Filter
(found 3898 products)
Book cover image
Mexico is a country in crisis. Capitalizing on weakened public institutions, widespread unemployment, a state of lawlessness and the strengthening of links between Mexican and Colombian drug cartels, narcotrafficking in the country has flourished during the post-1982 neoliberal era. In fact, it has become one of Mexico's biggest source of ...
Drug War Mexico: Politics, Neoliberalism and Violence in the New Narcoeconomy
Mexico is a country in crisis. Capitalizing on weakened public institutions, widespread unemployment, a state of lawlessness and the strengthening of links between Mexican and Colombian drug cartels, narcotrafficking in the country has flourished during the post-1982 neoliberal era. In fact, it has become one of Mexico's biggest source of revenue, as well as its most violent, with over 12,000 drug-related executions in 2011 alone. In response, Mexican president Felipe Calderon, armed with millions of dollars in US military aid, has launched a crackdown, ostensibly to combat organised crime. Despite this, human rights violations have increased, as has the murder rate, making Ciudad Juarez on the northern border the most dangerous city on the planet. Meanwhile, the supply of cocaine, heroin, marijuana and methamphetamine has continued to grow. In this insightful and controversial book, Watt and Zepeda throw new light on the situation, contending that the 'war on drugs' in Mexico is in fact the pretext for a US-backed strategy to bolster unpopular neoliberal policies, a weak yet authoritarian government and a radically unfair status quo.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781848138865.jpg
33.45 USD

Drug War Mexico: Politics, Neoliberalism and Violence in the New Narcoeconomy

by Roberto Zepeda, Peter Watt
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Honorable Mention for the 2019 Thomas McGann Book Prize from the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies Mexico's National Indigenist Institute (INI) was at the vanguard of hemispheric indigenismo from 1951 through the mid-1970s, thanks to the innovative development projects that were first introduced at its pilot Tseltal-Tsotsil Coordinating ...
Rethinking Mexican Indigenismo: The INI's Coordinating Center in Highland Chiapas and the Fate of a Utopian Project
Honorable Mention for the 2019 Thomas McGann Book Prize from the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies Mexico's National Indigenist Institute (INI) was at the vanguard of hemispheric indigenismo from 1951 through the mid-1970s, thanks to the innovative development projects that were first introduced at its pilot Tseltal-Tsotsil Coordinating Center in highland Chiapas. This book traces how indigenista innovation gave way to stagnation as local opposition, shifting national priorities, and waning financial support took their toll. After 1970 indigenismo may have served the populist aims of President Luis Echeverria, but Mexican anthropologists, indigenistas, and indigenous people themselves increasingly challenged INI theory and practice and rendered them obsolete.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826361516.jpg
36.700000 USD

Rethinking Mexican Indigenismo: The INI's Coordinating Center in Highland Chiapas and the Fate of a Utopian Project

by Stephen E. Lewis
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
If colonial America was the melting pot of modernity, it was because it was also a fabulous laboratory of images. . . . Just as much as speech and writing, the image can be a vehicle for all sorts of power and resistance. So writes Serge Gruzinski in the introduction ...
Images at War: Mexico From Columbus to Blade Runner (1492-2019)
If colonial America was the melting pot of modernity, it was because it was also a fabulous laboratory of images. . . . Just as much as speech and writing, the image can be a vehicle for all sorts of power and resistance. So writes Serge Gruzinski in the introduction to Images at War, his striking reinterpretation of the Spanish colonization of Mexico. Concentrating on the political meaning of the baroque image and its function within a multicultural society, Gruzinski compares its ubiquity in Mexico to our modern fascination with images and their meaning. Although the baroque image played a decisive role in many arenas, especially that of conquest and New World colonization, its powerful resonance in the sphere of religion is a focal point of Gruzinski's study. In his analysis of how images conveyed meaning across linguistic barriers, he uncovers recurring themes of false images, less-than-perfect replicas, the uprooting of peoples and cultural memories, and the violence of iconoclastic destruction. He shows how various ethnic groups-Indians, blacks, Europeans-left their distinct marks on images of colonialism and religion, coopting them into expressions of identity or instruments of rebellion. As Gruzinski's story unfolds, he tells of Aztec idols, the cult of the Virgin of Guadalupe, conquistadors, Franciscans, and neoclassical attempts to repress the baroque. In the final chapter he discusses the political and religious implications of contemporary imagery-such as that in Mexican soap operas-and speculates about the future of images in Latin America. Originally written in French, this work makes available to an English audience a seminal study of Mexico and the role of the image in the New World.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780822326434.jpg
28.300000 USD

Images at War: Mexico From Columbus to Blade Runner (1492-2019)

by Serge Gruzinski
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Hernan Cortes's Cartas de Relacion, written over a seven-year period to Charles V of Spain, provide an extraordinary narrative account of the conquest of Mexico from the founding of the coastal town of Veracruz until Cortes's journey to Honduras in 1525. Pagden's English translation has been prepared from a close ...
Letters from Mexico
Hernan Cortes's Cartas de Relacion, written over a seven-year period to Charles V of Spain, provide an extraordinary narrative account of the conquest of Mexico from the founding of the coastal town of Veracruz until Cortes's journey to Honduras in 1525. Pagden's English translation has been prepared from a close examination of the earliest surviving manuscript and of the first printed editions, and he also provides a new introduction offering a bold and innovative interpretation of the nature of the conquest and Cortes's involvement in it. J. H. Elliot's introductory essay explains Cortes's conflicts with the Crown and with Diego Velazquez, the governor of Cuba. The definitive edition [of the letters] in any language. . . . The book is a 'must' for all those who are seriously interested in this traumatic clash of civilizations and the consequences, both for good and ill, which ensued. -C. R. Boxer, English Historical Review One of the most fascinating Machiavellian documents to come out of the Renaissance. -Carlos Fuentes, Guardian [Pagden] provides us with two important innovations: the first reliable edition of the most important Spanish text . . . and annotations that draw on Pagden's own profound knowledge of Mesoamerican cultures. -Helen Nader, Sixteenth Century Journal
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780300090949.jpg
27.88 USD

Letters from Mexico

by Hernan Cortes
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The Estrada Plot is the first book ever written about the Estrada Conspiracy, the last great untold story of the early FBI. During the summer of 1926, exiled general Enrique Estrada organized an underground army in southern California for an all-out invasion of Mexico. From the teeming barrios of Los ...
The Estrada Plot: How the FBI Captured a Secret Army and Stopped the Invasion of Mexico
The Estrada Plot is the first book ever written about the Estrada Conspiracy, the last great untold story of the early FBI. During the summer of 1926, exiled general Enrique Estrada organized an underground army in southern California for an all-out invasion of Mexico. From the teeming barrios of Los Angeles to the farm country of the Imperial Valley, hundreds of migrants were recruited for the secret army. The conspirators amassed a stockpile of rifles, machine guns, and ammunition, constructed armored vehicles, and even contracted the manufacture of attack aircraft. At the eleventh hour, after an intense investigation, Estrada's army was captured at the border by a team of federal agents and local lawmen. The Estrada Plot is unlike any previous work about the Federal Bureau of Investigation. General Estrada's attempt to invade Mexico and overthrow its government occurred during the early years of the FBI's transition into a modern law enforcement agency. The characters in the story are a mix of the old Bureau and the new, and they often seem larger than life. Lucien Wheeler, special agent in charge of the Los Angeles field office, was a former Secret Service operative who had guarded three presidents. Special Agent Emilio Kosterlitzy, the Bureau's Mexican expert, was a former Russian naval officer who had led the Rurales, a border patrol in northern Mexico that operated under the maxim catch them in the act - shoot them on the spot. Agent Arthur Hopkins, the leader of the Estrada investigation, was a holdover from the final days of the old West. An ex-U.S. Marshal of the Arizona territory, Hopkins was an anachronism in Director Hoover's new organization. The historical background that led to Estrada's invasion plot is as fascinating as the story itself - a little-known religious conflict that erupted in Mexico during the mid-1920s. To eliminate the influence of religion in Mexican life, President Plutarco Elias Calles instituted anti-clerical laws directed against the Catholic Church - the country's predominant religion - bringing all religious activity under state control. Places of public worship became property of the state, religious clergy were deported, and harsh criminal penalties were imposed for infractions of the anti-religion statutes. In time, public worship would be punishable by the firing squad, and Calles decrees would lead to the Cristero War, which cost ninety thousand Mexican lives.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781640122116.jpg
31.450000 USD

The Estrada Plot: How the FBI Captured a Secret Army and Stopped the Invasion of Mexico

by Bill Mills
Hardback
Book cover image
Usborne Beginners are colourful information books for children beginning to read on their own. Vivid, full colour illustrations and photographs on every page, accompanied by short, informative text.
Aztecs
Usborne Beginners are colourful information books for children beginning to read on their own. Vivid, full colour illustrations and photographs on every page, accompanied by short, informative text.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780746074725.jpg
9.28 USD

Aztecs

by Catriona Clarke
Hardback
Book cover image
Step into the world of the Native North Americans! Make a dream catcher, design a Navajo sand painting, create a story on buffalo hide, challenge your friends to a game of Chance and make a teepee. Informative text and unique activities combine to bring ancient civilizations to life. All activities ...
The Hands on History: Aztecs: Dress, Eat, Write and Play Just Like the Aztecs
Step into the world of the Native North Americans! Make a dream catcher, design a Navajo sand painting, create a story on buffalo hide, challenge your friends to a game of Chance and make a teepee. Informative text and unique activities combine to bring ancient civilizations to life. All activities have clear step-by-step instructions and use easily obtainable materials. Written by an acclaimed non-fiction children's author and illustrated with lavish photography, artwork and maps, each book is a comprehensive guide to the period. Perfect for homework projects! Meets both the UK and US curriculum requirements for history at this level.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781848350182.jpg
11.14 USD

The Hands on History: Aztecs: Dress, Eat, Write and Play Just Like the Aztecs

by Fiona MacDonald
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This high interest series will offer an introduction to historical warfare and notable warriors from ancient history. Each title will focus on one group of ancient warriors, providing details about the weapons they used, the battles they fought and the geography they covered.
Aztec Warriors
This high interest series will offer an introduction to historical warfare and notable warriors from ancient history. Each title will focus on one group of ancient warriors, providing details about the weapons they used, the battles they fought and the geography they covered.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781406216387.jpg
9.72 USD

Aztec Warriors

by Charlotte Guillain
Paperback
Book cover image
This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these ...
Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity
This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these events, both civil and religious, were sponsored by the authorities and were crucial means to embody political and social concepts. The first European public rituals were introduced immediately after the conquest of the Aztec capital. Spanish priests seeking to evangelise the native population introduced Catholic festivals, and civil authorities sponsored celebrations designed to glorify the Spanish empire. Spectacle was one tool in an arsenal of colonising agents, and over time the growing diversity of the population made festival statecraft all the more important, as government-sponsored revelry attempted to promote shared histories and values among diverse and potentially dangerous groups. Festivals organisers developed a highly sophisticated message embedded within the celebrations that delineated the principles of leadership and the duties of both rulers and vassals. The pervasiveness of festivals and the power of the political message associated with them created possibilities for individuals to assess and participate in a larger discussion of good governance in the colony.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826331670.jpg
31.450000 USD

Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity

by Linda A. Curcio-Nagy
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Taking on the role of a young nobleman from Mexico in 1428, this book charts 'your' adventures as a captive of the ruthless Aztecs. The illustrations and text provide an interesting insight into the lives and times of the Aztecs and their captives.
Avoid Becoming An Aztec Sacrifice!
Taking on the role of a young nobleman from Mexico in 1428, this book charts 'your' adventures as a captive of the ruthless Aztecs. The illustrations and text provide an interesting insight into the lives and times of the Aztecs and their captives.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781904194019.jpg
11.14 USD

Avoid Becoming An Aztec Sacrifice!

by Fiona MacDonald, Fiona MacDonald
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
World-renowned bestselling author Carlos Castaneda's Selection of his wrtings on the shamans of ancient Mexico. Originally drawn to Yaqui Indian spiritual leader don Juan Matus for his knowledge of mind-altering plants, bestselling author Carlos Castaneda soon immersed himself in the sorcerer's magical world entirely. Ten years after his first encounter ...
The Wheel of Time: The Shamans of Ancient Mexico, Their Thoughts About Life, Death and the Universe
World-renowned bestselling author Carlos Castaneda's Selection of his wrtings on the shamans of ancient Mexico. Originally drawn to Yaqui Indian spiritual leader don Juan Matus for his knowledge of mind-altering plants, bestselling author Carlos Castaneda soon immersed himself in the sorcerer's magical world entirely. Ten years after his first encounter with the shaman, Castaneda examines his field notes and comes to understand what don Juan knew all along--that these plants are merely a means to understanding the alternative realities that one cannot fully embrace on one's own. In Journey to Ixtlan, Carlos Castaneda introduces readers to this new approach for the first time and explores, as he comes to experience it himself, his own final voyage into the teachings of don Juan, sharing with us what it is like to truly stop the world and perceive reality on his own terms.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780743412803.jpg
17.850000 USD

The Wheel of Time: The Shamans of Ancient Mexico, Their Thoughts About Life, Death and the Universe

by Carlos Castaneda
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In November 1519, Hernando Cortes walked along a causeway leading to the capital of the Aztec kingdom and came face to face with Moctezuma. That story-and the story of what happened afterwards-has been told many times, but always following the narrative offered by the Spaniards. After all, we have been ...
Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs
In November 1519, Hernando Cortes walked along a causeway leading to the capital of the Aztec kingdom and came face to face with Moctezuma. That story-and the story of what happened afterwards-has been told many times, but always following the narrative offered by the Spaniards. After all, we have been taught, it was the Europeans who held the pens. But the Native Americans were intrigued by the Roman alphabet and, unbeknownst to the newcomers, they used it to write detailed histories in their own language of Nahuatl. Until recently, these sources remained obscure, only partially translated, and rarely consulted by scholars. For the first time, in Fifth Sun, the history of the Aztecs is offered in all its complexity based solely on the texts written by the indigenous people themselves. Camilla Townsend presents an accessible and humanized depiction of these native Mexicans, rather than seeing them as the exotic, bloody figures of European stereotypes. The conquest, in this work, is neither an apocalyptic moment, nor an origin story launching Mexicans into existence. The Mexica people had a history of their own long before the Europeans arrived and did not simply capitulate to Spanish culture and colonization. Instead, they realigned their political allegiances, accommodated new obligations, adopted new technologies, and endured. This engaging revisionist history of the Aztecs, told through their own words, explores the experience of a once-powerful people facing the trauma of conquest and finding ways to survive, offering an empathetic interpretation for experts and non-specialists alike.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780190673062.jpg
31.450000 USD

Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs

by Camilla Townsend
Hardback
Book cover image
The Global Perspective of Urban Labor in Mexico City, 1910-1929 examines the global entanglement of the Mexican labor movement during the Mexican Revolution. It describes how global influences made their entry into labor culture through the cinema, the theater, and labor festivals as well as into the development of consumption ...
The Global Perspective of Urban Labor in Mexico City, 1910-1929: El Mundo al Reves
The Global Perspective of Urban Labor in Mexico City, 1910-1929 examines the global entanglement of the Mexican labor movement during the Mexican Revolution. It describes how global influences made their entry into labor culture through the cinema, the theater, and labor festivals as well as into the development of consumption patterns and advertisement. It further shows how the young labor movement constituted its discourse and invented its tradition at meetings and in the columns of newspapers. The local conditions constitute the framework for the examination of Mexican labor's perspectives on and engagement with contemporary events of global significance. Thereby, this book demonstrates how workers turned to the global context in search of guidance and role models, embracing global developments and narratives. It also reveals the differentiations from this context in order to create a unique local identity. This approach allows new perspectives on the role of a neglected revolutionary actor and on the influence of global developments in a revolution that has been predominantly interpreted from a national point of view. It shows the way global ideas were brought to life in the framework of revolutionary Mexico City - providing new insights into the grand-narratives of Globalization and Revolution.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780367198466.jpg
223.16 USD

The Global Perspective of Urban Labor in Mexico City, 1910-1929: El Mundo al Reves

by Stephan Fender
Hardback
Book cover image
Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as ...
Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City
Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as whites fled for the suburbs and exurbs in increasing numbers, Latin Americans immigrated to urban centres in even greater numbers. Barrio America charts the vibrant revival of American cities in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, arguing that we should attribute this revival to the influx of Latin American immigrants -- both legal and not. An award-winning historian and son of immigrants, Andrew Sandoval-Strausz recounts this untold history by focusing on the largest immigrant barrios in two of the nation's largest cities: Chicago's Little Village and Dallas's Oak Cliff. These neighbourhoods were once classic examples of urban crisis: they reached their peak prosperity around 1950, afterwards losing residents, jobs, and opportunity, which destabilised urban public order. But after 1965, when Lyndon Johnson overturned the restrictive 1924 immigration law and a major agricultural crisis was convulsing Mexico, these neighbourhoods saw a record number of incoming Latin Americans. The nation's urban barrios are regularly portrayed as decaying districts plagued by crime and disorder, but in reality, over the past several decades, areas with growing immigrant populations have become some of the most dynamic, stable, and safe neighbourhoods in their cities. The new immigrants brought with them three distinctive cultural traditions -- penchants for public spaces, walking, and small entrepreneurship -- that have changed the American city for the better. Drawing on dozens of oral histories with migrantes themselves, Sandoval-Strausz places immigrant voices at the centre of the narrative, emphasising the choices of Latin American newcomers, the motivations that brought them to the United States, and the hopes that lay before them, their families, and their communities. Barrio America demonstrates how migrants have used their labour, their capital, and their culture to build a new metropolitan America.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781541697249.jpg
33.600000 USD

Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City

by A.K. Sandoval-Strausz
Hardback
Book cover image
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from ...
The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from north to south and the importance of women to Catholic survival and change over the course of the twentieth century. As a devout Catholic single woman, neither nun nor mother, del Valle resisted religious persecution in an era of Mexican revolutionary upheaval, became a labor activist in a time of class conflict, founded an educational movement, toured the United States as a public lecturer, and raised money for Catholic ministries-all in an age dominated by economic depression, gender prejudice, and racial discrimination. The rise of the Global South marked a new power dynamic within the Church as Latin America moved from the margins of activism to the vanguard. Del Valle's life and the stories of those she met along the way illustrate the shared pious practices, gender norms, and organizational networks that linked activists across national borders. Told through the eyes of a little-known laywoman from Mexico, Andes shows how women journeyed from the pews into the heart of the modern world.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781496214669.jpg
68.250000 USD

The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico

by Stephen J. C. Andes
Hardback
Book cover image
Conflict, domination, violence-in this wide-ranging, briskly narrated volume from acclaimed Mexican historian Carlos Illades, these three phenomena register the pulse of a diverse, but inequitable and discriminatory, social order. Drawing on rich and varied historical sources, Illades guides the reader through seven signal episodes in Mexican social history, from rebellions ...
Conflict, Domination, and Violence: Episodes in Mexican Social History
Conflict, domination, violence-in this wide-ranging, briskly narrated volume from acclaimed Mexican historian Carlos Illades, these three phenomena register the pulse of a diverse, but inequitable and discriminatory, social order. Drawing on rich and varied historical sources, Illades guides the reader through seven signal episodes in Mexican social history, from rebellions under Porfirio Diaz's dictatorship to the cycles of violence that have plagued the country's deep south to the recent emergence of neo-anarchist movements. Taken together, they comprise a mosaic history of power and resistance, with artisans, rural communities, revolutionaries, students, and ordinary people confronting the forces of domination and transforming Mexican society.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781789205299.jpg
31.450000 USD

Conflict, Domination, and Violence: Episodes in Mexican Social History

by Carlos Illades
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Half a century ago, when archaeologist Jeffrey R. Parsons began fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, he could not know that many of the sites he studied were on the brink of destruction. The rural landscapes through which he traveled were, in many cases, destined to be plowed under and paved ...
Remembering Archaeological Fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, 1961-2003: A Photographic Essay
Half a century ago, when archaeologist Jeffrey R. Parsons began fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, he could not know that many of the sites he studied were on the brink of destruction. The rural landscapes through which he traveled were, in many cases, destined to be plowed under and paved over. In Remembering Archaeological Fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, 1961-2003, Parsons offers readers a chance to see archaeological sites that were hundreds or thousands of years old and have since vanished or been irrevocably altered. Hundreds of photographs, accompanied by descriptions, illustrate the sites, the people, and the landscapes that Parsons encountered during four decades of research in these regions. Parsons is now emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan and has published many archaeological monographs as well as ethnographic research on salt, fish, and other items used for traditional subsistence in Mexico. Foreword by Richard I. Ford.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780915703920.jpg
94.500000 USD

Remembering Archaeological Fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, 1961-2003: A Photographic Essay

by Jeffrey R Parsons
Hardback
Book cover image
In 2017, the New York Times announced that the long-lost memoir of Luis de Carvajal the Younger had been rediscovered. Considered the first autobiography by a Jew in the Americas, the book had been stolen decades earlier from Mexico's National Archives. Here, Ilan Stavans recounts the extraordinary and entertaining story ...
The Return of Carvajal: A Mystery
In 2017, the New York Times announced that the long-lost memoir of Luis de Carvajal the Younger had been rediscovered. Considered the first autobiography by a Jew in the Americas, the book had been stolen decades earlier from Mexico's National Archives. Here, Ilan Stavans recounts the extraordinary and entertaining story of the reappearance of this precious object and how its discovery opened up new vistas onto the world of secret Jews escaping the Spanish Inquisition. Called el Mozo (the Younger) to distinguish him from an uncle of the same name who was governor of Nuevo Leon, Luis de Carvajal learned of his Jewishness after being raised a Catholic. He came to recognize himself as a messiah for fellow crypto-Jews, and he was burned at the stake on December 8, 1596, in the biggest auto-da-fe in all of Latin America. His memoir-a 180-page manuscript written by a crypto-Jew targeted by the Holy Office of the Inquisition for unlawful proselytizing activities-was not only distinct but of enormous value. With characters such as conniving academics embroiled in a scholarly feud, a magnanimous philanthropist, naive booksellers, and a secondary cast that could be taken from a David Lynch film, The Return of Carvajal recounts the global intrigue that placed crypto-Jewish culture at the heart of contemporary debates on religion and identity.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780271084701.jpg
29.66 USD

The Return of Carvajal: A Mystery

by Ilan Stavans
Hardback
Book cover image
Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City traces the transformations that occurred between 1934 and 1968 in Mexico through the lens of childhood. Countering the dominance of Western European and North American views of childhood, Eileen Ford puts the experiences of children in Latin America into their historical, political, ...
Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City
Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City traces the transformations that occurred between 1934 and 1968 in Mexico through the lens of childhood. Countering the dominance of Western European and North American views of childhood, Eileen Ford puts the experiences of children in Latin America into their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Drawing on diverse primary sources ranging from oral histories to photojournalism, Ford reconstructs the emergent and varying meanings of childhood in Mexico City during a period of changing global attitudes towards childhood, and changing power relations in Mexico at multiple scales, from the family to the state. She analyses children's presence on the silver screen, in radio, and in print media to examine the way that children were constructed within public discourse, identifying the forces that would converge in the 1968 student movement. This book demonstrates children's importance within Mexican society as Mexico transitioned from a socialist-inspired revolutionary government to one that embraced industrial capitalism in the Cold War era. It is a fascinating study of an extremely important, burgeoning population group in Mexico that has previously been excluded from histories of Mexico's bid for modernity. Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City will be essential reading for students and scholars of Latin American history and the Cold War.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781350127753.jpg
53.92 USD

Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City

by Eileen Ford
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore ...
The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico
With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore their subject, these documents are inherently limiting given that the men described in them were considered to be criminals or otherwise marginal. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century resources, too, provide a limited perspective on machismo in the colonial period. The Origins of Macho addresses this deficiency by basing its study of colonial Mexican masculinity on the experiences of mainstream men. Lipsett-Rivera traces the genesis of the Mexican macho by looking at daily interactions between Mexican men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In doing so she establishes an important foundation for gender studies in Mexico and Latin America and makes a significant contribution to the larger field of masculinity studies.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826360403.jpg
31.450000 USD

The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico

by Sonya Lipsett-Rivera
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In this compelling narrative of capitalist development and revolutionary response, Jessica M. Kim reexamines the rise of Los Angeles from a small town to a global city against the backdrop of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, Gilded Age economics, and American empire. It is a far-reaching transnational history, chronicling how Los Angeles ...
Imperial Metropolis: Los Angeles, Mexico, and the Borderlands of American Empire, 1865-1941
In this compelling narrative of capitalist development and revolutionary response, Jessica M. Kim reexamines the rise of Los Angeles from a small town to a global city against the backdrop of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, Gilded Age economics, and American empire. It is a far-reaching transnational history, chronicling how Los Angeles boosters transformed the borderlands through urban and imperial capitalism at the end of the nineteenth century and how the Mexican Revolution redefined those same capitalist networks into the twentieth. Kim draws on archives in the United States and Mexico to argue that financial networks emerging from Los Angeles drove economic transformations in the borderlands, reshaped social relations across wide swaths of territory, and deployed racial hierarchies to advance investment projects across the border. However, the Mexican Revolution, with its implicit critique of imperialism, disrupted the networks of investment and exploitation that had structured the borderlands for sixty years, and reconfigured transnational systems of infrastructure and trade. Kim provides the first history to connect Los Angeles's urban expansionism with more continental and global currents, and what results is a rich account of real and imagined geographies of city, race, and empire.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781469651347.jpg
31.450000 USD

Imperial Metropolis: Los Angeles, Mexico, and the Borderlands of American Empire, 1865-1941

by Jessica M Kim
Hardback
Book cover image
The surprising connections between the American frontier and empire in southern Africa, and the people who participated in both This book begins in an era when romantic notions of American frontiering overlapped with Gilded Age extractive capitalism. In the late nineteenth century, the U.S.-Mexican borderlands constituted one stop of many ...
Frontiers in the Gilded Age: Adventure, Capitalism, and Dispossession from Southern Africa to the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands, 1880-1917
The surprising connections between the American frontier and empire in southern Africa, and the people who participated in both This book begins in an era when romantic notions of American frontiering overlapped with Gilded Age extractive capitalism. In the late nineteenth century, the U.S.-Mexican borderlands constituted one stop of many where Americans chased capitalist dreams beyond the United States. Crisscrossing the American West, southern Africa, and northern Mexico, Andrew Offenburger examines how these frontier spaces could glitter with grandiose visions, expose the flawed and immoral strategies of profiteers, and yet reveal the capacity for resistance and resilience that indigenous people summoned when threatened. Linking together a series of stories about Boer exiles who settled in Mexico, a global network of protestant missionaries, and adventurers involved in the parallel displacements of indigenous peoples in Rhodesia and the Yaqui Indians in Mexico, Offenburger situates the borderlands of the Mexican North and the American Southwest within a global system, bound by common actors who interpreted their lives through a shared frontier ideology.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780300225877.jpg
47.250000 USD

Frontiers in the Gilded Age: Adventure, Capitalism, and Dispossession from Southern Africa to the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands, 1880-1917

by Andrew Offenburger
Hardback
Book cover image
With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore ...
The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico
With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore their subject, these documents are inherently limiting given that the men described in them were considered to be criminals or otherwise marginal. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century resources, too, provide a limited perspective on machismo in the colonial period. The Origins of Macho addresses this deficiency by basing its study of colonial Mexican masculinity on the experiences of mainstream men. Lipsett-Rivera traces the genesis of the Mexican macho by looking at daily interactions between Mexican men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In doing so she establishes an important foundation for gender studies in Mexico and Latin America and makes a significant contribution to the larger field of masculinity studies.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826360397.jpg
99.750000 USD

The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico

by Sonya Lipsett-Rivera
Hardback
Book cover image
In this book Leisa A. Kauffmann takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the writings of one of Mexico's early chroniclers, Fernando de Alva Ixtilxochitl, a bilingual seventeenth-century historian from Central Mexico. His writing, especially his portrayal of the great pre-Hispanic poet-king Nezahualcoyotl, influenced other canonical histories of Mexico and is ...
The Legacy of Rulership in Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl's Historia de la nacion chichimeca
In this book Leisa A. Kauffmann takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the writings of one of Mexico's early chroniclers, Fernando de Alva Ixtilxochitl, a bilingual seventeenth-century historian from Central Mexico. His writing, especially his portrayal of the great pre-Hispanic poet-king Nezahualcoyotl, influenced other canonical histories of Mexico and is still influential today. Many scholars who discuss Alva Ixtlilxochitl's writing focus on his personal and literary investment in the European classical tradition, but Kauffmann argues that his work needs to be read through the lens of Nahua cultural concepts and literary-historical precepts. She suggests that he is best understood in light of his ancestral ties to Tetzcoco's rulers and as a historian who worked within both Native and European traditions. By paying attention to his representation of rulership, Kauffmann demonstrates how the literary and symbolic worlds of the Nahua exist in allegorical but still discernible subtexts within the larger Spanish context of his writing.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826360373.jpg
68.250000 USD

The Legacy of Rulership in Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl's Historia de la nacion chichimeca

by Leisa A. Kauffmann
Hardback
Book cover image
Once little more than party fuel, tequila has graduated to the status of fine sipping spirit. How the Gringos Stole Tequila traces the spirit's evolution in America from frat-house firewater to luxury good. But there's more to the story than tequila as upmarket drinking trend. Chantal Martineau spent several years ...
How the Gringos Stole Tequila: The Modern Age of Mexico's Most Traditional Spirit
Once little more than party fuel, tequila has graduated to the status of fine sipping spirit. How the Gringos Stole Tequila traces the spirit's evolution in America from frat-house firewater to luxury good. But there's more to the story than tequila as upmarket drinking trend. Chantal Martineau spent several years immersing herself in the world of tequila--traveling to visit distillers and agave farmers in Mexico, meeting and tasting with leading experts and mixologists around the United States, and interviewing academics on either side of the border who have studied the spirit. The result is a book that offers readers a glimpse into the social history and ongoing impact of this one-of-a-kind drink. It addresses issues surrounding the sustainability of the limited resource that is agave, the preservation of traditional production methods, and the agave advocacy movement that has grown up alongside the spirit's swelling popularity. In addition to discussing the culture and politics of Mexico's most popular export, the book takes readers on a colorful tour of the country's Tequila Trail, as well as introducing them to the mother of tequila: mezcal.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781595348807.jpg
19.900000 USD

How the Gringos Stole Tequila: The Modern Age of Mexico's Most Traditional Spirit

by Chantal Martineau
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
For many generations, the Nahuas of Mexico maintained their tradition of the xiuhpohualli. or year counts, telling and performing their history around communal firesides so that the memory of it would not be lost. When the Spaniards came, young Nahuas took the Roman letters taught to them by the friars ...
Annals of Native America: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History Alive
For many generations, the Nahuas of Mexico maintained their tradition of the xiuhpohualli. or year counts, telling and performing their history around communal firesides so that the memory of it would not be lost. When the Spaniards came, young Nahuas took the Roman letters taught to them by the friars and used the new alphabet to record historical performances by elders. Between them, they wrote hundreds of pages, which circulated widely within their communities. Over the next century and a half, their descendants copied and recopied these texts, sometimes embellishing, sometimes extracting, and often expanding them chronologically. The annals, as they have usually been called, were written not only by Indians but also for Indians, without regard to European interests. As such they are rare and inordinately valuable texts. They have often been assumed to be both largely anonymous and at least partially inscrutable to modern ears. In this work, Nahuatl scholar Camilla Townsend reveals the authors of most of the texts, restores them to their proper contexts, and makes sense of long misunderstood documents. She follows a remarkable chain of Nahua historians, generation by generation, exploring who they were, what they wrote, and why they wrote it. Sometimes they conceived of their work as a political act, reinstating bonds between communities, or between past, present, and future generations. Sometimes they conceived of it largely as art and delighted in offering language that was beautiful or startling or humorous. Annals of Native America brings together, for the first time, samples of their many creations to offer a heretofore obscured history of the Nahuas and an alternate perspective on the Conquest and its aftermath.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780190055523.jpg
29.350000 USD

Annals of Native America: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History Alive

by Camilla Townsend
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw ...
Energopolitics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw on shared fieldsites, archives, and encounters that can be productively read together, yet can also stand alone in their analytic ambitions. In his volume, Energopolitics, Boyer examines the politics of wind power and how it is shaped by myriad factors, from the legacies of settler colonialism and indigenous resistance to state bureaucracy and corporate investment. Drawing on interviews with activists, campesinos, engineers, bureaucrats, politicians, and bankers, Boyer outlines the fundamental impact of energy and fuel on political power. Boyer also demonstrates how large conceptual frameworks cannot adequately explain the fraught and uniquely complicated conditions on the isthmus, illustrating the need to resist narratives of anthropocenic universalism and to attend to local particularities.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781478003779.jpg
42.76 USD

Energopolitics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene

by Dominic Boyer
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw ...
Ecologics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw on shared fieldsites, archives, and encounters that can be productively read together, yet can also stand alone in their analytic ambitions. In her volume, Ecologics, Howe narrates how an antidote to the Anthropocene became both failure and success. Tracking the development of what would have been Latin America's largest wind park, Howe documents indigenous people's resistance to the project and the political and corporate climate that derailed its renewable energy potential. Using feminist and more-than-human theories, Howe demonstrates how the dynamics of energy and environment cannot be captured without understanding how human aspirations for energy articulate with nonhuman beings, technomaterial objects, and the geophysical forces that are at the heart of wind and power.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781478003854.jpg
39.04 USD

Ecologics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene

by Cymene Howe
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The Supernatural Sublime explores the long-neglected element of the supernatural in films from Spain and Mexico by focusing on the social and cultural contexts of their production and reception, their adaptations of codes and conventions for characters and plot, and their use of cinematic techniques to create the experience of ...
The Supernatural Sublime: The Wondrous Ineffability of the Everyday in Films from Mexico and Spain
The Supernatural Sublime explores the long-neglected element of the supernatural in films from Spain and Mexico by focusing on the social and cultural contexts of their production and reception, their adaptations of codes and conventions for characters and plot, and their use of cinematic techniques to create the experience of emotion without explanation. Deploying the overarching concepts of the supernatural and the sublime, Raul Rodriguez-Hernandez and Claudia Schaefer detail the dovetailing of the unnatural and the experience of limitlessness associated with the sublime. The Supernatural Sublime embeds the films in the social histories of twentieth- and twenty-first-century Mexico and Spain, both of which made a forced leap into modernity after historical periods founded on official ideologies and circumscribed visions of the nation. Evoking Kant's definition of the experience of the sublime, Rodriguez-Hernandez and Schaefer concentrate on the unrepresentable and the contradictory that oppose purported universal truths and instead offer up illusion, deception, and imagination through cinema, itself a type of illusion: writing with light.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781496214249.jpg
57.750000 USD

The Supernatural Sublime: The Wondrous Ineffability of the Everyday in Films from Mexico and Spain

by Claudia Schaefer, Raul Rodriguez-Hernandez
Hardback
Book cover image
This captivating study tells Mexico's best untold stories. The book takes the devastating 1833 cholera epidemic as its dramatic center and expands beyond this episode to explore love, lust, lies, and midwives. Parish archives and other sources tell us human stories about the intimate decisions, hopes, aspirations, and religious commitments ...
Mexico in the Time of Cholera
This captivating study tells Mexico's best untold stories. The book takes the devastating 1833 cholera epidemic as its dramatic center and expands beyond this episode to explore love, lust, lies, and midwives. Parish archives and other sources tell us human stories about the intimate decisions, hopes, aspirations, and religious commitments of Mexican men and women as they made their way through the transition from the Viceroyalty of New Spain to an independent republic. In this volume Stevens shows how Mexico assumed a new place in Atlantic history as a nation coming to grips with modernization and colonial heritage, helping us to understand the paradox of a country with a reputation for fervent Catholicism that moved so quickly to disestablish the Church.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826360557.jpg
36.700000 USD

Mexico in the Time of Cholera

by Donald Fithian Stevens
Paperback / softback
Page 1 of 40