Filter
(found 2307 products)
Book cover image
This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these ...
Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity
This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these events, both civil and religious, were sponsored by the authorities and were crucial means to embody political and social concepts. The first European public rituals were introduced immediately after the conquest of the Aztec capital. Spanish priests seeking to evangelise the native population introduced Catholic festivals, and civil authorities sponsored celebrations designed to glorify the Spanish empire. Spectacle was one tool in an arsenal of colonising agents, and over time the growing diversity of the population made festival statecraft all the more important, as government-sponsored revelry attempted to promote shared histories and values among diverse and potentially dangerous groups. Festivals organisers developed a highly sophisticated message embedded within the celebrations that delineated the principles of leadership and the duties of both rulers and vassals. The pervasiveness of festivals and the power of the political message associated with them created possibilities for individuals to assess and participate in a larger discussion of good governance in the colony.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826331670.jpg
31.450000 USD

Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity

by Linda A. Curcio-Nagy
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
World-renowned bestselling author Carlos Castaneda's Selection of his wrtings on the shamans of ancient Mexico. Originally drawn to Yaqui Indian spiritual leader don Juan Matus for his knowledge of mind-altering plants, bestselling author Carlos Castaneda soon immersed himself in the sorcerer's magical world entirely. Ten years after his first encounter ...
The Wheel of Time: The Shamans of Ancient Mexico, Their Thoughts About Life, Death and the Universe
World-renowned bestselling author Carlos Castaneda's Selection of his wrtings on the shamans of ancient Mexico. Originally drawn to Yaqui Indian spiritual leader don Juan Matus for his knowledge of mind-altering plants, bestselling author Carlos Castaneda soon immersed himself in the sorcerer's magical world entirely. Ten years after his first encounter with the shaman, Castaneda examines his field notes and comes to understand what don Juan knew all along--that these plants are merely a means to understanding the alternative realities that one cannot fully embrace on one's own. In Journey to Ixtlan, Carlos Castaneda introduces readers to this new approach for the first time and explores, as he comes to experience it himself, his own final voyage into the teachings of don Juan, sharing with us what it is like to truly stop the world and perceive reality on his own terms.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780743412803.jpg
17.850000 USD

The Wheel of Time: The Shamans of Ancient Mexico, Their Thoughts About Life, Death and the Universe

by Carlos Castaneda
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies
The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781443713931.jpg
31.490000 USD

The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies

by Arthur Helps
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
San Antonio, Texas, 1836. A Mexican army led by Santa Anna attacks a small fort called the Alamo. Disputes still rage over exactly what happended, why it happened, and how it should be remembered. Indeed, the battles fought over the memory of the Alamo have been almost as fierce as ...
A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory
San Antonio, Texas, 1836. A Mexican army led by Santa Anna attacks a small fort called the Alamo. Disputes still rage over exactly what happended, why it happened, and how it should be remembered. Indeed, the battles fought over the memory of the Alamo have been almost as fierce as their subject. In a riveting combination of history and cultural analysis, historians Randy Roberts and James N. Olson blend a rich narrative of the battle, told from the perspectives of both the Anglo and Mexican troops, drawing from a wide range of sources, including newly released documents from Mexican military archives and just-discovered pages of the famous de la Pena diary. Still controversial after all these years, the events at the Alamo pose some fascinating questions: Did Crockett really die a hero, or did he surrender before a summary execution? And why have Americans built a shrine for an event that lasted no more than ninety minutes, and inflated it into one of the country's biggest tourist attractions? A full explanation of the San Antonio encounter requires a peeling back of many layers. With powerful writing, Roberts and Olson retell the story of a great American myth, and show how and why it endures. This original volume is sure to change the way readers remember the Alamo.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780743212335.jpg
26.200000 USD

A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory

by James S. Olson, Randy Roberts
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In this new telling of Mexico's Second Empire and Louis Napoleon's installation of Maximilian von Habsburg and his wife, Carlota of Belgium, as the emperor and empress of Mexico, Maximilian and Carlota brings the dramatic, interesting, and tragic time of this six-year-siege to life. From 1861 to 1866, the French ...
Maximilian and Carlota: Europe's Last Empire in Mexico
In this new telling of Mexico's Second Empire and Louis Napoleon's installation of Maximilian von Habsburg and his wife, Carlota of Belgium, as the emperor and empress of Mexico, Maximilian and Carlota brings the dramatic, interesting, and tragic time of this six-year-siege to life. From 1861 to 1866, the French incorporated the armies of Austria, Belgium--including forces from Crimea to Egypt--to fight and subdue the regime of Mexico's Benito Juarez during the time of the U.S. Civil War. France viewed this as a chance to seize Mexican territory in a moment they were convinced the Confederacy would prevail and take over Mexico. With both sides distracted in the U.S., this was their opportunity to seize territory in North America. In 1867, with aid from the United States, this movement came to a disastrous end both for the royals and for France while ushering in a new era for Mexico. In a bid to oust Juarez, Mexican conservatives appealed to European leaders to select a monarch to run their country. Maximilian and Carlota's reign, from 1864 to 1867, was marked from the start by extravagance and ambition and ended with the execution of Maximilian by firing squad, with Carlota on the brink of madness. This epoch moment in the arc of French colonial rule, which spans North American and European history at a critical juncture on both continents, shows how Napoleon III's failure to save Maximilian disgusted Europeans and sealed his own fate. Maximilian and Carlota offers a vivid portrait of the unusual marriage of Maximilian and Carlota and of international high society and politics at this critical nineteenth-century juncture. This largely unknown era in the history of the Americas comes to life through this colorful telling of the couple's tragic reign.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781595341839.jpg
31.450000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927 is a study of federalism in late-nineteenth-century Veracruz State. It is also a politico-military analysis and an evaluation of social-revolutionary relations in the epoch of the Porfiriato and the Mexican Revolution. Koth interprets the Mexican Revolution across ...
Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927
Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927 is a study of federalism in late-nineteenth-century Veracruz State. It is also a politico-military analysis and an evaluation of social-revolutionary relations in the epoch of the Porfiriato and the Mexican Revolution. Koth interprets the Mexican Revolution across two axes: one is the heightened struggle for federalism, i.e., the conflict between the state of Veracruz and the central government; and the other is the class struggle that was brought into sharp relief by the violent social and military upheaval. Koth illustrates why and how, in 1927, President Plutarco ElA-as Calles crushed federalism, suppressed the aspirations of working classes, and co-opted a re-emergent Veracruz bourgeoisie. In Koth's view, the initial promises of the Mexican Revolution were never fulfilled. The old rancor born of elite control and the loss of federalism still brews not far beneath the surface of contemporary Mexican politics. This study is the first modern, comprehensive, and analytical history of the Porfiriato and Mexican Revolution in Veracruz.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781552380314.jpg
36.27 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The only substantive study of Plutarco Elias Calles and the Mexican Revolution, this book traces the remarkable life story of a complex and little-understood, yet key figure in Mexico's history. Jurgen Buchenau draws on a rich array of archival evidence from Mexico, the United States, and Europe to explore Calles's ...
Plutarco Elias Calles and the Mexican Revolution
The only substantive study of Plutarco Elias Calles and the Mexican Revolution, this book traces the remarkable life story of a complex and little-understood, yet key figure in Mexico's history. Jurgen Buchenau draws on a rich array of archival evidence from Mexico, the United States, and Europe to explore Calles's origins and political trajectory, ultimately leading to his reformist, yet authoritarian presidency from 1924 to 1928. After his term as president, Calles continued to exert broad influence as his country's foremost political figure; indeed, many of the institutions and laws forged during his tenure survive today. Through this comprehensive assessment of a quintessential politician in an era dominated by generals, entrepreneurs, and educated professionals, Buchenau opens an illuminating window into the Mexican Revolution and contemporary Mexico.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780742537491.jpg
53.550000 USD

Plutarco Elias Calles and the Mexican Revolution

by Jurgen Buchenau
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
A stunningly beautiful backdrop where cultures meet, meld, and thrive, the U.S.-Mexico borderlands is one of the most dynamic regions in the Americas. On the Border explores little-known corners of this fascinating area of the world in a rich collection of essays. Beginning with an exploration of mining and the ...
On the Border: Society and Culture between the United States and Mexico
A stunningly beautiful backdrop where cultures meet, meld, and thrive, the U.S.-Mexico borderlands is one of the most dynamic regions in the Americas. On the Border explores little-known corners of this fascinating area of the world in a rich collection of essays. Beginning with an exploration of mining and the rise of Tijuana, the book examines a number of aspects of the region's social and cultural history, including urban growth and housing, the mysterious underworld of border-town nightlife, a film noir treatment of the Peteet family suicides, borderlands cuisine, the life of squatters, and popular religion. As stimulating as it is lively, On the Border will spark a new appreciation for the range of social and cultural experiences in the borderlands.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780842051736.jpg
47.250000 USD

On the Border: Society and Culture between the United States and Mexico

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Cavernous, often cold, always dark, with the lingering smell of popcorn in the air: the experience of movie-going is universal. The cinematic experience in Mexico is no less profound and has evolved in complex ways in recent years. Films like Y Tu Mama Tambien, El Mariachi, Amores Perros, and the ...
Screening Neoliberalism: Transforming Mexican Cinema, 1988-2012
Cavernous, often cold, always dark, with the lingering smell of popcorn in the air: the experience of movie-going is universal. The cinematic experience in Mexico is no less profound and has evolved in complex ways in recent years. Films like Y Tu Mama Tambien, El Mariachi, Amores Perros, and the work of icons like Guillermo del Toro and Salma Hayek represent much more than resurgent interest in the cinema of Mexico. In Screening Neoliberalism, Ignacio Sanchez Prado explores precisely what happened to Mexico's film industry in recent decades. Far from just a history of the period, Screening Neoliberalism explores four deep transformations in the Mexican film industry: the decline of nationalism, the new focus on middle-class audiences, the redefinition of political cinema and the impact of globalisation. This analysis considers the directors and films that have found international notoriety as well as those that have been instrumental in building a domestic market. Screening Neoliberalism exposes the consequences of a film industry forced to find new audiences in Mexico's middle-class in order to achieve economic and cultural viability.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826519658.jpg
104.950000 USD

Screening Neoliberalism: Transforming Mexican Cinema, 1988-2012

by Ignacio M Sanchez Prado
Hardback
Book cover image
Drawing on materials ranging from archaeological findings to recent studies of migration issues and drug violence, William H. Beezley provides a dramatic narrative of human events as he recounts the story of Mexico in the context of world history. Beginning with the Mayan and Aztec civilizations and their brutal defeat ...
Mexico in World History
Drawing on materials ranging from archaeological findings to recent studies of migration issues and drug violence, William H. Beezley provides a dramatic narrative of human events as he recounts the story of Mexico in the context of world history. Beginning with the Mayan and Aztec civilizations and their brutal defeat at the hands of the Conquistadors, Beezley highlights the penetrating effect of Spain's three-hundred-year colonial rule, during which Mexico became a multicultural society marked by Roman Catholicism and the Spanish language. Independence, he shows, was likewise marked by foreign invasions and huge territorial losses, this time at the hands of the United States, who annexed a vast land mass-including the states of Texas, New Mexico, and California-and remained a powerful presence along the border. The 1910 revolution propelled land, educational, and public health reforms, but later governments turned to authoritarian rule, personal profits, and marginalization of rural, indigenous, and poor Mexicans. Throughout this eventful chronicle, Beezley highlights the people and international forces that shaped Mexico's rich and tumultuous history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780195337907.jpg
26.200000 USD

Mexico in World History

by William H. Beezley
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Under Moctezuma the mighty Aztec empire reached the height of its power; under Moctezuma, the Aztec empire met its ultimate downfall. The Aztecs ruled from the island metropolis of Tenochtitlan which, by the fifteenth century, stretched from the Gulf Coast to the Pacific Ocean. Focusing on their last elected leader, ...
Moctezuma and the Aztecs
Under Moctezuma the mighty Aztec empire reached the height of its power; under Moctezuma, the Aztec empire met its ultimate downfall. The Aztecs ruled from the island metropolis of Tenochtitlan which, by the fifteenth century, stretched from the Gulf Coast to the Pacific Ocean. Focusing on their last elected leader, Moctezuma II, this informative and beautifully illustrated little book explores the world of the Aztecs. It looks at their origins, the founding of their capital city Tenochtitlan, the structure of their society, their religious beliefs and ceremonies, their military prowess, their art and architecture, and their network of long-distance trade and tribute. The dramatic death of Moctezuma at the hands of the Spanish is also recounted. Moctezuma and the Aztecs not only offers a concise portrait of this famous, semi-divine figure but offers a wonderful introduction to a remarkable, sophisticated civilization.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780714125893.jpg
18.57 USD

Moctezuma and the Aztecs

by Elisenda Vila Llonch
Hardback
Book cover image
Brides of Christ invites the modern reader to follow the histories of colonial Mexican nuns inside the cloisters where they pursued a religious vocation or sought shelter from the world. Lavrin provides a complete overview of conventual life, including the early signs of vocation, the decision to enter a convent, ...
Brides of Christ: Conventual Life in Colonial Mexico
Brides of Christ invites the modern reader to follow the histories of colonial Mexican nuns inside the cloisters where they pursued a religious vocation or sought shelter from the world. Lavrin provides a complete overview of conventual life, including the early signs of vocation, the decision to enter a convent, profession, spiritual guidelines and devotional practices, governance, ceremonials, relations with male authorities and confessors, living arrangements, servants, sickness, and death rituals. Individual chapters deal with issues such as sexuality and the challenges to chastity in the cloisters and the little-known subject of the nuns' own writings as expressions of their spirituality. The foundation of convents for indigenous women receives special attention, because such religious communities existed nowhere else in the Spanish empire.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780804752831.jpg
78.750000 USD

Brides of Christ: Conventual Life in Colonial Mexico

by Asuncion Lavrin
Hardback
Book cover image
This book explores the origins, process, and consequences of forty years of nearly continual political violence in southeastern Mexico. Rather than recounting the well-worn narrative of the Caste War, it focuses instead on how four decades of violence helped shape social and political institutions of the Mexican southeast. Rebellion Now ...
Rebellion Now and Forever: Mayas, Hispanics, and Caste War Violence in Yucatan, 1800-1880
This book explores the origins, process, and consequences of forty years of nearly continual political violence in southeastern Mexico. Rather than recounting the well-worn narrative of the Caste War, it focuses instead on how four decades of violence helped shape social and political institutions of the Mexican southeast. Rebellion Now and Forever looks at Yucatan's famous Caste War from the perspective of the vast majority of Hispanics and Maya peasants who did not join in the great ethnic rebellion of 1847. It shows how the history of nonrebel territory was as dramatic and as violent as the front lines of the Caste War, and of greater significance for the larger evolution of Mexican society. The work explores political violence not merely as a method and process, but also as a molder of subsequent institutions and practices.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780804760485.jpg
78.750000 USD

Rebellion Now and Forever: Mayas, Hispanics, and Caste War Violence in Yucatan, 1800-1880

by Terry Rugeley
Hardback
Book cover image
Captivity was endemic in Arizona from the end of the Mexican-American War through its statehood in 1912. The practice crossed cultures: Native Americans, Mexican Americans, Mexicans, and whites kidnapped and held one another captive. Victoria Smith's narrative history of the practice of taking captives in early Arizona shows how this ...
Captive Arizona, 1851-1900
Captivity was endemic in Arizona from the end of the Mexican-American War through its statehood in 1912. The practice crossed cultures: Native Americans, Mexican Americans, Mexicans, and whites kidnapped and held one another captive. Victoria Smith's narrative history of the practice of taking captives in early Arizona shows how this phenomenon held Arizonans of all races in uneasy bondage that chafed social relations during the era. It also maps the social complex that accompanied captivity, a complex that included orphans, childlessness, acculturation, racial constructions, redemption, reintegration, intermarriage, and issues of heredity and environment. This in-depth work offers an absorbing account of decades of seizure and kidnapping and of the different captivity systems operating within Arizona. By focusing on the stories of those taken captive-young women, children, the elderly, and the disabled, all of whom are often missing from southwestern history-Captive Arizona, 1851-1900 complicates and enriches the early social history of Arizona and of the American West.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780803210905.jpg
47.250000 USD

Captive Arizona, 1851-1900

by Victoria Smith
Hardback
Book cover image
In this study of gender relations in late colonial Mexico (ca. 1760-1821), Steve Stern analyzes the historical connections between gender, power, and politics in the lives of peasants, Indians, and other marginalized peoples. Through vignettes of everyday life, he challenges assumptions about gender relations and political culture in a patriarchal ...
The Secret History of Gender: Women, Men, and Power in Late Colonial Mexico
In this study of gender relations in late colonial Mexico (ca. 1760-1821), Steve Stern analyzes the historical connections between gender, power, and politics in the lives of peasants, Indians, and other marginalized peoples. Through vignettes of everyday life, he challenges assumptions about gender relations and political culture in a patriarchal society. He also reflects on continuity and change between late colonial times and the present and suggests a paradigm for understanding similar struggles over gender rights in Old Regime societies in Europe and the Americas. Stern pursues three major arguments. First, he demonstrates that non-elite women and men developed contending models of legitimate gender authority and that these differences sparked bitter struggles over gender right and obligation. Second, he reveals connections, in language and social dynamics, between disputes over legitimate authority in domestic and familial matters and disputes in the arenas of community and state power. The result is a fresh interpretation of the gendered dynamics of peasant politics, community, and riot. Third, Stern examines regional and ethnocultural variation and finds that his analysis transcends particular locales and ethnic subgroupings within Mexico. The historical arguments and conceptual sweep of Stern's book will inform not only students of Mexico and Latin America but also students of gender in the West and other world regions. |An illustrated history of the hurricanes known to have struck North Carolina from the days of the first European settlers to the present. This edition takes into account the three major storms--Bonnie, Dennis, and Floyd--that have hit North Carolina since the last edition was published in 1998.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780807846438.jpg
47.250000 USD

The Secret History of Gender: Women, Men, and Power in Late Colonial Mexico

by Steve J. Stern
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Although Mexico began its national life in the 1821 as one of the most liberal democracies in the world, it ended the century with an authoritarian regime. Examining this defining process, distinguished historians focus on the evolution of Mexican liberalism from the perspectives of politics, the military, the Church, and ...
The Divine Charter: Constitutionalism and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century Mexico
Although Mexico began its national life in the 1821 as one of the most liberal democracies in the world, it ended the century with an authoritarian regime. Examining this defining process, distinguished historians focus on the evolution of Mexican liberalism from the perspectives of politics, the military, the Church, and the economy. Based on extensive archival research, the chapters demonstrate that-despite widely held assumptions-liberalism was not an alien ideology unsuited to Mexico's traditional, conservative, and multiethnic society. On the contrary, liberalism in New Spain arose from Hispanic culture, which drew upon a shared European tradition reaching back to ancient Greece. This volume provides the first systematic exploration of the evolution of Mexican liberal traditions in the nineteenth century. The chapters assess the changes in liberal ideology, the nature of federalism, efforts to create stability with a liberal monarchy in the 1860s, the Church's accommodation to the new liberal order, the role of the army and of the civil militias, the liberal tax system, and attempts to modernize the economy in the latter part of the century. Taken together, these essays provide a nuanced and comprehensive analysis of the transformation of liberalism in Mexico. Contributions by: Christon I. Archer, William H. Beezley, Marcello Carmagnani, Manuel Chust, Brian Connaughton, Robert H. Duncan, Aldo Flores-Quiroga, Alicia Hernandez Chavez, Sandra Kuntz Ficker, Andres Resendez, Jaime E. Rodriguez O., and Jose Antonio Serrano Ortega
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780742537118.jpg
55.650000 USD

The Divine Charter: Constitutionalism and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century Mexico

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This innovative history argues that we can understand important facets of the Mexican Revolution by analyzing the architecture designed and built in Mexico City during the formative years from 1920 to 1940. These artifacts allow us to trace and understand the path of the consolidation of the Mexican Revolution. Each ...
Artifacts of Revolution: Architecture, Society, and Politics in Mexico City, 1920-1940
This innovative history argues that we can understand important facets of the Mexican Revolution by analyzing the architecture designed and built in Mexico City during the formative years from 1920 to 1940. These artifacts allow us to trace and understand the path of the consolidation of the Mexican Revolution. Each individual building or development, by providing indelible evidence of the process by which the revolution evolved into a government, offers important insights into Mexican history. Seen in aggregate, they reveal an ongoing urban process at work; seen as a composition, they reveal changes over time in societal values and aspirations and in the direction of the revolution. This book focuses on structure, change, and process for this remarkable city in the true image of the gigantic heaven. The changes described in Fuentes' narrative are man-made, not wrought by impersonal or natural forces except on the rare occasions of earthquake and flood. Patrice Elizabeth Olsen views Mexico City as an artifact of those who created it-representing their ardor, humanity, and religion, as well as their politics. Individual chapters detail the expression of revolutionary values and aims in the physical form of Mexico City's built environment between 1920 and 1940, examining direction and meaning in terms of who is given license to design and build structures in the capital city, and equally important, who is excluded. Through the reshaping of the capital the revolution was extended and institutionalized; physical traces of the process of negotiation that enabled the revolution to be fixed in the Mexican polity appear in the city's skyline, parks, housing developments, and other new construction, as well as in modifications to existing colonial-era buildings. In this manner, the author argues, Mexico City's urban form crystallized as a product of the revolution as well as a part of the revolutionary process, as it has been of other conquests throughout its history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780742554207.jpg
115.500000 USD

Artifacts of Revolution: Architecture, Society, and Politics in Mexico City, 1920-1940

by Patrice Elizabeth Olsen
Hardback
Book cover image
Vicente Lombardo Toledano is an outstanding figure in the Mexican Revolution that began in 1910 and in whose name Mexico has been governed ever since. This book stresses his intellectual development and the content of his mature thought. Lombardo has played a major role in Mexican politics, the labor movement, ...
Mexican Marxist--Vicente Lombardo Toledano
Vicente Lombardo Toledano is an outstanding figure in the Mexican Revolution that began in 1910 and in whose name Mexico has been governed ever since. This book stresses his intellectual development and the content of his mature thought. Lombardo has played a major role in Mexican politics, the labor movement, and intellectual life during the past four decades. This book provides a better understanding of the man. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780807879252.jpg
49.880000 USD

Mexican Marxist--Vicente Lombardo Toledano

by Robert P. Millon
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
For almost 3,000 years Mexico was the site of some of the most advanced Indian civilizations, most notably the Aztec and Mayan. In many ways, these civilizations were more advanced than their European contemporaries, especially in such spheres as astronomy, mathematics, and city organization. Upon seeing the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, ...
The A to Z of Mexico
For almost 3,000 years Mexico was the site of some of the most advanced Indian civilizations, most notably the Aztec and Mayan. In many ways, these civilizations were more advanced than their European contemporaries, especially in such spheres as astronomy, mathematics, and city organization. Upon seeing the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, for the first time, Spanish explorer Bernal Diaz del Castillo was awed by its beauty and confessed he had never seen a city in Spain that could match it. However, Diaz del Castillo's arrival coincided with that of Hernan Cortes, the Spanish conqueror of Mexico who captured the Aztec capital in 1521. Since then, it has been known as Mexico City. Mexico's struggle-and eventual success-through the subsequent years to become an independent country is chronicled in The A to Z of Mexico. It covers the history of Mexico from its great Indian civilizations to the controversial election of Felipe Calderon in 2006. This is done through a detailed chronology, an introduction, a map, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on some of the more significant persons, places, and events; institutions and organizations; and political, economic, social, cultural, and religious facets.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780810872219.jpg
49.350000 USD

The A to Z of Mexico

by Marvin Alisky
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The first reference work of its kind, this volume on the United States-Mexican War encompasses the decade of the 1840s, focusing on the war years of 1846-1848. More than a dozen maps were drawn for this book, some of which depict major regions and localities over which armies of both ...
The A to Z of the United States-Mexican War
The first reference work of its kind, this volume on the United States-Mexican War encompasses the decade of the 1840s, focusing on the war years of 1846-1848. More than a dozen maps were drawn for this book, some of which depict major regions and localities over which armies of both nations moved great distances to position for battle, and others that depict major battlefields from the first engagement to the last. The narrative overview paints a broad picture of the war for both historians desiring a review before continuing research and for the interested layperson unfamiliar with the war and in search of an overview of the entire period. The dictionary itself contains hundreds of thoroughly researched entries describing the war's personalities, battles and campaign trails, armaments, support systems, political factions involved in the conflict in both nations, and an array of other topics related to the war. This reference also includes illustrations of the central figures of the conflict, a detailed chronology, and a bibliography of traditional and contemporary sources useful to the professional scholar, student, and amateur historian.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780810868618.jpg
49.350000 USD

The A to Z of the United States-Mexican War

by Paul C. Jr Clark, Edward H. Moseley
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) is the largest army in the world. China is predicted to be on the brink of overtaking the USA as the world's largest economy, and China's military capabilities and global ambitions are the single greatest long-term pre-occupation of Western governments. The PLA has progressed ...
The Chinese People's Liberation Army since 1949: Ground Forces
The Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) is the largest army in the world. China is predicted to be on the brink of overtaking the USA as the world's largest economy, and China's military capabilities and global ambitions are the single greatest long-term pre-occupation of Western governments. The PLA has progressed steadily - if slowly - since its creation in 1949, from a mass army of unsophisticated infantry limited to 'human wave' tactics into a highly sophisticated force with wide capabilities. The most recent reforms (1989 to the present day) have been made possible by massive economic liberalization, and have seen not only the modernization of all the armed forces but the beginnings of global outreach, even including Chinese participation in UN peace-keeping missions to Africa, the Middle East, and Haiti. Featuring rare photographs and specially commissioned color artwork, this study explores the developing structure, organization, equipment, appearance, and character of the Chinese People's Liberation Army from its creation until today.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781780960562.jpg
22.30 USD

The Chinese People's Liberation Army since 1949: Ground Forces

by Benjamin Lai
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Hidden lives, hidden history and hidden manuscripts. In The Virgin of Guadalupe and the Conversos, Marie-Theresa Hernandez unmasks the secret lives of conversos and judaizantes and their likely influence on the Catholic Church in the New World. The terms converso and juidaizante are often used for descendants of Spanish Jews ...
The Virgin of Guadalupe and the Conversos: Uncovering Hidden Influences from Spain to Mexico
Hidden lives, hidden history and hidden manuscripts. In The Virgin of Guadalupe and the Conversos, Marie-Theresa Hernandez unmasks the secret lives of conversos and judaizantes and their likely influence on the Catholic Church in the New World. The terms converso and juidaizante are often used for descendants of Spanish Jews (the Sephardi or Sefarditas as they are sometimes called), who converted under duress to Christianity in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. There are few, if any, archival documents that prove the existence of judaizantes after the Spanish expulsion of the Jews in 1492 and the Portuguese expulsion in 1497, as it is unlikely that a secret Jew in sixteenth-century Spain would have documented his allegiance to the Law of Moses, thereby providing evidence for the Inquisition. On a Da Vinci Code - style quest, Hernandez persisted in hunting for a trove of forgotten manuscripts at the New York Public Library. These documents, once unearthed, describe the Jewish/Christian religious beliefs of an early nineteenth-century Catholic priest in Mexico City, focusing on the relationship between the Virgin of Guadalupe and Judaism. With this discovery in hand, the author traces the cult of Guadalupe backwards to its fourteenth-century Spanish origins. The trail from that point forward can then be followed to its interface with early modern conversos and their descendants at the highest levels of the Church and the monarchy in Spain and Colonial Mexico. She describes key players who were somehow immune to the dangers of the Inquisition and who were allowed the freedom to display, albeit in a camouflaged manner, vestiges of their family's Jewish identity. By exploring the narratives produced by these individuals, Hernandez reveals the existence of those conversos and judaizantes who did not return to the covenantal bond of rabbinic law, who did not publicly identify themselves as Jews and who continued to exhibit in their influential writings a covert allegiance and longing for a Jewish past. This is a spellbinding and controversial story that offers a fresh perspective on the origins and history of conversos.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813565682.jpg
33.550000 USD

The Virgin of Guadalupe and the Conversos: Uncovering Hidden Influences from Spain to Mexico

by Marie Theresa Hernandez
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
What is history? And why do people value it? Basing his inquiry on fieldwork near Guadalajara in west Mexico, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on one reason for which people commonly value history-knowing history is said to make for better citizens, which helps to explain why history is taught at schools ...
Knowing History in Mexico: An Ethnography of Citizenship
What is history? And why do people value it? Basing his inquiry on fieldwork near Guadalajara in west Mexico, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on one reason for which people commonly value history-knowing history is said to make for better citizens, which helps to explain why history is taught at schools worldwide and history questions are included in citizenship tests. Stack combines his Mexican fieldwork with his personal experience of history in Scottish schools and at Oxford University to try to pinpoint what exactly it is that makes people who know history seem like better citizens. Much has been written about national history and citizenship; Stack concentrates instead on the history and citizenship of towns and cities. His Mexican informants talked (and wrote) not only of Mexican history but of their towns' histories, too. They acted, at the same time, as citizens of their towns as well as of Mexico. Urban history and citizenship are, the book shows, important yet neglected phenomena in Mexico and beyond. Rather than setting history on a pedestal, Stack treats it as one kind of knowledge among many others, comparing it not just to legend but also to gossip. Instead of focusing on academic historians, he interviewed people from all walks of life-bricklayers, priests, teachers, politicians, peasant farmers, lawyers, laborers, and migrants-and he also draws on a talk about history by the famous Mexican novelist Juan Rulfo. As an ethnography, Knowing History in Mexico provides a vivid portrait of ethnicity, lands, migration, tourism, education, religion, and government in a dynamic region of west Mexico that straddles the urban and rural, modern and traditional.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826352538.jpg
31.500000 USD

Knowing History in Mexico: An Ethnography of Citizenship

by Trevor R. Stack
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The history of Casa Boker, one of the first department stores in Mexico City, and its German owners provides important insights into Mexican and immigration history. Often called 'the Sears of Mexico', Casa Boker has become over the past 140 years one of Mexico's foremost wholesalers, working closely with US ...
Tools of Progress: A German Merchant Family in Mexico City, 1865-Present
The history of Casa Boker, one of the first department stores in Mexico City, and its German owners provides important insights into Mexican and immigration history. Often called 'the Sears of Mexico', Casa Boker has become over the past 140 years one of Mexico's foremost wholesalers, working closely with US and European exporters and eventually selling 40,000 different products across the republic, including sewing machines, typewriters, tools, cutlery, and even insurance. Like Mexico itself, Casa Boker has survived various economic development strategies, political changes, the rise of US influence and consumer culture, and the conflicted relationship between Mexicans and foreigners. Casa Boker thrived as a Mexican business while its owners clung to their German identity, supporting the Germans in both world wars. Today, the family speaks German but considers itself Mexican. Buchenau's study transcends the categories of local vs. foreign and insider vs. outsider by demonstrating that one family could be commercial insiders and, at the same time, cultural outsiders. Because the Bokers saw themselves as entrepreneurs first and Germans second, Buchenau suggests that transnational theory, a framework previously used to illustrate the fluidity of national identity in poor immigrants, is the best way of describing this and other elite families of foreign origin.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826330888.jpg
36.750000 USD

Tools of Progress: A German Merchant Family in Mexico City, 1865-Present

by J Buchenau
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Alice Dixon (1851-1910) was born into a comfortable middle class life in London that she eagerly left behind to travel to Yucatan as the young bride of Maya archaeologist Augustus Le Plongeon. Working side by side as photographers and archaeologists, the Le Plongeons were the first to excavate and systematically ...
Yucatan Through Her Eyes: Alice Dixon Le Plongeon, Writer and Expeditionary Photographer
Alice Dixon (1851-1910) was born into a comfortable middle class life in London that she eagerly left behind to travel to Yucatan as the young bride of Maya archaeologist Augustus Le Plongeon. Working side by side as photographers and archaeologists, the Le Plongeons were the first to excavate and systematically photograph the Maya sites of Chichen Itza and Uxmal. After spending eleven years in the field, she devoted the rest of her life to lecturing and published books and articles on a wide range of topics, including her exploration of Maya civilization, political activism and social justice, and epic poetry. Alice's papers became public in 1999 and included photographs, unpublished manuscripts, correspondence, and a handwritten diary; over two thousand of her prints and negatives survive today in public and private collections. Combined with Lawrence Desmond's biography of this remarkable woman's life, her diary offers readers a rare glimpse of life in the Yucatan peninsula during the final quarter of the nineteenth century, and an insider's view of fieldwork just prior to the emergence of Mesoamerican archaeology as a professional discipline.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826345950.jpg
52.500000 USD

Yucatan Through Her Eyes: Alice Dixon Le Plongeon, Writer and Expeditionary Photographer

by Lawrence Gustave Desmond
Hardback
Book cover image
The Mexican Revolution could not have succeeded without the use of American territory as a secret base of operations, a source of munitions, money, and volunteers, a refuge for personnel, an arena for propaganda, and a market for revolutionary loot. El Paso, the largest and most important American city on ...
The Secret War in El Paso: Mexican Revolutionary Intrigue, 1906-1920
The Mexican Revolution could not have succeeded without the use of American territory as a secret base of operations, a source of munitions, money, and volunteers, a refuge for personnel, an arena for propaganda, and a market for revolutionary loot. El Paso, the largest and most important American city on the Mexican border during this time, was the scene of many clandestine operations as American businesses and the U.S. federal government sought to maintain their influences in Mexico and protect national interest while keeping an eye on key Revolutionary figures. In addition, the city served as refuge to a cast of characters that included revolutionists, adventurers, smugglers, gunrunners, counterfeiters, propagandists, secret agents, double agents, criminals, and confidence men. Using 80,000 pages of previously classified FBI documents on the Mexican Revolution and hundreds of Mexican secret agent reports from El Paso and Ciudad Juarez in the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Relations archive, Charles Harris and Louis Sadler examine the mechanics of rebellion in a town where factional loyalty was fragile and treachery was elevated to an art form. As a case study, this slice of El paso's, and America's, history adds new dimensions to what is known about the Mexican Revolution.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826346520.jpg
47.250000 USD

The Secret War in El Paso: Mexican Revolutionary Intrigue, 1906-1920

by Louis R. Sadler, Charles H. Harris
Hardback
Book cover image
Dolores del Rio's enormously successful career in Hollywood, in Mexico, and internationally illuminates issues of race, ethnicity, and gender through the lenses of beauty and celebrity. She and her husband left Mexico in 1925, as both their well-to-do families suffered from the economic downturn that followed the Mexican Revolution. Far ...
Dolores del Rio: Beauty in Light and Shade
Dolores del Rio's enormously successful career in Hollywood, in Mexico, and internationally illuminates issues of race, ethnicity, and gender through the lenses of beauty and celebrity. She and her husband left Mexico in 1925, as both their well-to-do families suffered from the economic downturn that followed the Mexican Revolution. Far from being stigmatized as a woman of color, she was acknowledged as the epitome of beauty in the Hollywood of the 1920s and early 1930s. While she insisted upon her ethnicity, she was nevertheless coded white by the film industry and its fans, and she appeared for more than a decade as a romantic lead opposite white actors. Returning to Mexico in the early 1940s, she brought enthusiasm and prestige to the Golden Age of Mexican cinema, becoming one of the great divas of Mexican film. With struggle and perseverance, she overcame the influence of men in both countries who hoped to dominate her, ultimately controlling her own life professionally and personally.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780804799461.jpg
29.400000 USD

Dolores del Rio: Beauty in Light and Shade

by Linda B Hall
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Under constant surveillance and policed by increasingly militarized means, Arizona's border is portrayed in the media as a site of sharp political and ethnic divisions. But this view obscures the region's deeper history. Bringing to light the shared cultural and commercial ties through which businessmen and politicians forged a transnational ...
Standing on Common Ground: The Making of a Sunbelt Borderland
Under constant surveillance and policed by increasingly militarized means, Arizona's border is portrayed in the media as a site of sharp political and ethnic divisions. But this view obscures the region's deeper history. Bringing to light the shared cultural and commercial ties through which businessmen and politicians forged a transnational Sunbelt, Standing on Common Ground recovers the vibrant connections between Tucson, Arizona, and the neighboring Mexican state of Sonora. Geraldo L. Cadava corrects misunderstandings of the borderland's past and calls attention to the many types of exchange, beyond labor migrations, that demonstrate how the United States and Mexico continue to shape one another. In the 1940s, a flourishing cross-border traffic developed in the Arizona-Sonora Sunbelt, as the migrations of entrepreneurs, tourists, shoppers, and students maintained a densely connected transnational corridor. Politicians on both sides worked to cultivate a common ground of free enterprise, spurring the growth of manufacturing, ranching, and agriculture. However, as Cadava illustrates, these modernizing forces created conditions that marginalized the very workers who propped up the regional economy, and would eventually lead to the social and economic instability that has troubled the Arizona-Sonora borderland in recent times. Grounded in rich archival materials and oral histories, Standing on Common Ground clarifies why we cannot understand today's fierce debates over illegal immigration and border enforcement without identifying the roots of these problems in the Sunbelt's complex pan-ethnic and transnational history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780674970892.jpg
21.520000 USD

Standing on Common Ground: The Making of a Sunbelt Borderland

by Associate Professor of History Geraldo L Cadava
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The ordinary tortilla was an extraordinary bond between the human and divine... From birthdays to religious ceremonies, the people of Mesoamerica commemorated important events with tortillas. One Maya tribe even buried their dead with tortillas so that the dogs eaten as dinner during life would not bite the deceased in ...
Tortillas: A Cultural History
The ordinary tortilla was an extraordinary bond between the human and divine... From birthdays to religious ceremonies, the people of Mesoamerica commemorated important events with tortillas. One Maya tribe even buried their dead with tortillas so that the dogs eaten as dinner during life would not bite the deceased in revenge.' - from Tortillas: A Cultural History For centuries tortillas have remained a staple of the Mexican diet, but the rich significance of this unleavened flatbread stretches far beyond food. Today the tortilla crosses cultures and borders as part of an international network of people, customs, and culinary traditions. In this entertaining and informative account Paula E. Morton surveys the history of the tortilla from its roots in ancient Mesoamerica to the cross-cultural global tortilla. Morton tells the story of tortillas and the people who make and eat them - from the Mexican woman rolling the mano over the metate to grind corn, to the enormous wheat tortillas made in northern Mexico, to twenty-first-century elaborations like the stuffed burrito. This study - the first to extensively present the tortilla's history, symbolism, and impact - shows how the tortilla has changed our understanding of home cooking, industrialized food, healthy cuisine, and the people who live across borders.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826352149.jpg
26.200000 USD

Tortillas: A Cultural History

by Paula E. Morton
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, historians and anthropologists explain how evolving notions of the meaning and practice of manhood have shaped Mexican history. In essays that range from Texas to Oaxaca and from the 1880s to the present, contributors write about file clerks and movie stars, wealthy world ...
Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico
In Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, historians and anthropologists explain how evolving notions of the meaning and practice of manhood have shaped Mexican history. In essays that range from Texas to Oaxaca and from the 1880s to the present, contributors write about file clerks and movie stars, wealthy world travelers and ordinary people whose adventures were confined to a bar in the middle of town. The Mexicans we meet in these essays lived out their identities through extraordinary events--committing terrible crimes, writing world-famous songs, and ruling the nation--but also in everyday activities like falling in love, raising families, getting dressed, and going to the movies. Thus, these essays in the history of masculinity connect the major topics of Mexican political history since 1880 to the history of daily life.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826329059.jpg
36.700000 USD

Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico

Paperback / softback
Page 1 of 40