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This high interest series will offer an introduction to historical warfare and notable warriors from ancient history. Each title will focus on one group of ancient warriors, providing details about the weapons they used, the battles they fought and the geography they covered.
Aztec Warriors
This high interest series will offer an introduction to historical warfare and notable warriors from ancient history. Each title will focus on one group of ancient warriors, providing details about the weapons they used, the battles they fought and the geography they covered.
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9.72 USD

Aztec Warriors

by Charlotte Guillain
Paperback
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The people of Mexquitic, a town in the state of San Luis Potosi in rural northeastern Mexico, have redefined their sense of identity from Indian to Mexican over the last two centuries. In this ethnographic and historical study of Mexquitic, David Frye explores why and how this transformation occurred, thereby ...
Indians into Mexicans: History and Identity in a Mexican Town
The people of Mexquitic, a town in the state of San Luis Potosi in rural northeastern Mexico, have redefined their sense of identity from Indian to Mexican over the last two centuries. In this ethnographic and historical study of Mexquitic, David Frye explores why and how this transformation occurred, thereby increasing our understanding of the cultural creation of Indianness throughout the Americas. Frye focuses on the local embodiments of national and regional processes that have transformed rural Indians into modern Mexicans : parish priests, who always arrive with personal agendas in addition to their common ideological baggage; local haciendas; and local and regional representatives of royal and later of national power and control. He looks especially at the people of Mexquitic themselves, letting their own words describe the struggles they have endured while constructing their particular corner of Mexican national identity. This ethnography, the first for any town in northeastern Mexico, adds substantially to our knowledge of the forces that have rendered Indians almost invisible to European-origin peoples from the fifteenth century up to today. It will be important reading for a wide audience not only in anthropology and Latin American studies but also among the growing body of general readers interested in the multicultural heritage of the Americas.
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26.250000 USD

Indians into Mexicans: History and Identity in a Mexican Town

by David Frye
Paperback / softback
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The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies
The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
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31.490000 USD

The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies

by Arthur Helps
Paperback / softback
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This thoroughly revised and updated edition of Needler's well-known text brings his comprehensive examination and analysis of Mexican politics up through the 1994 Mexican elections. Providing historical and geographical background, the work examines economics and politics in the light of the structural changes attending the adoption of the neo-liberal economic ...
Mexican Politics: The Containment of Conflict, 3rd Edition
This thoroughly revised and updated edition of Needler's well-known text brings his comprehensive examination and analysis of Mexican politics up through the 1994 Mexican elections. Providing historical and geographical background, the work examines economics and politics in the light of the structural changes attending the adoption of the neo-liberal economic model. Also addressed are the implications of NAFTA, the Zapatista rebellion, and the assassination of Luis Donaldo Colosio, among other current political issues. An ideal text for students of comparative politics, Latin American studies, and recent Latin American history.
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29.350000 USD

Mexican Politics: The Containment of Conflict, 3rd Edition

by Martin C Needler
Paperback / softback
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Published originally as La flor mas bella de la maquiladora, this beautifully written book is based on interviews the author conducted with more than fifty Mexican women who work in the assembly plants along the U.S.-Mexico border. A descriptive analytic study conducted in the late 1970s, the book uses compelling ...
Beautiful Flowers of the Maquiladora: Life Histories of Women Workers in Tijuana
Published originally as La flor mas bella de la maquiladora, this beautifully written book is based on interviews the author conducted with more than fifty Mexican women who work in the assembly plants along the U.S.-Mexico border. A descriptive analytic study conducted in the late 1970s, the book uses compelling testimonials to detail the struggles these women face. The experiences of women in maquiladoras are attracting increasing attention from scholars, especially in the context of ongoing Mexican migration to the country's northern frontier and in light of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This book is among the earliest accounts of the physical and psychological toll exacted from the women who labor in these plants. Iglesias Prieto captures the idioms of these working women so that they emerge as dynamic individuals, young and articulate personalities, inexorably engaged in the daily struggle to change the fundamental conditions of their exploitation.
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20.950000 USD

Beautiful Flowers of the Maquiladora: Life Histories of Women Workers in Tijuana

by Norma Iglesias-Prieto
Paperback / softback
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San Antonio, Texas, 1836. A Mexican army led by Santa Anna attacks a small fort called the Alamo. Disputes still rage over exactly what happended, why it happened, and how it should be remembered. Indeed, the battles fought over the memory of the Alamo have been almost as fierce as ...
A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory
San Antonio, Texas, 1836. A Mexican army led by Santa Anna attacks a small fort called the Alamo. Disputes still rage over exactly what happended, why it happened, and how it should be remembered. Indeed, the battles fought over the memory of the Alamo have been almost as fierce as their subject. In a riveting combination of history and cultural analysis, historians Randy Roberts and James N. Olson blend a rich narrative of the battle, told from the perspectives of both the Anglo and Mexican troops, drawing from a wide range of sources, including newly released documents from Mexican military archives and just-discovered pages of the famous de la Pena diary. Still controversial after all these years, the events at the Alamo pose some fascinating questions: Did Crockett really die a hero, or did he surrender before a summary execution? And why have Americans built a shrine for an event that lasted no more than ninety minutes, and inflated it into one of the country's biggest tourist attractions? A full explanation of the San Antonio encounter requires a peeling back of many layers. With powerful writing, Roberts and Olson retell the story of a great American myth, and show how and why it endures. This original volume is sure to change the way readers remember the Alamo.
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26.200000 USD

A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory

by James S. Olson, Randy Roberts
Paperback / softback
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Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927 is a study of federalism in late-nineteenth-century Veracruz State. It is also a politico-military analysis and an evaluation of social-revolutionary relations in the epoch of the Porfiriato and the Mexican Revolution. Koth interprets the Mexican Revolution across ...
Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927
Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927 is a study of federalism in late-nineteenth-century Veracruz State. It is also a politico-military analysis and an evaluation of social-revolutionary relations in the epoch of the Porfiriato and the Mexican Revolution. Koth interprets the Mexican Revolution across two axes: one is the heightened struggle for federalism, i.e., the conflict between the state of Veracruz and the central government; and the other is the class struggle that was brought into sharp relief by the violent social and military upheaval. Koth illustrates why and how, in 1927, President Plutarco ElA-as Calles crushed federalism, suppressed the aspirations of working classes, and co-opted a re-emergent Veracruz bourgeoisie. In Koth's view, the initial promises of the Mexican Revolution were never fulfilled. The old rancor born of elite control and the loss of federalism still brews not far beneath the surface of contemporary Mexican politics. This study is the first modern, comprehensive, and analytical history of the Porfiriato and Mexican Revolution in Veracruz.
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36.27 USD
Paperback / softback
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'War' is no exaggeration in discussing the bloodshed that has terrorized Mexico in the past decades. As rival cartels battle for control of a billion-dollar drug trade, the body count- 23,000 dead in five years - and sheer horror beggar the imagination of journalistic witnesses. Cartel gunmen have shot up ...
El Narco: The Bloody Rise of Mexican Drug Cartels
'War' is no exaggeration in discussing the bloodshed that has terrorized Mexico in the past decades. As rival cartels battle for control of a billion-dollar drug trade, the body count- 23,000 dead in five years - and sheer horror beggar the imagination of journalistic witnesses. Cartel gunmen have shot up schools and rehabilitation centers, and murdered the entire families of those who defy them. Reformers and law enforcement officials have been gunned down within hours of taking office. Headless corpses are dumped on streets to intimidate rivals, and severed heads are rolled onto dancefloors as messages to would-be opponents. And the war is creeping northward. El Narco is the story of the ultraviolent criminal organizations that have turned huge areas of Mexico into a combat zone. It is a piercing portrait of a drug trade that turns ordinary men into mass murderers, as well as a diagnosis of what drives the cartels and what gives them such power. Veteran Mexico correspondent Ioan Grillo traces the gangs from their origins as smugglers to their present status as criminal empires. The narco cartels are a threat to the Mexican government, and their violence has now reached as far as North Carolina. El Narco is required reading for anyone concerned about one of the most important news stories of the decade.
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18.57 USD

El Narco: The Bloody Rise of Mexican Drug Cartels

by Ioan Grillo
Paperback
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Sir Robert Hermann Schomburgk (1804-1865) was a German-born surveyor and traveller. In 1835-1839 he explored British Guiana for the Royal Geographical Society, and in 1840 he was appointed to define its boundaries with Brazil. Knighted for his work, he then visited Barbados for the Barbados General Railway Company, publishing The ...
The History of Barbados: Comprising a Geographical and Statistical Description of the Island; a Sketch of the Historical Events since the Settlement; and an Account of its Geology and Natural Productions
Sir Robert Hermann Schomburgk (1804-1865) was a German-born surveyor and traveller. In 1835-1839 he explored British Guiana for the Royal Geographical Society, and in 1840 he was appointed to define its boundaries with Brazil. Knighted for his work, he then visited Barbados for the Barbados General Railway Company, publishing The History of Barbados in 1848. This substantial work contains - unsurprisingly given his background - a great deal more than a chronological narrative of the settlement and history of the island. He begins with a geographical analysis, statistical information, and an examination of the political and sociological state of Barbados. The third part is on the geology, mineral resources, and natural history of the colony. Although physically small, Barbados was extremely important both to British imperial policies and to her economy, playing a key role in the Atlantic trade routes, particularly for sugar.
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68.240000 USD

The History of Barbados: Comprising a Geographical and Statistical Description of the Island; a Sketch of the Historical Events since the Settlement; and an Account of its Geology and Natural Productions

by Sir Robert Hermann Schomburgk
Paperback / softback
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This book recounts Hernandez's electrifying journey through the far-off slums, glittering fashion parties and rapturous religious rituals of one of the world's most exciting megacities - the seething urban valley known as 'D.F.' to the locals. In vivid, intimate storytelling, Hernandez shows readers the youth subcultures - or 'urban tribes' ...
Down and Delirious in Mexico City: The Aztec Metropolis in the Twenty-first Century
This book recounts Hernandez's electrifying journey through the far-off slums, glittering fashion parties and rapturous religious rituals of one of the world's most exciting megacities - the seething urban valley known as 'D.F.' to the locals. In vivid, intimate storytelling, Hernandez shows readers the youth subcultures - or 'urban tribes' - that define social life for young people in the megalopolis. Surrounded by volcanoes, earthquake-prone and caked in smog, the city is a place of astounding manifestations of danger, desire, humour, and beauty, a surreal landscape of 'elemental violence'. In the 'lake of fire' that is Mexico City, youth tribes brawl in public plazas and kidnapping gangs terrorise the wealthy. As the year 2012 approaches, the so-called end of the Mayan calendar, Hernandez contemplates a vision of a future where Mexico City could locate a 'cosmic equilibrium' that has eluded it for five centuries.
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16.800000 USD

Down and Delirious in Mexico City: The Aztec Metropolis in the Twenty-first Century

by Daniel Hernandez
Paperback
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A land where some streams ran with gold. A landscape nearly empty of inhabitants in the wake of Apache raids from the north. And a former desert transformed by irrigation into vast fields of wheat and cotton. This was and is the state of Sonora in northwest Mexico. In this ...
Sonora: Its Geographical Personality
A land where some streams ran with gold. A landscape nearly empty of inhabitants in the wake of Apache raids from the north. And a former desert transformed by irrigation into vast fields of wheat and cotton. This was and is the state of Sonora in northwest Mexico. In this cultural historical geography, Robert C. West explores the dual geographic personality of this part of Mexico's northern frontier. Utilizing the idea of old and new landscapes, he describes two Sonoras-to the east, a semiarid to subhumid mountainous region that reached its peak of development in the colonial era and still lives largely in its colonial past; and, to the west, a desert region that in the twentieth century has become a major agricultural producer and the modern center of economic and cultural activity. After a description of the physical and biotic aspects of Sonora, West describes the aboriginal farming cultures that inhabited eastern Sonora before the Spanish conquest. Following the conquest, he traces the spread of Jesuit missions and Spanish mining and ranching communities into this land where gold, silver, and copper ores were easily extracted by surface mining. He charts the decline of eastern Sonora with the coming of Apache and Seri raids during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. And he shows how western Sonora has become one of Mexico's most powerful political and economic entities in the twentieth century. For geographers, historians, anthropologists, and economists, as well as travelers to Sonora and its coastal resorts, this lively and interesting book will be important reading.
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20.950000 USD

Sonora: Its Geographical Personality

by Robert C. West
Paperback / softback
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Beautifully illustrated throughout, this English translation of Desire Charnay's record of his travels among the ancient cities of Mexico and Central America was first published in 1887. Born in France, Charnay (1828-1915) travelled extensively through commissions from the French government and with private patronage. He made several visits to the ...
The Ancient Cities of the New World: Being Travels and Explorations in Mexico and Central America from 1857-1882
Beautifully illustrated throughout, this English translation of Desire Charnay's record of his travels among the ancient cities of Mexico and Central America was first published in 1887. Born in France, Charnay (1828-1915) travelled extensively through commissions from the French government and with private patronage. He made several visits to the region between 1857 and 1886, producing in his work both a journal of his adventures and an archaeological examination of past civilisations. Beginning in Mexico, Charnay notably examines the ancient city of Tula and also the history of Yucatan, discussing aspects of Toltec and Mayan culture. He explores the ruins of Chichen Itza, Kabah and Yaxchilan (which Charnay dubbed 'Lorillard Town' after a benefactor), among many other settlements. Surveying art, pyramid architecture, ancient customs and history based on extant sources, this account was a major contribution in its field and remains of interest to scholars of Latin American archaeology.
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68.240000 USD

The Ancient Cities of the New World: Being Travels and Explorations in Mexico and Central America from 1857-1882

by Desire Charnay
Paperback / softback
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Cult of Defeat in Mexico's Historical Fiction: Failure, Trauma, and Loss examines recent Mexican historical novels that highlight the mistakes of the nineteenth century for the purpose of responding to present crises.
Cult of Defeat in Mexico's Historical Fiction: Failure, Trauma, and Loss
Cult of Defeat in Mexico's Historical Fiction: Failure, Trauma, and Loss examines recent Mexican historical novels that highlight the mistakes of the nineteenth century for the purpose of responding to present crises.
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99.750000 USD

Cult of Defeat in Mexico's Historical Fiction: Failure, Trauma, and Loss

by B Price
Paperback / softback
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Fronteras No Mas examines the range of officials, non-government organizations, networks and remaining organizational vacuums that span the U.S. - Mexico border. Since NAFTA, more binational institutions and policies have emerged around the environment, business, and the labor force. This 'institutional shroud' facilitates the growth of civil society, yet cross-border ...
Fronteras No Mas: Toward Social Justice at the US Mexican Border
Fronteras No Mas examines the range of officials, non-government organizations, networks and remaining organizational vacuums that span the U.S. - Mexico border. Since NAFTA, more binational institutions and policies have emerged around the environment, business, and the labor force. This 'institutional shroud' facilitates the growth of civil society, yet cross-border organizing remains a challenging and complex version of local politics. Residents live and work within a region of vast economic inequalities and markedly different governments. The authors offer a civic blueprint on ways to enhance cooperation, given the almost certain future of increased interdependence in this North American space.
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78.740000 USD

Fronteras No Mas: Toward Social Justice at the US Mexican Border

by Irasema Coronado, Kathleen Staudt
Paperback / softback
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This 2002 book is the second in a three-volume history of Mexico, a major work that conveys the full sweep of Mexican history in all its social, economic, and political diversity. Focusing on the period from 1521 to 1821, Volume 2 offers a comprehensive narrative and analysis of colonial Mexico ...
Mexico: Volume 2: The Colonial Era
This 2002 book is the second in a three-volume history of Mexico, a major work that conveys the full sweep of Mexican history in all its social, economic, and political diversity. Focusing on the period from 1521 to 1821, Volume 2 offers a comprehensive narrative and analysis of colonial Mexico following the Spanish conquest. In explaining colonial patterns of development, Alan Knight pays particular attention to the political economy of the colony: the formation and growth of the hacienda and its impact on the Indian peasantry; the dynamics of the colonial state and its relationship to the church; the role of trade, demography, warfare and taxation; and contrasting patterns of regional development, of class and ethnic conflict, and of popular protest in both city and countryside. The book concludes with an analysis of the accumulating tensions of the Bourbon era and of the bloody struggle for Mexican independence.
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33.590000 USD

Mexico: Volume 2: The Colonial Era

by Alan Knight
Paperback / softback
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This is the true story of U.S. Army deserters, the majority of them Irish immigrants, who switched sides during the Mexican War. Fed up with the harsh treatment that they received from the xenophobic and anti-Catholic officer corps, they crossed the lines to fight for Mexico. Led by John Riley, ...
The Rogue's March: John Riley and the St. Patrick's Battalion, 1846-48
This is the true story of U.S. Army deserters, the majority of them Irish immigrants, who switched sides during the Mexican War. Fed up with the harsh treatment that they received from the xenophobic and anti-Catholic officer corps, they crossed the lines to fight for Mexico. Led by John Riley, a charismatic Galwayman, the St. Patrick's Battalion earned an honoured place in Mexican history while creating a controversial legacy for the United States.
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10.450000 USD

The Rogue's March: John Riley and the St. Patrick's Battalion, 1846-48

by Peter F. Stevens
Paperback
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Explosive book exposes the Mexican killing fields that claimed the lives of hundreds of women at the Juarez, Mexico border. The author's dangerous investigation reveals high-level corruption, a drug cartel run amok and more. Hollywood took note and produced a movie starring Jennifer Lopez and Antonio Banderas. Amnesty International, the ...
The Killing Fields: Harvest of Women
Explosive book exposes the Mexican killing fields that claimed the lives of hundreds of women at the Juarez, Mexico border. The author's dangerous investigation reveals high-level corruption, a drug cartel run amok and more. Hollywood took note and produced a movie starring Jennifer Lopez and Antonio Banderas. Amnesty International, the United Nations and the U.S. State Department want the Mexican government to put an end to the murders and disappearances that have spread to other places. Exclusive material, including FBI interviews, puts this book at the frontlines of the issue. Author is the expert on the ghastly border crimes. It is the first nonfiction book in English about the murders that attracted international attention.
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20.950000 USD

The Killing Fields: Harvest of Women

by Diana Washington Valdez
Paperback / softback
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This volume gives an insightful analysis of the causes, conduct and consequences of the Mexican Revolution, and carefully untangles the shifting alliances of the participants. Invaluable primary documents offer insight into the reasons for fighting, the politics behind the war, and the Revolution's international legacy.
The Mexican Revolution: A Brief History with Documents
This volume gives an insightful analysis of the causes, conduct and consequences of the Mexican Revolution, and carefully untangles the shifting alliances of the participants. Invaluable primary documents offer insight into the reasons for fighting, the politics behind the war, and the Revolution's international legacy.
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40.90 USD

The Mexican Revolution: A Brief History with Documents

by Mark Wasserman
Paperback
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Though the Aztec Empire fell to Spain in 1521, three principal heirs of the last emperor, Moctezuma II, survived the conquest and were later acknowledged by the Spanish victors as reyes naturales (natural kings or monarchs) who possessed certain inalienable rights as Indian royalty. For their part, the descendants of ...
Moctezuma's Children: Aztec Royalty under Spanish Rule, 1520-1700
Though the Aztec Empire fell to Spain in 1521, three principal heirs of the last emperor, Moctezuma II, survived the conquest and were later acknowledged by the Spanish victors as reyes naturales (natural kings or monarchs) who possessed certain inalienable rights as Indian royalty. For their part, the descendants of Moctezuma II used Spanish law and customs to maintain and enhance their status throughout the colonial period, achieving titles of knighthood and nobility in Mexico and Spain. So respected were they that a Moctezuma descendant by marriage became Viceroy of New Spain (colonial Mexico's highest governmental office) in 1696. This authoritative history follows the fortunes of the principal heirs of Moctezuma II across nearly two centuries. Drawing on extensive research in both Mexican and Spanish archives, Donald E. Chipman shows how daughters Isabel and Mariana and son Pedro and their offspring used lawsuits, strategic marriages, and political maneuvers and alliances to gain pensions, rights of entailment, admission to military orders, and titles of nobility from the Spanish government. Chipman also discusses how the Moctezuma family history illuminates several larger issues in colonial Latin American history, including women's status and opportunities and trans-Atlantic relations between Spain and its New World colonies.
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26.250000 USD

Moctezuma's Children: Aztec Royalty under Spanish Rule, 1520-1700

by Donald E Chipman
Paperback / softback
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An anthropologist and archaeologist working for much of his life at the British Museum, Thomas Athol Joyce (1878-1942) succeeded in making American archaeology more accessible to non-specialists. Through careful analysis and presentation of the available evidence from South and Central America, he secured his reputation as an authority in this ...
Central American and West Indian Archaeology: Being an Introduction to the Archaeology of the States of Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and the West Indies
An anthropologist and archaeologist working for much of his life at the British Museum, Thomas Athol Joyce (1878-1942) succeeded in making American archaeology more accessible to non-specialists. Through careful analysis and presentation of the available evidence from South and Central America, he secured his reputation as an authority in this field, especially with regard to Mayan civilisation. Drawing on his wide reading of the published literature, he produced three pioneering and highly illustrated textbooks. The present work appeared in 1916 and focuses on Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and the West Indies. The laws, religion, customs and daily life of the various indigenous peoples are discussed and compared, with thorough illustration and examination of a range of artefacts. Joyce intended his summary of the evidence to serve as 'a signpost for future investigators'. His South American Archaeology (1912) and Mexican Archaeology (1914) are also reissued in this series.
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43.040000 USD

Central American and West Indian Archaeology: Being an Introduction to the Archaeology of the States of Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and the West Indies

by Thomas Athol Joyce
Paperback / softback
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This timely study examines the processes by which modern states are created within multiethnic societies. How are national identities forged from countries made up of peoples with different and often conflicting cultures, languages, and histories? How successful is this process? What is lost and gained from the emergence of national ...
Nationalist Myths and Ethnic Identities: Indigenous Intellectuals and the Mexican State
This timely study examines the processes by which modern states are created within multiethnic societies. How are national identities forged from countries made up of peoples with different and often conflicting cultures, languages, and histories? How successful is this process? What is lost and gained from the emergence of national identities? Natividad Gutierrez examines the development of the modern Mexican state to address these difficult questions. She describes how Mexican national identity has been and is being created and evaluates the effectiveness of that process of state-building. Her investigation is distinguished by a critical consideration of cross-cultural theories of nationalism and the illuminating use of a broad range of data from Mexican culture and history, including interviews with contemporary indigenous intellectuals and students, public school textbooks, and information gathered from indigenous organizations.Gutierrez argues that the modern Mexican state is buttressed by pervasive nationalist myths of foundation, descent, and heroism. These myths - expressed and reinforced through the manipulation of symbols, public education, and political discourse - downplay separate ethnic identities and work together to articulate an overriding nationalist ideology. The ideology girding the Mexican state has not been entirely successful, however. This study reveals that indigenous intellectuals and students are troubled by the relationship between their nationalist and ethnic identities and are increasingly questioning official policies of integration. Natividad Gutierrez is a senior researcher and lecturer at Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico.
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29.11 USD

Nationalist Myths and Ethnic Identities: Indigenous Intellectuals and the Mexican State

by Natividad Guiterrez
Paperback
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Since the 1950s, the Sierra Mazateca of Oaxaca, Mexico, has drawn a strange assortment of visitors and pilgrims-schoolteachers and government workers, North American and European spelunkers exploring the region's vast cave system, and counterculturalists from hippies (John Lennon and other celebrities supposedly among them) to New Age seekers, all chasing ...
The Devil's Book of Culture: History, Mushrooms, and Caves in Southern Mexico
Since the 1950s, the Sierra Mazateca of Oaxaca, Mexico, has drawn a strange assortment of visitors and pilgrims-schoolteachers and government workers, North American and European spelunkers exploring the region's vast cave system, and counterculturalists from hippies (John Lennon and other celebrities supposedly among them) to New Age seekers, all chasing a firsthand experience of transcendence and otherness through the ingestion of psychedelic mushrooms in context with a Mazatec shaman. Over time, this steady incursion of the outside world has significantly influenced the Mazatec sense of identity, giving rise to an ongoing discourse about what it means to be us and them. In this highly original ethnography, Benjamin Feinberg investigates how different understandings of Mazatec identity and culture emerge through talk that circulates within and among various groups, including Mazatec-speaking businessmen, curers, peasants, intellectuals, anthropologists, bureaucrats, cavers, and mushroom-seeking tourists. Specifically, he traces how these groups express their sense of culture and identity through narratives about three nearby yet strange discursive worlds -the magic world of psychedelic mushrooms and shamanic practices, the underground world of caves and its associated folklore of supernatural beings and magical wealth, and the world of the past or the past/present relationship. Feinberg's research refutes the notion of a static Mazatec identity now changed by contact with the outside world, showing instead that identity forms at the intersection of multiple transnational discourses.
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30.400000 USD

The Devil's Book of Culture: History, Mushrooms, and Caves in Southern Mexico

by Benjamin Feinberg
Paperback / softback
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An anthropologist and archaeologist working for much of his life at the British Museum, Thomas Athol Joyce (1878-1942) succeeded in making American archaeology more accessible to non-specialists. Through careful analysis and presentation of the available evidence from South and Central America, he secured his reputation as an authority in this ...
Mexican Archaeology: An Introduction to the Archaeology of the Mexican and Mayan Civilizations of Pre-Spanish America
An anthropologist and archaeologist working for much of his life at the British Museum, Thomas Athol Joyce (1878-1942) succeeded in making American archaeology more accessible to non-specialists. Through careful analysis and presentation of the available evidence from South and Central America, he secured his reputation as an authority in this field, especially with regard to Mayan civilisation. Drawing on his wide reading of the published literature, he produced three pioneering and highly illustrated textbooks. The present work appeared in 1914 and focuses on Mexican and Mayan culture. The topics discussed include social structure and daily life, warfare, trade and architecture, as well as religious observance and mythology. Particular attention is paid to the calendar, with appendices providing the names of days and months along with a provisional dating scheme. Joyce's South American Archaeology (1912) and Central American and West Indian Archaeology (1916) are also reissued in this series.
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48.290000 USD

Mexican Archaeology: An Introduction to the Archaeology of the Mexican and Mayan Civilizations of Pre-Spanish America

by Thomas Athol Joyce
Paperback / softback
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The Church's contribution to the building of Jamaica as a nation and lobbying for the implementation of the necessary socio-political infrastructure of a healthy society has long been overlooked. Rebellion to Riot addresses this oversight by showing how the Church, between 1865 and 1999, worked largely behind the scenes to ...
Rebellion to Riot: The Jamaican Church in Nation-building, 1865-1999
The Church's contribution to the building of Jamaica as a nation and lobbying for the implementation of the necessary socio-political infrastructure of a healthy society has long been overlooked. Rebellion to Riot addresses this oversight by showing how the Church, between 1865 and 1999, worked largely behind the scenes to bring economic empowerment and education to a previously enslaved people. The book also touches upon current issues such as the rampant violence and immorality faced by the society and outlines the Church's drive to bring about justice, peace and values throughout the island. Reverend Devon Dick's narrative is well-balanced in that it does not seek to portray the Church in a positive light only. Like any other institution, the Church has its shortcomings, and Rebellion to Riot unflinchingly addresses these issues: the limited role that women were allowed to play, the Church's tendency to shy away from any association with rebellions that brought about much needed social change and racism in the Church and the wider society. Written in a style accessible to the general reader, the book is also enhanced with statistical data, reference notes and an extensive bibliography making it an important historical record, charting the evolution of the nation and the Jamaican Church.
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13.16 USD
Paperback / softback
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Winner, Thomas F. McGann Memorial Prize, Rocky Mountain Council on Latin American Studies, 2004 Southwest Book Award, Border Regional Library Association, 2003 In their efforts to impose colonial rule on Nueva Vizcaya from the sixteenth century to the middle of the seventeenth, Spaniards established missions among the principal Indian groups ...
Defiance and Deference in Mexico's Colonial North: Indians under Spanish Rule in Nueva Vizcaya
Winner, Thomas F. McGann Memorial Prize, Rocky Mountain Council on Latin American Studies, 2004 Southwest Book Award, Border Regional Library Association, 2003 In their efforts to impose colonial rule on Nueva Vizcaya from the sixteenth century to the middle of the seventeenth, Spaniards established missions among the principal Indian groups of present-day eastern Sinaloa, northern Durango, and southern Chihuahua, Mexico-the Xiximes, Acaxees, Conchos, Tepehuanes, and Tarahumaras. Yet, when the colonial era ended two centuries later, only the Tepehuanes and Tarahumaras remained as distinct peoples, the other groups having disappeared or blended into the emerging mestizo culture of the northern frontier. Why were these two indigenous peoples able to maintain their group identity under conditions of conquest, while the others could not? In this book, Susan Deeds constructs authoritative ethnohistories of the Xiximes, Acaxees, Conchos, Tepehuanes, and Tarahumaras to explain why only two of the five groups successfully resisted Spanish conquest and colonization. Drawing on extensive research in colonial-era archives, Deeds provides a multifaceted analysis of each group's past from the time the Spaniards first attempted to settle them in missions up to the middle of the eighteenth century, when secular pressures had wrought momentous changes. Her masterful explanations of how ethnic identities, subsistence patterns, cultural beliefs, and gender relations were forged and changed over time on Mexico's northern frontier offer important new ways of understanding the struggle between resistance and adaptation in which Mexico's indigenous peoples are still engaged, five centuries after the Spanish Conquest.
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31.500000 USD

Defiance and Deference in Mexico's Colonial North: Indians under Spanish Rule in Nueva Vizcaya

by Susan M. Deeds
Paperback / softback
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In villages and towns across Spain and its former New World colonies, local performers stage mock battles between Spanish Christians and Moors or Aztecs that range from brief sword dances to massive street theatre lasting several days. The festival tradition officially celebrates the triumph of Spanish Catholicism over its enemies, ...
Aztecs, Moors, and Christians: Festivals of Reconquest in Mexico and Spain
In villages and towns across Spain and its former New World colonies, local performers stage mock battles between Spanish Christians and Moors or Aztecs that range from brief sword dances to massive street theatre lasting several days. The festival tradition officially celebrates the triumph of Spanish Catholicism over its enemies, yet this does not explain its persistence for more than five hundred years nor its widespread diffusion. In this insightful book, Max Harris seeks to understand Mexicans' puzzling and enduring passion for festivals of moros y cristianos. He begins by tracing the performances' roots in medieval Spain and showing how they came to be superimposed on the mock battles that had been a part of pre-contact Aztec calendar rituals. Then using James Scott's distinction between public and hidden transcripts, he reveals how, in the hands of folk and indigenous performers, these spectacles of conquest became prophecies of the eventual reconquest of Mexico by the defeated Aztec peoples. Even today, as lively descriptions of current festivals make plain, they remain a remarkably sophisticated vehicle for the communal expression of dissent.
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31.500000 USD

Aztecs, Moors, and Christians: Festivals of Reconquest in Mexico and Spain

by Max Harris
Paperback / softback
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Narcoland describes a disastrous 'war on drugs' that has led to more than 80,000 deaths in half a dozen years. This is a book that exposes how everything in Mexico is implicated in the 'narco system.' Anabel Hernandez, journalist and author, accuses the Mexican state of complicity with the cartels, ...
Narcoland: The Mexican Drug Lords and Their Godfathers
Narcoland describes a disastrous 'war on drugs' that has led to more than 80,000 deaths in half a dozen years. This is a book that exposes how everything in Mexico is implicated in the 'narco system.' Anabel Hernandez, journalist and author, accuses the Mexican state of complicity with the cartels, and says the 'war on drugs' is a sham. She's had headless animals left at her door and her family have been threatened by gunmen. Narcoland became, and remains, a bestseller: more than 100,000 copies sold in Mexico. The success is impossible to overstate, a staggering figure for a non-fiction book in a country with indices of income and literacy incomparable to the American-European book-buying market.,The most remarkable feature of Anabel Hernandez's brave and invaluable account of Mexico's blood-drenched drug wars is that she survived long enough to write it. We would all be poorer without Hernandez's determination to account for a civil conflict that has cost at least 60,000 lives. There could be no greater shame for Mexico should such a fearless and dedicated reporter come to any harm. Narcoland, with its explosive descriptions of decades of corruption permeating the upper echelons of government, leaves an extremely bad taste in the reader's mouth about the state of Mexico's perennially corrupt institutions - and begs the question: how much has changed? For Narcoland, Anabel Hernandez spent five years combing police, court and US papers, securing access to informers and sources and pursuing often fruitless requests for official files. The result is a searing indictment of a war on drugs she believes was a sham from the start.The stark truth of a sham 'war'...A product of five years' investigative reporting, Hernandez's meticulously researched explanation of the links between the Sinaloa cartel, the world's biggest criminal organisation, and Mexico's leadership makes for jaw-dropping reading.,In this brave work, the author argues that since the presidency of Gustavo Diaz Ordaz (1964 - 1970), all of Mexico's rulers have maintained close relations with groups that import, export, and sell illegal drugs. Indispensable reading for anyone who wants to understand the origins of the violence ...An extraordinary book for making the necessary journey to our heart of darkness.
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20.44 USD

Narcoland: The Mexican Drug Lords and Their Godfathers

by Anabel Hernandez
Paperback
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