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The Galapagos Islands are one of the world's premiere nature attractions, home to unique ecosystems widely thought to be untouched and pristine. Historical Ecology and Archaeology in the Galapagos Islands reveals that the archipelago is not as isolated as many imagine, examining how centuries of human occupation have transformed its ...
Historical Ecology and Archaeology in the Galapagos Islands: A Legacy of Human Occupation
The Galapagos Islands are one of the world's premiere nature attractions, home to unique ecosystems widely thought to be untouched and pristine. Historical Ecology and Archaeology in the Galapagos Islands reveals that the archipelago is not as isolated as many imagine, examining how centuries of human occupation have transformed its landscape. This book shows that the island chain has been a part of global networks since its discovery in 1535 and traces the changes caused by human colonization. Central to this history is the sugar plantation Hacienda El Progreso on San Cristobal Island. Here, zooarchaeological and archaeobotanical evidence documents the introduction of exotic species and landscape transformations, and material evidence attests that inhabitants maintained connections to the outside world for consumer goods. Beyond illuminating the human history of the islands, the authors also look at the impact of visitors to Galapagos National Park today, raising questions about tourism's role in biological conservation, preservation, and restoration.
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94.500000 USD

Historical Ecology and Archaeology in the Galapagos Islands: A Legacy of Human Occupation

by Florencio Delgado, Diego Quiroga, Ross W. Jamieson, Fernando J Astudillo, Peter W. Stahl
Hardback
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President Trump repeatedly rails against the savage gang MS-13 and warns against them entering our country. However, it is the many victims of the gang who are fleeing El Salvador and trying to enter the U.S. This book tells the story of how MS-13 perpetuated three generations of Salvadoran conflict ...
State of War: MS-13 and El Savador's World of Violence
President Trump repeatedly rails against the savage gang MS-13 and warns against them entering our country. However, it is the many victims of the gang who are fleeing El Salvador and trying to enter the U.S. This book tells the story of how MS-13 perpetuated three generations of Salvadoran conflict and sets the record straight about the President's claims of crime and immigration.
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16.790000 USD

State of War: MS-13 and El Savador's World of Violence

by William Wheeler
Paperback / softback
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Borderless Empire explores the volatile history of Dutch Guiana, in particular the forgotten colonies of Essequibo and Demerara, to provide new perspectives on European empire building in the Atlantic world. Bram Hoonhout argues that imperial expansion was a process of improvisation at the colonial level rather than a project that ...
Borderless Empire: Dutch Guiana in the Atlantic World, 1750-1800
Borderless Empire explores the volatile history of Dutch Guiana, in particular the forgotten colonies of Essequibo and Demerara, to provide new perspectives on European empire building in the Atlantic world. Bram Hoonhout argues that imperial expansion was a process of improvisation at the colonial level rather than a project that was centrally orchestrated from the metropolis. Furthermore, he emphasizes that colonial expansion was far more transnational than the oft-used divisions into national Atlantics suggest. In so doing, he transcends the framework of the Dutch Atlantic by looking at the connections across cultural and imperial boundaries. The openness of Essequibo and Demerara affected all levels of the colonial society. Instead of counting on metropolitan soldiers, the colonists relied on Amerindian allies, who captured runaway slaves and put down revolts. Instead of waiting for Dutch slavers, the planters bought enslaved Africans from foreign smugglers. Instead of trying to populate the colonies with Dutchmen, the local authorities welcomed adventurers from many different origins. The result was a borderless world in which slavery was contingent on Amerindian support and colonial trade was rooted in illegality. These transactions created a colonial society that was far more Atlantic than Dutch.
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62.950000 USD

Borderless Empire: Dutch Guiana in the Atlantic World, 1750-1800

by Bram Hoonhout
Hardback
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The creation of Lima's red light district in 1928 marked the culminating achievement of the promoters of regulation who sought to control the spread of venereal disease by medically policing female prostitutes. Its closure in 1956 was arguably the high point of abolitionism, a transnational movement originating in the 1860s ...
The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s
The creation of Lima's red light district in 1928 marked the culminating achievement of the promoters of regulation who sought to control the spread of venereal disease by medically policing female prostitutes. Its closure in 1956 was arguably the high point of abolitionism, a transnational movement originating in the 1860s that advocated that regulation was not only ineffective from a public health perspective, but also morally wrong. The Sexual Question charts this cyclic process of regulation and abolition in Peru, uncovering the ideas, policies, and actors shaping the debates over governing prostitution in Lima and beyond. The history of prostitution, Paulo Drinot shows, sheds light on the interplay of gender and sexuality, medicine and public health, and nation-building and state formation in Peru. With its compelling historical lens, this landmark study offers readers an engaging narrative, and new perspectives on Latin American studies, social policy, and Peruvian history.
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44.61 USD

The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s

by Paulo Drinot
Paperback / softback
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An insightful exploration of the iconic Galapagos tortoises, and how their fate is inextricably linked to our own in a rapidly changing world The Galapagos archipelago is often viewed as a last foothold of pristine nature. For sixty years, conservationists have worked to restore this evolutionary Eden after centuries of ...
On the Backs of Tortoises: Darwin, the Galapagos, and the Fate of an Evolutionary Eden
An insightful exploration of the iconic Galapagos tortoises, and how their fate is inextricably linked to our own in a rapidly changing world The Galapagos archipelago is often viewed as a last foothold of pristine nature. For sixty years, conservationists have worked to restore this evolutionary Eden after centuries of exploitation at the hands of pirates, whalers, and island settlers. This book tells the story of the islands' namesakes-the giant tortoises-as coveted food sources, objects of natural history, and famous icons of conservation and tourism. By doing so, it brings into stark relief the paradoxical, and impossible, goal of conserving species by trying to restore a past state of prehistoric evolution. The tortoises, Elizabeth Hennessy demonstrates, are not prehistoric, but rather microcosms whose stories show how deeply human and nonhuman life are entangled. In a world where evolution is thoroughly shaped by global history, Hennessy puts forward a vision for conservation based on reckoning with the past, rather than trying to erase it.
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37.19 USD

On the Backs of Tortoises: Darwin, the Galapagos, and the Fate of an Evolutionary Eden

by Elizabeth Hennessy
Hardback
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Even to experts, Colombia is one of the most confusing countries in the Americas. Its democratic tradition is among the richest and most long-standing in the hemisphere, with only eleven years of military rule during its 200 some years of independence. Except for the United States and Canada, Colombia has ...
Colombia: What Everyone Needs to Know (R)
Even to experts, Colombia is one of the most confusing countries in the Americas. Its democratic tradition is among the richest and most long-standing in the hemisphere, with only eleven years of military rule during its 200 some years of independence. Except for the United States and Canada, Colombia has had the highest growth rate in the Americas over the last 75 years. It is widely seen as having some of the continent's best universities and deep intellectual traditions along with a dazzling array of fine and industrial arts and now globally-popular tropical music. But despite these admirable achievements, Colombia has also experienced what its Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez once called a biblical holocaust of human savagery. Along with the scourge of politically-motivated assassinations (averaging 30 per day in the 1990s) have been drug-related massacres, widespread disappearances, rapes and kidnappings, and even the signature defilement of murder victims. The relentless dynamics of the illegal drug industry raises a puzzling question: how did Colombia capture and control that enormously-lucrative industry and then leverage its status as America's No. 1 drug supplier into a $7 billion military partnership with the world's superpower? The answer to that question is something everyone needs to know. To unravel the enigma, Richard D. Mahoney links historical legacies with key periods in the post-World War II era and then sets forth overarching cultural features-land violence, the Church, race, the Spanish language, and magical culture-that run through Colombia's history, distinguish its national experience, and fuel its unquenchable creativity.
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17.800000 USD

Colombia: What Everyone Needs to Know (R)

by Richard D Mahoney
Paperback / softback
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In 1786, Guatemalan priest Pedro Jose de Arrese published a work instructing readers on their duty to perform the cesarean operation on the bodies of recently deceased pregnant women in order to extract the fetus while it was still alive. Although the fetus's long-term survival was desired, the overarching goal ...
Baptism Through Incision: The Postmortem Cesarean Operation in the Spanish Empire
In 1786, Guatemalan priest Pedro Jose de Arrese published a work instructing readers on their duty to perform the cesarean operation on the bodies of recently deceased pregnant women in order to extract the fetus while it was still alive. Although the fetus's long-term survival was desired, the overarching goal was to cleanse the unborn child of original sin and ensure its place in heaven. Baptism Through Incision presents Arrese's complete treatise-translated here into English for the first time-with a critical introduction and excerpts from related primary source texts. Inspired by priests' writings published in Spain and Sicily beginning in the mid-eighteenth century, Arrese and writers like him in Peru, Mexico, Alta California, Guatemala, and the Philippines penned local medico-religious manuals and guides for performing the operation and baptism. Comparing these texts to one another and placing them in dialogue with archival cases and print culture references, this book traces the genealogy of the postmortem cesarean operation throughout the Spanish Empire and reconstructs the transatlantic circulation of obstetrical and scientific knowledge around childbirth and reproduction. In doing so, it shows that knowledge about cesarean operations and fetal baptism intersected with local beliefs and quickly became part of the new ideas and scientific-medical advancements circulating broadly among transatlantic Enlightenment cultures. A valuable resource for scholars and students of colonial Latin American history, the history of medicine, and the history of women, reproduction, and childbirth, Baptism Through Incision includes translated excerpts of works by Spanish surgeon Jaime Alcala y Martinez, Mexican physician Ignacio Segura, and Peruvian friar Francisco Gonzalez Laguna, as well as late colonial Guatemalan instructions, and newspaper articles published in the Gazeta de Mexico, the Gazeta de Guatemala, and the Mercurio Peruano.
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20.950000 USD

Baptism Through Incision: The Postmortem Cesarean Operation in the Spanish Empire

by Adam Warren, Zeb Tortorici, Martha Few
Paperback / softback
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Latin America is a concept firmly entrenched in its philosophical, moral, and historical meanings. And yet, Mauricio Tenorio-Trillo argues in this landmark book, it is an obsolescent racial-cultural idea that ought to have vanished long ago with the banishment of racial theory. Latin America: The Allure and Power of an ...
Latin America: The Allure and Power of an Idea
Latin America is a concept firmly entrenched in its philosophical, moral, and historical meanings. And yet, Mauricio Tenorio-Trillo argues in this landmark book, it is an obsolescent racial-cultural idea that ought to have vanished long ago with the banishment of racial theory. Latin America: The Allure and Power of an Idea makes this case persuasively. Tenorio-Trillo builds the book on three interlocking steps: first, an intellectual history of the concept of Latin America in its natural historical habitat--mid-nineteenth-century redefinitions of empire and the cultural, political, and economic intellectualism; second, a serious and uncompromising critique of the current Latin Americanism --which circulates in United States-based humanities and social sciences; and, third, accepting that we might actually be stuck with Latin America, Tenorio-Trillo charts a path forward for the writing and teaching of Latin American history. Accessible and forceful, rich in historical research and specificity, the book offers a distinctive, conceptual history of Latin America and its many connections and intersections of political and intellectual significance. Tenorio-Trillo's book is a masterpiece of interdisciplinary scholarship.
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26.250000 USD

Latin America: The Allure and Power of an Idea

by Mauricio Tenorio Trillo
Paperback / softback
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Herbert Klein and Francisco Luna present a sweeping narrative of social change in Brazil that documents its transition from a predominantly rural and illiterate society in 1950, to an overwhelmingly urban, modern, and literate society in the twenty-first century. Tracing this radical evolution reveals how industrialization created a new labor ...
Modern Brazil: A Social History
Herbert Klein and Francisco Luna present a sweeping narrative of social change in Brazil that documents its transition from a predominantly rural and illiterate society in 1950, to an overwhelmingly urban, modern, and literate society in the twenty-first century. Tracing this radical evolution reveals how industrialization created a new labor force, how demographic shifts reorganized the family and social attitudes, and how urban life emerged in what is now one of the most important industrial economies in the world. A paradigm for modern social histories, the book also examines changes in social stratification and mobility, the decline of regional disparities, education, social welfare, race, and gender. By analyzing Brazil's unprecedented Brazilian political, economic, and social changes in the late twentieth and twenty-first century, the authors address an under-explored area in current scholarship and offer an invaluable resource for scholars of Latin American and Brazil.
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50.19 USD

Modern Brazil: A Social History

by Francisco Vidal Luna, Herbert S. Klein
Paperback / softback
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This book is a political and theological reflection on the violence and injustice that has taken place in Mexico and Central America since 2006 as a result of the drug war, considered through the lens of the cultural and economic aspects of globalization. In order to understand and respond to ...
A Theology of the Drug War: Globalization, Violence, and Salvation
This book is a political and theological reflection on the violence and injustice that has taken place in Mexico and Central America since 2006 as a result of the drug war, considered through the lens of the cultural and economic aspects of globalization. In order to understand and respond to this conflict, William A. Walker III combines the work of philosopher Enrique Dussel and theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar to develop a theology of the drug war that transcends both a Eurocentric conception of the world and a merely political account of salvation. Walker also highlights examples of Christian and church-based approaches to practicing neighborliness and resistance to drug trade- related violence, challenging both Christians and non-Christians to participate in the creation of a more just and merciful society.
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120.88 USD

A Theology of the Drug War: Globalization, Violence, and Salvation

by William A., Walker III
Hardback
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A detailed examination of the controversial expeditions to the Tayos Cave complex in Ecuador and the treasures glimpsed in its depths * Reconstructs the expeditions from the 1960s and '70s, including the Mormon Church's search for lost tablets, Stanley Hall's quest with Neil Armstrong, and sightings of a metal library, ...
Mysteries of the Tayos Caves: The Lost Civilizations Where the Andes Meet the Amazon
A detailed examination of the controversial expeditions to the Tayos Cave complex in Ecuador and the treasures glimpsed in its depths * Reconstructs the expeditions from the 1960s and '70s, including the Mormon Church's search for lost tablets, Stanley Hall's quest with Neil Armstrong, and sightings of a metal library, books of gold, copper plates, and a quartz sarcophagus * Includes photos from the author's own dangerous expeditions to the Tayos Caves * Explores connections to Atlantis, Ancient Astronauts, and the Hollow Earth theory and the possibility of tunnel networks that extend from the Rocky Mountains to Patagonia The Cuevas de los Tayos is a cavern complex in the Amazon rain forest of Ecuador. Named for the tayos, the oil birds that reside within them, these caves have countless enigmas connected with them, from the discovery of inexplicable architectural details, to claims of curses and treasures, to dangerous encounters with the indigenous people, the Shuar, for whom the caves are sacred. Sharing his more than 30 years of research into the Tayos Caves as well as his own explorations, Alex Chionetti examines the legends and mysteries associated with this site and the explorers who have ventured within. He details the discovery of the Tayos Cave complex by Hungarian explorer Janos Juan Moricz in the 1960s, including Moricz's claims of finding a metal library with books of gold. Exploring the oral tradition of the Shuar, he explains how this region was the possible origin of Incan culture and the legend of El Dorado. The author shares his own dangerous explorations within the Tayos Caves, and, drawing on unpublished interviews with speleologist Julio Goyen Aguado, he reconstructs the expeditions of the 1960s and '70s, revealing the Mormon Church's search for lost tablets, a British army incursion, and sightings of paintings, gold statues and skeletons, copper plates, and a quartz sarcophagus--treasures akin to the Crespi treasure. The author also shares details from Stanley Hall's suspicious expedition in 1976, which included astronaut Neil Armstrong. Investigating the lost civilizations behind the Tayos treasures, Chionetti explores the possible connections to Atlantis, aliens, Ancient Astronauts, and the Hollow Earth theory; the caves' links with hermetic societies; and claims of tunnel networks that extend thousands of miles through both American continents, from the Rocky Mountains to Patagonia. Sharing a real-life adventure story wilder than an Indiana Jones plot, the author shows that Earth's ancient past has many secrets waiting to be uncovered.
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21.000000 USD

Mysteries of the Tayos Caves: The Lost Civilizations Where the Andes Meet the Amazon

by Alex Chionetti
Paperback / softback
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In November 1519, Hernando Cortes walked along a causeway leading to the capital of the Aztec kingdom and came face to face with Moctezuma. That story-and the story of what happened afterwards-has been told many times, but always following the narrative offered by the Spaniards. After all, we have been ...
Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs
In November 1519, Hernando Cortes walked along a causeway leading to the capital of the Aztec kingdom and came face to face with Moctezuma. That story-and the story of what happened afterwards-has been told many times, but always following the narrative offered by the Spaniards. After all, we have been taught, it was the Europeans who held the pens. But the Native Americans were intrigued by the Roman alphabet and, unbeknownst to the newcomers, they used it to write detailed histories in their own language of Nahuatl. Until recently, these sources remained obscure, only partially translated, and rarely consulted by scholars. For the first time, in Fifth Sun, the history of the Aztecs is offered in all its complexity based solely on the texts written by the indigenous people themselves. Camilla Townsend presents an accessible and humanized depiction of these native Mexicans, rather than seeing them as the exotic, bloody figures of European stereotypes. The conquest, in this work, is neither an apocalyptic moment, nor an origin story launching Mexicans into existence. The Mexica people had a history of their own long before the Europeans arrived and did not simply capitulate to Spanish culture and colonization. Instead, they realigned their political allegiances, accommodated new obligations, adopted new technologies, and endured. This engaging revisionist history of the Aztecs, told through their own words, explores the experience of a once-powerful people facing the trauma of conquest and finding ways to survive, offering an empathetic interpretation for experts and non-specialists alike.
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31.450000 USD

Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs

by Camilla Townsend
Hardback
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In 1983, following a military dictatorship that left thousands dead and disappeared and the economy in ruins, Raul Alfonsin was elected president of Argentina on the strength of his pledge to prosecute the armed forces for their crimes and restore a measure of material well-being to Argentine lives. Food, housing, ...
In Search of the Lost Decade: Everyday Rights in Post-Dictatorship Argentina
In 1983, following a military dictatorship that left thousands dead and disappeared and the economy in ruins, Raul Alfonsin was elected president of Argentina on the strength of his pledge to prosecute the armed forces for their crimes and restore a measure of material well-being to Argentine lives. Food, housing, and full employment became the litmus tests of the new democracy. In Search of the Lost Decade reconsiders Argentina's transition to democracy by examining the everyday meanings of rights and the lived experience of democratic return, far beyond the ballot box and corridors of power. Beginning with promises to eliminate hunger and ending with food shortages and burning supermarkets, Jennifer Adair provides an in-depth account of the Alfonsin government's unfulfilled projects to ensure basic needs against the backdrop of a looming neoliberal world order. As it moves from the presidential palace to the streets, this original book offers a compelling reinterpretation of post-dictatorship Argentina and Latin America's so-called lost decade.
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36.700000 USD

In Search of the Lost Decade: Everyday Rights in Post-Dictatorship Argentina

by Jennifer Adair
Paperback / softback
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In this novel take on diplomatic history, Sebastian Hurtado-Torres examines the involvement of the United States in Chile during the Eduardo Frei administration (1964-1970). The Gathering Storm shows how the engagement between the two nations deepened the process of political polarization in Chile. Hurtado-Torres presents major revisionist arguments about the ...
The Gathering Storm: Eduardo Frei's Revolution in Liberty and Chile's Cold War
In this novel take on diplomatic history, Sebastian Hurtado-Torres examines the involvement of the United States in Chile during the Eduardo Frei administration (1964-1970). The Gathering Storm shows how the engagement between the two nations deepened the process of political polarization in Chile. Hurtado-Torres presents major revisionist arguments about the relationship between Chile and the US during the Frei years. At the heart of his account is a description of the partnership between Frei's government and that of Lyndon B. Johnson. Both leaders considered modernization to be integral to political and economic development, and the US Embassy in Santiago was recognized by all parties to be the center of this modernizing agenda and the practical work of the Alliance for Progress (AFP). The Gathering Storm portrays the diplomatic and economic relationship between Chile and the United States in a manner that departs from the most militant and conservative interpretations of US foreign policy toward Latin America. By focusing on the active participation of agents of US foreign policy, particularly those associated with the AFP, and not secret operatives of the Central Intelligence Agency, Hurtado-Torres offers a fresh narrative about a critical period in Chilean political history and a new understanding of the ways and means through which the foreign policy of the United States was carried out.
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52.450000 USD

The Gathering Storm: Eduardo Frei's Revolution in Liberty and Chile's Cold War

by Sebastian Hurtado-Torres
Hardback
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Itineraries of Expertise contends that experts and expertise played fundamental roles in the Latin American Cold War. While traditional Cold War histories of the region have examined diplomatic, intelligence, and military operations and more recent studies have probed the cultural dimensions of the conflict, the experts who constitute the focus ...
Itineraries of Expertise: Science, Technology, and the Environment in Latin America
Itineraries of Expertise contends that experts and expertise played fundamental roles in the Latin American Cold War. While traditional Cold War histories of the region have examined diplomatic, intelligence, and military operations and more recent studies have probed the cultural dimensions of the conflict, the experts who constitute the focus of this volume escaped these categories. Although they often portrayed themselves as removed from politics, their work contributed to the key geopolitical agendas of the day. The paths traveled by the experts in this volume not only traversed Latin America and connected Latin America to the global North, they also stretch traditional chronologies of the Latin American Cold War to show how local experts in the early twentieth century laid the foundation for post-World War II development projects, and how Cold War knowledge of science, technology, and the environment continues to impact our world today. These essays unite environmental history and the history of science and technology to argue for the importance of expertise in the Latin American Cold War.
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42.000000 USD

Itineraries of Expertise: Science, Technology, and the Environment in Latin America

by Timothy Lorek, Andra Chastain
Hardback
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This edited book contributes to the growing field of self-translation studies by exploring the diversity of roles the practice has in Spanish-speaking contexts of production on both sides of the Atlantic. Part I surveys the presence of self-translation in contemporary Indigenous literatures in Spanish America, with a focus on Mexico ...
Literary Self-Translation in Hispanophone Contexts - La autotraduccion literaria en contextos de habla hispana: Europe and the Americas - Europa y America
This edited book contributes to the growing field of self-translation studies by exploring the diversity of roles the practice has in Spanish-speaking contexts of production on both sides of the Atlantic. Part I surveys the presence of self-translation in contemporary Indigenous literatures in Spanish America, with a focus on Mexico and the Mapuche poetry of Chile and Argentina. Part II proposes to incorporate self-translation into the history of Spanish-American literatures- including its relation with colonial multilingual-translation practices, the transfers it allowed between the French and Spanish-American avant-gardes, and the insertion it offered for exiled Republicans in Mexico. Part III develops new reflections on the Iberian realm: on the choice between self and allograph translation Basque writers must face, a new category in Xose Dasilva's typology, based on the Galician context, and the need to expand the analysis of directionality in Catalan self-translations. This book brings together contributions from some of the leading international experts in translation and self-translation, and it will be of interest to scholars and students in the fields of Translation Studies, Cultural Studies, Comparative Literature, Spanish Literature, Spanish American and Latin American Literature, and Amerindian Literatures.
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146.990000 USD

Literary Self-Translation in Hispanophone Contexts - La autotraduccion literaria en contextos de habla hispana: Europe and the Americas - Europa y America

Hardback
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An examination of the social and cultural repercussions of Jewish emigration from Poland to Argentina in the 1920s and 1930s. Between the 1890s and 1930s, Argentina, following the United States and Palestine, became the main destination for Eastern European Ashkenazi Jews seeking safety, civil rights, and better economic prospects. Just ...
Polacos in Argentina: Polish Jews, Interwar Migration, and the Emergence of Transatlantic Jewish Culture
An examination of the social and cultural repercussions of Jewish emigration from Poland to Argentina in the 1920s and 1930s. Between the 1890s and 1930s, Argentina, following the United States and Palestine, became the main destination for Eastern European Ashkenazi Jews seeking safety, civil rights, and better economic prospects. Just Between 1918 and 1939, sixty thousand Polish Jews established new homes in Argentina. They formed a strong ethnic community that quickly embraced Argentine culture while still maintaining their unique Jewish-Polish character. This mass migration caused a transfer of cultural, social, and political contents in both Poland and Argentina, forever shaping the cultural landscape of both lands. In Polacos in Argentina: Polish Jews, Interwar Migration, and the Emergence of Transatlantic Jewish Culture, Mariusz Kalczewiak has constructed a multifaceted and in-depth narrative that sheds light on marginalized aspects of Jewish migration and enriches the dialogue between Latin American Jewish studies and Polish Jewish Studies. Based on archival research, Yiddish travelogues on Argentina, and the Yiddish and Spanish-language press, this study recreates a mosaic of entanglements that Jewish migration wove between Poland and Argentina. Most studies on mass migration fail to acknowledge the role of the country of origin, but this innovative work approaches Jewish migration to Argentina as a continuous process that took place on both sides of the Atlantic. Taken as a whole, Polacos in Argentina enlightens the heterogeneous and complex issue of immigrant commitments, belongings, and expectations. Jewish emigration from Poland to Argentina serves as a case study of how ethnicity evolves and transforms among migrants and their children, and the dynamics that emerge between putting down roots in a new country and maintaining commitments to the country of origin.
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52.450000 USD

Polacos in Argentina: Polish Jews, Interwar Migration, and the Emergence of Transatlantic Jewish Culture

by Mariusz Kalczewiak
Hardback
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Now in English for the first time, Keila Grinberg's compelling study of the nineteenth-century jurist Antonio Pereira Reboucas (1798-1880) traces the life of an Afro-Brazilian intellectual who rose from a humble background to play a key as well as conflicted role as Brazilians struggled to define citizenship and understand racial ...
A Black Jurist in a Slave Society: Antonio Pereira Reboucas and the Trials of Brazilian Citizenship
Now in English for the first time, Keila Grinberg's compelling study of the nineteenth-century jurist Antonio Pereira Reboucas (1798-1880) traces the life of an Afro-Brazilian intellectual who rose from a humble background to play a key as well as conflicted role as Brazilians struggled to define citizenship and understand racial politics. One of the most prominent specialists in civil law of his time, Reboucas explained why blacks fought stridently for their own inclusion in society but also complicitly embraced an ethic of silence on race more broadly. Grinberg argues that while this silence was crucial for defining spaces of social mobility and respectability regardless of race, it was also stifling, and played an important role in quelling political mobilization based on racial identity. Reboucas's commitment to liberal ideals also exemplifies the contradiction he embodied: though he rejected movements that were grounded in racial political mobilization, he was consistently treated as potentially dangerous for the single fact that he was of African origin. Grinberg's analysis of Reboucas and his times demonstrates how his life and career-encompassing such themes as racial politics and identities, slavery and racism, and imperfect citizenship-are central for our understanding of Atlantic slave and post-abolition societies.
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31.450000 USD

A Black Jurist in a Slave Society: Antonio Pereira Reboucas and the Trials of Brazilian Citizenship

by Keila Grinberg
Paperback / softback
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Legacies of the Left Turn in Latin America: The Promise of Inclusive Citizenship contains original essays by a diverse group of leading and emerging scholars from North America, Europe, and Latin America. The book speaks to wide-ranging debates on democracy, the left, and citizenship in Latin America. What were the ...
Legacies of the Left Turn in Latin America: The Promise of Inclusive Citizenship
Legacies of the Left Turn in Latin America: The Promise of Inclusive Citizenship contains original essays by a diverse group of leading and emerging scholars from North America, Europe, and Latin America. The book speaks to wide-ranging debates on democracy, the left, and citizenship in Latin America. What were the effects of a decade and a half of left and center-left governments? The central purpose of this book is to evaluate both the positive and negative effects of the Left turn on state-society relations and inclusion.Promises of social inclusion and the expansion of citizenship rights were paramount to the center-left discourses upon the factions' arrival to power in the late 1990s and early 2000s. This book is a first step in understanding to what extent these initial promises were or were not fulfilled, and why. In analyzing these issues, the authors demonstrate that these years yield both signs of progress in some areas and the deepening of historical problems in others. The contributors to this book reveal variation among and within countries, and across policy and issue areas such as democratic institution reforms, human rights, minorities' rights, environmental questions, and violence. This focus on issues rather than countries distinguishes the book from other recent volumes on the left in Latin America, and the book will speak to a broad and multi-dimensional audience, both inside and outside the academic world. CONTRIBUTORS: Manuel Balan, Francoise Montambeault, Philip Oxhorn, Maxwell A. Cameron, Kenneth M. Roberts, Nathalia Sandoval-Rojas, Daniel M. Brinks, Benjamin Goldfrank, Roberta Rice, Elizabeth Jelin, Celina Van Dembroucke, Nora Nagels, Merike Blofield, Jordi Diez, Eve Bratman,Gabriel Kessler, Olivier Dabene, Jared Abbot, Steve Levitsky.
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63.000000 USD

Legacies of the Left Turn in Latin America: The Promise of Inclusive Citizenship

Hardback
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In Sandinistas: A Moral History, Robert J. Sierakowski offers a bold new perspective on the liberation movement that brought the Sandinista National Liberation Front to power in Nicaragua in 1979, overthrowing the longest-running dictatorship in Latin America. Unique sources, from trial transcripts to archival collections and oral histories, offer a ...
Sandinistas: A Moral History
In Sandinistas: A Moral History, Robert J. Sierakowski offers a bold new perspective on the liberation movement that brought the Sandinista National Liberation Front to power in Nicaragua in 1979, overthrowing the longest-running dictatorship in Latin America. Unique sources, from trial transcripts to archival collections and oral histories, offer a new vantage point beyond geopolitics and ideologies to understand the central role that was played by everyday Nicaraguans. Focusing on the country's rural north, Sierakowski explores how a diverse coalition of labor unionists, student activists, housewives, and peasants inspired by Catholic liberation theology came to successfully challenge the legitimacy of the Somoza dictatorship and its entrenched networks of power. Mobilizing communities against the ubiquitous cantinas, gambling halls, and brothels, grassroots organizers exposed the regime's complicity in promoting social ills, disorder, and quotidian violence while helping to construct radical new visions of moral uplift and social renewal.Sierakowski similarly recasts our understanding of the Nicaraguan National Guard, grounding his study of the Somozas' army in the social and cultural world of the ordinary soldiers who enlisted and fought in defense of the dictatorship. As the military responded to growing opposition with heightened state terror and human rights violations, repression culminated in widespread civilian massacres, stories that are unearthed for the first time in this work. These atrocities further exposed the regime's moral breakdown in the eyes of the public, pushing thousands of previously unaligned Nicaraguans into the ranks of the guerrilla insurgency by the late 1970s. Sierakowski's innovative reinterpretation of the Sandinista Revolution will be of interest to students, scholars, and activists concerned with Latin American social movements, the Cold War, and human rights.
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36.750000 USD

Sandinistas: A Moral History

by Robert J Sierakowski
Hardback
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The Global Perspective of Urban Labor in Mexico City, 1910-1929 examines the global entanglement of the Mexican labor movement during the Mexican Revolution. It describes how global influences made their entry into labor culture through the cinema, the theater, and labor festivals as well as into the development of consumption ...
The Global Perspective of Urban Labor in Mexico City, 1910-1929: El Mundo al Reves
The Global Perspective of Urban Labor in Mexico City, 1910-1929 examines the global entanglement of the Mexican labor movement during the Mexican Revolution. It describes how global influences made their entry into labor culture through the cinema, the theater, and labor festivals as well as into the development of consumption patterns and advertisement. It further shows how the young labor movement constituted its discourse and invented its tradition at meetings and in the columns of newspapers. The local conditions constitute the framework for the examination of Mexican labor's perspectives on and engagement with contemporary events of global significance. Thereby, this book demonstrates how workers turned to the global context in search of guidance and role models, embracing global developments and narratives. It also reveals the differentiations from this context in order to create a unique local identity. This approach allows new perspectives on the role of a neglected revolutionary actor and on the influence of global developments in a revolution that has been predominantly interpreted from a national point of view. It shows the way global ideas were brought to life in the framework of revolutionary Mexico City - providing new insights into the grand-narratives of Globalization and Revolution.
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223.16 USD

The Global Perspective of Urban Labor in Mexico City, 1910-1929: El Mundo al Reves

by Stephan Fender
Hardback
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Offering a unique perspective on the very notions and practices of storytelling, history, memory, and language, Clio's Laws collects ten essays (some new and some previously published in Spanish) by a revered voice in global history. Taking its title from the Greek muse of history, this opus considers issues related ...
Clio's Laws: On History and Language
Offering a unique perspective on the very notions and practices of storytelling, history, memory, and language, Clio's Laws collects ten essays (some new and some previously published in Spanish) by a revered voice in global history. Taking its title from the Greek muse of history, this opus considers issues related to the historian's craft, including nationalism and identity, and draws on Tenorio-Trillo's own lifetime of experiences as a historian with deep roots in both Mexico and the United States. By turns deeply ironic, provocative, and experimental, and covering topics both lowbrow and highbrow, the essays form a dialogue with Clio about idiosyncratic yet profound matters. Tenorio-Trillo presents his own version of an ars historica (what history is, why we write it, and how we abuse it) alongside a very personal essay on the relationship between poetry and history. Other selections include an exploration of the effects of a historian's autobiography, a critique of history's celebratory obsession, and a guide to reading history in an era of internet searches and too many books. A self-described exile, Tenorio-Trillo has produced a singular tour of the historical imagination and its universal traits.
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47.250000 USD

Clio's Laws: On History and Language

by Mauricio Tenorio Trillo
Hardback
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Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as ...
Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City
Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as whites fled for the suburbs and exurbs in increasing numbers, Latin Americans immigrated to urban centres in even greater numbers. Barrio America charts the vibrant revival of American cities in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, arguing that we should attribute this revival to the influx of Latin American immigrants -- both legal and not. An award-winning historian and son of immigrants, Andrew Sandoval-Strausz recounts this untold history by focusing on the largest immigrant barrios in two of the nation's largest cities: Chicago's Little Village and Dallas's Oak Cliff. These neighbourhoods were once classic examples of urban crisis: they reached their peak prosperity around 1950, afterwards losing residents, jobs, and opportunity, which destabilised urban public order. But after 1965, when Lyndon Johnson overturned the restrictive 1924 immigration law and a major agricultural crisis was convulsing Mexico, these neighbourhoods saw a record number of incoming Latin Americans. The nation's urban barrios are regularly portrayed as decaying districts plagued by crime and disorder, but in reality, over the past several decades, areas with growing immigrant populations have become some of the most dynamic, stable, and safe neighbourhoods in their cities. The new immigrants brought with them three distinctive cultural traditions -- penchants for public spaces, walking, and small entrepreneurship -- that have changed the American city for the better. Drawing on dozens of oral histories with migrantes themselves, Sandoval-Strausz places immigrant voices at the centre of the narrative, emphasising the choices of Latin American newcomers, the motivations that brought them to the United States, and the hopes that lay before them, their families, and their communities. Barrio America demonstrates how migrants have used their labour, their capital, and their culture to build a new metropolitan America.
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33.600000 USD

Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City

by A.K. Sandoval-Strausz
Hardback
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In 1999, Venezuela became the first country in the world to constitutionally recognize the socioeconomic value of housework and enshrine homemakers' social security. This landmark provision was part of a larger project to transform the state and expand social inclusion during Hugo Chavez's presidency. The Bolivarian revolution opened new opportunities ...
Engendering Revolution: Women, Unpaid Labor, and Maternalism in Bolivarian Venezuela
In 1999, Venezuela became the first country in the world to constitutionally recognize the socioeconomic value of housework and enshrine homemakers' social security. This landmark provision was part of a larger project to transform the state and expand social inclusion during Hugo Chavez's presidency. The Bolivarian revolution opened new opportunities for poor and working-class-or popular-women's organizing. The state recognized their unpaid labor and maternal gender role as central to the revolution. Yet even as state recognition enabled some popular women to receive public assistance, it also made their unpaid labor and organizing vulnerable to state appropriation. Offering the first comprehensive analysis of this phenomenon, Engendering Revolution demonstrates that the Bolivarian revolution cannot be understood without comprehending the gendered nature of its state-society relations. Showcasing field research that comprises archival analysis, observation, and extensive interviews, these thought-provoking findings underscore the ways in which popular women sustained a movement purported to exalt them, even while many could not access social security and remained socially, economically, and politically vulnerable.
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36.700000 USD

Engendering Revolution: Women, Unpaid Labor, and Maternalism in Bolivarian Venezuela

by Rachel Elfenbein
Paperback / softback
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Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from ...
The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from north to south and the importance of women to Catholic survival and change over the course of the twentieth century. As a devout Catholic single woman, neither nun nor mother, del Valle resisted religious persecution in an era of Mexican revolutionary upheaval, became a labor activist in a time of class conflict, founded an educational movement, toured the United States as a public lecturer, and raised money for Catholic ministries-all in an age dominated by economic depression, gender prejudice, and racial discrimination. The rise of the Global South marked a new power dynamic within the Church as Latin America moved from the margins of activism to the vanguard. Del Valle's life and the stories of those she met along the way illustrate the shared pious practices, gender norms, and organizational networks that linked activists across national borders. Told through the eyes of a little-known laywoman from Mexico, Andes shows how women journeyed from the pews into the heart of the modern world.
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36.750000 USD

The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico

by Stephen J. C. Andes
Paperback / softback
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In The Triumph of Persusasion: Brazil, United States, and the Good Neighbor Policy during World War II, Alexandre Busko Valim studies the use of cinema in Brazil as an instrument of political persuasion by the United States during the period of the so-called Good Neighbor policy during World War II ...
Brazil, the United States, and the Good Neighbor Policy: The Triumph of Persuasion during World War II
In The Triumph of Persusasion: Brazil, United States, and the Good Neighbor Policy during World War II, Alexandre Busko Valim studies the use of cinema in Brazil as an instrument of political persuasion by the United States during the period of the so-called Good Neighbor policy during World War II by examining extensive documentation found in the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. In doing so, Valim demonstrates the modus operandi of media imperialism: its mapping strategies and control of the market, its actions, and its objectives of domination. When thinking about the place of images as a means of convincing and imposing an ideological project, the author notes the methods necessary to examine this relationship between art and politics, a problem that is central in the contemporary world. Scholars of Latin American Studies, international relations, history, political science, and media studies will find this book particularly useful.
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99.750000 USD

Brazil, the United States, and the Good Neighbor Policy: The Triumph of Persuasion during World War II

by Alexandre Busko Valim
Hardback
Book cover image
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from ...
The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from north to south and the importance of women to Catholic survival and change over the course of the twentieth century. As a devout Catholic single woman, neither nun nor mother, del Valle resisted religious persecution in an era of Mexican revolutionary upheaval, became a labor activist in a time of class conflict, founded an educational movement, toured the United States as a public lecturer, and raised money for Catholic ministries-all in an age dominated by economic depression, gender prejudice, and racial discrimination. The rise of the Global South marked a new power dynamic within the Church as Latin America moved from the margins of activism to the vanguard. Del Valle's life and the stories of those she met along the way illustrate the shared pious practices, gender norms, and organizational networks that linked activists across national borders. Told through the eyes of a little-known laywoman from Mexico, Andes shows how women journeyed from the pews into the heart of the modern world.
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68.250000 USD

The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico

by Stephen J. C. Andes
Hardback
Book cover image
Much of the confusion about a central event in United States history begins with the name: the Civil War. In reality, the Civil War was not merely civil--meaning national--and not merely a war, but instead an international conflict of ideas as well as armies. Its implications transformed the U.S. Constitution ...
The Second American Revolution: The Civil War-Era Struggle over Cuba and the Rebirth of the American Republic
Much of the confusion about a central event in United States history begins with the name: the Civil War. In reality, the Civil War was not merely civil--meaning national--and not merely a war, but instead an international conflict of ideas as well as armies. Its implications transformed the U.S. Constitution and reshaped a world order, as political and economic systems grounded in slavery and empire clashed with the democratic process of republican forms of government. And it spilled over national boundaries, tying the United States together with Cuba, Spain, Mexico, Britain, and France in a struggle over the future of slavery and of republics. Here Gregory P. Downs argues that we can see the Civil War anew by understanding it as a revolution. More than a fight to preserve the Union and end slavery, the conflict refashioned a nation, in part by remaking its Constitution. More than a struggle of brother against brother, it entailed remaking an Atlantic world that centered in surprising ways on Cuba and Spain. Downs introduces a range of actors not often considered as central to the conflict but clearly engaged in broader questions and acts they regarded as revolutionary. This expansive canvas allows Downs to describe a broad and world-shaking war with implications far greater than often recognized.
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29.350000 USD

The Second American Revolution: The Civil War-Era Struggle over Cuba and the Rebirth of the American Republic

by Gregory P Downs
Hardback
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Contrary to claims that socialism opposed the family unit, Rachel Hynson argues that the revolutionary Cuban government engaged in social engineering to redefine the nuclear family and organize citizens to serve the state. Drawing on Cuban newspapers and periodicals, government documents and speeches, long-overlooked laws, and oral histories, Hynson reveals ...
Laboring for the State: Women, Family, and Work in Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-1971
Contrary to claims that socialism opposed the family unit, Rachel Hynson argues that the revolutionary Cuban government engaged in social engineering to redefine the nuclear family and organize citizens to serve the state. Drawing on Cuban newspapers and periodicals, government documents and speeches, long-overlooked laws, and oral histories, Hynson reveals that by 1961, and increasingly throughout this decade, revolutionary citizenship was earned through labor. While men were to work outside the home in state-approved jobs, women found their citizenship tied to affording the state control over their reproduction and sexual labor. Through all four campaigns examined in this book - the projects to control women's reproduction, promote marriage, end prostitution, and compel men into state-sanctioned employment - Hynson shows that the state's progression toward authoritarianism and its attendant monopolization of morality were met with resistance and counter-narratives by citizens who so opposed the mandates of these campaigns that Cuban leadership has since reconfigured or effaced these programs from the Revolution's grand narrative.
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41.990000 USD

Laboring for the State: Women, Family, and Work in Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-1971

by Rachel Hynson
Hardback
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Ilan Stavans is one of the best known and most prolific Latino academics working today. In preparation for writing Seventh Heaven, Stavans spent five years traveling through Latin America in search of what defines the Jewish communities in the region. The roots of these communities date back to the expedition ...
The Seventh Heaven: Travels Through Jewish Latin America
Ilan Stavans is one of the best known and most prolific Latino academics working today. In preparation for writing Seventh Heaven, Stavans spent five years traveling through Latin America in search of what defines the Jewish communities in the region. The roots of these communities date back to the expedition of Columbus. Stavans visits Mexico, Argentina, Cuba, Peru, Brazil, and Venezuela, and he talks to families of the desaparecidos in Buenos Aires, to Indian Jews in central Mexico, and to neo-Nazis in Patagonia. He also visits Spain, to understand the long-term effects of the Inquisition, the American Southwest, habitat of secret Jews, and Israel, where immigrants from Latin America have reshaped the Jewish state. Along the way, he looks for the proverbial seventh heaven, which, according to the Talmud, is the closest layer to the divine in which the meaning of life in general, and Jewish life in particular, becomes clearer.
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36.750000 USD

The Seventh Heaven: Travels Through Jewish Latin America

by Ilan Stavans
Hardback
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