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Mexico is a country in crisis. Capitalizing on weakened public institutions, widespread unemployment, a state of lawlessness and the strengthening of links between Mexican and Colombian drug cartels, narcotrafficking in the country has flourished during the post-1982 neoliberal era. In fact, it has become one of Mexico's biggest source of ...
Drug War Mexico: Politics, Neoliberalism and Violence in the New Narcoeconomy
Mexico is a country in crisis. Capitalizing on weakened public institutions, widespread unemployment, a state of lawlessness and the strengthening of links between Mexican and Colombian drug cartels, narcotrafficking in the country has flourished during the post-1982 neoliberal era. In fact, it has become one of Mexico's biggest source of revenue, as well as its most violent, with over 12,000 drug-related executions in 2011 alone. In response, Mexican president Felipe Calderon, armed with millions of dollars in US military aid, has launched a crackdown, ostensibly to combat organised crime. Despite this, human rights violations have increased, as has the murder rate, making Ciudad Juarez on the northern border the most dangerous city on the planet. Meanwhile, the supply of cocaine, heroin, marijuana and methamphetamine has continued to grow. In this insightful and controversial book, Watt and Zepeda throw new light on the situation, contending that the 'war on drugs' in Mexico is in fact the pretext for a US-backed strategy to bolster unpopular neoliberal policies, a weak yet authoritarian government and a radically unfair status quo.
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33.45 USD

Drug War Mexico: Politics, Neoliberalism and Violence in the New Narcoeconomy

by Roberto Zepeda, Peter Watt
Paperback / softback
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If colonial America was the melting pot of modernity, it was because it was also a fabulous laboratory of images. . . . Just as much as speech and writing, the image can be a vehicle for all sorts of power and resistance. So writes Serge Gruzinski in the introduction ...
Images at War: Mexico From Columbus to Blade Runner (1492-2019)
If colonial America was the melting pot of modernity, it was because it was also a fabulous laboratory of images. . . . Just as much as speech and writing, the image can be a vehicle for all sorts of power and resistance. So writes Serge Gruzinski in the introduction to Images at War, his striking reinterpretation of the Spanish colonization of Mexico. Concentrating on the political meaning of the baroque image and its function within a multicultural society, Gruzinski compares its ubiquity in Mexico to our modern fascination with images and their meaning. Although the baroque image played a decisive role in many arenas, especially that of conquest and New World colonization, its powerful resonance in the sphere of religion is a focal point of Gruzinski's study. In his analysis of how images conveyed meaning across linguistic barriers, he uncovers recurring themes of false images, less-than-perfect replicas, the uprooting of peoples and cultural memories, and the violence of iconoclastic destruction. He shows how various ethnic groups-Indians, blacks, Europeans-left their distinct marks on images of colonialism and religion, coopting them into expressions of identity or instruments of rebellion. As Gruzinski's story unfolds, he tells of Aztec idols, the cult of the Virgin of Guadalupe, conquistadors, Franciscans, and neoclassical attempts to repress the baroque. In the final chapter he discusses the political and religious implications of contemporary imagery-such as that in Mexican soap operas-and speculates about the future of images in Latin America. Originally written in French, this work makes available to an English audience a seminal study of Mexico and the role of the image in the New World.
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28.300000 USD

Images at War: Mexico From Columbus to Blade Runner (1492-2019)

by Serge Gruzinski
Paperback / softback
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Hernan Cortes's Cartas de Relacion, written over a seven-year period to Charles V of Spain, provide an extraordinary narrative account of the conquest of Mexico from the founding of the coastal town of Veracruz until Cortes's journey to Honduras in 1525. Pagden's English translation has been prepared from a close ...
Letters from Mexico
Hernan Cortes's Cartas de Relacion, written over a seven-year period to Charles V of Spain, provide an extraordinary narrative account of the conquest of Mexico from the founding of the coastal town of Veracruz until Cortes's journey to Honduras in 1525. Pagden's English translation has been prepared from a close examination of the earliest surviving manuscript and of the first printed editions, and he also provides a new introduction offering a bold and innovative interpretation of the nature of the conquest and Cortes's involvement in it. J. H. Elliot's introductory essay explains Cortes's conflicts with the Crown and with Diego Velazquez, the governor of Cuba. The definitive edition [of the letters] in any language. . . . The book is a 'must' for all those who are seriously interested in this traumatic clash of civilizations and the consequences, both for good and ill, which ensued. -C. R. Boxer, English Historical Review One of the most fascinating Machiavellian documents to come out of the Renaissance. -Carlos Fuentes, Guardian [Pagden] provides us with two important innovations: the first reliable edition of the most important Spanish text . . . and annotations that draw on Pagden's own profound knowledge of Mesoamerican cultures. -Helen Nader, Sixteenth Century Journal
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27.88 USD

Letters from Mexico

by Hernan Cortes
Paperback / softback
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Usborne Beginners are colourful information books for children beginning to read on their own. Vivid, full colour illustrations and photographs on every page, accompanied by short, informative text.
Aztecs
Usborne Beginners are colourful information books for children beginning to read on their own. Vivid, full colour illustrations and photographs on every page, accompanied by short, informative text.
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9.28 USD

Aztecs

by Catriona Clarke
Hardback
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Step into the world of the Native North Americans! Make a dream catcher, design a Navajo sand painting, create a story on buffalo hide, challenge your friends to a game of Chance and make a teepee. Informative text and unique activities combine to bring ancient civilizations to life. All activities ...
The Hands on History: Aztecs: Dress, Eat, Write and Play Just Like the Aztecs
Step into the world of the Native North Americans! Make a dream catcher, design a Navajo sand painting, create a story on buffalo hide, challenge your friends to a game of Chance and make a teepee. Informative text and unique activities combine to bring ancient civilizations to life. All activities have clear step-by-step instructions and use easily obtainable materials. Written by an acclaimed non-fiction children's author and illustrated with lavish photography, artwork and maps, each book is a comprehensive guide to the period. Perfect for homework projects! Meets both the UK and US curriculum requirements for history at this level.
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11.14 USD

The Hands on History: Aztecs: Dress, Eat, Write and Play Just Like the Aztecs

by Fiona MacDonald
Paperback / softback
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This high interest series will offer an introduction to historical warfare and notable warriors from ancient history. Each title will focus on one group of ancient warriors, providing details about the weapons they used, the battles they fought and the geography they covered.
Aztec Warriors
This high interest series will offer an introduction to historical warfare and notable warriors from ancient history. Each title will focus on one group of ancient warriors, providing details about the weapons they used, the battles they fought and the geography they covered.
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9.72 USD

Aztec Warriors

by Charlotte Guillain
Paperback
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This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these ...
Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity
This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these events, both civil and religious, were sponsored by the authorities and were crucial means to embody political and social concepts. The first European public rituals were introduced immediately after the conquest of the Aztec capital. Spanish priests seeking to evangelise the native population introduced Catholic festivals, and civil authorities sponsored celebrations designed to glorify the Spanish empire. Spectacle was one tool in an arsenal of colonising agents, and over time the growing diversity of the population made festival statecraft all the more important, as government-sponsored revelry attempted to promote shared histories and values among diverse and potentially dangerous groups. Festivals organisers developed a highly sophisticated message embedded within the celebrations that delineated the principles of leadership and the duties of both rulers and vassals. The pervasiveness of festivals and the power of the political message associated with them created possibilities for individuals to assess and participate in a larger discussion of good governance in the colony.
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31.450000 USD

Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity

by Linda A. Curcio-Nagy
Paperback / softback
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Taking on the role of a young nobleman from Mexico in 1428, this book charts 'your' adventures as a captive of the ruthless Aztecs. The illustrations and text provide an interesting insight into the lives and times of the Aztecs and their captives.
Avoid Becoming An Aztec Sacrifice!
Taking on the role of a young nobleman from Mexico in 1428, this book charts 'your' adventures as a captive of the ruthless Aztecs. The illustrations and text provide an interesting insight into the lives and times of the Aztecs and their captives.
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11.14 USD

Avoid Becoming An Aztec Sacrifice!

by Fiona MacDonald, Fiona MacDonald
Paperback / softback
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World-renowned bestselling author Carlos Castaneda's Selection of his wrtings on the shamans of ancient Mexico. Originally drawn to Yaqui Indian spiritual leader don Juan Matus for his knowledge of mind-altering plants, bestselling author Carlos Castaneda soon immersed himself in the sorcerer's magical world entirely. Ten years after his first encounter ...
The Wheel of Time: The Shamans of Ancient Mexico, Their Thoughts About Life, Death and the Universe
World-renowned bestselling author Carlos Castaneda's Selection of his wrtings on the shamans of ancient Mexico. Originally drawn to Yaqui Indian spiritual leader don Juan Matus for his knowledge of mind-altering plants, bestselling author Carlos Castaneda soon immersed himself in the sorcerer's magical world entirely. Ten years after his first encounter with the shaman, Castaneda examines his field notes and comes to understand what don Juan knew all along--that these plants are merely a means to understanding the alternative realities that one cannot fully embrace on one's own. In Journey to Ixtlan, Carlos Castaneda introduces readers to this new approach for the first time and explores, as he comes to experience it himself, his own final voyage into the teachings of don Juan, sharing with us what it is like to truly stop the world and perceive reality on his own terms.
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17.850000 USD

The Wheel of Time: The Shamans of Ancient Mexico, Their Thoughts About Life, Death and the Universe

by Carlos Castaneda
Paperback / softback
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Honorable Mention for the 2019 Thomas McGann Book Prize from the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies Mexico's National Indigenist Institute (INI) was at the vanguard of hemispheric indigenismo from 1951 through the mid-1970s, thanks to the innovative development projects that were first introduced at its pilot Tseltal-Tsotsil Coordinating ...
Rethinking Mexican Indigenismo: The INI's Coordinating Center in Highland Chiapas and the Fate of a Utopian Project
Honorable Mention for the 2019 Thomas McGann Book Prize from the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies Mexico's National Indigenist Institute (INI) was at the vanguard of hemispheric indigenismo from 1951 through the mid-1970s, thanks to the innovative development projects that were first introduced at its pilot Tseltal-Tsotsil Coordinating Center in highland Chiapas. This book traces how indigenista innovation gave way to stagnation as local opposition, shifting national priorities, and waning financial support took their toll. After 1970 indigenismo may have served the populist aims of President Luis Echeverria, but Mexican anthropologists, indigenistas, and indigenous people themselves increasingly challenged INI theory and practice and rendered them obsolete.
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36.700000 USD

Rethinking Mexican Indigenismo: The INI's Coordinating Center in Highland Chiapas and the Fate of a Utopian Project

by Stephen E. Lewis
Paperback / softback
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The Estrada Plot is the first book ever written about the Estrada Conspiracy, the last great untold story of the early FBI. During the summer of 1926, exiled general Enrique Estrada organized an underground army in southern California for an all-out invasion of Mexico. From the teeming barrios of Los ...
The Estrada Plot: How the FBI Captured a Secret Army and Stopped the Invasion of Mexico
The Estrada Plot is the first book ever written about the Estrada Conspiracy, the last great untold story of the early FBI. During the summer of 1926, exiled general Enrique Estrada organized an underground army in southern California for an all-out invasion of Mexico. From the teeming barrios of Los Angeles to the farm country of the Imperial Valley, hundreds of migrants were recruited for the secret army. The conspirators amassed a stockpile of rifles, machine guns, and ammunition, constructed armored vehicles, and even contracted the manufacture of attack aircraft. At the eleventh hour, after an intense investigation, Estrada's army was captured at the border by a team of federal agents and local lawmen. The Estrada Plot is unlike any previous work about the Federal Bureau of Investigation. General Estrada's attempt to invade Mexico and overthrow its government occurred during the early years of the FBI's transition into a modern law enforcement agency. The characters in the story are a mix of the old Bureau and the new, and they often seem larger than life. Lucien Wheeler, special agent in charge of the Los Angeles field office, was a former Secret Service operative who had guarded three presidents. Special Agent Emilio Kosterlitzy, the Bureau's Mexican expert, was a former Russian naval officer who had led the Rurales, a border patrol in northern Mexico that operated under the maxim catch them in the act - shoot them on the spot. Agent Arthur Hopkins, the leader of the Estrada investigation, was a holdover from the final days of the old West. An ex-U.S. Marshal of the Arizona territory, Hopkins was an anachronism in Director Hoover's new organization. The historical background that led to Estrada's invasion plot is as fascinating as the story itself - a little-known religious conflict that erupted in Mexico during the mid-1920s. To eliminate the influence of religion in Mexican life, President Plutarco Elias Calles instituted anti-clerical laws directed against the Catholic Church - the country's predominant religion - bringing all religious activity under state control. Places of public worship became property of the state, religious clergy were deported, and harsh criminal penalties were imposed for infractions of the anti-religion statutes. In time, public worship would be punishable by the firing squad, and Calles decrees would lead to the Cristero War, which cost ninety thousand Mexican lives.
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31.450000 USD

The Estrada Plot: How the FBI Captured a Secret Army and Stopped the Invasion of Mexico

by Bill Mills
Hardback
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The people of Mexquitic, a town in the state of San Luis Potosi in rural northeastern Mexico, have redefined their sense of identity from Indian to Mexican over the last two centuries. In this ethnographic and historical study of Mexquitic, David Frye explores why and how this transformation occurred, thereby ...
Indians into Mexicans: History and Identity in a Mexican Town
The people of Mexquitic, a town in the state of San Luis Potosi in rural northeastern Mexico, have redefined their sense of identity from Indian to Mexican over the last two centuries. In this ethnographic and historical study of Mexquitic, David Frye explores why and how this transformation occurred, thereby increasing our understanding of the cultural creation of Indianness throughout the Americas. Frye focuses on the local embodiments of national and regional processes that have transformed rural Indians into modern Mexicans : parish priests, who always arrive with personal agendas in addition to their common ideological baggage; local haciendas; and local and regional representatives of royal and later of national power and control. He looks especially at the people of Mexquitic themselves, letting their own words describe the struggles they have endured while constructing their particular corner of Mexican national identity. This ethnography, the first for any town in northeastern Mexico, adds substantially to our knowledge of the forces that have rendered Indians almost invisible to European-origin peoples from the fifteenth century up to today. It will be important reading for a wide audience not only in anthropology and Latin American studies but also among the growing body of general readers interested in the multicultural heritage of the Americas.
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26.250000 USD

Indians into Mexicans: History and Identity in a Mexican Town

by David Frye
Paperback / softback
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The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies
The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
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31.490000 USD

The Life Of Las Casas, The Apostle Of The Indies

by Arthur Helps
Paperback / softback
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Between 1910 and 1929, the two decades that history defines as the Mexican Revolution, almost a million people left Mexico to escape the war's devastation. This exodus jump-started the growth of the U.S. Latino population, a group which now numbers well over 50 million. These political refugees established productive new ...
The Children of the Revolucion: How the Mexican Revolution Changed America
Between 1910 and 1929, the two decades that history defines as the Mexican Revolution, almost a million people left Mexico to escape the war's devastation. This exodus jump-started the growth of the U.S. Latino population, a group which now numbers well over 50 million. These political refugees established productive new lives in the United States. Countless numbers of their descendants, now American citizens, are highly accomplished individuals, including both community and national leaders. To capture these never-before-told stories, Lionel and Kathy Sosa, together with KLRN public television in San Antonio and Jesus Ramirez and his My Story, Inc., wrote and produced a twenty-part documentary series titled Children of the Revolucion: How the Mexican Revolution Changed America's Destiny. In this companion volume, some of these descendants tell the stories of life in Mexico, the chaos that their families endured during the Revolution, their treacherous trek to America, and their settlement in a strange new country. In these stories, we discover the heart of the Latino soul, rich in spirit, patriotism, and a fierce commitment to the United States. Their many contributions cannot be ignored. With Professor Neftali Garcia providing the historic backdrop, editor Lionel Sosa offers new insights into how the Mexican Revolution changed America.
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27.33 USD
Hardback
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This thoroughly revised and updated edition of Needler's well-known text brings his comprehensive examination and analysis of Mexican politics up through the 1994 Mexican elections. Providing historical and geographical background, the work examines economics and politics in the light of the structural changes attending the adoption of the neo-liberal economic ...
Mexican Politics: The Containment of Conflict, 3rd Edition
This thoroughly revised and updated edition of Needler's well-known text brings his comprehensive examination and analysis of Mexican politics up through the 1994 Mexican elections. Providing historical and geographical background, the work examines economics and politics in the light of the structural changes attending the adoption of the neo-liberal economic model. Also addressed are the implications of NAFTA, the Zapatista rebellion, and the assassination of Luis Donaldo Colosio, among other current political issues. An ideal text for students of comparative politics, Latin American studies, and recent Latin American history.
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29.350000 USD

Mexican Politics: The Containment of Conflict, 3rd Edition

by Martin C Needler
Paperback / softback
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Published originally as La flor mas bella de la maquiladora, this beautifully written book is based on interviews the author conducted with more than fifty Mexican women who work in the assembly plants along the U.S.-Mexico border. A descriptive analytic study conducted in the late 1970s, the book uses compelling ...
Beautiful Flowers of the Maquiladora: Life Histories of Women Workers in Tijuana
Published originally as La flor mas bella de la maquiladora, this beautifully written book is based on interviews the author conducted with more than fifty Mexican women who work in the assembly plants along the U.S.-Mexico border. A descriptive analytic study conducted in the late 1970s, the book uses compelling testimonials to detail the struggles these women face. The experiences of women in maquiladoras are attracting increasing attention from scholars, especially in the context of ongoing Mexican migration to the country's northern frontier and in light of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This book is among the earliest accounts of the physical and psychological toll exacted from the women who labor in these plants. Iglesias Prieto captures the idioms of these working women so that they emerge as dynamic individuals, young and articulate personalities, inexorably engaged in the daily struggle to change the fundamental conditions of their exploitation.
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20.950000 USD

Beautiful Flowers of the Maquiladora: Life Histories of Women Workers in Tijuana

by Norma Iglesias-Prieto
Paperback / softback
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San Antonio, Texas, 1836. A Mexican army led by Santa Anna attacks a small fort called the Alamo. Disputes still rage over exactly what happended, why it happened, and how it should be remembered. Indeed, the battles fought over the memory of the Alamo have been almost as fierce as ...
A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory
San Antonio, Texas, 1836. A Mexican army led by Santa Anna attacks a small fort called the Alamo. Disputes still rage over exactly what happended, why it happened, and how it should be remembered. Indeed, the battles fought over the memory of the Alamo have been almost as fierce as their subject. In a riveting combination of history and cultural analysis, historians Randy Roberts and James N. Olson blend a rich narrative of the battle, told from the perspectives of both the Anglo and Mexican troops, drawing from a wide range of sources, including newly released documents from Mexican military archives and just-discovered pages of the famous de la Pena diary. Still controversial after all these years, the events at the Alamo pose some fascinating questions: Did Crockett really die a hero, or did he surrender before a summary execution? And why have Americans built a shrine for an event that lasted no more than ninety minutes, and inflated it into one of the country's biggest tourist attractions? A full explanation of the San Antonio encounter requires a peeling back of many layers. With powerful writing, Roberts and Olson retell the story of a great American myth, and show how and why it endures. This original volume is sure to change the way readers remember the Alamo.
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26.200000 USD

A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory

by James S. Olson, Randy Roberts
Paperback / softback
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In this new telling of Mexico's Second Empire and Louis Napoleon's installation of Maximilian von Habsburg and his wife, Carlota of Belgium, as the emperor and empress of Mexico, Maximilian and Carlota brings the dramatic, interesting, and tragic time of this six-year-siege to life. From 1861 to 1866, the French ...
Maximilian and Carlota: Europe's Last Empire in Mexico
In this new telling of Mexico's Second Empire and Louis Napoleon's installation of Maximilian von Habsburg and his wife, Carlota of Belgium, as the emperor and empress of Mexico, Maximilian and Carlota brings the dramatic, interesting, and tragic time of this six-year-siege to life. From 1861 to 1866, the French incorporated the armies of Austria, Belgium--including forces from Crimea to Egypt--to fight and subdue the regime of Mexico's Benito Juarez during the time of the U.S. Civil War. France viewed this as a chance to seize Mexican territory in a moment they were convinced the Confederacy would prevail and take over Mexico. With both sides distracted in the U.S., this was their opportunity to seize territory in North America. In 1867, with aid from the United States, this movement came to a disastrous end both for the royals and for France while ushering in a new era for Mexico. In a bid to oust Juarez, Mexican conservatives appealed to European leaders to select a monarch to run their country. Maximilian and Carlota's reign, from 1864 to 1867, was marked from the start by extravagance and ambition and ended with the execution of Maximilian by firing squad, with Carlota on the brink of madness. This epoch moment in the arc of French colonial rule, which spans North American and European history at a critical juncture on both continents, shows how Napoleon III's failure to save Maximilian disgusted Europeans and sealed his own fate. Maximilian and Carlota offers a vivid portrait of the unusual marriage of Maximilian and Carlota and of international high society and politics at this critical nineteenth-century juncture. This largely unknown era in the history of the Americas comes to life through this colorful telling of the couple's tragic reign.
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31.450000 USD
Hardback
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Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927 is a study of federalism in late-nineteenth-century Veracruz State. It is also a politico-military analysis and an evaluation of social-revolutionary relations in the epoch of the Porfiriato and the Mexican Revolution. Koth interprets the Mexican Revolution across ...
Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927
Waking the Dictator: Veracruz, the Struggle for Federalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1870-1927 is a study of federalism in late-nineteenth-century Veracruz State. It is also a politico-military analysis and an evaluation of social-revolutionary relations in the epoch of the Porfiriato and the Mexican Revolution. Koth interprets the Mexican Revolution across two axes: one is the heightened struggle for federalism, i.e., the conflict between the state of Veracruz and the central government; and the other is the class struggle that was brought into sharp relief by the violent social and military upheaval. Koth illustrates why and how, in 1927, President Plutarco ElA-as Calles crushed federalism, suppressed the aspirations of working classes, and co-opted a re-emergent Veracruz bourgeoisie. In Koth's view, the initial promises of the Mexican Revolution were never fulfilled. The old rancor born of elite control and the loss of federalism still brews not far beneath the surface of contemporary Mexican politics. This study is the first modern, comprehensive, and analytical history of the Porfiriato and Mexican Revolution in Veracruz.
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36.27 USD
Paperback / softback
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Temples lost in the rainforest. Strange inscriptions and ritual bloodletting. Such are the images popularly associated with the ancient Maya of Central America. But who really were the people of this lost civilization? How and why did their culture achieve regional dominance? Could such pressing contemporary problems as climate change ...
The Ancient Maya: New Perspectives
Temples lost in the rainforest. Strange inscriptions and ritual bloodletting. Such are the images popularly associated with the ancient Maya of Central America. But who really were the people of this lost civilization? How and why did their culture achieve regional dominance? Could such pressing contemporary problems as climate change and environmental degradation hold the key to the collapse of Maya civilization? Of interest to scholars and general readers alike, The Ancient Maya brings the controversies that have divided experts on the ancient Maya to a wider audience. Heather McKillop examines the debates concerning Mayan hieroglyphs, the Maya economy, and the conflicting theories behind the enigmatic collapse of the Maya civilization. The most readable and accessible work in the field, this book brings the general reader up to date with the latest archaeological evidence.
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31.450000 USD
Paperback / softback
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The Martinez del Rio family was a vigorous contestant in the highly politicized economy of early national Mexico. David Walker's case study of its successes and failures provides a unique insider's view of the trials and tribulations of doing business in a hostile environment. The family's ordeal in Mexico-a series ...
Kinship, Business, and Politics: The Martinez Del Rio Family in Mexico, 1823-1867
The Martinez del Rio family was a vigorous contestant in the highly politicized economy of early national Mexico. David Walker's case study of its successes and failures provides a unique insider's view of the trials and tribulations of doing business in a hostile environment. The family's ordeal in Mexico-a series of personal dislocations and traumas-mirrored the painful contractions of an old society reluctantly giving birth to a new nation. Using previously undiscovered primary source materials (including the private correspondence and business records of the family, public notary documents, transcripts of judicial proceedings, and the archives of Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Relations and the British Foreign Office), Walker employs family history to analyze problems relating more generally to the development of state and society in newly independent Mexico. The processes of socioeconomic formation in Mexico differed from those of Western Europe and the United States; accordingly, entrepreneurial activity had markedly contrasting implications for economic development and class formation. In the downwardly spiraling economy of nineteenth-century Mexico, economic activity was a zero-sum game. No new wealth was being created; most sectors remained stagnant and unproductive. To make their fortunes, empresarios, the Mexican capitalists, could not rely on income generated from authentic economic growth. Instead, they exploited the arbitrary acts of the interventionist Mexican state, which proscribed the free movement of factors within the marketplace. Speculation in the public debt took the place of more substantive undertakings. Coercive state power was diverted to create artificial environments in which otherwise inefficient and unproductive enterprises could flourish. But however well the empresarios might imitate the outward forms of industrial capitalism, they could not unlock the productive capacity of the Mexican economy. Instead, they and their allies and rivals engaged in destructive struggles to manipulate the state for personal gain, to the detriment of class interests, economic growth, and political stability.
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30.400000 USD

Kinship, Business, and Politics: The Martinez Del Rio Family in Mexico, 1823-1867

by David W Walker
Paperback / softback
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Prehistoric farmers in Mexico invented irrigation, developed it into a science, and used it widely. Indeed, many of the canal systems still in use in Mexico today were originally begun well before the discovery of the New World. In this comprehensive study, William E. Doolittle synthesizes and extensively analyzes all ...
Canal Irrigation in Prehistoric Mexico: The Sequence of Technological Change
Prehistoric farmers in Mexico invented irrigation, developed it into a science, and used it widely. Indeed, many of the canal systems still in use in Mexico today were originally begun well before the discovery of the New World. In this comprehensive study, William E. Doolittle synthesizes and extensively analyzes all that is currently known about the development and use of irrigation technology in prehistoric Mexico from about 1200 B.C. until the Spanish conquest in the sixteenth century A.D. Unlike authors of previous studies who have focused on the political, economic, and social implications of irrigation, Doolittle considers it in a developmental context. He examines virtually all the known systems, from small canals that diverted runoff from ephemeral mountain streams to elaborate networks that involved numerous large canals to irrigate broad valley floors with water from perennial rivers. Throughout the discussion, he gives special emphasis to the technological elaborations that distinguish each system from its predecessors. He also traces the spread of canal technology into and through different ecological settings. This research substantially clarifies the relationship between irrigation technology in Mexico and the American Southwest and argues persuasively that much of the technology that has been attributed to the Spaniards was actually developed in Mexico by indigenous people. These findings will be important not only for archaeologists working in this area but also for geographers, historians, and engineers interested in agriculture, technology, and arid lands.
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26.250000 USD

Canal Irrigation in Prehistoric Mexico: The Sequence of Technological Change

by William E. Doolittle
Paperback / softback
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Constructing Mexico City: Colonial Conflicts over Culture, Space, and Authority examines the spatial, material, and cultural dimensions of life in eighteenth-century Mexico City, through programs that colonial leaders created to renovate and reshape urban environments.
Constructing Mexico City: Colonial Conflicts over Culture, Space, and Authority
Constructing Mexico City: Colonial Conflicts over Culture, Space, and Authority examines the spatial, material, and cultural dimensions of life in eighteenth-century Mexico City, through programs that colonial leaders created to renovate and reshape urban environments.
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104.990000 USD

Constructing Mexico City: Colonial Conflicts over Culture, Space, and Authority

by Sharon Bailey Glasco
Hardback
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This study argues for a radically new interpretation of the origins and evolution of the ethnic Mexican community across the US. This book offers a definitive account of the interdependent histories of the US and Mexico as well as the making of the Chicano population in America. The authors link ...
A Century of Chicano History: Empire, Nations and Migration
This study argues for a radically new interpretation of the origins and evolution of the ethnic Mexican community across the US. This book offers a definitive account of the interdependent histories of the US and Mexico as well as the making of the Chicano population in America. The authors link history to contemporary issues, emphasizing the overlooked significance of late 19th and 20th century US economic expansionism to Europe in the formation of the Mexican community.
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47.200000 USD

A Century of Chicano History: Empire, Nations and Migration

by Gilbert G. Gonzalez, Raul E. Fernandez
Paperback / softback
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Among the native-language documents written by the Nahuas of central Mexico after Spanish contact, the annals genre gave them the freest rein in expressing themselves. The premier practitioner of the Nahuatl annals form was a writer of the early seventeenth century now known as Chimalpahin. Until recently, attention went primarily ...
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Anton Munon Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin
Among the native-language documents written by the Nahuas of central Mexico after Spanish contact, the annals genre gave them the freest rein in expressing themselves. The premier practitioner of the Nahuatl annals form was a writer of the early seventeenth century now known as Chimalpahin. Until recently, attention went primarily to his writings about precontact events.Now Chimalpahin's equally important writings about his own time have begun to come to the fore; the present volume is the first English edition of Chimalpahin's largest work, written during the first two decades of the seventeenth century. The great immediate value of the material is that it shows the Mexico City of the author's time, both Spanish and indigenous, as a cultured Nahua viewed it, and reveals the Nahuatl social and cultural vocabulary of that era. Among entries reporting run-of-the-mill events, the annals contain much color and humanity.The edition features a faithful transcription and a very readable translation. The apparatus includes telling new analysis of both language and content.
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78.750000 USD

Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Anton Munon Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin

Hardback
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During more than twenty years of field research, Roderic Ai Camp built a monumental database of biographical information on more than 3,000 leading national figures in Mexico. In this major contribution to Mexican political history, he draws on that database to present a definitive account of the paths to power ...
Political Recruitment across Two Centuries: Mexico, 1884-1991
During more than twenty years of field research, Roderic Ai Camp built a monumental database of biographical information on more than 3,000 leading national figures in Mexico. In this major contribution to Mexican political history, he draws on that database to present a definitive account of the paths to power Mexican political leaders pursued during the period 1884 to 1992. Camp's research clarifies the patterns of political recruitment in Mexico, showing the consequences of choosing one group over another. It calls into question numerous traditional assumptions, including that upward political mobility was a cause of the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Comparing Mexican practices with those in several East Asian countries also allows Camp to question many of the tenets of political recruitment theory. His book will be of interest to students not only of Mexican politics but also of history, comparative politics, political leadership, and Third World development.
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31.450000 USD

Political Recruitment across Two Centuries: Mexico, 1884-1991

by Roderic Ai. Camp
Paperback / softback
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Although the battlefields of World War II lay thousands of miles from Mexican shores, the conflict had a significant influence on the country's political development. Though the war years in Mexico have attracted less attention than other periods, this book shows how the crisis atmosphere of the early 1940s played ...
The War Has Brought Peace to Mexico: World War II and the Consolidation of the Post-Revolutionary State
Although the battlefields of World War II lay thousands of miles from Mexican shores, the conflict had a significant influence on the country's political development. Though the war years in Mexico have attracted less attention than other periods, this book shows how the crisis atmosphere of the early 1940s played an important part in the consolidation of the post-revolutionary regime. Through its management of Mexico's role in the war, including the sensitive question of military participation, the administration of Manuel Avila Camacho was able to insist upon a policy of national unity, bringing together disparate factions and making open opposition to the government difficult. World War II also made possible a reshaping of the country's foreign relations, allowing Mexico to repair ties that had been strained in the 1930s and to claim a leading place among Latin American nations in the postwar world. The period was also marked by an unprecedented degree of cooperation with the United States in support of the Allied cause, culminating in the deployment of a Mexican fighter squadron in the Pacific, a symbolic direct contribution to the war effort.
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57.750000 USD

The War Has Brought Peace to Mexico: World War II and the Consolidation of the Post-Revolutionary State

by Halbert Jones
Hardback
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Beginning in 1983, the Mexican government implemented one of the most extensive programs of market-oriented reform in the developing world. Downsizing the State examines a key element of this reform program: the privatization of public firms. Drawing upon interviews with government officials, business executives, and labor leaders as well as ...
Downsizing the State: Privatization and the Limits of Neoliberal Reform in Mexico
Beginning in 1983, the Mexican government implemented one of the most extensive programs of market-oriented reform in the developing world. Downsizing the State examines a key element of this reform program: the privatization of public firms. Drawing upon interviews with government officials, business executives, and labor leaders as well as data from government archives and corporate documents, MacLeod highlights the difficulties of linking market reforms to improved public welfare. Privatization failed to live up to its promise of raising living standards or decentralizing the economy. Indeed, privatization actually increased the concentration of wealth in Mexico while redirecting the economy toward foreign markets. These findings contribute to theoretical debates regarding state autonomy and the embeddedness of economic action. MacLeod calls into question the autonomy of the Mexican state in its privatization program. He shows that the creation of markets where public firms once dominated has involved both the destruction of social relations and the construction of new relations and institutions to regulate the market.
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44.050000 USD

Downsizing the State: Privatization and the Limits of Neoliberal Reform in Mexico

by Dag MacLeod
Paperback / softback
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As a free trade zone and Latin America's most popular destination, Cancuan, Mexico, is more than just a tourist town. It is not only actively involved in the production of transnational capital but also forms an integral part of the state's modernization plan for rural, indigenous communities. Indeed, Maya migrants ...
A Return to Servitude: Maya Migration and the Tourist Trade in Cancun
As a free trade zone and Latin America's most popular destination, Cancuan, Mexico, is more than just a tourist town. It is not only actively involved in the production of transnational capital but also forms an integral part of the state's modernization plan for rural, indigenous communities. Indeed, Maya migrants make up over a third of the city's population.A Return to Servitude is an ethnography of Maya migration within Mexico that analyzes the foundational role indigenous peoples play in the development of the modern nation-state. Focusing on tourism in the Yucatan Peninsula, M. Bianet Castellanos examines how Cancuan came to be equated with modernity, how this city has shaped the political economy of the peninsula, and how indigenous communities engage with this vision of contemporary life. More broadly, she demonstrates how indigenous communities experience, resist, and accommodate themselves to transnational capitalism.Tourism and the social stratification that results from migration have created conflict among the Maya. At the same time, this work asserts, it is through engagement with modernity and its resources that they are able to maintain their sense of indigeneity and community.
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26.250000 USD

A Return to Servitude: Maya Migration and the Tourist Trade in Cancun

by M. Bianet Castellanos
Paperback / softback
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The Spanish conquest and colonisation of the Americas dramatically transformed the lives of native peoples in Mesoamerica and the Andes. This revolutionary and multilayered process varied greatly in its intensity and timing from region to region, but in all cases radically changed indigenous societies, their values and beliefs. The encounter ...
New World, First Nations: Native Peoples of Mesoamerica and the Andes Under Colonial Rule
The Spanish conquest and colonisation of the Americas dramatically transformed the lives of native peoples in Mesoamerica and the Andes. This revolutionary and multilayered process varied greatly in its intensity and timing from region to region, but in all cases radically changed indigenous societies, their values and beliefs. The encounter between native peoples and the Spanish conquistadors and later settlers was marked by violence and drastic, epidemic-driven population decline. This dislocatory phase gradually gave way to myriad forms of accommodation, resistance, and social, cultural and religious hybridity -- the colonial heritage of Spanish America. The innovative essays in this volume compare the colonial experience of native peoples of the conquered Aztec, Maya and Inca civilisations, from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth centuries. They highlight their creative responses to the challenges posed by colonial rule, its institutions, religion, and legal and economic systems. Interdisciplinary in approach, the essays distil a generation of scholarship and suggest an agenda for future research. This book will be of great interest to historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, and post-colonialists.
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102.28 USD

New World, First Nations: Native Peoples of Mesoamerica and the Andes Under Colonial Rule

by David Cahill
Hardback
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