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This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these ...
Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity
This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these events, both civil and religious, were sponsored by the authorities and were crucial means to embody political and social concepts. The first European public rituals were introduced immediately after the conquest of the Aztec capital. Spanish priests seeking to evangelise the native population introduced Catholic festivals, and civil authorities sponsored celebrations designed to glorify the Spanish empire. Spectacle was one tool in an arsenal of colonising agents, and over time the growing diversity of the population made festival statecraft all the more important, as government-sponsored revelry attempted to promote shared histories and values among diverse and potentially dangerous groups. Festivals organisers developed a highly sophisticated message embedded within the celebrations that delineated the principles of leadership and the duties of both rulers and vassals. The pervasiveness of festivals and the power of the political message associated with them created possibilities for individuals to assess and participate in a larger discussion of good governance in the colony.
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31.450000 USD

Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity

by Linda A. Curcio-Nagy
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These seven original essays offer the first ethnohistorical interpretation of Spanish-Indian interaction from Florida to California. The indigenous peoples in the borderlands were hunter-gatherers or agriculturalists whose lives differed substantially from the lives of Indians in large-scale hierarchical societies of central Mexico. As a result, Spain's entry and expansion varied ...
New Views of Borderlands History
These seven original essays offer the first ethnohistorical interpretation of Spanish-Indian interaction from Florida to California. The indigenous peoples in the borderlands were hunter-gatherers or agriculturalists whose lives differed substantially from the lives of Indians in large-scale hierarchical societies of central Mexico. As a result, Spain's entry and expansion varied throughout the borderlands. How did indigenous peoples fare under Spanish rule from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries? The contributors to this book discuss the social, demographic, and economic impacts of Spanish colonization on Indians. Relations among settlers, soldiers, priests, and indigenous peoples throughout the borderlands are examined, bringing immediacy and human interest to the interpretation. Contributors are Susan M. Deeds, Jesus F. de la Teja, Ross Frank, Robert H. Jackson, Peter Stern, and Patricia Wickman. Their essays offer a new and engaging synthesis that will reinvigorate teaching and research in borderlands history.
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31.500000 USD

New Views of Borderlands History

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The mining boom that began in northern Mexico in the 1890s set in motion fundamental social change. On the one hand it uprooted many workers, and the concerns of government officials, middle-class, reformers, and company managers coalesced into laws and programs to control the restless masses. But changes in the ...
A Peaceful and Working People: Manners, Morals, and Class Formation in Northern Mexico
The mining boom that began in northern Mexico in the 1890s set in motion fundamental social change. On the one hand it uprooted many workers, and the concerns of government officials, middle-class, reformers, and company managers coalesced into laws and programs to control the restless masses. But changes in the mining economy and political culture also precipitated class consciousness among merchants and artisans as well as skilled and unskilled workers. This study of the Hidalgo mining district in Chihuahua from the 1890s to the 1920s examines class formation, in particular its relation to social control, popular values, and pre-industrial traditions. In arguing that class identity stemmed less from the nature of one's work than from the beliefs one held, this work brings together the disparate themes of moral economy of mine workers, new mining technology, and the management policy of mine owners during the Mexican Revolution.
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36.750000 USD

A Peaceful and Working People: Manners, Morals, and Class Formation in Northern Mexico

by William E. French
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Since the 1994 Zapatista uprising in the southernmost Mexican state of Chiapas, the indigenous population has seen a lot of changes. These have been particularly salient with regard to nongovernmental (NGO) development projects that have provided marginalized communities with social and economic infrastructure that operate independently from the Mexican state. ...
Developing Zapatista Autonomy: Conflict and NGO Involvement in Rebel Chiapas
Since the 1994 Zapatista uprising in the southernmost Mexican state of Chiapas, the indigenous population has seen a lot of changes. These have been particularly salient with regard to nongovernmental (NGO) development projects that have provided marginalized communities with social and economic infrastructure that operate independently from the Mexican state. NGOs and solidarity groups continue to play an increasingly important role in helping these communities strengthen their autonomy in the regions controlled by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN). Niels Barmeyer devoted time in Chiapas in the mid-1990s as a human rights activist and later as an NGO volunteer and PhD researcher. Based on these experiences, he provides an in-depth analysis of the advances and limitations of the Zapatista autonomy project over the past fourteen years. Barmeyer's study includes personal histories of indigenous people and international activists from four rebel communities who are involved in NGO development projects. Their stories of clandestine organization, land occupation, raising money and support, and internal disagreements offer a range of perspectives.
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31.450000 USD

Developing Zapatista Autonomy: Conflict and NGO Involvement in Rebel Chiapas

by Niels Barmeyer
Paperback / softback
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Miracles, signs of divine presence and intervention, have been esteemed by Christians, especially Catholic Christians, as central to religious belief. During the second half of the eighteenth century, Spain's Bourbon dynasty sought to tighten its control over New World colonies, reform imperial institutions, and change the role of the church ...
Marvels and Miracles in Late Colonial Mexico: Three Texts in Context
Miracles, signs of divine presence and intervention, have been esteemed by Christians, especially Catholic Christians, as central to religious belief. During the second half of the eighteenth century, Spain's Bourbon dynasty sought to tighten its control over New World colonies, reform imperial institutions, and change the role of the church and religion in colonial life. As a result, miracles were recognized and publicized sparingly by the church hierarchy, and colonial courts were increasingly reluctant to recognize the events. Despite this lack of official encouragement, stories of amazing healings, rescues, and acts of divine retribution abounded throughout Mexico. Consisting of three rare documents about miracles from this period, each accompanied by an introductory essay, this study serves as a source book and complement to the author's Shrines and Miraculous Images: Religious Life in Mexico Before the Reforma.
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31.450000 USD

Marvels and Miracles in Late Colonial Mexico: Three Texts in Context

by William B. Taylor
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What is history? And why do people value it? Basing his inquiry on fieldwork near Guadalajara in west Mexico, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on one reason for which people commonly value history-knowing history is said to make for better citizens, which helps to explain why history is taught at schools ...
Knowing History in Mexico: An Ethnography of Citizenship
What is history? And why do people value it? Basing his inquiry on fieldwork near Guadalajara in west Mexico, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on one reason for which people commonly value history-knowing history is said to make for better citizens, which helps to explain why history is taught at schools worldwide and history questions are included in citizenship tests. Stack combines his Mexican fieldwork with his personal experience of history in Scottish schools and at Oxford University to try to pinpoint what exactly it is that makes people who know history seem like better citizens. Much has been written about national history and citizenship; Stack concentrates instead on the history and citizenship of towns and cities. His Mexican informants talked (and wrote) not only of Mexican history but of their towns' histories, too. They acted, at the same time, as citizens of their towns as well as of Mexico. Urban history and citizenship are, the book shows, important yet neglected phenomena in Mexico and beyond. Rather than setting history on a pedestal, Stack treats it as one kind of knowledge among many others, comparing it not just to legend but also to gossip. Instead of focusing on academic historians, he interviewed people from all walks of life-bricklayers, priests, teachers, politicians, peasant farmers, lawyers, laborers, and migrants-and he also draws on a talk about history by the famous Mexican novelist Juan Rulfo. As an ethnography, Knowing History in Mexico provides a vivid portrait of ethnicity, lands, migration, tourism, education, religion, and government in a dynamic region of west Mexico that straddles the urban and rural, modern and traditional.
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31.500000 USD

Knowing History in Mexico: An Ethnography of Citizenship

by Trevor R. Stack
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The history of Casa Boker, one of the first department stores in Mexico City, and its German owners provides important insights into Mexican and immigration history. Often called 'the Sears of Mexico', Casa Boker has become over the past 140 years one of Mexico's foremost wholesalers, working closely with US ...
Tools of Progress: A German Merchant Family in Mexico City, 1865-Present
The history of Casa Boker, one of the first department stores in Mexico City, and its German owners provides important insights into Mexican and immigration history. Often called 'the Sears of Mexico', Casa Boker has become over the past 140 years one of Mexico's foremost wholesalers, working closely with US and European exporters and eventually selling 40,000 different products across the republic, including sewing machines, typewriters, tools, cutlery, and even insurance. Like Mexico itself, Casa Boker has survived various economic development strategies, political changes, the rise of US influence and consumer culture, and the conflicted relationship between Mexicans and foreigners. Casa Boker thrived as a Mexican business while its owners clung to their German identity, supporting the Germans in both world wars. Today, the family speaks German but considers itself Mexican. Buchenau's study transcends the categories of local vs. foreign and insider vs. outsider by demonstrating that one family could be commercial insiders and, at the same time, cultural outsiders. Because the Bokers saw themselves as entrepreneurs first and Germans second, Buchenau suggests that transnational theory, a framework previously used to illustrate the fluidity of national identity in poor immigrants, is the best way of describing this and other elite families of foreign origin.
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36.750000 USD

Tools of Progress: A German Merchant Family in Mexico City, 1865-Present

by J Buchenau
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This rich anthology provides a glimpse of modern Mexico through the eyes of foreign observers. Some of these selections are by well-known authors (Alexander von Humboldt, John Reed, B. Traven, Evelyn Waugh). Some are unpublished pieces by little-known writers, and six are available here for the first time in English. ...
Mexico Otherwise: Modern Mexico in the Eyes of Foreign Observers
This rich anthology provides a glimpse of modern Mexico through the eyes of foreign observers. Some of these selections are by well-known authors (Alexander von Humboldt, John Reed, B. Traven, Evelyn Waugh). Some are unpublished pieces by little-known writers, and six are available here for the first time in English. The writings fall into four periods: the transitions to independence and Mexico's first decades as a sovereign country (1800-1867), the era of Liberal modernization (1867-1910), the Mexican Revolution (1910-1940), and the post-World War II era. Four major topics show up repeatedly: ethnicity, gender, and race; cultural differences between Mexicans and foreigners; political stability and instability; and the economy and its impact on Mexicans. Although observers expressed a wide range of viewpoints on these issues, they agreed in finding a stunning degree of ethnic and regional diversity as well as what they saw as stark contrasts between urban and rural, rich and poor, modernity and tradition. In addition to Anglo American authors, the anthology includes selections by German, French, Norwegian, and Spanish authors. Just over a third of the pieces are by women, who offer glimpses of private worlds closed to men, such as convent life, relations between women and their servants, and household affairs. Each selection contains biographical information on the author.
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31.450000 USD

Mexico Otherwise: Modern Mexico in the Eyes of Foreign Observers

by Jurgen Buchenau
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Weaving together landscape and memory, this book presents historical photographs of the Rio Grande of the American Southwest. The dynamic Rio Grande has run through all the valley's diverse cultures: Puebloan, Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo. Photography arrived in the region at the beginning of the river's great transformation by trade, ...
Rio: A Photographic Journey down the Old Rio Grande
Weaving together landscape and memory, this book presents historical photographs of the Rio Grande of the American Southwest. The dynamic Rio Grande has run through all the valley's diverse cultures: Puebloan, Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo. Photography arrived in the region at the beginning of the river's great transformation by trade, industry, and cultivation. In Rio Savage has collected images that document the sweeping history of that transformation - from those of nineteenth-century expeditionary photographer W. H. Jackson to the work of the great twentieth-century chronicler of the river, Laura Gilpin. The photographs are assembled in thematic bundles - river crossings, cultivation, trade, floods, the Mexican insurrection, the Big Bend region, and the estuary where the river at last meets the Gulf of Mexico. Essays by Rina Swentzell, G. Emlen Hall, Juan Estevan Arellano, Estella Leopold, Norma Elia Cantu, Jan Reid, and Dan Flores illuminate the images.
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31.450000 USD

Rio: A Photographic Journey down the Old Rio Grande

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The ordinary tortilla was an extraordinary bond between the human and divine... From birthdays to religious ceremonies, the people of Mesoamerica commemorated important events with tortillas. One Maya tribe even buried their dead with tortillas so that the dogs eaten as dinner during life would not bite the deceased in ...
Tortillas: A Cultural History
The ordinary tortilla was an extraordinary bond between the human and divine... From birthdays to religious ceremonies, the people of Mesoamerica commemorated important events with tortillas. One Maya tribe even buried their dead with tortillas so that the dogs eaten as dinner during life would not bite the deceased in revenge.' - from Tortillas: A Cultural History For centuries tortillas have remained a staple of the Mexican diet, but the rich significance of this unleavened flatbread stretches far beyond food. Today the tortilla crosses cultures and borders as part of an international network of people, customs, and culinary traditions. In this entertaining and informative account Paula E. Morton surveys the history of the tortilla from its roots in ancient Mesoamerica to the cross-cultural global tortilla. Morton tells the story of tortillas and the people who make and eat them - from the Mexican woman rolling the mano over the metate to grind corn, to the enormous wheat tortillas made in northern Mexico, to twenty-first-century elaborations like the stuffed burrito. This study - the first to extensively present the tortilla's history, symbolism, and impact - shows how the tortilla has changed our understanding of home cooking, industrialized food, healthy cuisine, and the people who live across borders.
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26.200000 USD

Tortillas: A Cultural History

by Paula E. Morton
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This provocative examination of Aztec marriage practices offers a powerful analysis of the dynamics of society and politics in Mexico before and after the Spanish conquest. The author surveys what it means to be polygynous by comparing the practice in other cultures, past and present, and he uses its demographic ...
Polygamy and the Rise and Demise of the Aztec Empire
This provocative examination of Aztec marriage practices offers a powerful analysis of the dynamics of society and politics in Mexico before and after the Spanish conquest. The author surveys what it means to be polygynous by comparing the practice in other cultures, past and present, and he uses its demographic consequences to flesh out this understudied topic in Aztec history. Polygyny provided Aztec women with opportunities for upward social mobility. It also led to increased migration to Tenochtitlan and influenced royal succession as well as united the empire. Surprisingly, the shift to monogamy that the Aztecs experienced in a single generation took over a millennium to occur in Europe. Hassig's analysis sheds new light on the conquest, showing that the imposition of monogamy - rather than military might, as earlier scholars have assumed - was largely responsible for the strong and rapid Spanish influence on Aztec society.
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31.450000 USD

Polygamy and the Rise and Demise of the Aztec Empire

by Ross Hassig
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In Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, historians and anthropologists explain how evolving notions of the meaning and practice of manhood have shaped Mexican history. In essays that range from Texas to Oaxaca and from the 1880s to the present, contributors write about file clerks and movie stars, wealthy world ...
Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico
In Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, historians and anthropologists explain how evolving notions of the meaning and practice of manhood have shaped Mexican history. In essays that range from Texas to Oaxaca and from the 1880s to the present, contributors write about file clerks and movie stars, wealthy world travelers and ordinary people whose adventures were confined to a bar in the middle of town. The Mexicans we meet in these essays lived out their identities through extraordinary events--committing terrible crimes, writing world-famous songs, and ruling the nation--but also in everyday activities like falling in love, raising families, getting dressed, and going to the movies. Thus, these essays in the history of masculinity connect the major topics of Mexican political history since 1880 to the history of daily life.
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36.700000 USD

Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico

Paperback / softback
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This innovative social and cultural history explores the daily lives of the lowest echelons in president Porfirio Diaz's army through the decades leading up to the 1910 Revolution. The author shows how life in the barracks-not just combat and drill but also leisure, vice, and intimacy-reveals the basic power relations ...
The Blood Contingent: The Military and the Making of Modern Mexico, 1876-1911
This innovative social and cultural history explores the daily lives of the lowest echelons in president Porfirio Diaz's army through the decades leading up to the 1910 Revolution. The author shows how life in the barracks-not just combat and drill but also leisure, vice, and intimacy-reveals the basic power relations that made Mexico into a modern society. The Porfirian regime sought to control and direct violence, to impose scientific hygiene and patriotic zeal, and to build an army to rival that of the European powers. The barracks community enacted these objectives in times of war or peace, but never perfectly, and never as expected. The fault lines within the process of creating the ideal army echoed the challenges of constructing an ideal society. This insightful history of life, love, and war in turn-of-the-century Mexico sheds useful light on the troubled state of the Mexican military more than a century later.
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31.450000 USD

The Blood Contingent: The Military and the Making of Modern Mexico, 1876-1911

by Stephen B. Neufeld
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In this intriguing study, Jason Dormady examines the ways members of Mexico's urban and rural poor used religious community to mediate between themselves and the state through the practice of religious primitivism, the belief that they were restoring Christianity--and the practice of Mexican citizenship--to a more pure and essential state. ...
Primitive Revolution: Restorationist Religion and the Idea of the Mexican Revolution, 1940-1968
In this intriguing study, Jason Dormady examines the ways members of Mexico's urban and rural poor used religious community to mediate between themselves and the state through the practice of religious primitivism, the belief that they were restoring Christianity--and the practice of Mexican citizenship--to a more pure and essential state. Focusing on three community formation projects--the Iglesia del Reino de Dios en su Plenitud, a Mormon-based polygamist organization; the Iglesia Luz del Mundo, an evangelical Protestant organization; and the Union Nacional Sinarquista, a semi-fascist Mexican Catholic group--Dormady argues that their attempts to establish religious authenticity mirror the efforts of officials to define the meaning of the Mexican Revolution in the era following its military phase. Despite the fact that these communities engaged in counterrevolutionary behavior, the state remained pragmatic and willing to be flexible depending on convergence of the group's interests with those of the official revolution.
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31.450000 USD

Primitive Revolution: Restorationist Religion and the Idea of the Mexican Revolution, 1940-1968

by Jason H Dormady
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This is the first book to analyse the link between Mexico's foreign and domestic relations in the 1930s. By studying the regime of President Lazaro Cardenas (1934-1940), Professor Schuler substantially revises our understanding of how Cardenas asserted Mexico's economic and political sovereignty and also consolidated one-party rule and state-directed capitalism. ...
Mexico Between Hitler and Roosevelt: Mexican Foreign Relations in the Age of Lazaro Cardenas
This is the first book to analyse the link between Mexico's foreign and domestic relations in the 1930s. By studying the regime of President Lazaro Cardenas (1934-1940), Professor Schuler substantially revises our understanding of how Cardenas asserted Mexico's economic and political sovereignty and also consolidated one-party rule and state-directed capitalism. Amid a deteriorating international climate and world-wide depression, a cadre of technocrats and ministers under Cardenas consistently advanced domestic goals in their foreign policy initiatives, particularly the centralisation of the economy and the industrialisation of Mexico. Drawing on impressive research in Mexico, the United States, Germany, and Great Britain, Professor Schuler shows that Cardenas was far less of a doctrinaire leftist at home and abroad than previously assumed, especially in his ongoing economic contacts with Nazi Germany before and after Mexico's expropriation of oil in March 1938.
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31.500000 USD

Mexico Between Hitler and Roosevelt: Mexican Foreign Relations in the Age of Lazaro Cardenas

by Friedrich E. Schuler
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Now available in paperback, this informal account of the people, culture, land, and history of Sonora, Mexico, describes blistering deserts, alpine mountains, tropical river valleys, and arid coastlines, and relates the lives and stories of cattlemen, lumbermen, fishermen, weavers, cobblers, musicians, bootleggers, and Indians. The author's curiosity extends to the ...
Sonora: An Intimate Geography
Now available in paperback, this informal account of the people, culture, land, and history of Sonora, Mexico, describes blistering deserts, alpine mountains, tropical river valleys, and arid coastlines, and relates the lives and stories of cattlemen, lumbermen, fishermen, weavers, cobblers, musicians, bootleggers, and Indians. The author's curiosity extends to the weaving of Nacori hats, the distillation of fiery bacanora, and the utility of the tegua, the Sonoran cowboy boot. Sonora is also a record of painful twentieth-century change of human dislocation from rural villages to industrial cities and the relentless destruction of Sonoran forests, jungles, deserts, and rivers. A regular visitor for over thirty years, the author provides a colorful portrait of the Sonora of the past, present, and future.
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26.200000 USD

Sonora: An Intimate Geography

by David Yetman
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Although the battlefields of World War II lay thousands of miles from Mexican shores, the conflict had a significant influence on the country's political development. Though the war years in Mexico have attracted less attention than other periods, this book shows how the crisis atmosphere of the early 1940s played ...
The War Has Brought Peace to Mexico: World War II and the Consolidation of the Post-Revolutionary State
Although the battlefields of World War II lay thousands of miles from Mexican shores, the conflict had a significant influence on the country's political development. Though the war years in Mexico have attracted less attention than other periods, this book shows how the crisis atmosphere of the early 1940s played an important part in the consolidation of the post-revolutionary regime. Through its management of Mexico's role in the war, the administration of Manuel Avila Camacho was able to insist upon a policy of national unity, bringing together disparate factions and making open opposition to the government difficult. World War II also made possible a reshaping of the country's foreign relations, allowing Mexico to claim a leading place among Latin American nations in the postwar world. The period was also marked by an unprecedented degree of cooperation with the United States in support of the Allied cause.
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36.700000 USD

The War Has Brought Peace to Mexico: World War II and the Consolidation of the Post-Revolutionary State

by Halbert Jones
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This memoir of a young gringo's assimilation into the exotic street life of a bustling port on Mexico's Sea of Cortez is an eye-opening account of the area's working-class life. After months of anthropological field work in late 1960s Ecuador, David Stuart returns to Guaymas with broken bones and a ...
Guaymas Chronicles: La Mandadera
This memoir of a young gringo's assimilation into the exotic street life of a bustling port on Mexico's Sea of Cortez is an eye-opening account of the area's working-class life. After months of anthropological field work in late 1960s Ecuador, David Stuart returns to Guaymas with broken bones and a broken heart, finding comfort in the cafes and night spots along the waterfront. There he reveals his failings to people whose lingua franca is the simple wisdom of listening and understanding. The loyal barmen and taxi drivers adopt him into their tight-knit circle, helping him ride out the devastation of betrayal by a woman who is carrying another man's child. Dubbed El Guero (Whitey) on the street, Stuart drifts into 'la movida', the Mexican world of hustlers, politicians, police officials, businessmen, and street urchins. In a 1970 Mexico, where a $500 bribe and a two-year wait 'might' get you a telephone, he needs help. A headstrong shoeshine girl, Lupita, becomes his 'mandadera' (messenger) and then his confidante and junior business partner, working her magic by bribing customs officials and making deals for tires, fans, blenders, and other 'fayuca' (contraband). A scrawny eleven-year-old, she is not just street-brilliant but complicated and utterly fascinating. This vivid, haunting portrait of a world many Americans have visited but few understand, is a unique examination of what Mexico means to one American and what America means to the everyday Mexican people who surround and protect him.
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26.200000 USD

Guaymas Chronicles: La Mandadera

by David E. Stuart
Paperback / softback
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The essays in this collection build upon a series of conversations and papers that resulted from 'New Directions in North American Scholarship on Afro-Mexico', a symposium conducted at Pennsylvania State University in 2004. The issues addressed include contested historiography, social and economic contributions of Afro-Mexicans, social construction of race and ...
Black Mexico: Race and Society from Colonial to Modern Times
The essays in this collection build upon a series of conversations and papers that resulted from 'New Directions in North American Scholarship on Afro-Mexico', a symposium conducted at Pennsylvania State University in 2004. The issues addressed include contested historiography, social and economic contributions of Afro-Mexicans, social construction of race and ethnic identity, forms of agency and resistance, and contemporary inquiry into ethnographic work on Afro-Mexican communities. Comprised of a core set of chapters that examine the colonial period and a shorter epilogue addressing the modern era, this volume allows the reader to explore ideas of racial representation from the sixteenth century into the twenty-first.
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31.450000 USD

Black Mexico: Race and Society from Colonial to Modern Times

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The first edition was the recipient of the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights Award as an outstanding work on intolerance and violation of basic rights. During the Great Depression, a sense of total despair plagued the United States. Americans sought a convenient scapegoat and found it ...
Decade of Betrayal: Mexican Repatriation in the 1930s
The first edition was the recipient of the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights Award as an outstanding work on intolerance and violation of basic rights. During the Great Depression, a sense of total despair plagued the United States. Americans sought a convenient scapegoat and found it in the Mexican community. Laws forbidding employment of Mexicans were accompanied by the hue and cry to get rid of the Mexicans! The hysteria led pandemic repatriation drives and one million Mexicans and their children were illegally shipped to Mexico. Despite their horrific treatment and traumatic experiences, the American born children never gave up hope of returning to the United States. Upon attaining legal age, they badgered their parents to let them return home. Repatriation survivors who came back worked diligently to get their lives back together. Due to their sense of shame, few of them ever told their children about their tragic ordeal. Decade of Betrayal recounts the injustice and suffering endured by the Mexican community during the 1930s. It focuses on the experiences of individuals forced to undergo the tragic ordeal of betrayal, deprivation, and adjustment. This revised edition also addresses the inclusion of the event in the educational curriculum, the issuance of a formal apology, and the question of fiscal remuneration.
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36.700000 USD

Decade of Betrayal: Mexican Repatriation in the 1930s

by R. L. Rodriguez, Francisco E. Balderrama
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With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore ...
The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico
With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore their subject, these documents are inherently limiting given that the men described in them were considered to be criminals or otherwise marginal. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century resources, too, provide a limited perspective on machismo in the colonial period. The Origins of Macho addresses this deficiency by basing its study of colonial Mexican masculinity on the experiences of mainstream men. Lipsett-Rivera traces the genesis of the Mexican macho by looking at daily interactions between Mexican men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In doing so she establishes an important foundation for gender studies in Mexico and Latin America and makes a significant contribution to the larger field of masculinity studies.
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31.450000 USD

The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico

by Sonya Lipsett-Rivera
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This captivating study tells Mexico's best untold stories. The book takes the devastating 1833 cholera epidemic as its dramatic center and expands beyond this episode to explore love, lust, lies, and midwives. Parish archives and other sources tell us human stories about the intimate decisions, hopes, aspirations, and religious commitments ...
Mexico in the Time of Cholera
This captivating study tells Mexico's best untold stories. The book takes the devastating 1833 cholera epidemic as its dramatic center and expands beyond this episode to explore love, lust, lies, and midwives. Parish archives and other sources tell us human stories about the intimate decisions, hopes, aspirations, and religious commitments of Mexican men and women as they made their way through the transition from the Viceroyalty of New Spain to an independent republic. In this volume Stevens shows how Mexico assumed a new place in Atlantic history as a nation coming to grips with modernization and colonial heritage, helping us to understand the paradox of a country with a reputation for fervent Catholicism that moved so quickly to disestablish the Church.
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36.700000 USD

Mexico in the Time of Cholera

by Donald Fithian Stevens
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The relationship between Mexico and Cuba grabbed international headlines early in the twenty-first century due to a rift in a relationship generally understood to be unique, special, and friendly since Fidel Castro's rise to power in Cuba in 1959. Much of the goodwill between the two countries existed because Mexico ...
Creating a Third World: Mexico, Cuba, and the United States During the Castro Era
The relationship between Mexico and Cuba grabbed international headlines early in the twenty-first century due to a rift in a relationship generally understood to be unique, special, and friendly since Fidel Castro's rise to power in Cuba in 1959. Much of the goodwill between the two countries existed because Mexico retained its allegiance to Cuba between 1964 and 1970, when all other Latin American countries severed relations with Cuba. In one of the first English-language studies to examine relationships in a trilateral context, Christopher White portrays a broad-based history of this unique and complex association and identifies the processes that led to the recent strain between the two countries. White asserts that Mexico and Cuba utilized the Cold War to define themselves as influential leaders in the developing world through their exertion of autonomy in international relations. White also views this relationship as an example of an alternative path from that taken by many developing world nations that buckled under the pressures of being caught between the United States and the Soviet Union.
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31.450000 USD

Creating a Third World: Mexico, Cuba, and the United States During the Castro Era

by Christopher M. White
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In 1949, a group of villagers and ad hoc archaeologists dug up what they believed to be the remains of the last Aztec emperor, Cuauhte?moc, in a remote village in the mountains of central Mexico. State and local leaders enthusiastically promoted this remarkable discovery and nationalist celebrations erupted throughout the ...
Cuauhtemoc's Bones: Forging National Identity in Modern Mexico
In 1949, a group of villagers and ad hoc archaeologists dug up what they believed to be the remains of the last Aztec emperor, Cuauhte?moc, in a remote village in the mountains of central Mexico. State and local leaders enthusiastically promoted this remarkable discovery and nationalist celebrations erupted throughout the country. The festivities ended abruptly when professional Mexican archaeologists denied that the body was that of Cuauhte?moc, igniting what became the greatest scandal in the cultural politics of twentieth-century Mexico. Suddenly, Cuauhte?moc's bones were at the center of debates about the politics and mechanisms of Mexican national identity. In this engaging study, Paul Gillingham uses the revelation of the forgery of Cuauhte?moc's tomb and the responses it evoked as a means of examining the set of ideas, beliefs, and dreams that bind societies to the nation-state.
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31.450000 USD

Cuauhtemoc's Bones: Forging National Identity in Modern Mexico

by Paul Gillingham
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Chiapas, a state in southern Mexico, burst into international news in January 1994. Several thousand insurgents, given a voice in the communiques of Subcomandante Marcos, took control of the capital and other key towns and held the Mexican army and government at bay for weeks. Proclaiming themselves the Zapatista Army ...
A Rich Land, a Poor People: Politics and Society in Modern Chiapas
Chiapas, a state in southern Mexico, burst into international news in January 1994. Several thousand insurgents, given a voice in the communiques of Subcomandante Marcos, took control of the capital and other key towns and held the Mexican army and government at bay for weeks. Proclaiming themselves the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, they captured both land and headlines. Worldwide, people wanted to know the answer to one question: why had revolutionaries taken over a Mexican state? No other study of Chiapas answers that question as thoroughly as does this book. The uprising and government's armed occupation of the state are but the latest violent episodes in a region that is now and has always been a rich land worked by poor people. By studying the impoverishment of the laboring class in Chiapas, Benjamin addresses how the Chiapan elite survived the Revolution of 1910 and remain in control of the state's development and destiny. More clearly than anyone else, Benjamin shows in his new final chapter that the contemporary agrarian uprising is the legacy of Chiapan underdevelopment.
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36.750000 USD

A Rich Land, a Poor People: Politics and Society in Modern Chiapas

by Thomas Benjamin
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Only two years after Coronado's expedition to what is now New Mexico, Spanish officials conducted an inquiry into the effects of the expedition on the native people Coronado encountered. The documents that record that investigation are at the heart of this book. These depositions are as fresh as today's news. ...
Great Cruelties Have Been Reported: The 1544 Investigation of the Coronado Expedition
Only two years after Coronado's expedition to what is now New Mexico, Spanish officials conducted an inquiry into the effects of the expedition on the native people Coronado encountered. The documents that record that investigation are at the heart of this book. These depositions are as fresh as today's news. Published both in the original Spanish and in English translation, they provide an unparalleled wealth of information about the Indians' responses to the Europeans and the attitudes of the Europeans toward the native peoples.
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63.000000 USD

Great Cruelties Have Been Reported: The 1544 Investigation of the Coronado Expedition

by Richard Flint
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Between 1910 and 1919, Morelos, Mexico, was home to a bloody agrarian revolution that saw government troops burn villages, cities stand abandoned, and two of every five people either flee the fighting or die in it. The region's conflict came in response to a dramatic economic transformation from a peasant ...
Bitter Harvest: The Social Transformation of Morelos, Mexico, and the Origins of the Zapatista Revolution, 1840-1910
Between 1910 and 1919, Morelos, Mexico, was home to a bloody agrarian revolution that saw government troops burn villages, cities stand abandoned, and two of every five people either flee the fighting or die in it. The region's conflict came in response to a dramatic economic transformation from a peasant economy to the hub of Mexico's sugar industry during the nineteenth century. The volatile nature of the sugar industry in Morelos, and the silver and cattle industries of the North, exacerbated the social problems created by an exclusionary political regime. Soon, displaced peasants, small farmers, disgruntled ranch hands, and unemployed miners joined Francisco Villa in northern Mexico, while peasants, farmers, and sugar workers rallied around the leadership of Emiliano Zapata in Morelos. When President Porfirio Diaz and the revolutionary leaders who succeeded him resisted the call for deep social change, turmoil engulfed much of the nation for the next decade. In the end, the Zapatistas were defeated militarily, yet they still forced major concessions out of the national government, which helped shape Mexican society for the rest of the twentieth century.
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31.450000 USD

Bitter Harvest: The Social Transformation of Morelos, Mexico, and the Origins of the Zapatista Revolution, 1840-1910

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The work of Argentine photographer Leandro Katz is presented here in dialogue with the nineteenth-century artist Frederick Catherwood, whose images of Maya ruins have fascinated viewers for more than a century. Catherwood's daguerreotypes and sketches, originally published to illustrate the travel narratives of John Lloyd Stephens, are among the most ...
The Catherwood Project: Incidents of Visual Reconstructions and Other Matters
The work of Argentine photographer Leandro Katz is presented here in dialogue with the nineteenth-century artist Frederick Catherwood, whose images of Maya ruins have fascinated viewers for more than a century. Catherwood's daguerreotypes and sketches, originally published to illustrate the travel narratives of John Lloyd Stephens, are among the most accurate depictions of important Maya sites before the advent of modern archaeology. Katz's photos of the same sites, most of which are previously unpublished, are presented alongside Jesse Lerner's essay, which explores their connections to the history of archaeology, their resonance in contemporary art, and the evolution of an artist who seamlessly integrates form and content.
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47.250000 USD

The Catherwood Project: Incidents of Visual Reconstructions and Other Matters

by Jesse Lerner
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Famous for its majestic ruins, Mexico has gone to great lengths to preserve and display the remains of its pre-Hispanic past. The Pursuit of Ruins argues that the government effort to take control of the ancient remains took off in the late nineteenth century during the dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz. ...
The Pursuit of Ruins: Archaeology, History, and the Making of Modern Mexico
Famous for its majestic ruins, Mexico has gone to great lengths to preserve and display the remains of its pre-Hispanic past. The Pursuit of Ruins argues that the government effort to take control of the ancient remains took off in the late nineteenth century during the dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz. Under Diaz Mexico acquired an official history more firmly rooted in Indian antiquity. This prestigious pedigree served to counter Mexico's image as a backward, peripheral nation. The government claimed symbolic links with the great civilizations of pre-Hispanic times as it hauled statues to the National Museum and reconstructed Teotihuacan. Christina Bueno explores the different facets of the Porfirian archaeological project and underscores the contradictory place of indigenous identity in modern Mexico. While the making of Mexico's official past was thought to bind the nation together, it was an exclusionary process, one that celebrated the civilizations of bygone times while disparaging contemporary Indians.
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31.450000 USD

The Pursuit of Ruins: Archaeology, History, and the Making of Modern Mexico

by Christina Bueno
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The War for Mexico's West examines a dramatic, complex episode in the early history of New Spain that stands as an instructive counterpoint to the much more familiar, triumphalist narrative of Spanish daring, resilience and victory embodied in the oft-told tale of the conquest of central Mexico. As Spaniards consolidated ...
The War for Mexico's West: Indians and Spaniards in New Galicia, 1524-1550
The War for Mexico's West examines a dramatic, complex episode in the early history of New Spain that stands as an instructive counterpoint to the much more familiar, triumphalist narrative of Spanish daring, resilience and victory embodied in the oft-told tale of the conquest of central Mexico. As Spaniards consolidated their hold over central Mexico they fanned out in several directions, first entering western Mexico - the future New Galicia - in 1524. A full-fledged expedition of conquest followed several years later. Among the loosely organized, ethnically and linguistically diverse societies of New Galicia, however, neither the Spaniards' usual stratagems of conquest nor their attempts to settle and impose their institutions met with much success. An uprising against Spanish rule, today known as the Mixton war, erupted in 1540, attracting thousands of people from many different indigenous communities and bringing Spanish failure in the region into sharp relief. Set within the context of the complex politics of early New Spain in which such prominent figures as Hernando Cortes, Nuno de Guzman, Pedro de Alvarado, Francisco Vazquez de Coronado and don Antonio de Mendoza vied to fulfill their ambitions in the west and incorporating accounts and testimony reflecting indigenous perspectives, Altman's treatment of the prolonged conquest of New Galicia provides the first full-length account in English of these little-known events and their consequences for Indians and Spaniards.
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31.450000 USD

The War for Mexico's West: Indians and Spaniards in New Galicia, 1524-1550

Paperback / softback
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