Filter
(found 264 products)
Book cover image
An exploration of the social and environmental consequences of oil extraction in the tropical rainforest. Using northern Veracruz as a case study, the author argues that oil production generated major historical and environmental transformations in land tenure systems and uses, and social organisation. Such changes, furthermore, entailed effects, including the ...
The Ecology of Oil: Environment, Labor, and the Mexican Revolution, 1900-1938
An exploration of the social and environmental consequences of oil extraction in the tropical rainforest. Using northern Veracruz as a case study, the author argues that oil production generated major historical and environmental transformations in land tenure systems and uses, and social organisation. Such changes, furthermore, entailed effects, including the marginalisation of indigenes, environmental destruction, and tense labour relations. In the context of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920), however, the results of oil development did not go unchallenged. Mexican oil workers responded to their experience by forging a politicised culture and a radical left militancy that turned 'oil country' into one of the most significant sites of class conflict in revolutionary Mexico. Ultimately, the book argues, Mexican oil workers deserve their share of credit for the 1938 decree nationalising the foreign oil industry - heretofore reserved for President Lazaro Cardenas - and thus changing the course of Mexican history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780521115377.jpg
45.140000 USD

The Ecology of Oil: Environment, Labor, and the Mexican Revolution, 1900-1938

by Myrna I. Santiago
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Herbert Klein and Francisco Luna present a sweeping narrative of social change in Brazil that documents its transition from a predominantly rural and illiterate society in 1950, to an overwhelmingly urban, modern, and literate society in the twenty-first century. Tracing this radical evolution reveals how industrialization created a new labor ...
Modern Brazil: A Social History
Herbert Klein and Francisco Luna present a sweeping narrative of social change in Brazil that documents its transition from a predominantly rural and illiterate society in 1950, to an overwhelmingly urban, modern, and literate society in the twenty-first century. Tracing this radical evolution reveals how industrialization created a new labor force, how demographic shifts reorganized the family and social attitudes, and how urban life emerged in what is now one of the most important industrial economies in the world. A paradigm for modern social histories, the book also examines changes in social stratification and mobility, the decline of regional disparities, education, social welfare, race, and gender. By analyzing Brazil's unprecedented Brazilian political, economic, and social changes in the late twentieth and twenty-first century, the authors address an under-explored area in current scholarship and offer an invaluable resource for scholars of Latin American and Brazil.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108733298.jpg
50.19 USD

Modern Brazil: A Social History

by Francisco Vidal Luna, Herbert S. Klein
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Herbert Klein and Francisco Luna present a sweeping narrative of social change in Brazil that documents its transition from a predominantly rural and illiterate society in 1950, to an overwhelmingly urban, modern, and literate society in the twenty-first century. Tracing this radical evolution reveals how industrialization created a new labor ...
Modern Brazil: A Social History
Herbert Klein and Francisco Luna present a sweeping narrative of social change in Brazil that documents its transition from a predominantly rural and illiterate society in 1950, to an overwhelmingly urban, modern, and literate society in the twenty-first century. Tracing this radical evolution reveals how industrialization created a new labor force, how demographic shifts reorganized the family and social attitudes, and how urban life emerged in what is now one of the most important industrial economies in the world. A paradigm for modern social histories, the book also examines changes in social stratification and mobility, the decline of regional disparities, education, social welfare, race, and gender. By analyzing Brazil's unprecedented Brazilian political, economic, and social changes in the late twentieth and twenty-first century, the authors address an under-explored area in current scholarship and offer an invaluable resource for scholars of Latin American and Brazil.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108489027.jpg
110.250000 USD

Modern Brazil: A Social History

by Francisco Vidal Luna, Herbert S. Klein
Hardback
Book cover image
The creation of Lima's red light district in 1928 marked the culminating achievement of the promoters of regulation who sought to control the spread of venereal disease by medically policing female prostitutes. Its closure in 1956 was arguably the high point of abolitionism, a transnational movement originating in the 1860s ...
The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s
The creation of Lima's red light district in 1928 marked the culminating achievement of the promoters of regulation who sought to control the spread of venereal disease by medically policing female prostitutes. Its closure in 1956 was arguably the high point of abolitionism, a transnational movement originating in the 1860s that advocated that regulation was not only ineffective from a public health perspective, but also morally wrong. The Sexual Question charts this cyclic process of regulation and abolition in Peru, uncovering the ideas, policies, and actors shaping the debates over governing prostitution in Lima and beyond. The history of prostitution, Paulo Drinot shows, sheds light on the interplay of gender and sexuality, medicine and public health, and nation-building and state formation in Peru. With its compelling historical lens, this landmark study offers readers an engaging narrative, and new perspectives on Latin American studies, social policy, and Peruvian history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108493123.jpg
104.990000 USD

The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s

by Paulo Drinot
Hardback
Book cover image
Drawing on a wide and rich array of sources, this book explores the nature and extent of Dutch trade and commerce in the Rio de la Plata during three decades of the least-studied century (1650-1750) of Spain's rule in the Americas. In doing so, it raises important questions about trade ...
A Silver River in a Silver World: Dutch Trade in the Rio de la Plata, 1648-1678
Drawing on a wide and rich array of sources, this book explores the nature and extent of Dutch trade and commerce in the Rio de la Plata during three decades of the least-studied century (1650-1750) of Spain's rule in the Americas. In doing so, it raises important questions about trade in colonial South America and how it was impacted by the Dutch, suggesting that these transactions were carried out within the confines of the law, contradicting common beliefs among scholars that this trading was not regulated. The book contributes to a growing literature on contraband trade, administration, networks, and corruption while challenging narratives of exclusively Spanish influence on the Americas.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108417495.jpg
104.990000 USD

A Silver River in a Silver World: Dutch Trade in the Rio de la Plata, 1648-1678

by David Freeman
Hardback
Book cover image
The creation of Lima's red light district in 1928 marked the culminating achievement of the promoters of regulation who sought to control the spread of venereal disease by medically policing female prostitutes. Its closure in 1956 was arguably the high point of abolitionism, a transnational movement originating in the 1860s ...
The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s
The creation of Lima's red light district in 1928 marked the culminating achievement of the promoters of regulation who sought to control the spread of venereal disease by medically policing female prostitutes. Its closure in 1956 was arguably the high point of abolitionism, a transnational movement originating in the 1860s that advocated that regulation was not only ineffective from a public health perspective, but also morally wrong. The Sexual Question charts this cyclic process of regulation and abolition in Peru, uncovering the ideas, policies, and actors shaping the debates over governing prostitution in Lima and beyond. The history of prostitution, Paulo Drinot shows, sheds light on the interplay of gender and sexuality, medicine and public health, and nation-building and state formation in Peru. With its compelling historical lens, this landmark study offers readers an engaging narrative, and new perspectives on Latin American studies, social policy, and Peruvian history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108717281.jpg
44.61 USD

The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s

by Paulo Drinot
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Contrary to claims that socialism opposed the family unit, Rachel Hynson argues that the revolutionary Cuban government engaged in social engineering to redefine the nuclear family and organize citizens to serve the state. Drawing on Cuban newspapers and periodicals, government documents and speeches, long-overlooked laws, and oral histories, Hynson reveals ...
Laboring for the State: Women, Family, and Work in Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-1971
Contrary to claims that socialism opposed the family unit, Rachel Hynson argues that the revolutionary Cuban government engaged in social engineering to redefine the nuclear family and organize citizens to serve the state. Drawing on Cuban newspapers and periodicals, government documents and speeches, long-overlooked laws, and oral histories, Hynson reveals that by 1961, and increasingly throughout this decade, revolutionary citizenship was earned through labor. While men were to work outside the home in state-approved jobs, women found their citizenship tied to affording the state control over their reproduction and sexual labor. Through all four campaigns examined in this book - the projects to control women's reproduction, promote marriage, end prostitution, and compel men into state-sanctioned employment - Hynson shows that the state's progression toward authoritarianism and its attendant monopolization of morality were met with resistance and counter-narratives by citizens who so opposed the mandates of these campaigns that Cuban leadership has since reconfigured or effaced these programs from the Revolution's grand narrative.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781107188679.jpg
41.990000 USD

Laboring for the State: Women, Family, and Work in Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-1971

by Rachel Hynson
Hardback
Book cover image
A Concise History of Brazil covers almost 500 years of Brazilian history, from the arrival of the Portuguese in the New World to the political events that defined the recent transition from an authoritarian to a democratic political regime. Brazilian territorial unity and national identity were forged throughout the nineteenth ...
A Concise History of Brazil
A Concise History of Brazil covers almost 500 years of Brazilian history, from the arrival of the Portuguese in the New World to the political events that defined the recent transition from an authoritarian to a democratic political regime. Brazilian territorial unity and national identity were forged throughout the nineteenth century, after the proclamation of independence in 1822, resulting in a nation with one common language and wide ethnic and racial variety. Remarkable in this respect, the country nevertheless faces problems of social and ethnic disparity as well as of preservation and adequate use of its natural resources. This book emphasizes topics that have deeply influenced the historical formation of Brazil and affected its existence to the present day, such as the destruction of Indian civilizations, slavery and massive immigration throughout the last decades of the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth century.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780521565264.jpg
39.04 USD

A Concise History of Brazil

by Boris Fausto
Paperback
Book cover image
The lowland American tropics have posed great challenges for archaeologists. Working in awkward terrain, in humid conditions where preservation is difficult, modern scholars pioneered new methods that increasingly influence archaeological practice internationally. The contributors to this volume all have substantial experience in the region. Their essays explore problems of site ...
Archaeology in the Lowland American Tropics: Current Analytical Methods and Applications
The lowland American tropics have posed great challenges for archaeologists. Working in awkward terrain, in humid conditions where preservation is difficult, modern scholars pioneered new methods that increasingly influence archaeological practice internationally. The contributors to this volume all have substantial experience in the region. Their essays explore problems of site discovery, excavation, the preservation of artifacts and osteological and botanical remains, and methods of analysis. Specific technical innovations are discussed in relation to particular excavations.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780521444866.jpg
98.690000 USD

Archaeology in the Lowland American Tropics: Current Analytical Methods and Applications

Hardback
Book cover image
Royalist Indians and slaves in the northern Andes engaged with the ideas of the Age of Revolution (1780-1825), such as citizenship and freedom. Although generally ignored in recent revolution-centered versions of the Latin American independence processes, their story is an essential part of the history of the period. In Indian ...
Indian and Slave Royalists in the Age of Revolution: Reform, Revolution, and Royalism in the Northern Andes, 1780-1825
Royalist Indians and slaves in the northern Andes engaged with the ideas of the Age of Revolution (1780-1825), such as citizenship and freedom. Although generally ignored in recent revolution-centered versions of the Latin American independence processes, their story is an essential part of the history of the period. In Indian and Slave Royalists in the Age of Revolution, Marcela Echeverri draws a picture of the royalist region of Popayan (modern-day Colombia) that reveals deep chronological layers and multiple social and spatial textures. She uses royalism as a lens to rethink the temporal, spatial, and conceptual boundaries that conventionally structure historical narratives about the Age of Revolution. Looking at royalism and liberal reform in the northern Andes, she suggests that profound changes took place within the royalist territories. These emerged as a result of the negotiation of the rights of local people, Indians and slaves, with the changing monarchical regime.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781107446007.jpg
31.490000 USD

Indian and Slave Royalists in the Age of Revolution: Reform, Revolution, and Royalism in the Northern Andes, 1780-1825

by Marcela Echeverri
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In 1804 when W. B. Stevenson (fl. 1803-25) arrived on the small island of Mocha, just off the coast of South America, he stepped onto a continent on the brink of mass revolution. Over the next twenty years, he had an extraordinary range of experiences: as a traveller, a Spanish ...
A Historical and Descriptive Narrative of Twenty Years' Residence in South America
In 1804 when W. B. Stevenson (fl. 1803-25) arrived on the small island of Mocha, just off the coast of South America, he stepped onto a continent on the brink of mass revolution. Over the next twenty years, he had an extraordinary range of experiences: as a traveller, a Spanish government official, a prisoner, and as secretary to an ex-Royal Navy admiral turned revolutionary. In this three-volume work, published in 1825, Stevenson gives a dramatic, fascinating account of the life and culture of South America as it began to break free from Spanish colonial rule. Volume 1 focuses on Stevenson's arrival in 1804, his initial impressions, and travels in Chile, Colombia and Peru. It describes food and drink, society and culture, administration and climate. It also covers his imprisonment in Lima by the Spanish authorities.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108033640.jpg
48.290000 USD

A Historical and Descriptive Narrative of Twenty Years' Residence in South America

by W. B. Stevenson
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In 1804 when W. B. Stevenson (fl. 1803-25) arrived on the small island of Mocha, just off the coast of South America, he stepped onto a continent on the brink of mass revolution. Over the next twenty years, he had an extraordinary range of experiences: as a traveller, a Spanish ...
A Historical and Descriptive Narrative of Twenty Years' Residence in South America
In 1804 when W. B. Stevenson (fl. 1803-25) arrived on the small island of Mocha, just off the coast of South America, he stepped onto a continent on the brink of mass revolution. Over the next twenty years, he had an extraordinary range of experiences: as a traveller, a Spanish government official, a prisoner, and as secretary to an ex-Royal Navy admiral turned revolutionary. In this three-volume work, published in 1825, Stevenson gives a dramatic, fascinating account of life and society in South America as it began to break free from Spanish colonial rule. Volume 3 focuses on the revolutions and uprisings Stevenson witnessed in Colombia, Peru and Chile, as well as his time as secretary to Lord Cochrane, the former admiral who fought on the side of the rebels.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108033664.jpg
53.550000 USD

A Historical and Descriptive Narrative of Twenty Years' Residence in South America

by W. B. Stevenson
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Tetzcoco was one of the most important cities of the pre-Hispanic Aztec Empire. When the Spaniards arrived in 1519, the indigenous hereditary nobles that governed Tetzcoco faced both opportunities and challenges, and were forced to adapt from the very moment of contact. This book examines how the city's nobility navigated ...
The Lords of Tetzcoco: The Transformation of Indigenous Rule in Postconquest Central Mexico
Tetzcoco was one of the most important cities of the pre-Hispanic Aztec Empire. When the Spaniards arrived in 1519, the indigenous hereditary nobles that governed Tetzcoco faced both opportunities and challenges, and were forced to adapt from the very moment of contact. This book examines how the city's nobility navigated this tumultuous period of conquest and colonialism, and negotiated a place for themselves under Spanish rule. While Tetzcoco's native nobles experienced a remarkable degree of continuity with the pre-contact period, especially in the first few decades after conquest, various forces and issues, such as changing access to economic resources, interethnic marriage, and intra-familial conflict, transformed Tetzcoco's ruling family into colonial subjects by the century's end.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781316640692.jpg
31.490000 USD

The Lords of Tetzcoco: The Transformation of Indigenous Rule in Postconquest Central Mexico

by Bradley Benton
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This book opens new dimensions on race in Latin America by examining the extreme caste groups of colonial Mexico. In tracing their experiences, a broader understanding of the connection between mestizaje (Latin America's modern ideology of racial mixture) and the colonial caste system is rendered. Before mestizaje emerged as a ...
Before Mestizaje: The Frontiers of Race and Caste in Colonial Mexico
This book opens new dimensions on race in Latin America by examining the extreme caste groups of colonial Mexico. In tracing their experiences, a broader understanding of the connection between mestizaje (Latin America's modern ideology of racial mixture) and the colonial caste system is rendered. Before mestizaje emerged as a primary concept in Latin America, an earlier precursor existed that must be taken seriously. This colonial form of racial hybridity, encased in an elastic caste system, allowed some people to live through multiple racial lives. Hence, the great fusion of races that swept Latin America and defined its modernity, carries an important corollary. Mestizaje, when viewed at its roots, is not just about mixture, but also about dissecting and reconnecting lives. Such experiences may have carved a special ability for some Latin American populations to reach across racial groups to relate with and understand multiple racial perspectives. This overlooked, deep history of mestizaje is a legacy that can be built upon in modern times.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781107026438.jpg
132.02 USD

Before Mestizaje: The Frontiers of Race and Caste in Colonial Mexico

by Ben Vinson
Hardback
Book cover image
Sir Robert Hermann Schomburgk (1804-1865) was a German-born surveyor and traveller. In 1835-1839 he explored British Guiana for the Royal Geographical Society. In 1840 he was appointed to define its boundaries with Brazil, as Brazilian encroachments were wiping out native tribes. His report to the Colonial Office was published as ...
A Description of British Guiana, Geographical and Statistical: Exhibiting its Resources and Capabilities, Together with the Present and Future Condition and Prospects of the Colony
Sir Robert Hermann Schomburgk (1804-1865) was a German-born surveyor and traveller. In 1835-1839 he explored British Guiana for the Royal Geographical Society. In 1840 he was appointed to define its boundaries with Brazil, as Brazilian encroachments were wiping out native tribes. His report to the Colonial Office was published as A Description of British Guiana, Geographical and Statistical in 1840, and was the first detailed account of the colony. As well as surveying the land, and being the first European to reach the source of the Essequibo River, he discovered many new species of plants. His work on the boundaries led to the establishment of the 'Schomburgk Line' which was the basis for the definition of the borders with Brazil and Venezuela at the end of the century. He was knighted in 1845, and spent much of the rest of his life abroad as a British consul.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108024051.jpg
29.390000 USD

A Description of British Guiana, Geographical and Statistical: Exhibiting its Resources and Capabilities, Together with the Present and Future Condition and Prospects of the Colony

by Sir Robert Hermann Schomburgk
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In 1823 and 1824, the newly independent government of Mexico entered the international capital market, raising two loans in London totaling GBP6.4 million. Intended to cover a variety of expenses, the loans fell into default by 1827 and remained in default until 1887. This case study explores how the loan ...
Politics, Markets, and Mexico's 'London Debt', 1823-1887
In 1823 and 1824, the newly independent government of Mexico entered the international capital market, raising two loans in London totaling GBP6.4 million. Intended to cover a variety of expenses, the loans fell into default by 1827 and remained in default until 1887. This case study explores how the loan process worked in Mexico in the early nineteenth century, when foreign lending was still a novelty, and the unexpected ways in which international debt could influence politics and policy. The history of the loans, the efforts of successive governments in Mexico to resume repayment, and the efforts of the foreign lenders to recover their investment became one of the most significant, persistent, and contentious, if largely misunderstood, issues in the political and financial history of nineteenth-century Mexico. The loans themselves became entangled in partisan politics in Mexico and abroad, especially in Great Britain and France, and were a fertile source of speculation for a wide range of legitimate - and not-so-legitimate - international financiers.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780521489997.jpg
92.390000 USD

Politics, Markets, and Mexico's 'London Debt', 1823-1887

by Richard J Salvucci
Hardback
Book cover image
The acclaimed Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) was referred to by Charles Darwin as 'the greatest scientific traveller who ever lived'. Several of his works were in the library aboard the Beagle, including the multi-volume Personal Narrative of Travels, two books on geology and Tableaux de la nature (all ...
Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain 2 Volume Set
The acclaimed Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) was referred to by Charles Darwin as 'the greatest scientific traveller who ever lived'. Several of his works were in the library aboard the Beagle, including the multi-volume Personal Narrative of Travels, two books on geology and Tableaux de la nature (all reissued in the Cambridge Library Collection). Darwin's copy of this two-volume 1811 New York edition of Humboldt's Political Essay (originally published in French earlier that year) is inscribed 'Buenos Ayres', suggesting he acquired it there in 1832-3, without its accompanying atlas (forthcoming). Humboldt had spent a year in Mexico in 1803-4, and was struck by its 'civilization' as compared to regions of South America that he had visited earlier on his expedition. The work begins with a 'geographical introduction', after which Humboldt describes Mexico's topography, agriculture, population, mines, industry and commerce, its economic state and its military defences.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108077910.jpg
89.25 USD

Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain 2 Volume Set

by Alexander von Humboldt
Mixed media product
Book cover image
First published in 1824, this is a two-volume English translation of part of the account by German naturalists Johann Baptist von Spix (1781-1826) and Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius (1794-1868) of their Brazilian expedition, one of the nineteenth century's great scientific enterprises. Despite debilitating conditions (which would contribute to Spix's ...
Travels in Brazil, in the Years 1817-1820: Undertaken by Command of His Majesty the King of Bavaria
First published in 1824, this is a two-volume English translation of part of the account by German naturalists Johann Baptist von Spix (1781-1826) and Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius (1794-1868) of their Brazilian expedition, one of the nineteenth century's great scientific enterprises. Despite debilitating conditions (which would contribute to Spix's premature death), they accumulated a spectacular collection of specimens, including dozens of live animals and over 10,000 other examples of flora and fauna. Although no further volumes appeared, this wide-ranging work formed part of the library aboard the Beagle during Darwin's famous voyage. Volume 2 covers the expedition's progress from Sao Paulo, through the state of Minas Gerais, to Villa Rica (now Ouro Preto) up to May 1818. One of the illustrations depicts the two indigenous children, Juri and Miranha, who were taken back to Munich. Several popular songs in Portuguese form an appendix.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108063821.jpg
43.040000 USD

Travels in Brazil, in the Years 1817-1820: Undertaken by Command of His Majesty the King of Bavaria

by C. F. P. von Martius, Johann Baptist Von Spix
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Latin American Constitutions provides a comprehensive historical study of constitutionalism in Latin America from the independence period to the present, focusing on the Constitution of Cadiz, a foundational document in Latin American constitutionalism. Although drafted in Spain, it was applied in many regions of Latin America, and deputies from America ...
Latin American Constitutions: The Constitution of Cadiz and its Legacy in Spanish America
Latin American Constitutions provides a comprehensive historical study of constitutionalism in Latin America from the independence period to the present, focusing on the Constitution of Cadiz, a foundational document in Latin American constitutionalism. Although drafted in Spain, it was applied in many regions of Latin America, and deputies from America formed a significant part of the drafting body. The politicization of constitutionalism reflected in Latin America's first moments proved to be a lasting legacy evident in the legal and constitutional world of the region today: many of Latin America's present challenges to establishing effective constitutionalism can be traced to the debates, ideas, structures, and assumptions of this text. This book explores the region's attempts to create effective constitutional texts and regimes in light of an established practice of linking constitutions to political goals and places important constitutional thinkers and regional constitutions, such as the Mexican Constitution of 1917, into their legal and historical context.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781107618558.jpg
31.490000 USD

Latin American Constitutions: The Constitution of Cadiz and its Legacy in Spanish America

by Philip Mirowski
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The acclaimed Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) was referred to by Charles Darwin as 'the greatest scientific traveller who ever lived'. Several of his works were in the library aboard the Beagle, including the multi-volume Personal Narrative of Travels, two books on geology and Tableaux de la nature (all ...
Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain
The acclaimed Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) was referred to by Charles Darwin as 'the greatest scientific traveller who ever lived'. Several of his works were in the library aboard the Beagle, including the multi-volume Personal Narrative of Travels, two books on geology and Tableaux de la nature (all reissued in the Cambridge Library Collection). Darwin's copy of this two-volume 1811 New York edition of Humboldt's Political Essay (originally published in French earlier that year) is inscribed 'Buenos Ayres', suggesting he acquired it there in 1832-3, without its accompanying atlas (forthcoming). Humboldt had spent a year in Mexico in 1803-4, and was struck by its 'civilization' as compared to regions of South America that he had visited earlier on his expedition. Volume 1 of his account contains a 'geographical introduction' and discussions of physical geography, agriculture, and the ethnic diversity, distribution and health of the population.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108077897.jpg
39.890000 USD

Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain

by Alexander von Humboldt
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The publications of the Hakluyt Society (founded in 1846) made available edited (and sometimes translated) early accounts of exploration. The first series, which ran from 1847 to 1899, consists of 100 books containing published or previously unpublished works by authors from Christopher Columbus to Sir Francis Drake, and covering voyages ...
Reports on the Discovery of Peru
The publications of the Hakluyt Society (founded in 1846) made available edited (and sometimes translated) early accounts of exploration. The first series, which ran from 1847 to 1899, consists of 100 books containing published or previously unpublished works by authors from Christopher Columbus to Sir Francis Drake, and covering voyages to the New World, to China and Japan, to Russia and to Africa and India. In this 1872 volume, Clements R. Markham, Honorary Secretary of the Society from 1858 to 1887, and then its President for twenty years, translated and edited four accounts of the Spanish conquest of Peru, written by eye-witnesses including Francisco Pizarro's secretary and his brother Hernando. The narratives include the events surrounding the downfall of the Inca empire; the final document is a notary's account of the distribution of the gold and silver which the Incas paid to the Spaniards as ransom for their ruler.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108010610.jpg
29.390000 USD

Reports on the Discovery of Peru

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The husband of Maria, Lady Nugent (1771-1834) was Governor of Jamaica from 1801 to 1806. Her diaries were not written for publication, and therefore offer a valuable and frank record of people and situations she met with in Jamaica. They were published privately after her death, and are here reproduced ...
Lady Nugent's Journal: Jamaica One Hundred Years Ago
The husband of Maria, Lady Nugent (1771-1834) was Governor of Jamaica from 1801 to 1806. Her diaries were not written for publication, and therefore offer a valuable and frank record of people and situations she met with in Jamaica. They were published privately after her death, and are here reproduced from the 1907 edition. The Jamaica diary covers a period of uncertainty in the West Indies due to the Napoleonic Wars. While generally avoiding politics, she comments on colonial society and planter life. Her initial view of slaves altered as rumours of uprisings made her fear for her young children. She also expresses concern about the sexual exploitation of slaves by planters, as being bad for both parties. The latter part of the work covers in less detail her return to England, and the period she spent in India where her husband had been appointed commander-in-chief.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108024419.jpg
54.590000 USD

Lady Nugent's Journal: Jamaica One Hundred Years Ago

by Maria Nugent
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Nearly 4,000 Mexican troops and convicts landed in Manila Bay in the Philippines from 1765 to 1811. The majority were veterans and recruits; the rest were victims of vagrancy campaigns. Eva Maria Mehl follows these forced exiles from recruiting centers, jails and streets in central Mexico to Spanish outposts in ...
Forced Migration in the Spanish Pacific World: From Mexico to the Philippines, 1765-1811
Nearly 4,000 Mexican troops and convicts landed in Manila Bay in the Philippines from 1765 to 1811. The majority were veterans and recruits; the rest were victims of vagrancy campaigns. Eva Maria Mehl follows these forced exiles from recruiting centers, jails and streets in central Mexico to Spanish outposts in the Philippines, and traces relationships of power between the imperial authorities in Madrid and the colonial governments and populations of New Spain and the Philippines in the late Bourbon era. Ultimately, forced migration from Mexico City to Manila illustrates that the histories of the Spanish Philippines and colonial Mexico have embraced and shaped each other, that there existed a connectivity between imperial processes in the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans, and that a perspective of the Spanish empire centered on the Atlantic cannot adequately reflect the historical importance of the richly textured transpacific world.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781107136793.jpg
121.790000 USD

Forced Migration in the Spanish Pacific World: From Mexico to the Philippines, 1765-1811

by Eva Maria Mehl
Hardback
Book cover image
Bernal Diaz del Castillo (1492-1584) was a foot soldier in the army of Mexico's conqueror Hernan Cortes, and participated in the campaigns that led to the fall of the Aztec empire in 1521. This 1928 translation of his journals derives from the 1904 edition by the Mexican historian Genaro Garcia ...
The True History of the Conquest of New Spain
Bernal Diaz del Castillo (1492-1584) was a foot soldier in the army of Mexico's conqueror Hernan Cortes, and participated in the campaigns that led to the fall of the Aztec empire in 1521. This 1928 translation of his journals derives from the 1904 edition by the Mexican historian Genaro Garcia - the first edition based on the original manuscript. Written as a corrective to accounts that overemphasised Cortes' exploits, Diaz's epic focuses on the experiences of the common soldier. The most complete contemporary chronicle of the Mexican conquest, this important historical document is also a captivating adventure narrative that combines factual accuracy with many dramatic anecdotes. Volume 1, in which Diaz recounts his first two expeditions to the Yucatan coast and the beginning of his service in Cortes' army, contains chapters 1-81 and includes part of Garcia's 1904 introduction to his edition.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781108017053.jpg
53.550000 USD

The True History of the Conquest of New Spain

by Bernal Diaz Del Castillo
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This is the first complete economic and social history of Brazil in the modern period in any language. It provides a detailed analysis of the evolution of the Brazilian society and economy from the end of the empire in 1889 to the present day. The authors elucidate the basic trends ...
The Economic and Social History of Brazil since 1889
This is the first complete economic and social history of Brazil in the modern period in any language. It provides a detailed analysis of the evolution of the Brazilian society and economy from the end of the empire in 1889 to the present day. The authors elucidate the basic trends that have defined modern Brazilian society and economy. In this period Brazil moved from being a mostly rural traditional agriculture society with only light industry and low levels of human capital to a modern literate and industrial nation. It has also transformed itself into one of the world's most important agricultural exporters. How and why this occurred is explained in this important survey.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781107616585.jpg
37.790000 USD

The Economic and Social History of Brazil since 1889

by Herbert S. Klein, Francisco Vidal Luna
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This book, originally published in 1987, is a socio-cultural analysis of a tropical belle epoque: Rio de Janeiro between 1898 and 1914. It relates how the city's elite evolved from the semi-rural, slave-owning patriarchy of the coffee-port seat of a monarchy into an urbane, professional, rentier upper crust dominating the ...
A Tropical Belle Epoque: Elite Culture and Society in Turn-of-the-Century Rio de Janeiro
This book, originally published in 1987, is a socio-cultural analysis of a tropical belle epoque: Rio de Janeiro between 1898 and 1914. It relates how the city's elite evolved from the semi-rural, slave-owning patriarchy of the coffee-port seat of a monarchy into an urbane, professional, rentier upper crust dominating the centre of a 'modernising' oligarchical republic. It explores such varied topics as architecture, literature, prostitution, urban reform, the family, secondary schools, and the salon. It evokes a milieu increasingly marked by Europe, demonstrating how French and English culture permeated the lives of elite members who adapted it to their needs and perspectives as a dominant stratum of relatively recent and varied origin. This exploration of cultural 'dependency' in a unique, cosmopolitan, fin-de-siecle urban culture will also interest those concerned with the broader questions of culture and colonialism during the high tide of European imperialism.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780521126014.jpg
44.090000 USD

A Tropical Belle Epoque: Elite Culture and Society in Turn-of-the-Century Rio de Janeiro

by Jeffrey D. Needell
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Originally published in 1940, this book contains a lively account of a journey through Mexico by John Brande Trend, the first Professor of Spanish at the University of Cambridge. Trend vividly describes important ancient sites such as Cichen Itza as well as Spanish traditions that he observed while in Mexico. ...
Mexico: A New Spain with Old Friends
Originally published in 1940, this book contains a lively account of a journey through Mexico by John Brande Trend, the first Professor of Spanish at the University of Cambridge. Trend vividly describes important ancient sites such as Cichen Itza as well as Spanish traditions that he observed while in Mexico. Photographic plates of important artefacts are also included in the text. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in Spanish influence in Mexico and Mexican history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781107502055.jpg
28.340000 USD

Mexico: A New Spain with Old Friends

by John Brande Trend
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This book is a history of women, radio, and the gendered constructions of voice and sound in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Montevideo, Uruguay. Through the stories of five women and one radio station, this study makes a substantial theoretical contribution to the study of gender, mass media, and political culture ...
Radio and the Gendered Soundscape: Women and Broadcasting in Argentina and Uruguay, 1930-1950
This book is a history of women, radio, and the gendered constructions of voice and sound in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Montevideo, Uruguay. Through the stories of five women and one radio station, this study makes a substantial theoretical contribution to the study of gender, mass media, and political culture and expands our knowledge of these issues beyond the US and Western Europe. Included here is a study of the first all-women's radio station in the Western Hemisphere, an Argentine comedian known as 'Chaplin in Skirts', an author of titillating dramatic serials and, of course, Argentine First Lady 'Evita' Peron. Through the concept of the gendered soundscape, this study integrates sound studies and gender history in new ways, asking readers to consider both the female voice in history and the sonic dimensions of gender.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781107079564.jpg
100.790000 USD

Radio and the Gendered Soundscape: Women and Broadcasting in Argentina and Uruguay, 1930-1950

by Christine Ehrick
Hardback
Book cover image
The Brazilian Amazon experienced, in the late 1830s, one of Brazil's largest peasant and urban-poor insurrections, known as the Cabanagem. Uniquely, rebels succeeded in controlling provincial government and town councils for more than a year. In this first book-length study in English, the rebellion is placed in the context of ...
Rebellion on the Amazon: The Cabanagem, Race, and Popular Culture in the North of Brazil, 1798-1840
The Brazilian Amazon experienced, in the late 1830s, one of Brazil's largest peasant and urban-poor insurrections, known as the Cabanagem. Uniquely, rebels succeeded in controlling provincial government and town councils for more than a year. In this first book-length study in English, the rebellion is placed in the context of late colonial and early national society and economy. It compares the Cabanagem with contemporaneous Latin American peasant rebellions and challenges to centralized authority in Brazil. Using unpublished documentation, it reveals - contrary to other studies - that insurgents were not seeking revolutionary change or separation from the rest of Brazil. Rather, rebels wanted to promote their vision of a newly independent nation and an end to exploitation by a distant power. The Cabanagem is critical to understanding why the Amazon came to be perceived as a land without history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780521437233.jpg
110.240000 USD

Rebellion on the Amazon: The Cabanagem, Race, and Popular Culture in the North of Brazil, 1798-1840

by Mark Harris
Hardback
Book cover image
Immigration, Ethnicity, and National Identity in Brazil, 1808 to the Present examines the immigration to Brazil of millions of Europeans, Asians and Middle Easterners beginning in the nineteenth century. Jeffrey Lesser analyzes how these newcomers and their descendants adapted to their new country and how national identity was formed as ...
Immigration, Ethnicity, and National Identity in Brazil, 1808 to the Present
Immigration, Ethnicity, and National Identity in Brazil, 1808 to the Present examines the immigration to Brazil of millions of Europeans, Asians and Middle Easterners beginning in the nineteenth century. Jeffrey Lesser analyzes how these newcomers and their descendants adapted to their new country and how national identity was formed as they became Brazilians along with their children and grandchildren. Lesser argues that immigration cannot be divorced from broader patterns of Brazilian race relations, as most immigrants settled in the decades surrounding the final abolition of slavery in 1888 and their experiences were deeply conditioned by ideas of race and ethnicity formed long before their arrival. This broad exploration of the relationships between immigration, ethnicity and nation allows for analysis of one of the most vexing areas of Brazilian study: identity.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780521145350.jpg
31.490000 USD

Immigration, Ethnicity, and National Identity in Brazil, 1808 to the Present

by Jeffrey Lesser
Paperback / softback
Page 1 of 9