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While the rise and abolition of slavery and ongoing race relations are central themes of the history of the United States, the African diaspora actually had a far greater impact on Latin and Central America. More than ten times as many Africans came to Spanish and Portuguese America as the ...
Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000
While the rise and abolition of slavery and ongoing race relations are central themes of the history of the United States, the African diaspora actually had a far greater impact on Latin and Central America. More than ten times as many Africans came to Spanish and Portuguese America as the United States. In this, the first history of the African diaspora in Latin America from emancipation to the present, George Reid Andrews deftly synthesizes the history of people of African descent in every Latin American country from Mexico and the Caribbean to Argentina. He examines how African peooples and their descendants made their way from slavery to freedom and how they helped shape and responded to political, economic, and cultural changes in their societies. Individually and collectively they pursued the goals of freedom, equality, and citizenship through military service, political parties, civic organizations, labor unions, religious activity, and other avenues. Spanning two centuries, this tour de force should be read by anyone interested in Latin American history, the history of slavery, and the African diaspora, as well as the future of Latin America.
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28.300000 USD

Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000

by George Reid Andrews
Paperback / softback
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This collection of essays challenges long-entrenched ideas about the history, nature, and significance of the informal neighborhoods that house the vast majority of Latin America's urban poor. Until recently, scholars have mainly viewed these settlements through the prisms of crime and drug-related violence, modernization and development theories, populist or revolutionary ...
Cities From Scratch: Poverty and Informality in Urban Latin America
This collection of essays challenges long-entrenched ideas about the history, nature, and significance of the informal neighborhoods that house the vast majority of Latin America's urban poor. Until recently, scholars have mainly viewed these settlements through the prisms of crime and drug-related violence, modernization and development theories, populist or revolutionary politics, or debates about the cultures of poverty. Yet shantytowns have proven both more durable and more multifaceted than any of these perspectives foresaw. Far from being accidental offshoots of more dynamic economic and political developments, they are now a permanent and integral part of Latin America's urban societies, critical to struggles over democratization, economic transformation, identity politics, and the drug and arms trades. Integrating historical, cultural, and social scientific methodologies, this collection brings together recent research from across Latin America, from the informal neighborhoods of Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City, Managua and Buenos Aires. Amid alarmist exposes, Cities from Scratch intervenes by considering Latin American shantytowns at a new level of interdisciplinary complexity. Contributors. Javier Auyero, Mariana Cavalcanti, Ratao Diniz, Emilio Duhau, Sujatha Fernandes, Brodwyn Fischer, Bryan McCann, Edward Murphy, Dennis Rodgers
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38.62 USD

Cities From Scratch: Poverty and Informality in Urban Latin America

Paperback / softback
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This diagnostic history of Argentina's economic prostration is full of timely lessons for readers in the United States about how an irresponsible capitalist elite and cynical politicians can lead a wealthy nation to throw it all away. * 15 illustrations
The Agony of Argentine Capitalism: From Menem to the Kirchners
This diagnostic history of Argentina's economic prostration is full of timely lessons for readers in the United States about how an irresponsible capitalist elite and cynical politicians can lead a wealthy nation to throw it all away. * 15 illustrations
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31.450000 USD

The Agony of Argentine Capitalism: From Menem to the Kirchners

by Paul H. Lewis
Paperback / softback
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Pretty Modern is a riveting account of Brazil's emergence as a global leader in plastic surgery. Intrigued by a Carnaval parade that mysteriously paid homage to a Rio de Janeiro plastic surgeon, anthropologist Alexander Edmonds conducted research that took him from Ipanema socialite circles to glitzy telenovela studios to the ...
Pretty Modern: Beauty, Sex, and Plastic Surgery in Brazil
Pretty Modern is a riveting account of Brazil's emergence as a global leader in plastic surgery. Intrigued by a Carnaval parade that mysteriously paid homage to a Rio de Janeiro plastic surgeon, anthropologist Alexander Edmonds conducted research that took him from Ipanema socialite circles to glitzy telenovela studios to the packed waiting rooms of public hospitals offering free cosmetic surgery. The result is provocative exploration of the erotic, commercial, and intimate aspects of beauty in a nation with extremes of wealth and poverty and a reputation for natural sensuality. Drawing on conversations with maids and their elite mistresses, divorced housewives, black celebrities, and favela residents aspiring to be fashion models, Edmonds analyzes what sexual desirability means and does for women in different social positions. He argues that beauty is a distinct realm of modern experience that does not simply reflect other inequalities. It mimics the ambiguous emancipatory potential of capital, challenging traditional hierarchies while luring consumers into a sexual culture that reduces the body to the brute biological criteria of attractiveness. Illustrated with color photographs, Pretty Modern offers a fresh theoretical perspective on the significance of female beauty in consumer capitalism.
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29.350000 USD

Pretty Modern: Beauty, Sex, and Plastic Surgery in Brazil

by Alexander Edmonds
Paperback / softback
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A knowledgeable appreciation of a complex, vital South American giant, destined to be one of the world's premier economic powers Experts believe that Brazil, the world's fifth largest country and its seventh largest economy, will be one of the most important global powers by the year 2030. Yet far more ...
Brazil: The troubled rise of a global power
A knowledgeable appreciation of a complex, vital South American giant, destined to be one of the world's premier economic powers Experts believe that Brazil, the world's fifth largest country and its seventh largest economy, will be one of the most important global powers by the year 2030. Yet far more attention has been paid to the other rising behemoths Russia, India, and China. Often ignored and underappreciated, Brazil, according to renowned, award-winning journalist Michael Reid, has finally begun to live up to its potential, but faces important challenges before it becomes a nation of substantial global significance. After decades of military rule, the fourth most populous democracy enjoyed effective reformist leadership that tamed inflation, opened the country up to trade, and addressed poverty and other social issues, enabling Brazil to become more of an essential participant in global affairs. But as it prepares to host the 2014 soccer World Cup and 2016 Olympics, Brazil has been rocked by mass protest. This insightful volume considers the nation's still abundant problems-an inefficient state, widespread corruption, dysfunctional politics, and violent crime in its cities-alongside its achievements to provide a fully rounded portrait of a vibrant country about to take a commanding position on the world stage.
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37.19 USD

Brazil: The troubled rise of a global power

by Michael Reid
Hardback
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Originally published in Brazil as O Diabo e a Terra de Santa Cruz, this translation from the Portuguese analyzes the nature of popular religion and the ways it was transferred to the New World in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Using richly detailed transcripts from Inquisition trials, Mello e Souza ...
The Devil and the Land of the Holy Cross: Witchcraft, Slavery, and Popular Religion in Colonial Brazil
Originally published in Brazil as O Diabo e a Terra de Santa Cruz, this translation from the Portuguese analyzes the nature of popular religion and the ways it was transferred to the New World in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Using richly detailed transcripts from Inquisition trials, Mello e Souza reconstructs how Iberian, indigenous, and African beliefs fused to create a syncretic and magical religious culture in Brazil. Focusing on sorcery, the author argues that European traditions of witchcraft combined with practices of Indians and African slaves to form a uniquely Brazilian set of beliefs that became central to the lives of the people in the colony. Her work shows how the Inquisition reinforced the view held in Europe (particularly Portugal) that the colony was a purgatory where those who had sinned were exiled, a place where the Devil had a wide range of opportunities. Her focus on the three centuries of the colonial period, the multiple regions in Brazil, and the Indian, African, and Portuguese traditions of magic, witchcraft, and healing, make the book comprehensive in scope. Stuart Schwartz of Yale University says, It is arguably the best book of this genre about Latin America...all in all, a wonderful book. Alida Metcalf of Trinity University, San Antonio, says, This book is a major contribution to the field of Brazilian history...the first serious study of popular religion in colonial Brazil...Mello e Souza is a wonderful writer.
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38.800000 USD

The Devil and the Land of the Holy Cross: Witchcraft, Slavery, and Popular Religion in Colonial Brazil

by Laura de Mello e Souza
Paperback / softback
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An accessible biography of one of the most influential figures of recent times based on new, original research. Che Guevara is something of a symbol in the West. But for the rest of the world he is different: a charismatic revolutionary who redrew the political map of Latin America and ...
The Story of Che Guevara
An accessible biography of one of the most influential figures of recent times based on new, original research. Che Guevara is something of a symbol in the West. But for the rest of the world he is different: a charismatic revolutionary who redrew the political map of Latin America and gave hope to those resisting colonialism everywhere. In The Story of Che Guevara Lucia Alvarez de Toledo follows Che from his birth in Rosario and his early years in his parent's mate plantation, to his immortal motorcycle journeys across South America, his role at the heart of Castro's new Cuban government, and through to the unforgiving jungle that formed the backdrop to his doomed campaigns in the Congo and Bolivia. Based on interviews with Che's family and those who knew him intimately, this is an accessible biography that concentrates on the man rather than the icon. With the political developments in Latin America in the twenty-first century, his influence can be seen to be even greater than it was during his lifetime and The Story of Che Guevara is a perfect introduction to an extraordinary man.
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18.60 USD

The Story of Che Guevara

by Lucia Alvarez De Toledo
Paperback / softback
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The Chile Reader makes available a rich variety of documents spanning more than five hundred years of Chilean history. Most of the selections are by Chileans; many have never before appeared in English. The history of Chile is rendered from diverse perspectives, including those of Mapuche Indians and Spanish colonists, ...
The Chile Reader: History, Culture, Politics
The Chile Reader makes available a rich variety of documents spanning more than five hundred years of Chilean history. Most of the selections are by Chileans; many have never before appeared in English. The history of Chile is rendered from diverse perspectives, including those of Mapuche Indians and Spanish colonists, peasants and aristocrats, feminists and military strongmen, entrepreneurs and workers, and priests and poets. Among the many selections are interviews, travel diaries, letters, diplomatic cables, cartoons, photographs, and song lyrics.Texts and images, each introduced by the editors, provide insights into the ways that Chile's unique geography has shaped its national identity, the country's unusually violent colonial history, and the stable but autocratic republic that emerged after independence from Spain. They shed light on Chile's role in the world economy, the social impact of economic modernization, and the enduring problems of deep inequality. The Reader also covers Chile's bold experiments with reform and revolution, its subsequent descent into one of Latin America's most ruthless Cold War dictatorships, and its much-admired transition to democracy and a market economy in the years since dictatorship.
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31.450000 USD

The Chile Reader: History, Culture, Politics

Paperback / softback
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Battling for Hearts and Minds is the story of the dramatic struggle to define collective memory in Chile during the violent, repressive dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet, from the 1973 military coup in which he seized power through his defeat in a 1988 plebiscite. Steve J. Stern provides a riveting ...
Battling for Hearts and Minds: Memory Struggles in Pinochet's Chile, 1973-1988<BR>
Battling for Hearts and Minds is the story of the dramatic struggle to define collective memory in Chile during the violent, repressive dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet, from the 1973 military coup in which he seized power through his defeat in a 1988 plebiscite. Steve J. Stern provides a riveting narration of Chile's political history during this period. At the same time, he analyzes Chileans' conflicting interpretations of events as they unfolded. Drawing on testimonios, archives, Truth Commission documents, radio addresses, memoirs, and written and oral histories, Stern identifies four distinct perspectives on life and events under the dictatorship. He describes how some Chileans viewed the regime as salvation from ruin by Leftists (the narrative favored by Pinochet's junta), some as a wound repeatedly reopened by the state, others as an experience of persecution and awakening, and still others as a closed book, a past to be buried and forgotten.In the 1970s, Chilean dissidents were lonely voices in the wilderness insisting that state terror and its victims be recognized and remembered. By the 1980s, the dissent had spread, catalyzing a mass movement of individuals who revived public dialogue by taking to the streets, creating alternative media, and demanding democracy and human rights. Despite long odds and discouraging defeats, people of conscience-victims of the dictatorship, priests, youth, women, workers, and others-overcame fear and succeeded in creating truthful public memories of state atrocities. Recounting both their efforts and those of the regime's supporters to win the battle for Chileans' hearts and minds, Stern shows how profoundly the struggle to create memories, to tell history, matters. Battling for Hearts and Minds is the second volume in the trilogy The Memory Box of Pinochet's Chile. The third book will examine Chileans' efforts to achieve democracy while reckoning with Pinochet's legacy.
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35.650000 USD

Battling for Hearts and Minds: Memory Struggles in Pinochet's Chile, 1973-1988<BR>

by Steve J. Stern
Paperback / softback
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In this audacious book, Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier explores how listening has been central to the production of notions of language, music, voice, and sound that determine the politics of life. Drawing primarily from nineteenth-century Colombian sources, Ochoa Gautier locates sounds produced by different living entities at the juncture of ...
Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia
In this audacious book, Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier explores how listening has been central to the production of notions of language, music, voice, and sound that determine the politics of life. Drawing primarily from nineteenth-century Colombian sources, Ochoa Gautier locates sounds produced by different living entities at the juncture of the human and nonhuman. Her acoustically tuned analysis of a wide array of texts reveals multiple debates on the nature of the aural. These discussions were central to a politics of the voice harnessed in the service of the production of different notions of personhood and belonging. In Ochoa Gautier's groundbreaking work, Latin America and the Caribbean emerge as a historical site where the politics of life and the politics of expression inextricably entangle the musical and the linguistic, knowledge and the sensorial.
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28.300000 USD

Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia

by Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier
Paperback / softback
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This is the riveting and frightening story of ambitious, tempestuous and avowed anti-American Hugo Chavez, who is making waves through South America and being widely compared to Fidel Castro. Ex-paratrooper, outspoken socialist, and brash personality, Chavez is known for his stance against big business, fearless threats to the Bush administration, ...
Hugo Chavez: Oil, Politics, and the Challenge to the U.S.
This is the riveting and frightening story of ambitious, tempestuous and avowed anti-American Hugo Chavez, who is making waves through South America and being widely compared to Fidel Castro. Ex-paratrooper, outspoken socialist, and brash personality, Chavez is known for his stance against big business, fearless threats to the Bush administration, social reforms that have violently polarized his country, and claims that he will soon unite South America. As gas prices rise to unprecedented highs, Venezuela's importance surges as the fifth largest oil exporter in the world. Nikolas Kozloff's access to top advisors, members of the opposition, and leaders of Chavez's own political movement allow him to present a comprehensive portrait of Chavez as he runs for re-election and moves into the global spotlight.
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22.040000 USD

Hugo Chavez: Oil, Politics, and the Challenge to the U.S.

by Nikolas Kozloff
Paperback / softback
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President Hugo Chavez openly defies the ruling class in the United States, daring to advance universal access to health care and education, to remove itself from the economic orbit dominated by the United States, to diversify its production to meet human needs and promote human development, and to forge an ...
Bush Versus Chavez: Washington's War on Venezuela
President Hugo Chavez openly defies the ruling class in the United States, daring to advance universal access to health care and education, to remove itself from the economic orbit dominated by the United States, to diversify its production to meet human needs and promote human development, and to forge an economic coalition between Latin American countries. But as Bush Versus Chavez reveals, Venezuela's revolutionary process has drawn more than simply the ire of Washington. It has precipitated an ongoing campaign to contain and cripple the democratically elected government of Latin America's leading oil power. Bush Versus Chavez details how millions of U.S. taxpayer dollars are used to fund groups - such as the National Endowment for Democracy, the United States Agency for International Development, and the Office for Transition - with the express purpose to support counter-revolutionary groups in Venezuela. It describes how Washington is attempting to impose endless sanctions, justified by fabricated evidence, to cause economic distress. And it illuminates the build up of U.S. military troops, operations, and exercises in the Caribbean, that specifically threaten the Venezuelan people and government. Bush Versus Chavez exposes the imperialist machinations of Washington as it tries to thwart a socialist revolution for the twenty-first century.
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16.750000 USD

Bush Versus Chavez: Washington's War on Venezuela

by Eva Golinger
Paperback / softback
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Did Hitler - code name: `Grey Wolf' - really die in 1945? In a riveting scenario that has never been fully investigated until now, international journalist Gerrard Williams and military historian Simon Dunstan make a powerful case for the Fuhrer's escape to a remote enclave in Argentina - along with ...
Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler
Did Hitler - code name: `Grey Wolf' - really die in 1945? In a riveting scenario that has never been fully investigated until now, international journalist Gerrard Williams and military historian Simon Dunstan make a powerful case for the Fuhrer's escape to a remote enclave in Argentina - along with other key Nazis - where he is believed to have lived comfortably until 1962. Following years of meticulous research, the authors reconstruct the dramatic plot, including astonishing evidence and compelling testimony, some only recently declassified. Impossible to put down, `Grey Wolf' unravels an extraordinary story that flies in the face of history.
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17.800000 USD

Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler

by Gerrard Williams, Simon Dunstan
Paperback / softback
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Until now, very little about the recent history of the Mapuche, Chile's largest indigenous group, has been available to English-language readers. Courage Tastes of Blood helps to rectify this situation. It tells the story of one Mapuche community-Nicolas Ailio, located in the south of the country-across the entire twentieth century, ...
Courage Tastes of Blood: The Mapuche Community of Nicolas Ailio and the Chilean State, 1906-2001
Until now, very little about the recent history of the Mapuche, Chile's largest indigenous group, has been available to English-language readers. Courage Tastes of Blood helps to rectify this situation. It tells the story of one Mapuche community-Nicolas Ailio, located in the south of the country-across the entire twentieth century, from its founding in the resettlement process that followed the military defeat of the Mapuche by the Chilean state at the end of the nineteenth century. Florencia E. Mallon places oral histories gathered from community members over an extended period of time in the 1990s in dialogue with one another and with her research in national and regional archives. Taking seriously the often quite divergent subjectivities and political visions of the community's members, Mallon presents an innovative historical narrative, one that reflects a mutual collaboration between herself and the residents of Nicolas Ailio.Mallon recounts the land usurpation Nicolas Ailio endured in the first decades of the twentieth century and the community's ongoing struggle for restitution. Facing extreme poverty and inspired by the agrarian mobilizations of the 1960s, some community members participated in the agrarian reform under the government of socialist president Salvador Allende. With the military coup of 1973, they suffered repression and desperate impoverishment. Out of this turbulent period the Mapuche revitalization movement was born. What began as an effort to protest the privatization of community lands under the military dictatorship evolved into a broad movement for cultural and political recognition that continues to the present day. By providing the historical and local context for the emergence of the Mapuche revitalization movement, Courage Tastes of Blood offers a distinctive perspective on the evolution of Chilean democracy and its rupture with the military coup of 1973.
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30.400000 USD

Courage Tastes of Blood: The Mapuche Community of Nicolas Ailio and the Chilean State, 1906-2001

by Florencia E. Mallon
Paperback / softback
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Nationalism has played a uniquely powerful role in Argentine history, in large part due to the rise and enduring strength of two variants of anti-liberal nationalist thought: one left-wing and identifying with the people, and the other right-wing and identifying with Argentina's Catholic heritage. Although embracing very different political programs, ...
Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina: Defending the True Nation
Nationalism has played a uniquely powerful role in Argentine history, in large part due to the rise and enduring strength of two variants of anti-liberal nationalist thought: one left-wing and identifying with the people, and the other right-wing and identifying with Argentina's Catholic heritage. Although embracing very different political programs, the leaders of these two forms of nationalism shared the belief that the country's nineteenth-century liberal elites had betrayed the country by seeking to impose an alien ideology at odds with the supposedly true nature of the Argentine people. The result, in their view, was an ongoing conflict between the false Argentina of the liberals and the authentic or real nation of true Argentines. Despite their commonalities, scholarship has yet to pay significant attention to the interconnections between these two variants of Argentine nationalism. Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina fills this gap. In this study, Jeane DeLaney explores the origins and development of Argentina's two forms of nationalism by linking nationalist thought to ongoing debates over Argentine identity. Part I of this study considers the period before 1930, examining the emergence and spread of new essentialist ideas of national identity during the age of mass immigration. Part II analyzes the rise of nationalist movements after 1930, focusing more narrowly on individuals who self-identified as nationalists.DeLaney links the rise of Argentina's anti-liberal nationalist movements to the shock of early twentieth-century immigration. She examines how pressures posed by the newcomers led to the weakening of the traditional ideal of Argentina as a civic community and the rise of new ethno-cultural understandings of national identity. This study demonstrates that national identities are neither unitary nor immutable, and how citizens imagine their nation has crucial implications for how they perceive immigrants and whether they believe domestic minorities to be full-fledged members of the national community. Given the recent surge of anti-immigrant sentiment in Europe and the United States, this study will be of interest to scholars of nationalism, political science, Latin American political thought and the contemporary history of Argentina.
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131.250000 USD

Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina: Defending the True Nation

by Jeane Delaney
Hardback
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Nationalism has played a uniquely powerful role in Argentine history, in large part due to the rise and enduring strength of two variants of anti-liberal nationalist thought: one left-wing and identifying with the people, and the other right-wing and identifying with Argentina's Catholic heritage. Although embracing very different political programs, ...
Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina: Defending the True Nation
Nationalism has played a uniquely powerful role in Argentine history, in large part due to the rise and enduring strength of two variants of anti-liberal nationalist thought: one left-wing and identifying with the people, and the other right-wing and identifying with Argentina's Catholic heritage. Although embracing very different political programs, the leaders of these two forms of nationalism shared the belief that the country's nineteenth-century liberal elites had betrayed the country by seeking to impose an alien ideology at odds with the supposedly true nature of the Argentine people. The result, in their view, was an ongoing conflict between the false Argentina of the liberals and the authentic or real nation of true Argentines. Despite their commonalities, scholarship has yet to pay significant attention to the interconnections between these two variants of Argentine nationalism. Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina fills this gap. In this study, Jeane DeLaney explores the origins and development of Argentina's two forms of nationalism by linking nationalist thought to ongoing debates over Argentine identity. Part I of this study considers the period before 1930, examining the emergence and spread of new essentialist ideas of national identity during the age of mass immigration. Part II analyzes the rise of nationalist movements after 1930, focusing more narrowly on individuals who self-identified as nationalists.DeLaney links the rise of Argentina's anti-liberal nationalist movements to the shock of early twentieth-century immigration. She examines how pressures posed by the newcomers led to the weakening of the traditional ideal of Argentina as a civic community and the rise of new ethno-cultural understandings of national identity. This study demonstrates that national identities are neither unitary nor immutable, and how citizens imagine their nation has crucial implications for how they perceive immigrants and whether they believe domestic minorities to be full-fledged members of the national community. Given the recent surge of anti-immigrant sentiment in Europe and the United States, this study will be of interest to scholars of nationalism, political science, Latin American political thought and the contemporary history of Argentina.
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47.250000 USD

Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina: Defending the True Nation

by Jeane Delaney
Paperback / softback
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In Prizefighting and Civilization: A Cultural History of Boxing, Race, and Masculinity in Mexico and Cuba, 1840-1940, historian David C. LaFevor traces the history of pugilism in Mexico and Cuba from its controversial beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century through its exponential rise in popularity during the early twentieth century. A ...
Prizefighting and Civilization: A Cultural History of Boxing, Race, and Masculinity in Mexico and Cuba, 1840-1940
In Prizefighting and Civilization: A Cultural History of Boxing, Race, and Masculinity in Mexico and Cuba, 1840-1940, historian David C. LaFevor traces the history of pugilism in Mexico and Cuba from its controversial beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century through its exponential rise in popularity during the early twentieth century. A divisive subculture that was both a profitable blood sport and a contentious public spectacle, boxing provides a unique vantage point from which LaFevor examines the deeper historical evolution of national identity, everyday normative concepts of masculinity and race, and an expanding and democratizing public sphere in both Mexico and Cuba, the United States' closest Latin American neighbors. Prizefighting and Civilization explores the processes by which boxing--once considered an outlandish purveyor of low culture--evolved into a nationalized pillar of popular culture, a point of pride that transcends gender, race, and class.
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78.750000 USD

Prizefighting and Civilization: A Cultural History of Boxing, Race, and Masculinity in Mexico and Cuba, 1840-1940

by David C. LaFevor
Hardback
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James P. Woodard's history of consumer capitalism in Brazil, today the world's fifth most populous country, is at once magisterial, intimate, and penetrating enough to serve as a history of modern Brazil itself. It tells how a new economic outlook took hold over the course of the twentieth century, a ...
Brazil's Revolution in Commerce: Creating Consumer Capitalism in the American Century
James P. Woodard's history of consumer capitalism in Brazil, today the world's fifth most populous country, is at once magisterial, intimate, and penetrating enough to serve as a history of modern Brazil itself. It tells how a new economic outlook took hold over the course of the twentieth century, a time when the United States became Brazil's most important trading partner and the tastemaker of its better-heeled citizens. In a cultural entangling with the United States, Brazilians saw Chevrolets and Fords replace horse-drawn carriages, railroads lose to a mania for cheap automobile roads, and the fabric of everyday existence rewoven as commerce reached into the deepest spheres of family life. The United States loomed large in this economic transformation, but American consumer culture was not merely imposed on Brazilians. By the seventies, many elements once thought of as American had slipped their exotic traces and become Brazilian, and this process illuminates how the culture of consumer capitalism became a more genuinely transnational and globalized phenomenon. This commercial and cultural turn is the great untold story of Brazil's twentieth century, and one key to its twenty-first.
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39.380000 USD

Brazil's Revolution in Commerce: Creating Consumer Capitalism in the American Century

by James P. Woodard
Paperback / softback
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In Making Immigrants in Modern Argentina, Julia AlbarracIn argues that modern Argentina's selection of immigrants lies at the intersection of state decision-making processes and a number of economic, cultural, and international factors. Immediately after independence, Argentina designed a national project for the selection of Western European immigrants in order to ...
Making Immigrants in Modern Argentina
In Making Immigrants in Modern Argentina, Julia AlbarracIn argues that modern Argentina's selection of immigrants lies at the intersection of state decision-making processes and a number of economic, cultural, and international factors. Immediately after independence, Argentina designed a national project for the selection of Western European immigrants in order to build an economically viable society. Paradoxically, Argentina welcomed many more local Latin Americans, as well as Jewish and Middle Eastern immigrants. Still today, Argentines are quick to blame Latin American immigrants for crime, drug violence, and increasing the number of people living in shantytowns. AlbarracIn discusses how the current Macri administration, possibly emulating the Trump administration's immigration policies, has rolled back some of the rights awarded to immigrants by law in 2003 through an executive order issued in 2017. AlbarracIn explains the roles of the executive and legislative branches in enacting these policies and determines the influence of various factors throughout this process. Additionally, AlbarracIn puts Argentine immigration policies into a comparative perspective and creates space for new ways to examine countries other than those of the North Atlantic world that are typically discussed.Incorporating a vast amount of research spanning 150 years of immigration policies, five decades of media coverage of immigration, surveys with congresspersons, and interviews with key policy makers, AlbarracIn goes beyond the causes and consequences of immigration to assess the factors shaping policy decisions both in the past and in modern Argentina. This book will appeal to scholars, students, and general readers with an interest in immigration, democratization, race, history, culture, nationalism, Latin American studies, and representation of minorities in the media.
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57.750000 USD

Making Immigrants in Modern Argentina

by Julia AlbarracA n
Hardback
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The essays in this book demonstrate the importance of transatlantic and intra-American slave trafficking in the development of colonial Spanish America, highlighting the Spanish colonies' previously underestimated significance within the broader history of the slave trade. Spanish America received African captives not only directly via the transatlantic slave trade but ...
From the Galleons to the Highlands: Slave Trade Routes in the Spanish Americas
The essays in this book demonstrate the importance of transatlantic and intra-American slave trafficking in the development of colonial Spanish America, highlighting the Spanish colonies' previously underestimated significance within the broader history of the slave trade. Spanish America received African captives not only directly via the transatlantic slave trade but also from slave markets in the Portuguese, English, Dutch, French, and Danish Americas, ultimately absorbing more enslaved Africans than any other imperial jurisdiction in the Americas except Brazil. The contributors focus on the histories of slave trafficking to, within, and across highly diverse regions of Spanish America throughout the entire colonial period, with themes ranging from the earliest known transatlantic slaving voyages during the sixteenth century to the evolution of antislavery efforts within the Spanish empire. Students and scholars will find the comprehensive study and analysis in From the Galleons to the Highlands invaluable in examining the study of the slave trade to colonial Spanish America.
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99.750000 USD

From the Galleons to the Highlands: Slave Trade Routes in the Spanish Americas

Hardback
Book cover image
The essays in this book demonstrate the importance of transatlantic and intra-American slave trafficking in the development of colonial Spanish America, highlighting the Spanish colonies' previously underestimated significance within the broader history of the slave trade. Spanish America received African captives not only directly via the transatlantic slave trade but ...
From the Galleons to the Highlands: Slave Trade Routes in the Spanish Americas
The essays in this book demonstrate the importance of transatlantic and intra-American slave trafficking in the development of colonial Spanish America, highlighting the Spanish colonies' previously underestimated significance within the broader history of the slave trade. Spanish America received African captives not only directly via the transatlantic slave trade but also from slave markets in the Portuguese, English, Dutch, French, and Danish Americas, ultimately absorbing more enslaved Africans than any other imperial jurisdiction in the Americas except Brazil. The contributors focus on the histories of slave trafficking to, within, and across highly diverse regions of Spanish America throughout the entire colonial period, with themes ranging from the earliest known transatlantic slaving voyages during the sixteenth century to the evolution of antislavery efforts within the Spanish empire. Students and scholars will find the comprehensive study and analysis in From the Galleons to the Highlands invaluable in examining the study of the slave trade to colonial Spanish America.
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36.700000 USD

From the Galleons to the Highlands: Slave Trade Routes in the Spanish Americas

Paperback / softback
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Latin America and the Global Cold War analyzes more than a dozen of Latin America's forgotten encounters with Africa, Asia, and the Communist world, and by placing the region in meaningful dialogue with the wider Global South, this volume produces the first truly global history of contemporary Latin America. It ...
Latin America and the Global Cold War
Latin America and the Global Cold War analyzes more than a dozen of Latin America's forgotten encounters with Africa, Asia, and the Communist world, and by placing the region in meaningful dialogue with the wider Global South, this volume produces the first truly global history of contemporary Latin America. It uncovers a multitude of overlapping and sometimes conflicting iterations of Third Worldist movements in Latin America, and offers insights for better understanding the region's past, as well as its possible futures, challenging us to consider how the Global Cold War continues to inform Latin America's ongoing political struggles. Contributors: Miguel Serra Coelho, Thomas C. Field Jr., Sarah Foss, Michelle Getchell, Eric Gettig, Alan McPherson, Stella Krepp, Eline van Ommen, Eugenia Palieraki, Vanni Pettina, Tobias Rupprecht, David M. K. Sheinin, Christy Thornton, Miriam Elizabeth Villanueva, and Odd Arne Westad.
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41.950000 USD

Latin America and the Global Cold War

Hardback
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In the wake of a 1952 revolution, leaders of Bolivia's National Revolutionary Movement (MNR) embarked on a program of internal colonization known as the March to the East. In an impoverished country dependent on highland mining, the MNR sought to convert the nation's vast undeveloped Amazonian frontier into farmland, hoping ...
Landscape of Migration: Mobility and Environmental Change on Bolivia's Tropical Frontier, 1952 to the Present
In the wake of a 1952 revolution, leaders of Bolivia's National Revolutionary Movement (MNR) embarked on a program of internal colonization known as the March to the East. In an impoverished country dependent on highland mining, the MNR sought to convert the nation's vast undeveloped Amazonian frontier into farmland, hoping to achieve food security, territorial integrity, and demographic balance. To do so, they encouraged hundreds of thousands of Indigenous Bolivians to relocate from the overcrowded Andes to the tropical lowlands, but also welcomed surprising transnational migrant streams, including horse-and-buggy Mennonites from Mexico and displaced Okinawans from across the Pacific. Ben Nobbs-Thiessen details the multifaceted results of these migrations on the environment of the South American interior. As he reveals, one of the migrants with the greatest impact was the soybean, which Bolivia embraced as a profitable cash crop while eschewing earlier goals of food security, creating a new model for extractive export agriculture. Half a century of colonization would transform the small regional capital of Santa Cruz de la Sierra into Bolivia's largest city, and the diverging stories of Andean, Mennonite, and Okinawan migrants complicate our understandings of tradition, modernity, foreignness, and belonging in the heart of a rising agro-industrial empire.
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94.500000 USD

Landscape of Migration: Mobility and Environmental Change on Bolivia's Tropical Frontier, 1952 to the Present

by Ben Nobbs-Thiessen
Hardback
Book cover image
In the wake of a 1952 revolution, leaders of Bolivia's National Revolutionary Movement (MNR) embarked on a program of internal colonization known as the March to the East. In an impoverished country dependent on highland mining, the MNR sought to convert the nation's vast undeveloped Amazonian frontier into farmland, hoping ...
Landscape of Migration: Mobility and Environmental Change on Bolivia's Tropical Frontier, 1952 to the Present
In the wake of a 1952 revolution, leaders of Bolivia's National Revolutionary Movement (MNR) embarked on a program of internal colonization known as the March to the East. In an impoverished country dependent on highland mining, the MNR sought to convert the nation's vast undeveloped Amazonian frontier into farmland, hoping to achieve food security, territorial integrity, and demographic balance. To do so, they encouraged hundreds of thousands of Indigenous Bolivians to relocate from the overcrowded Andes to the tropical lowlands, but also welcomed surprising transnational migrant streams, including horse-and-buggy Mennonites from Mexico and displaced Okinawans from across the Pacific. Ben Nobbs-Thiessen details the multifaceted results of these migrations on the environment of the South American interior. As he reveals, one of the migrants with the greatest impact was the soybean, which Bolivia embraced as a profitable cash crop while eschewing earlier goals of food security, creating a new model for extractive export agriculture. Half a century of colonization would transform the small regional capital of Santa Cruz de la Sierra into Bolivia's largest city, and the diverging stories of Andean, Mennonite, and Okinawan migrants complicate our understandings of tradition, modernity, foreignness, and belonging in the heart of a rising agro-industrial empire.
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39.380000 USD

Landscape of Migration: Mobility and Environmental Change on Bolivia's Tropical Frontier, 1952 to the Present

by Ben Nobbs-Thiessen
Paperback / softback
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This biography of Beatriz Allende (1942-1977) - revolutionary doctor and daughter of Chile's socialist president, Salvador Allende - portrays what it means to live, love, and fight for change. Inspired by the Cuban Revolution, Beatriz and her generation drove political campaigns, university reform, public health programs, internationalist guerrilla insurgencies, and ...
Beatriz Allende: A Revolutionary Life in Cold War Latin America
This biography of Beatriz Allende (1942-1977) - revolutionary doctor and daughter of Chile's socialist president, Salvador Allende - portrays what it means to live, love, and fight for change. Inspired by the Cuban Revolution, Beatriz and her generation drove political campaigns, university reform, public health programs, internationalist guerrilla insurgencies, and government strategies. Centering Beatriz's life within the global contours of the Cold War era, Tanya Harmer exposes the promises and paradoxes of the revolutionary wave that swept through Latin America in the long 1960s. Drawing on exclusive access to Beatriz's private papers, as well as firsthand interviews, Harmer connects the private and political as she reveals the human dimensions of radical upheaval. Exiled to Havana after Chile's right-wing military coup, Beatriz worked tirelessly to oppose dictatorship back home. Harmer's interviews make vivid the terrible consequences of the coup for the Chilean Left, the realities of everyday life in Havana, and the unceasing demands of solidarity work that drained Beatriz and her generation of the dreams they once had. Her story demolishes the myth that women were simply extras in the story of Latin America's Left and brings home the immense cost of a revolutionary moment's demise.
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36.700000 USD

Beatriz Allende: A Revolutionary Life in Cold War Latin America

by Tanya Harmer
Hardback
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Making Market Women tells of the initial success, and later failure, of a liberationist Catholic women's cooperative in central Ecuador. Jill DeTemple argues that when gender and religious identities are capitalized, they are made vulnerable. Using archival and ethnographic methods, she shares the story of the women involved in the ...
Making Market Women: Gender, Religion, and Work in Ecuador
Making Market Women tells of the initial success, and later failure, of a liberationist Catholic women's cooperative in central Ecuador. Jill DeTemple argues that when gender and religious identities are capitalized, they are made vulnerable. Using archival and ethnographic methods, she shares the story of the women involved in the cooperative, producing cheese and knitted goods for local markets, and places their stories in the larger context of both the cooperative and the community. DeTemple explores the impact of gender roles, the perception of women, the growing middle class, and the changing mode of Catholicism in their community. Although the success may have been due to group cohesion to the identity of Catholic women, the failure of the cooperative left many women less sure of these identities. They keep their Catholic identity but blame the institutional church in some ways for the failure and are less confident in their ability as women to compete successfully in market economies. Because DeTemple examines not only the effects of gender and religion on development but also the effects of development, successful or unsuccessful, on the identities of those involved, this book will interest scholars of international development, religious studies, Latin American studies, anthropology, and women's studies.
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57.750000 USD

Making Market Women: Gender, Religion, and Work in Ecuador

by Jill DeTemple
Hardback
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Your journey starts here. Featuring DK's much-loved maps and illustrations, walks and information, plus all new, full-colour photography, this 100% updated guide to Brazil brings you the best of this captivating country in a brand-new, lightweight format. What's inside? - full-colour photography, hand-drawn illustrations, and maps throughout - easy-to-follow walks, ...
DK Eyewitness Brazil
Your journey starts here. Featuring DK's much-loved maps and illustrations, walks and information, plus all new, full-colour photography, this 100% updated guide to Brazil brings you the best of this captivating country in a brand-new, lightweight format. What's inside? - full-colour photography, hand-drawn illustrations, and maps throughout - easy-to-follow walks, tours, and itineraries - our pick of Brazil's must-sees, top experiences, and hidden gems - insider tips and information: when to visit, how to avoid the crowds, where to capture the perfect photo, and more - the best spots to eat, drink, shop, and stay - an area-by-area guide covering each corner of Brazil, from Sao Paulo to Salvador, Rio de Janeiro to the Amazon rainforest - expert advice: get ready, get around, and stay safe Now in paperback and printed on quality lightweight paper, our Brazil travel guide has been redesigned with you, the traveller, in mind, so you can take it wherever you go. Touring more of South America? Look out for our DK Eyewitness Travel Guides to Peru, Argentina, and Chile and Easter Island.
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31.59 USD

DK Eyewitness Brazil

by DK Eyewitness
Paperback / softback
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A free open access ebook is available upon publication. Learn more at www.luminosoa.org. Peruvian migrant workers began arriving in South Korea in large numbers in the mid 1990s, eventually becoming one of the largest groups of non-Asians in the country. Migrant Conversions shows how despite facing unstable income and legal ...
Migrant Conversions: Transforming Connections Between Peru and South Korea
A free open access ebook is available upon publication. Learn more at www.luminosoa.org. Peruvian migrant workers began arriving in South Korea in large numbers in the mid 1990s, eventually becoming one of the largest groups of non-Asians in the country. Migrant Conversions shows how despite facing unstable income and legal exclusion, migrants come to see Korea as an ideal destination. Some even see it as part of their divine destiny. Faced with looming departures, Peruvians develop cosmopolitan plans to transform themselves from economic migrants into pastors, lovers, and leaders. Set against the backdrop of 2008's global financial crisis, Vogel explores the intersections of three types of conversions- money, religious beliefs and cosmopolitan plans-to argue that conversions are how migrants negotiate the meaning of their lives in a constantly changing transnational context. At the convergence of cosmopolitan projects spearheaded by the state, churches, and other migrants, Peruvians change the value and meaning of their migrations. Yet, in attempting to make themselves at home in the world and give their families more opportunities, they also create potential losses. As Peruvians help carve out social spaces, they create complex and uneven connections between Peru and Korea that challenge a global hierarchy of nations and migrants. Exploring how migrants, churches and nations change through processes of conversion reveals how globalization continues to impact people's lives and ideas about their futures and pasts long after they have stopped moving, or that particular global moment has come to an end.
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36.700000 USD

Migrant Conversions: Transforming Connections Between Peru and South Korea

by Erica Vogel
Paperback / softback
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In this novel take on diplomatic history, Sebastian Hurtado-Torres examines the involvement of the United States in Chile during the Eduardo Frei administration (1964-1970). The Gathering Storm shows how the engagement between the two nations deepened the process of political polarization in Chile. Hurtado-Torres presents major revisionist arguments about the ...
The Gathering Storm: Eduardo Frei's Revolution in Liberty and Chile's Cold War
In this novel take on diplomatic history, Sebastian Hurtado-Torres examines the involvement of the United States in Chile during the Eduardo Frei administration (1964-1970). The Gathering Storm shows how the engagement between the two nations deepened the process of political polarization in Chile. Hurtado-Torres presents major revisionist arguments about the relationship between Chile and the US during the Frei years. At the heart of his account is a description of the partnership between Frei's government and that of Lyndon B. Johnson. Both leaders considered modernization to be integral to political and economic development, and the US Embassy in Santiago was recognized by all parties to be the center of this modernizing agenda and the practical work of the Alliance for Progress (AFP). The Gathering Storm portrays the diplomatic and economic relationship between Chile and the United States in a manner that departs from the most militant and conservative interpretations of US foreign policy toward Latin America. By focusing on the active participation of agents of US foreign policy, particularly those associated with the AFP, and not secret operatives of the Central Intelligence Agency, Hurtado-Torres offers a fresh narrative about a critical period in Chilean political history and a new understanding of the ways and means through which the foreign policy of the United States was carried out.
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52.450000 USD

The Gathering Storm: Eduardo Frei's Revolution in Liberty and Chile's Cold War

by Sebastian Hurtado-Torres
Hardback
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Inca Apocalypse develops a new perspective on the European invasions of the Inca realm, and the way that the Spanish transformation of the Andes relates to broader changes occurring in the transition from medieval to early modern Europe. The book is structured to foreground some of the parallels in the ...
Inca Apocalypse: The Spanish Conquest and the Transformation of the Andean World
Inca Apocalypse develops a new perspective on the European invasions of the Inca realm, and the way that the Spanish transformation of the Andes relates to broader changes occurring in the transition from medieval to early modern Europe. The book is structured to foreground some of the parallels in the imperial origins of the Incas and Spain, as well as some of the global processes affecting both societies during the first century of their interaction. The Spanish conquest of the Inca empire was more than a decisive victory at Cajamarca in 1532-it was an uneven process that failed to bring to pass the millenarian vision that set it in motion, yet it succeeded profoundly in some respects. The Incas and their Andean subjects were not passive victims of colonization, and indigenous complicity and resistance actively shaped Spanish colonial rule. As it describes the transformation of the Inca world, Inca Apocalypse attempts to build a more global context than previous accounts of the Spanish Conquest, and it seeks not to lose sight of the parallel changes occurring in Europe as Spain pursued state projects that complemented the colonial endeavors in the Americas. New archaeological and archival research makes it possible to frame a familiar story from a larger historical and geographical scale than has typically been considered. The new text will have solid scholarly foundations but a narrative intended to be accessible to non-academic readers.
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36.700000 USD

Inca Apocalypse: The Spanish Conquest and the Transformation of the Andean World

by R. Alan Covey
Hardback
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