soldier in the Great War explores the practice of violence in the German ...
Violence and the German Soldier in the Great War: Killing, Dying, Surviving
Translated into English as the Winner of the Geisteswissenschaften International Translation Prize for Work in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2015. During the Great War, mass killing took place on an unprecedented scale. Violence and the German Soldier in the Great War explores the practice of violence in the German army and demonstrates how he killing of enemy troops, the deaths of German soldiers and their survival were entwined. As the war reached its climax in 1918, German soldiers refused to continue killing in their droves, and thus made an active contribution to the German defeat and ensuing revolution. Examining the postwar period, the chapters of this book also discuss the contested issue of a `brutalization' of German society as a prerequisite of the Nazi mass movement. Biographical case studies on key figures such as Ernst Junger demonstrate how the killing of enemy troops by German soldiers followed a complex set of rules. Benjamin Ziemann makes a wealth of extensive archival work available to an Anglophone audience for the first time, enhancing our understanding of the German army and its practices of violence during the First World War as well as the implications of this brutalization in post-war Germany. This book provides new insights into a crucial topic for students of twentieth-century German history and the First World War.
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41.950000 USD

Violence and the German Soldier in the Great War: Killing, Dying, Surviving

by Benjamin Ziemann
Paperback / softback
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This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. It is free to read at Oxford Scholarship Online and offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations. An Equal Burden is the first scholarly study of the ...
An Equal Burden: The Men of the Royal Army Medical Corps in the First World War
This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. It is free to read at Oxford Scholarship Online and offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations. An Equal Burden is the first scholarly study of the Army Medical Services in the First World War to focus on the roles and experiences of the men of the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC). Though they were not professional medical caregivers, they were called upon to provide urgent medical care and, as non-combatants, were forbidden from carrying weapons. Their role in the war effort was quite unique and warranting of further study. Structured both chronologically and thematically, An Equal Burden examines the work that RAMC rankers undertook and its importance to the running of the chain of medical evacuation. It additionally explores the gendered status of these men within the medical, military, and cultural hierarchies of a society engaged in total war. Through close readings of official documents, personal papers, and cultural representations, Meyer argues that the ranks of the RAMC formed a space in which non-commissioned servicemen, through their many roles, defined and redefined medical caregiving as men's work in wartime.
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110.91 USD

An Equal Burden: The Men of the Royal Army Medical Corps in the First World War

by Jessica Meyer
Hardback
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This text provides an innovative global military history that joins three periods-World War I, the interwar years, and World War II. Jeremy Black offers a comprehensive survey of both wars, comparing continuities and differences. He traces the causes of each war and assesses land, sea, and air warfare as separate ...
The World at War, 1914-1945
This text provides an innovative global military history that joins three periods-World War I, the interwar years, and World War II. Jeremy Black offers a comprehensive survey of both wars, comparing continuities and differences. He traces the causes of each war and assesses land, sea, and air warfare as separate dimensions. He argues that the unprecedented nature of the two wars owed much to the demographic and industrial strength of the states involved and their ability and determination to mobilize vast resources. Yet the demands of the world wars also posed major difficulties, not simply in sustaining the struggle but also in conceiving of practical strategies and operational methods in the heat and competition of ever-evolving conflict. In this process, resources, skills, leadership, morale, and alliance cohesion all proved significant. In addition to his military focus, Black considers other key dimensions of the conflicts, especially political and social influences and impacts. He thoroughly integrates the interwar years, tracing the significant continuities between the two world wars. He emphasizes how essential American financial, industrial, agricultural, and energy resources were to the Allies-both before and after the United States entered each war. Bringing the two world wars to life, Black sheds light not only on both as individual conflicts but also on the interwoven relationships between the two.
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40.950000 USD

The World at War, 1914-1945

by Jeremy Black
Paperback / softback
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Launched in 1914, two years after the ill-fated voyage of her sister ship, RMS Titanic, the Britannic was intended to be superior to her tragic twin in every way. But war intervened and in 1915 she was requisitioned as a hospital ship. Just one year later, while on her way ...
Exploring the Britannic: The life, last voyage and wreck of Titanic's tragic twin
Launched in 1914, two years after the ill-fated voyage of her sister ship, RMS Titanic, the Britannic was intended to be superior to her tragic twin in every way. But war intervened and in 1915 she was requisitioned as a hospital ship. Just one year later, while on her way to collect troops wounded in the Balkans campaign, she fell victim to a mine laid by a German U-boat and tragically sank in the middle of the Aegean Sea. There her wreck lay, at a depth of 400 feet, until it was discovered 59 years later by legendary explorer Jacques Cousteau. In 1996 the wreck was bought by the author of this book, Simon Mills. Exploring the Britannic tells the complete story of this enigmatic ship: her construction, launch and life, her fateful last voyage, and the historical findings resulting from the exploration of the well-preserved wreck over a period of 40 years. With remarkable sonar scans and many never before seen photographs of the wreck, plus fold-out sections of the original Harland & Wolff ship plans, not previously published in their entirety, Exploring the Britannic finally details how the mysteries surrounding the 100-year-old enigma were laid to rest, and what the future might also hold for her.
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42.66 USD

Exploring the Britannic: The life, last voyage and wreck of Titanic's tragic twin

by Simon Mills
Hardback
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Contains previously unpublished material. An interesting story which, through the eyes of an ordinary soldier, touches on much of the Great War's major events, embracing the unusual circumstances of marriage to a French girl while the war still raged and leading into post-war work in France with the Imperial War ...
A Bradford Pal: `It was Simply Heart Breaking' - From Mill Town to the Battlefields of France
Contains previously unpublished material. An interesting story which, through the eyes of an ordinary soldier, touches on much of the Great War's major events, embracing the unusual circumstances of marriage to a French girl while the war still raged and leading into post-war work in France with the Imperial War Graves Commission. A family history of an individual soldier written by his surviving son.
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34.12 USD

A Bradford Pal: `It was Simply Heart Breaking' - From Mill Town to the Battlefields of France

by John Broadhead
Hardback
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Frederick Whirlpool's Victoria Cross is displayed near the entrance to the Hall of Valour at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. It was the first VC pinned to an Australian uniform, yet almost nothing was known about its enigmatic recipient. Two acts of valour during the Indian Mutiny won him the ...
Frederick Whirlpool VC: The Hidden Victoria Cross
Frederick Whirlpool's Victoria Cross is displayed near the entrance to the Hall of Valour at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. It was the first VC pinned to an Australian uniform, yet almost nothing was known about its enigmatic recipient. Two acts of valour during the Indian Mutiny won him the Victoria Cross, but 17 severe sword wounds ended his career. After migrating to Australia in 1859, he became a volunteer rifleman and school teacher. His VC was presented in Melbourne in 1861\. He applied to join the Victorian Police, but corruption and unsolicited political interference prevented it. Repulsed by fame, he fled and hid his cross from the world. Fragments of his story were known, but since 1895, they have been tainted by error and guesswork. This new book reveals his true identity and early life in Ireland, before he joined the East India Company Army and sailed to India. Frederick Whirlpool VC is the fascinating history of an ordinary man, whose life is deserving of factual interpretation. It is a story of heroism, suffering and failure, but this forgotten man will triumph in its telling: the true story of this sad and purposefully enigmatic hero.
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34.11 USD

Frederick Whirlpool VC: The Hidden Victoria Cross

by Leek, Alan
Hardback
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The centenary of the First World War captured the hearts of the nation. From community activities and war memorial restorations to large-scale national ceremonial events, this highly illustrated publication captures the variety and breadth of the events that took place to commemorate this significant milestone in our nation's history. As ...
The Centenary of the First World War: How The Nation Remembered
The centenary of the First World War captured the hearts of the nation. From community activities and war memorial restorations to large-scale national ceremonial events, this highly illustrated publication captures the variety and breadth of the events that took place to commemorate this significant milestone in our nation's history. As well as the large-scale events commemorating some of the major battles of the First World War, a diverse range of other activities also took place over the centenary. These included projects funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, activities organised by the Imperial War Museums' Centenary Partnership, the ground-breaking artistic and cultural programme delivered by 14-18 NOW, and many other touching events from communities and groups around the UK. Many are showcased in this special limited edition publication, as a lasting reminder of `how we remembered'.
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51.19 USD

The Centenary of the First World War: How The Nation Remembered

Hardback
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The Great War is still seen as a mostly European war. The Middle Eastern theater is, at best, considered a sideshow written from the western perspective. This book fills an important gap in the literature by giving an insight through annotated translations from five Ottoman memoirs, previously not available in ...
The Ottoman Twilight in the Arab Lands: Turkish Testimonies and Memories of the Great War
The Great War is still seen as a mostly European war. The Middle Eastern theater is, at best, considered a sideshow written from the western perspective. This book fills an important gap in the literature by giving an insight through annotated translations from five Ottoman memoirs, previously not available in English, of actors who witnessed the last few years of Turkish presence in the Arab lands. It provides the historical background to many of the crises in the Middle East today, such as the Arab-Israeli confrontation, the conflict-ridden emergence of Syria and Lebanon, the struggle over the holy places of Islam in the Hejaz, and the mutual prejudices of Arabs and Turks about each other.
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42.58 USD

The Ottoman Twilight in the Arab Lands: Turkish Testimonies and Memories of the Great War

Paperback / softback
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This action-packed narrative history of destroyer-class ships begins with destroyers' first incarnation as torpedo boats in 1898 through the last true combat service of the ships in the Vietnam War. Nicknamed tin cans or greyhounds, destroyers were quick naval ships used to defend larger battleships-and they proved indispensable in America's ...
Tin Cans and Greyhounds: The Destroyers that Won Two World Wars
This action-packed narrative history of destroyer-class ships begins with destroyers' first incarnation as torpedo boats in 1898 through the last true combat service of the ships in the Vietnam War. Nicknamed tin cans or greyhounds, destroyers were quick naval ships used to defend larger battleships-and they proved indispensable in America's military victories. In Tin Cans and Greyhounds, author Clint Johnson brings readers inside the quarter-inch hulls of destroyers to meet the men who manned the ships' five-inch guns and fought America's wars from inside a tin can -risking death by cannon shell, shrapnel, bomb, fire, drowning, exposure, and sharks.
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31.490000 USD

Tin Cans and Greyhounds: The Destroyers that Won Two World Wars

by Clint Johnson
Hardback
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American Prisoner of War Camps in Northern California describes the impact of the large number of prisoners of war on the population of Northern California, as well as the impact of the people of Northern California on those imprisoned there. Providing detail on the care and employment of prisoners of ...
American Prisoner of War Camps in Northern California
American Prisoner of War Camps in Northern California describes the impact of the large number of prisoners of war on the population of Northern California, as well as the impact of the people of Northern California on those imprisoned there. Providing detail on the care and employment of prisoners of war according to the Geneva Convention of 1929, the lives of POWs in this region is illustrated, along with the details of camp locations in Northern California and the deaths and burials that occurred among them. Some prisoner names are included, as well as references to source materials at various repositories. Historical photographs serve to provide depth to the story.
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25.190000 USD

American Prisoner of War Camps in Northern California

by Kathy Kirkpatrick
Paperback / softback
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Traditionally, in general studies of the First World War, the Middle East is an arena of combat that has been portrayed in romanticised terms, in stark contrast to the mud, blood, and presumed futility of the Western Front. Battles fought in Egypt, Palestine, Mesopotamia, and Arabia offered a different narrative ...
The Great War in the Middle East: A Clash of Empires
Traditionally, in general studies of the First World War, the Middle East is an arena of combat that has been portrayed in romanticised terms, in stark contrast to the mud, blood, and presumed futility of the Western Front. Battles fought in Egypt, Palestine, Mesopotamia, and Arabia offered a different narrative on the Great War, one in which the agency of individual figures was less neutered by heavy artillery. As with the historiography of the Western Front, which has been the focus of sustained inquiry since the mid-1960s, such assumptions about the Middle East have come under revision in the last two decades - a reflection of an emerging `global turn' in the history of the First World War. The `sideshow' theatres of the Great War - Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Pacific - have come under much greater scrutiny from historians. The fifteen chapters in this volume cover a broad range of perspectives on the First World War in the Middle East, from strategic planning issues wrestled with by statesmen through to the experience of religious communities trying to survive in war zones. The chapter authors look at their specific topics through a global lens, relating their areas of research to wider arguments on the history of the First World War.
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179.16 USD

The Great War in the Middle East: A Clash of Empires

Hardback
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The aim of this book is to reconstruct the violent nature of the March on Rome and to emphasise its significance in demarcating a real break in the country's history and the beginning of the Fascist dictatorship. This aspect of the March has long been obscured: first by the Fascists' ...
The March on Rome: Violence and the Rise of Italian Fascism
The aim of this book is to reconstruct the violent nature of the March on Rome and to emphasise its significance in demarcating a real break in the country's history and the beginning of the Fascist dictatorship. This aspect of the March has long been obscured: first by the Fascists' celebratory project, and then by the ironic and reductive interpretation of the event put forward by anti-Fascists. This volume focuses on the role and purpose of Fascist political violence from its origins. In doing so, it highlights the conflictual nature of the March by illustrating the violent impact it had on Italian institutions as well as the importance of a debate on this political turning point in Italy and beyond. The volume also examines how the event crucially contributed to the construction of a dictatorial political regime in Italy in the weeks following Mussolini's appointment as head of the government. Originally published in Italian, this book fills a notable gap in current critical discussion surrounding the March in the English language.
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196.22 USD

The March on Rome: Violence and the Rise of Italian Fascism

by Giulia Albanese
Hardback
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A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press's Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. In the post-World War I American climate of isolationism, nativism, democratic expansion of civic rights, and consumerism, Italian-born star Rodolfo Valentino and Italy's dictator Benito Mussolini ...
The Divo and the Duce: Promoting Film Stardom and Political Leadership in 1920s America
A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press's Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. In the post-World War I American climate of isolationism, nativism, democratic expansion of civic rights, and consumerism, Italian-born star Rodolfo Valentino and Italy's dictator Benito Mussolini became surprising paragons of authoritarian male power and mass appeal. Drawing on extensive archival research in the United States and Italy, Giorgio Bertellini's work shows how their popularity, both political and erotic, largely depended on the efforts of public opinion managers, including publicists, journalists, and even ambassadors. Beyond the democratic celebrations of the Jazz Age, the promotion of their charismatic masculinity through spectacle and press coverage inaugurated the now-familiar convergence of popular celebrity and political authority. This is the first volume in the new Cinema Cultures in Contact series, coedited by Giorgio Bertellini, Richard Abel, and Matthew Solomon.
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36.700000 USD

The Divo and the Duce: Promoting Film Stardom and Political Leadership in 1920s America

by Giorgio Bertellini
Paperback / softback
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The historic city of Chester in Cheshire, in the north-west of England, experienced tragedies and hardships during the two World Wars. In the First World War many young men called up to fight in the conflict lost their lives, leaving communities bereft. On the Home Front, food shortages and the ...
Chester at War
The historic city of Chester in Cheshire, in the north-west of England, experienced tragedies and hardships during the two World Wars. In the First World War many young men called up to fight in the conflict lost their lives, leaving communities bereft. On the Home Front, food shortages and the demands of wartime work in manufacturing and other vital wartime industries changed life for all. In the Second World War the city of Chester was a direct target for aerial bombing raids, destroying many homes and familiar buildings with a significant loss of life. Communities learned to deal with rationing, air raids and large numbers of evacuees. Both wars had a devastating effect on local communities, but both were also a time of courage and fortitude in an effort to continue with everyday life. In this book, historian Mike Royden has captured the tribulations of the times in words and pictures, telling the stories of many local men, women and children during these trying periods. Chester at War pays tribute to the people of this city who served, died and lived through the two World Wars, and how they managed to endure in the face of the horrors of conflict.
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27.29 USD

Chester at War

by Mike Royden
Paperback / softback
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On 5 December 1965, the giant American aircraft carrier Ticonderoga was heading to Japan for rest and recreation for its 3,000 crew, following a month on `Yankee Station' launching missions against targets in Vietnam. Whilst fighting a real conflict and losing men in conventional warfare, Tico's primary mission was Cold ...
Broken Arrow: How the U.S. Navy Lost a Nuclear Bomb
On 5 December 1965, the giant American aircraft carrier Ticonderoga was heading to Japan for rest and recreation for its 3,000 crew, following a month on `Yankee Station' launching missions against targets in Vietnam. Whilst fighting a real conflict and losing men in conventional warfare, Tico's primary mission was Cold War nuclear combat with the Communist bloc. The cruise from the Yankee Station to Japan was used to practice procedures for Armageddon. Douglas Webster was a young pilot from Ohio, newly married and with seventeen combat missions under his belt. On that day in 1965 he strapped into an A-4 Skyhawk bomber for a routine weapons loading drill and simulated mission. After mishandling the manoeuvre, the plane and its pilot sunk to the bottom of the South China sea, along with a live B43 one-megaton thermonuclear bomb. A cover-up mission began. The crew was ordered to stay quiet, rumours circulate of sabotage, a damaged weapon and a troublesome pilot who needed `disposing of'. The incident, a `Broken Arrow' in the parlance of the Pentagon, was kept under wraps until 25 years later. The details that emerged caused a diplomatic incident, revealing that the U.S. had violated agreements not to bring nuclear weapons into Japan. Family members and the public only learnt the truth when researchers discovered archived documents that disclosed the true location of the carrier, hundreds of miles closer to land than admitted. Broken Arrow tells the story of Ticonderoga's sailors and airmen, the dangers of combat missions and shipboard life, and the accident that threatened to wipe her off the map and blow US-Japanese relations apart. For the first time, through previously classified documents, never before published photos of the accident aircraft and the recollections of those who were there, the story of carrier aviation's only `Broken Arrow' is told in full.
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34.600000 USD

Broken Arrow: How the U.S. Navy Lost a Nuclear Bomb

by Jim Winchester
Hardback
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Australia's extraordinary contribution to World War I extended well beyond its military forces to the expertise of its universities and professional men and women. Scientists and engineers oversaw the manufacture of munitions and the development of chemical weapons. Doctors sustained soldiers in the trenches, and treated the physically and psychologically ...
The First World War, the Universities and the Professions in Australia 1914-1939
Australia's extraordinary contribution to World War I extended well beyond its military forces to the expertise of its universities and professional men and women. Scientists and engineers oversaw the manufacture of munitions and the development of chemical weapons. Doctors sustained soldiers in the trenches, and treated the physically and psychologically damaged. Public servants, lawyers and translators were employed in the war bureaucracy, while artists and writers found new modes to convey the trauma of war. The graduates and staff of Australia's six universitiesaEURO Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Tasmania, Queensland and Western Australia and QueenslandaEURO were involved in this expansion of expertise. But what did these men and women do after the guns were silenced? How were the professions and universities transformed by the immediate and longer-term impacts of the war? The First World War, the Universities and the Professions examines how the technical and conceptual advances that occurred during World War I transformed Australian society. It traces the evolving role of universities and their graduates in the 1920s and 1930s, the increasing government validation of research, the expansion of the public service, and the rise of modern professional associations and international networks. While the war contributed to greater specialisations in traditional professions such as teaching or medicine, it also stimulated new jobs and trainingaEURO whether in economics, anthropology or graphic art. This volume provides a new account of the interwar years that places knowledge and expertise at the heart of the Australian story. Its four sectionsaEURO The Medical Sciences; Science and Technology; Humanities, Social Sciences and Teaching; and The Arts: Design, Music and WritingaEURO highlight how World War I disrupted and shaped the careers of individuals as well as the development of Australian society and institutions.
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65.69 USD

The First World War, the Universities and the Professions in Australia 1914-1939

by James Waghorne, Kate Darian-Smith
Paperback / softback
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The year 1919 has often been ignored in historians' dizzy haste to enter the world of the Roaring Twenties but it was a year of enormous challenges and change. After a brief period of celebration after the Armistice, reality began to sink in. Returning servicemen were resentful at the prospect ...
1919 - A Land Fit for Heroes: Britain at Peace
The year 1919 has often been ignored in historians' dizzy haste to enter the world of the Roaring Twenties but it was a year of enormous challenges and change. After a brief period of celebration after the Armistice, reality began to sink in. Returning servicemen were resentful at the prospect of unemployment and lack of available housing. Many of the troops had lost their jobs to women on lower rates of pay. Soon there were strikes, with soldiers and tanks on the streets of Britain. This is also the year in which The Troubles began in earnest. The Spanish Flu epidemic continued to take its toll. Even the gilded few were unhappy with rising taxation and a scarcity of servants. Worse, men who had made fortunes from the war had invaded their exclusive clubs. The bars and smoking rooms were full of regional accents and loud suits. Remarkably, something like 40 per cent of all the tax revenue the government raised in the twenties was swallowed up by the war bonds debt. The emerging `bright young things' embraced sex, drugs and Dixieland jazz. Motor transport was replacing horses, whilst the first crossing of the Atlantic by air showed the way forward. There was entertainment to be had, with sport providing a popular outlet. Long queues formed outside cinemas to see the latest silent films. Theatres and music halls played to packed houses. It was a year of creativity and invention within the arts but also one of nostalgia for old Edwardian certainties. The nation rediscovered a love of shopping in the expanding number of department stores. The year was also a pause for breath after the horrors of war; a time to take stock before rushing into an uncertain future that was rapidly announcing itself.
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34.12 USD

1919 - A Land Fit for Heroes: Britain at Peace

by Mike Hutton
Hardback
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The First World War battlefields to the north of Arras - including Vimy Ridge - are among the most famous and most visited sites on the Western Front, rivalled only by those around Ypres and the Somme, and this clearly written, highly illustrated guide is the ideal introduction to them. ...
The Battles of Arras: North: A Visitor's Guide; Vimy Ridge to Oppy Wood and Gavrelle
The First World War battlefields to the north of Arras - including Vimy Ridge - are among the most famous and most visited sites on the Western Front, rivalled only by those around Ypres and the Somme, and this clearly written, highly illustrated guide is the ideal introduction to them. Visitors can trace for themselves the course of each battle across the modern landscape and gain a fascinating insight into the nature of the fighting in the area - and the wider conflict across the Western Front - throughout the war. The book covers the key battles fought in the northern sector of the Arras front, including the 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge and battles at Villers au Bois, Oppy Wood and Gavrelle. Expert guides Jon Cooksey and Jerry Murland have devised a series of routes that can be walked, biked or driven, explaining the fighting that occurred at each place in vivid detail. They record what happened, where it happened and why, and point out the sights that remain for the visitor to see. Their guidebook is essential reading for visitors who wish to enhance their understanding of the war on the Western Front.
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25.58 USD

The Battles of Arras: North: A Visitor's Guide; Vimy Ridge to Oppy Wood and Gavrelle

by Jerry Murland, Jon Cooksey
Paperback / softback
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Baseball is the most American game. No other sporting contest so closely reflects the American psyche and culture. Its uniqueness comes from the fact that part of the game is clearly defined and unchanged since play first began, while another part of the game fluctuates and changes constantly. And if ...
Play Ball!: Doughboys and Baseball during the Great War
Baseball is the most American game. No other sporting contest so closely reflects the American psyche and culture. Its uniqueness comes from the fact that part of the game is clearly defined and unchanged since play first began, while another part of the game fluctuates and changes constantly. And if baseball is the truest American game, the Doughboys of the Great War were its most loyal proponents. By 1918, there were over four million of them: two million in France fighting in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and another two million in stateside training camps awaiting their turn to cross the Atlantic to the Western Front. Playing wherever they could find enough room to throw a ball, they brought the game with them into the front lines and then into the occupation of Germany. Sharing their military service, in combat and on the baseball diamond, were a number of famous professional ballplayers, managers, lawyers, politicians, and even an umpire.
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28.340000 USD

Play Ball!: Doughboys and Baseball during the Great War

by Samuel O. Barnes, Peter L. Belmonte, Alexander F. Barnes
Hardback
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In tracing the rise of the modern idea of the American new woman, Lynn Dumenil examines World War I's surprising impact on women and, in turn, women's impact on the war. Telling the stories of a diverse group of women, including African Americans, dissidents, pacifists, reformers, and industrial workers, Dumenil ...
The Second Line of Defense: American Women and World War I
In tracing the rise of the modern idea of the American new woman, Lynn Dumenil examines World War I's surprising impact on women and, in turn, women's impact on the war. Telling the stories of a diverse group of women, including African Americans, dissidents, pacifists, reformers, and industrial workers, Dumenil analyzes both the roadblocks and opportunities they faced. She richly explores the ways in which women helped the United States mobilize for the largest military endeavor in the nation's history. Dumenil shows how women activists staked their claim to loyal citizenship by framing their war work as homefront volunteers, overseas nurses, factory laborers, and support personnel as the second line of defense. But in assessing the impact of these contributions on traditional gender roles, Dumenil finds that portrayals of these new modern women did not always match with real and enduring change. Extensively researched and drawing upon popular culture sources as well as archival material, The Second Line of Defense offers a comprehensive study of American women and war and frames them in the broader context of the social, cultural, and political history of the era.
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29.350000 USD

The Second Line of Defense: American Women and World War I

by Lynn Dumenil
Paperback / softback
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Australia's extraordinary contribution to World War I extended well beyond its military forces to the expertise of its universities and professional men and women. Scientists and engineers oversaw the manufacture of munitions and the development of chemical weapons. Doctors sustained soldiers in the trenches, and treated the physically and psychologically ...
The First World War, the Universities and the Professions in Australia 1914-1939
Australia's extraordinary contribution to World War I extended well beyond its military forces to the expertise of its universities and professional men and women. Scientists and engineers oversaw the manufacture of munitions and the development of chemical weapons. Doctors sustained soldiers in the trenches, and treated the physically and psychologically damaged. Public servants, lawyers and translators were employed in the war bureaucracy, while artists and writers found new modes to convey the trauma of war. The graduates and staff of Australia's six universities in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Tasmania, Queensland and Western Australia and Queensland were involved in this expansion of expertise. But what did these men and women do after the guns were silenced? How were the professions and universities transformed by the immediate and longer-term impacts of the war? The First World War, the Universities and the Professions examines how the technical and conceptual advances that occurred during World War I transformed Australian society. It traces the evolving role of universities and their graduates in the 1920s and 1930s, the increasing government validation of research, the expansion of the public service, and the rise of modern professional associations and international networks. While the war contributed to greater specialisations in traditional professions such as teaching or medicine, it also stimulated new jobs and trainingaEURO whether in economics, anthropology or graphic art. This volume provides a new account of the interwar years that places knowledge and expertise at the heart of the Australian story. Its four sectionsaEURO The Medical Sciences; Science and Technology; Humanities, Social Sciences and Teaching; and The Arts: Design, Music and WritingaEURO highlight how World War I disrupted and shaped the careers of individuals as well as the development of Australian society and institutions.
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92.05 USD

The First World War, the Universities and the Professions in Australia 1914-1939

by James Waghorne, Kate Darian-Smith
Hardback
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Although Americans have long celebrated their nation's diversity, they also have consistently harbored suspicions of foreign peoples both at home and abroad. In Age of Fear, Zachary Smith argues that, as World War I grew more menacing and the presumed German threat loomed over the United States, many white Anglo-Saxon ...
Age of Fear: Othering and American Identity during World War I
Although Americans have long celebrated their nation's diversity, they also have consistently harbored suspicions of foreign peoples both at home and abroad. In Age of Fear, Zachary Smith argues that, as World War I grew more menacing and the presumed German threat loomed over the United States, many white Anglo-Saxon Americans grew increasingly concerned about the vulnerability of their race, culture, and authority. Consequently, they directed their long-held apprehensions over ethnic and racial pluralism onto their German neighbors and overseas enemies whom they had once greatly admired. Smith examines the often racially tinged, apocalyptic arguments made during the war by politicians, propaganda agencies, the press, novelists, and artists. He also assesses citizens' reactions to these messages and explains how the rise of nationalism in the United States and Europe acted as a catalyst to hierarchical racism. Germans in both the United States and Europe eventually took the form of the proverbial Other, a dangerous, volatile, and uncivilized people who posed an existential threat to the nation and all that Anglo-Saxon Americans believed themselves to be. Exploring what the Great War meant to a large portion of the white American population while providing a historic precedent for modern-day conceptions of presumably dangerous foreign Others, Age of Fear is a compelling look at how the source of wartime paranoia can be found in deep-seated understandings of racial and millennial progress.
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75.93 USD

Age of Fear: Othering and American Identity during World War I

by Zachary Smith
Hardback
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Recent discussion, academic publications and many of the national exhibitions relating to the Great War at sea have focussed on capital ships, Jutland and perhaps U-boats. Very little has been published about the crucial role played by fishermen, fishing vessels and coastal communities all round the British Isles. Yet fishermen ...
Fishermen, the Fishing Industry and the Great War at Sea: A Forgotten History?
Recent discussion, academic publications and many of the national exhibitions relating to the Great War at sea have focussed on capital ships, Jutland and perhaps U-boats. Very little has been published about the crucial role played by fishermen, fishing vessels and coastal communities all round the British Isles. Yet fishermen and armed fishing craft were continually on the maritime front line throughout the conflict; they formed the backbone of the Auxiliary Patrol and were in constant action against-U-boats or engaged on unrelenting minesweeping duties. Approximately 3000 fishing vessels were requisitioned and armed by the Admiralty and more than 39,000 fishermen joined the Trawler Section of the Royal Naval Reserve. The class and cultural gap between working fishermen and many RN officers was enormous. This book examines the multifaceted role that fishermen and the fish trade played throughout the conflict. It examines the reasons why, in an age of dreadnoughts and other high-tech military equipment, so many fishermen and fishing vessels were called upon to play such a crucial role in the littoral war against mines and U-boats, not only around the British Isles but also off the coasts of various other theatres of war. It will analyse the nature of the fishing industry's war-time involvement and also the contribution that non-belligerent fishing vessels continued to play in maintaining the beleaguered nation's food supplies.
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127.97 USD

Fishermen, the Fishing Industry and the Great War at Sea: A Forgotten History?

by Robb Robinson
Hardback
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First World War generals have a reputation for both failing to understand the conditions their men were fighting in and also to adopt to the reality of the Western Front. All too often in discussions, the Lions led by Donkeys attitude prevails which has been reinforced by Blackadder's `General Melchett'. ...
Lessons from the Mud: 55th (West Lancashire) Division at the Third Battle of Ypres
First World War generals have a reputation for both failing to understand the conditions their men were fighting in and also to adopt to the reality of the Western Front. All too often in discussions, the Lions led by Donkeys attitude prevails which has been reinforced by Blackadder's `General Melchett'. General Jeudwine was neither a Donkey nor a Melchett. His command of 55th (West Lancashire) Division from January 1916 was highly regarded and the division was in the top third of the British Expeditionary Force. The division attacked twice during the Third Battle of Ypres. After each attack, Jeudwine collected `Narratives' from his men. These range from formal reports from Commanding Officers to Private soldier's handwritten memoires on a sheet of paper torn from a notepad. Transcribed in their entirety for the first time, these Narratives offer a fascinating, first-hand account of two major written within days of the battle. Within the Narratives are details of the fates of men whose names are recorded on the Menin Gate, the practical application of tactics, small scale actions around German strong points. In analysis, the evolution of tactics is seen between the two attacks which shows the Army as a learning organisation.
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59.72 USD

Lessons from the Mud: 55th (West Lancashire) Division at the Third Battle of Ypres

by Paul Knight
Paperback / softback
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A visit to the battlefield of Verdun is usually dominated by the forts of Douamont and Vaux, the museum at Fleury and the striking, huge Ossuary, Although this gives a flavour of the horrific fighting that took place in the area, particularly in 1916, the visitor will be hard pressed ...
Walking In the Footsteps of the Fallen: Verdun 1916
A visit to the battlefield of Verdun is usually dominated by the forts of Douamont and Vaux, the museum at Fleury and the striking, huge Ossuary, Although this gives a flavour of the horrific fighting that took place in the area, particularly in 1916, the visitor will be hard pressed to get much more than an impression from such places.This book seeks to guide the battlefield pilgrim into parts of the battlefield that get rarely visited by means of a series of walks, a number of which include the major sites. The four tours have been carefully walked. All are practicable for a reasonably healthy adult; the tours vary in length, most taking a half day to complete and the longest (the last) a day. In a twist to the usual walks to be found in the Battleground series, Christina makes full use of the numerous field graves and isolated memorials that are to be found on the Verdun battlefield, a number of which will bring visitors to the most visited sites. In the course of these walks many physical remnants will be found, such as gun positions, bunkers and trench systems, the significance of which is fully explained. The walks have not been chosen at random: by following these the tourer will get a far greater understanding of why the fighting at Verdun developed as it did and why such places as Fort Vaux were so significant to both sides. The field graves and memorials to the combatants, very often of individuals, provide an opportunity to give their story and the unit action in which they were fighting when they were killed. Verdun is a battlefield where the story of units and individuals can easily become lost in the horror of the incessant fighting that raged over ten months; and over ground which is extremely difficult to read because of the post war forestation programme. Profusely illustrated and with excellent mapping, a hallmark of Christina Holstein's books, a visitor who follows the walks in this book will be left with a far clearer idea of the men who fought and died here and of the features of the battlefield and their significance in this battle that so challenged the endurance of the armies of two nations.
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25.58 USD

Walking In the Footsteps of the Fallen: Verdun 1916

by Christina Holstein
Paperback / softback
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Even before Pancho Villa's 1916 raid on Columbus, New Mexico, and the following punitive expedition under General John J. Pershing, the U.S. Army was strengthening its presence on the southwestern border in response to the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Manning forty-one small outposts along a three-hundred mile stretch of the ...
The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911-1921
Even before Pancho Villa's 1916 raid on Columbus, New Mexico, and the following punitive expedition under General John J. Pershing, the U.S. Army was strengthening its presence on the southwestern border in response to the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Manning forty-one small outposts along a three-hundred mile stretch of the Rio Grande region, the army remained for a decade, rotating eighteen different regiments, primarily cavalry, until the return of relative calm. The remote, rugged, and desolate terrain of the Big Bend defied even the technological advances of World War I, and it remained very much a cavalry and pack mule operation until the outposts were finally withdrawn in 1921. With The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911-1921, Thomas T. Ty Smith, one of Texas's leading military historians, has delved deep into the records of the U.S. Army to provide an authoritative portrait, richly complemented by many photos published here for the first time, of the final era of soldiers on horseback in the American West.
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29.350000 USD

The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911-1921

by Thomas Ty Smith
Paperback / softback
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The true story of the toughest bicycle race ever staged, the Circuit des Champs de Bataille (the Tour of the Battlefields) The Circuit des Champs de Bataille (the Tour of the Battlefields) was held in 1919, less than six months after the end of the First World War. It covered ...
Riding in the Zone Rouge: The Tour of the Battlefields 1919 - Cycling's Toughest-Ever Stage Race
The true story of the toughest bicycle race ever staged, the Circuit des Champs de Bataille (the Tour of the Battlefields) The Circuit des Champs de Bataille (the Tour of the Battlefields) was held in 1919, less than six months after the end of the First World War. It covered 2,000 kilometres and was raced in appalling conditions across the battlefields of the Western Front, otherwise known as the Zone Rouge. The race was so tough that only 21 riders finished, and it was never staged again. With one of the most demanding routes ever to feature in a bicycle race, and plagued by appalling weather conditions, the Circuit des Champs de Bataille was beyond gruelling, but today its extraordinary story is largely forgotten. Many of the riders came to the event straight from the army and had to ride 18-hour stages through sleet and snow across the battlefields on which they had fought, and lost friends and family, only a few months before. But in addition to the hellish conditions there were moments of high comedy, even farce. The rediscovered story of the Circuit des Champs de Bataille is an epic tale of human endurance, suffering and triumph over extreme adversity.
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34.12 USD

Riding in the Zone Rouge: The Tour of the Battlefields 1919 - Cycling's Toughest-Ever Stage Race

by Tom Isitt
Hardback
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This volume synthesises the latest scholarship on First World War veterans in post-war Britain and Ireland, investigating the topic through its political, social and cultural dynamics. It examines the post-war experiences of those men and women who served and illuminates the nature of the post-war society for which service had ...
Veterans of the First World War: Ex-Servicemen and Ex-Servicewomen in Post-War Britain and Ireland
This volume synthesises the latest scholarship on First World War veterans in post-war Britain and Ireland, investigating the topic through its political, social and cultural dynamics. It examines the post-war experiences of those men and women who served and illuminates the nature of the post-war society for which service had been given. Complicating the homogenising tendency in existing scholarship it offers comparison of the experiences of veterans in different regions of Britain, including perspectives drawn from Ireland. Further nuance is offered by the assessment of the experiences of ex-servicewomen alongside those of ex-servicemen, such focus deeping understanding into the gendered specificities of post-war veteran activities and experiences. Moreover, case studies of specific cohorts of veterans are offered, including focus on disabled veterans and ex-prisoners of war. In these regards the collection offers vital updates to existing scholarship while bringing important new departures and challenges to the current interpretive frameworks of veteran experiences in post-war Britain and Ireland.
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196.22 USD

Veterans of the First World War: Ex-Servicemen and Ex-Servicewomen in Post-War Britain and Ireland

Hardback
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