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William Hickling Prescott's History of the Conquest of Mexico presents the conquest of Mexico between 1519 and 1521 in four volumes. Although blind and having never traveled to the Americas, Prescott's account of the conquest of the Aztecs is as highly respected by historians today as it was in the ...
History of the Conquest of Mexico. Volume 1
William Hickling Prescott's History of the Conquest of Mexico presents the conquest of Mexico between 1519 and 1521 in four volumes. Although blind and having never traveled to the Americas, Prescott's account of the conquest of the Aztecs is as highly respected by historians today as it was in the 19th century.
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360.76 USD

History of the Conquest of Mexico. Volume 1

by William H Prescott
Hardback
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Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as ...
Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City
Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as whites fled for the suburbs and exurbs in increasing numbers, Latin Americans immigrated to urban centres in even greater numbers. Barrio America charts the vibrant revival of American cities in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, arguing that we should attribute this revival to the influx of Latin American immigrants -- both legal and not. An award-winning historian and son of immigrants, Andrew Sandoval-Strausz recounts this untold history by focusing on the largest immigrant barrios in two of the nation's largest cities: Chicago's Little Village and Dallas's Oak Cliff. These neighbourhoods were once classic examples of urban crisis: they reached their peak prosperity around 1950, afterwards losing residents, jobs, and opportunity, which destabilised urban public order. But after 1965, when Lyndon Johnson overturned the restrictive 1924 immigration law and a major agricultural crisis was convulsing Mexico, these neighbourhoods saw a record number of incoming Latin Americans. The nation's urban barrios are regularly portrayed as decaying districts plagued by crime and disorder, but in reality, over the past several decades, areas with growing immigrant populations have become some of the most dynamic, stable, and safe neighbourhoods in their cities. The new immigrants brought with them three distinctive cultural traditions -- penchants for public spaces, walking, and small entrepreneurship -- that have changed the American city for the better. Drawing on dozens of oral histories with migrantes themselves, Sandoval-Strausz places immigrant voices at the centre of the narrative, emphasising the choices of Latin American newcomers, the motivations that brought them to the United States, and the hopes that lay before them, their families, and their communities. Barrio America demonstrates how migrants have used their labour, their capital, and their culture to build a new metropolitan America.
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33.600000 USD

Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City

by A.K. Sandoval-Strausz
Hardback
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Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from ...
The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from north to south and the importance of women to Catholic survival and change over the course of the twentieth century. As a devout Catholic single woman, neither nun nor mother, del Valle resisted religious persecution in an era of Mexican revolutionary upheaval, became a labor activist in a time of class conflict, founded an educational movement, toured the United States as a public lecturer, and raised money for Catholic ministries-all in an age dominated by economic depression, gender prejudice, and racial discrimination. The rise of the Global South marked a new power dynamic within the Church as Latin America moved from the margins of activism to the vanguard. Del Valle's life and the stories of those she met along the way illustrate the shared pious practices, gender norms, and organizational networks that linked activists across national borders. Told through the eyes of a little-known laywoman from Mexico, Andes shows how women journeyed from the pews into the heart of the modern world.
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36.750000 USD

The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico

by Stephen J. C. Andes
Paperback / softback
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From the boundary surveys of the 1850s to the ever-expanding fences and highway networks of the twenty-first century, Border Land, Border Water examines the history of the construction projects that have shaped the region where the United States and Mexico meet. Tracing the accretion of ports of entry, boundary markers, ...
Border Land, Border Water: A History of Construction on the US-Mexico Divide
From the boundary surveys of the 1850s to the ever-expanding fences and highway networks of the twenty-first century, Border Land, Border Water examines the history of the construction projects that have shaped the region where the United States and Mexico meet. Tracing the accretion of ports of entry, boundary markers, transportation networks, fences and barriers, surveillance infrastructure, and dams and other river engineering projects, C. J. Alvarez advances a broad chronological narrative that captures the full life cycle of border building. He explains how initial groundbreaking in the nineteenth century transitioned to unbridled faith in the capacity to control the movement of people, goods, and water through the use of physical structures. By the 1960s, however, the built environment of the border began to display increasingly obvious systemic flaws. More often than not, Alvarez shows, federal agencies in both countries responded with more construction- compensatory building designed to mitigate unsustainable policies relating to immigration, black markets, and the natural world. Border Land, Border Water reframes our understanding of how the border has come to look and function as it does and is essential to current debates about the future of the US-Mexico divide.
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47.250000 USD

Border Land, Border Water: A History of Construction on the US-Mexico Divide

by C J Alvarez
Hardback
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In November 1519, Hernando Cortes walked along a causeway leading to the capital of the Aztec kingdom and came face to face with Moctezuma. That story-and the story of what happened afterwards-has been told many times, but always following the narrative offered by the Spaniards. After all, we have been ...
Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs
In November 1519, Hernando Cortes walked along a causeway leading to the capital of the Aztec kingdom and came face to face with Moctezuma. That story-and the story of what happened afterwards-has been told many times, but always following the narrative offered by the Spaniards. After all, we have been taught, it was the Europeans who held the pens. But the Native Americans were intrigued by the Roman alphabet and, unbeknownst to the newcomers, they used it to write detailed histories in their own language of Nahuatl. Until recently, these sources remained obscure, only partially translated, and rarely consulted by scholars. For the first time, in Fifth Sun, the history of the Aztecs is offered in all its complexity based solely on the texts written by the indigenous people themselves. Camilla Townsend presents an accessible and humanized depiction of these native Mexicans, rather than seeing them as the exotic, bloody figures of European stereotypes. The conquest, in this work, is neither an apocalyptic moment, nor an origin story launching Mexicans into existence. The Mexica people had a history of their own long before the Europeans arrived and did not simply capitulate to Spanish culture and colonization. Instead, they realigned their political allegiances, accommodated new obligations, adopted new technologies, and endured. This engaging revisionist history of the Aztecs, told through their own words, explores the experience of a once-powerful people facing the trauma of conquest and finding ways to survive, offering an empathetic interpretation for experts and non-specialists alike.
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31.450000 USD

Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs

by Camilla Townsend
Hardback
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Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from ...
The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from north to south and the importance of women to Catholic survival and change over the course of the twentieth century. As a devout Catholic single woman, neither nun nor mother, del Valle resisted religious persecution in an era of Mexican revolutionary upheaval, became a labor activist in a time of class conflict, founded an educational movement, toured the United States as a public lecturer, and raised money for Catholic ministries-all in an age dominated by economic depression, gender prejudice, and racial discrimination. The rise of the Global South marked a new power dynamic within the Church as Latin America moved from the margins of activism to the vanguard. Del Valle's life and the stories of those she met along the way illustrate the shared pious practices, gender norms, and organizational networks that linked activists across national borders. Told through the eyes of a little-known laywoman from Mexico, Andes shows how women journeyed from the pews into the heart of the modern world.
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68.250000 USD

The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico

by Stephen J. C. Andes
Hardback
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Conflict, domination, violence-in this wide-ranging, briskly narrated volume from acclaimed Mexican historian Carlos Illades, these three phenomena register the pulse of a diverse, but inequitable and discriminatory, social order. Drawing on rich and varied historical sources, Illades guides the reader through seven signal episodes in Mexican social history, from rebellions ...
Conflict, Domination, and Violence: Episodes in Mexican Social History
Conflict, domination, violence-in this wide-ranging, briskly narrated volume from acclaimed Mexican historian Carlos Illades, these three phenomena register the pulse of a diverse, but inequitable and discriminatory, social order. Drawing on rich and varied historical sources, Illades guides the reader through seven signal episodes in Mexican social history, from rebellions under Porfirio Diaz's dictatorship to the cycles of violence that have plagued the country's deep south to the recent emergence of neo-anarchist movements. Taken together, they comprise a mosaic history of power and resistance, with artisans, rural communities, revolutionaries, students, and ordinary people confronting the forces of domination and transforming Mexican society.
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31.450000 USD

Conflict, Domination, and Violence: Episodes in Mexican Social History

by Carlos Illades
Paperback / softback
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Half a century ago, when archaeologist Jeffrey R. Parsons began fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, he could not know that many of the sites he studied were on the brink of destruction. The rural landscapes through which he traveled were, in many cases, destined to be plowed under and paved ...
Remembering Archaeological Fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, 1961-2003: A Photographic Essay
Half a century ago, when archaeologist Jeffrey R. Parsons began fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, he could not know that many of the sites he studied were on the brink of destruction. The rural landscapes through which he traveled were, in many cases, destined to be plowed under and paved over. In Remembering Archaeological Fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, 1961-2003, Parsons offers readers a chance to see archaeological sites that were hundreds or thousands of years old and have since vanished or been irrevocably altered. Hundreds of photographs, accompanied by descriptions, illustrate the sites, the people, and the landscapes that Parsons encountered during four decades of research in these regions. Parsons is now emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan and has published many archaeological monographs as well as ethnographic research on salt, fish, and other items used for traditional subsistence in Mexico. Foreword by Richard I. Ford.
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94.500000 USD

Remembering Archaeological Fieldwork in Mexico and Peru, 1961-2003: A Photographic Essay

by Jeffrey R Parsons
Hardback
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The year is 1912, and Francisco Madero is president of Mexico. Just last year he and his top general ousted the long-standing president (some say dictator) Porfirio Diaz, who is now in exile. But the country is far from stable. A basic cultural rift between elite and the poor portends ...
Mexico in Revolution, 1912-1920
The year is 1912, and Francisco Madero is president of Mexico. Just last year he and his top general ousted the long-standing president (some say dictator) Porfirio Diaz, who is now in exile. But the country is far from stable. A basic cultural rift between elite and the poor portends a sequence of tumbling revolts. Students are assigned to play characters that are charged with stabilizing their country and preventing further civil war. The goal is to reform Mexico and make it a better nation for all of its inhabitants-but Mexicans and foreigners worry that without a firm hand, Mexico's governance might spiral out of control. At what cost will progress come? Reacting to the Past is an award-winning series of immersive role-playing games that actively engage students in their own learning. Students assume the roles of historical characters to practice critical thinking, primary source analysis, and both written and spoken argument. Adopted by thousands of instructors at all types of institutions, Reacting to the Past games are flexible enough to be used across the curriculum, from first-year general education classes and discussion sections of lecture classes to capstone experiences and honors programs.
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40.950000 USD

Mexico in Revolution, 1912-1920

by Stephany Slaughter, Jonathan Truitt
Paperback / softback
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In the summer of 1648, yellow fever appeared for the first time on the Yucatan Peninsula, claiming the lives of roughly one-third of the population. To combat this epidemic, Spanish colonial authorities carried a miracle-working Marian icon in procession from Itzmal to the capital city of Merida and back again ...
Idolizing Mary: Maya-Catholic Icons in Yucatan, Mexico
In the summer of 1648, yellow fever appeared for the first time on the Yucatan Peninsula, claiming the lives of roughly one-third of the population. To combat this epidemic, Spanish colonial authorities carried a miracle-working Marian icon in procession from Itzmal to the capital city of Merida and back again as a means of invoking divine intercession. Idolizing Mary uses this event and this icon to open a discussion about the early and profound indigenous veneration of the Virgin Mary. Amara Solari argues that particular Marian icons, such as the Virgin of Itzmal, embodied an ideal suite of precontact numinous qualities, which Maya neophytes reframed for their community's religious needs. Examining prints, paintings, and early modern writings about the Virgin of Itzmal, Solari takes up various topics that contributed to the formation of Yucatan Catholicism-such as indigenous Maya notions of sacrality, ritual purity, and the formal qualities of offering vessels-and demonstrates how these aligned with the Virgin of Itzmal in such a way that the icon came to be viewed by the native populations as a deity of a new world order. Thoroughly researched and convincingly argued, Idolizing Mary will be welcomed by scholars and students interested in religious transformation and Marian devotion in colonial Spanish America.
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104.950000 USD

Idolizing Mary: Maya-Catholic Icons in Yucatan, Mexico

by Amara Solari
Hardback
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In 2017, the New York Times announced that the long-lost memoir of Luis de Carvajal the Younger had been rediscovered. Considered the first autobiography by a Jew in the Americas, the book had been stolen decades earlier from Mexico's National Archives. Here, Ilan Stavans recounts the extraordinary and entertaining story ...
The Return of Carvajal: A Mystery
In 2017, the New York Times announced that the long-lost memoir of Luis de Carvajal the Younger had been rediscovered. Considered the first autobiography by a Jew in the Americas, the book had been stolen decades earlier from Mexico's National Archives. Here, Ilan Stavans recounts the extraordinary and entertaining story of the reappearance of this precious object and how its discovery opened up new vistas onto the world of secret Jews escaping the Spanish Inquisition. Called el Mozo (the Younger) to distinguish him from an uncle of the same name who was governor of Nuevo Leon, Luis de Carvajal learned of his Jewishness after being raised a Catholic. He came to recognize himself as a messiah for fellow crypto-Jews, and he was burned at the stake on December 8, 1596, in the biggest auto-da-fe in all of Latin America. His memoir-a 180-page manuscript written by a crypto-Jew targeted by the Holy Office of the Inquisition for unlawful proselytizing activities-was not only distinct but of enormous value. With characters such as conniving academics embroiled in a scholarly feud, a magnanimous philanthropist, naive booksellers, and a secondary cast that could be taken from a David Lynch film, The Return of Carvajal recounts the global intrigue that placed crypto-Jewish culture at the heart of contemporary debates on religion and identity.
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29.66 USD

The Return of Carvajal: A Mystery

by Ilan Stavans
Hardback
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Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City traces the transformations that occurred between 1934 and 1968 in Mexico through the lens of childhood. Countering the dominance of Western European and North American views of childhood, Eileen Ford puts the experiences of children in Latin America into their historical, political, ...
Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City
Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City traces the transformations that occurred between 1934 and 1968 in Mexico through the lens of childhood. Countering the dominance of Western European and North American views of childhood, Eileen Ford puts the experiences of children in Latin America into their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Drawing on diverse primary sources ranging from oral histories to photojournalism, Ford reconstructs the emergent and varying meanings of childhood in Mexico City during a period of changing global attitudes towards childhood, and changing power relations in Mexico at multiple scales, from the family to the state. She analyses children's presence on the silver screen, in radio, and in print media to examine the way that children were constructed within public discourse, identifying the forces that would converge in the 1968 student movement. This book demonstrates children's importance within Mexican society as Mexico transitioned from a socialist-inspired revolutionary government to one that embraced industrial capitalism in the Cold War era. It is a fascinating study of an extremely important, burgeoning population group in Mexico that has previously been excluded from histories of Mexico's bid for modernity. Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City will be essential reading for students and scholars of Latin American history and the Cold War.
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53.92 USD

Childhood and Modernity in Cold War Mexico City

by Eileen Ford
Paperback / softback
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With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore ...
The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico
With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore their subject, these documents are inherently limiting given that the men described in them were considered to be criminals or otherwise marginal. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century resources, too, provide a limited perspective on machismo in the colonial period. The Origins of Macho addresses this deficiency by basing its study of colonial Mexican masculinity on the experiences of mainstream men. Lipsett-Rivera traces the genesis of the Mexican macho by looking at daily interactions between Mexican men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In doing so she establishes an important foundation for gender studies in Mexico and Latin America and makes a significant contribution to the larger field of masculinity studies.
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31.450000 USD

The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico

by Sonya Lipsett-Rivera
Paperback / softback
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In this compelling narrative of capitalist development and revolutionary response, Jessica M. Kim reexamines the rise of Los Angeles from a small town to a global city against the backdrop of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, Gilded Age economics, and American empire. It is a far-reaching transnational history, chronicling how Los Angeles ...
Imperial Metropolis: Los Angeles, Mexico, and the Borderlands of American Empire, 1865-1941
In this compelling narrative of capitalist development and revolutionary response, Jessica M. Kim reexamines the rise of Los Angeles from a small town to a global city against the backdrop of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, Gilded Age economics, and American empire. It is a far-reaching transnational history, chronicling how Los Angeles boosters transformed the borderlands through urban and imperial capitalism at the end of the nineteenth century and how the Mexican Revolution redefined those same capitalist networks into the twentieth. Kim draws on archives in the United States and Mexico to argue that financial networks emerging from Los Angeles drove economic transformations in the borderlands, reshaped social relations across wide swaths of territory, and deployed racial hierarchies to advance investment projects across the border. However, the Mexican Revolution, with its implicit critique of imperialism, disrupted the networks of investment and exploitation that had structured the borderlands for sixty years, and reconfigured transnational systems of infrastructure and trade. Kim provides the first history to connect Los Angeles's urban expansionism with more continental and global currents, and what results is a rich account of real and imagined geographies of city, race, and empire.
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31.450000 USD

Imperial Metropolis: Los Angeles, Mexico, and the Borderlands of American Empire, 1865-1941

by Jessica M Kim
Hardback
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The surprising connections between the American frontier and empire in southern Africa, and the people who participated in both This book begins in an era when romantic notions of American frontiering overlapped with Gilded Age extractive capitalism. In the late nineteenth century, the U.S.-Mexican borderlands constituted one stop of many ...
Frontiers in the Gilded Age: Adventure, Capitalism, and Dispossession from Southern Africa to the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands, 1880-1917
The surprising connections between the American frontier and empire in southern Africa, and the people who participated in both This book begins in an era when romantic notions of American frontiering overlapped with Gilded Age extractive capitalism. In the late nineteenth century, the U.S.-Mexican borderlands constituted one stop of many where Americans chased capitalist dreams beyond the United States. Crisscrossing the American West, southern Africa, and northern Mexico, Andrew Offenburger examines how these frontier spaces could glitter with grandiose visions, expose the flawed and immoral strategies of profiteers, and yet reveal the capacity for resistance and resilience that indigenous people summoned when threatened. Linking together a series of stories about Boer exiles who settled in Mexico, a global network of protestant missionaries, and adventurers involved in the parallel displacements of indigenous peoples in Rhodesia and the Yaqui Indians in Mexico, Offenburger situates the borderlands of the Mexican North and the American Southwest within a global system, bound by common actors who interpreted their lives through a shared frontier ideology.
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65.09 USD

Frontiers in the Gilded Age: Adventure, Capitalism, and Dispossession from Southern Africa to the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands, 1880-1917

by Andrew Offenburger
Hardback
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For reasons of language and history, the United States has prized its Anglo heritage above all others. However, as Carrie Gibson explains with great depth and clarity in El Norte, America has much older Spanish roots - ones that have long been unacknowledged or marginalized. The Hispanic past of the ...
El Norte: The Epic and Forgotten Story of Hispanic North America
For reasons of language and history, the United States has prized its Anglo heritage above all others. However, as Carrie Gibson explains with great depth and clarity in El Norte, America has much older Spanish roots - ones that have long been unacknowledged or marginalized. The Hispanic past of the United States predates the arrival of the Pilgrims by a century and has been every bit as important in shaping the nation. El Norte chronicles the sweeping and dramatic history of Hispanic North America from the arrival of the Spanish to the present - from Ponce de Leon's initial landing in Florida in 1513 to Spanish control of the vast Louisiana territory in 1762 to the Mexican-American War in 1846 and up to the more recent tragedy of post-hurricane Puerto Rico and the ongoing border acrimony with Mexico. Interwoven in this stirring narrative of events and people are cultural issues that have been there from the start and remain unresolved: language, belonging, community, race and nationality. Seeing them play out over centuries provides vital perspective at a time when it is urgently needed. In 1883, Walt Whitman wrote 'to that composite American identity of the future, Spanish character will supply some of the most needed parts.' That future is here, and El Norte, an emotive and eventful history in its own right, will have a powerful impact on our perception of the United States.
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46.49 USD

El Norte: The Epic and Forgotten Story of Hispanic North America

by Carrie Gibson
Hardback
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With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore ...
The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico
With limited resources to contextualize masculinity in colonial Mexico, film, literature, and social history perpetuate the stereotype associating Mexican men with machismo--defined as excessive virility that is accompanied by bravado and explosions of violence. While scholars studying men's gender identities in the colonial period have used Inquisition documents to explore their subject, these documents are inherently limiting given that the men described in them were considered to be criminals or otherwise marginal. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century resources, too, provide a limited perspective on machismo in the colonial period. The Origins of Macho addresses this deficiency by basing its study of colonial Mexican masculinity on the experiences of mainstream men. Lipsett-Rivera traces the genesis of the Mexican macho by looking at daily interactions between Mexican men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In doing so she establishes an important foundation for gender studies in Mexico and Latin America and makes a significant contribution to the larger field of masculinity studies.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826360397.jpg
99.750000 USD

The Origins of Macho: Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico

by Sonya Lipsett-Rivera
Hardback
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In this book Leisa A. Kauffmann takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the writings of one of Mexico's early chroniclers, Fernando de Alva Ixtilxochitl, a bilingual seventeenth-century historian from Central Mexico. His writing, especially his portrayal of the great pre-Hispanic poet-king Nezahualcoyotl, influenced other canonical histories of Mexico and is ...
The Legacy of Rulership in Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl's Historia de la nacion chichimeca
In this book Leisa A. Kauffmann takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the writings of one of Mexico's early chroniclers, Fernando de Alva Ixtilxochitl, a bilingual seventeenth-century historian from Central Mexico. His writing, especially his portrayal of the great pre-Hispanic poet-king Nezahualcoyotl, influenced other canonical histories of Mexico and is still influential today. Many scholars who discuss Alva Ixtlilxochitl's writing focus on his personal and literary investment in the European classical tradition, but Kauffmann argues that his work needs to be read through the lens of Nahua cultural concepts and literary-historical precepts. She suggests that he is best understood in light of his ancestral ties to Tetzcoco's rulers and as a historian who worked within both Native and European traditions. By paying attention to his representation of rulership, Kauffmann demonstrates how the literary and symbolic worlds of the Nahua exist in allegorical but still discernible subtexts within the larger Spanish context of his writing.
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68.250000 USD

The Legacy of Rulership in Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl's Historia de la nacion chichimeca

by Leisa A. Kauffmann
Hardback
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Once little more than party fuel, tequila has graduated to the status of fine sipping spirit. How the Gringos Stole Tequila traces the spirit's evolution in America from frat-house firewater to luxury good. But there's more to the story than tequila as upmarket drinking trend. Chantal Martineau spent several years ...
How the Gringos Stole Tequila: The Modern Age of Mexico's Most Traditional Spirit
Once little more than party fuel, tequila has graduated to the status of fine sipping spirit. How the Gringos Stole Tequila traces the spirit's evolution in America from frat-house firewater to luxury good. But there's more to the story than tequila as upmarket drinking trend. Chantal Martineau spent several years immersing herself in the world of tequila--traveling to visit distillers and agave farmers in Mexico, meeting and tasting with leading experts and mixologists around the United States, and interviewing academics on either side of the border who have studied the spirit. The result is a book that offers readers a glimpse into the social history and ongoing impact of this one-of-a-kind drink. It addresses issues surrounding the sustainability of the limited resource that is agave, the preservation of traditional production methods, and the agave advocacy movement that has grown up alongside the spirit's swelling popularity. In addition to discussing the culture and politics of Mexico's most popular export, the book takes readers on a colorful tour of the country's Tequila Trail, as well as introducing them to the mother of tequila: mezcal.
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19.900000 USD

How the Gringos Stole Tequila: The Modern Age of Mexico's Most Traditional Spirit

by Chantal Martineau
Paperback / softback
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Postcards from the Chihuahua Border: Revisiting a Pictorial Past, 1900s-1950s
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47.250000 USD

Postcards from the Chihuahua Border: Revisiting a Pictorial Past, 1900s-1950s

by Daniel D. Arreola
Hardback
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Cavernosa, usualmente fria, siempre oscura, con un ligero olor a palomitas de maiz en el aire: la experiencia de ir al cine es universal. No es menos intensa en M&#233xico, donde la experiencia ha evolucionado de formas complejas en anos recientes. Peliculas como Y tu mama tambi&#233n, El Mariachi, Amores ...
La proyeccion del neoliberalismo: Las transformaciones del cine mexicano (1988-2012)
Cavernosa, usualmente fria, siempre oscura, con un ligero olor a palomitas de maiz en el aire: la experiencia de ir al cine es universal. No es menos intensa en México, donde la experiencia ha evolucionado de formas complejas en anos recientes. Peliculas como Y tu mama también, El Mariachi, Amores perros y las obras de los paradigmaticos Guillermo del Toro y Salma Hayek, reflejan mucho mas un renovado interés por el cine en México. En La proyeccion del neoliberalismo, Ignacio Sanchez Prado explora precisamente los eventos que tuvieron lugar en la industria del cine mexicano durante las ultimas décadas. Lejos de ser una simple historia del periodo, La proyeccion del neoliberalismo examina cuatro aspectos esenciales de las transformaciones ocurridas en la industria del cine mexicano: la caida del nacionalismo, un nuevo enfoque en audiencias de clase media, la redefinicion del concepto de cine politico y el impacto de la globalizacion. Este analisis incluye a directores y peliculas que han alcanzado notoriedad internacional o relevancia en la construccion de un mercado nacional. La proyeccion del neoliberalismo expone las consecuencias de una industria del cine forzada a encontrar nuevas audiencias entre la clase media mexicana para poder alcanzar el ansiado éxito economico y la aprobacion cultural.
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26.200000 USD

La proyeccion del neoliberalismo: Las transformaciones del cine mexicano (1988-2012)

by Ignacio M Sanchez Prado
Paperback / softback
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Divided Peoples: Policy, Activism, and Indigenous Identities on the U.S.-Mexico Border
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57.750000 USD

Divided Peoples: Policy, Activism, and Indigenous Identities on the U.S.-Mexico Border

by Christina Leza
Hardback
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Homelands: Four Friends, Two Countries, and the Fate of the Great Mexican-American Migration
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20.44 USD

Homelands: Four Friends, Two Countries, and the Fate of the Great Mexican-American Migration

by Alfredo Corchado
Paperback / softback
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Mexican Waves: Radio Broadcasting Along Mexico's Northern Border, 1930-1950
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52.500000 USD

Mexican Waves: Radio Broadcasting Along Mexico's Northern Border, 1930-1950

by Sonia Robles
Hardback
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Mexico's love of celebration is well known, and cartoneria, a kind of papier-mache art, produces the objects that are essential to Mexican holidays and festivals, including Day of the Dead, Holy Week, and Christmas. Just about everyone knows what a pinata is, but few understand that it is part of ...
Mexican Cartoneria: Paper, Paste and Fiesta
Mexico's love of celebration is well known, and cartoneria, a kind of papier-mache art, produces the objects that are essential to Mexican holidays and festivals, including Day of the Dead, Holy Week, and Christmas. Just about everyone knows what a pinata is, but few understand that it is part of an entire branch of traditional handcrafts. With more than 120 photos and bilingual English/Spanish text, here is the history of the craft, how it is woven through Mexican culture, and how the craft is growing and changing. Learn about the traditional objects made with the technique and their importance to Mexican culture. Look inside the studios of several artisans and consider not only the craft's strongholds in Mexico City and Celaya, Guanajuato, but also other areas in Mexico where it is expanding in creativity. A variety of artisans (more than 50 artists, museum directors, and other experts) help identify who the main drivers of this folk art are today, its relevance to modern Mexican culture, and where it is headed.
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63.21 USD

Mexican Cartoneria: Paper, Paste and Fiesta

by Leigh,Ann Thelmadatter.
Hardback
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Return to Ixil: Maya Society in an Eighteenth-Century Yucatec Town
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79.800000 USD

Return to Ixil: Maya Society in an Eighteenth-Century Yucatec Town

by Matthew Restall, Mark Z. Christensen
Hardback
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History of the Chichimeca Nation: Don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl's Seventeeth-Century Chronicle of Ancient Mexico
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31.450000 USD

History of the Chichimeca Nation: Don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl's Seventeeth-Century Chronicle of Ancient Mexico

Paperback / softback
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History of the Chichimeca Nation: Don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl's Seventeeth-Century Chronicle of Ancient Mexico
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63.000000 USD

History of the Chichimeca Nation: Don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl's Seventeeth-Century Chronicle of Ancient Mexico

Hardback
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Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw ...
Energopolitics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw on shared fieldsites, archives, and encounters that can be productively read together, yet can also stand alone in their analytic ambitions. In his volume, Energopolitics, Boyer examines the politics of wind power and how it is shaped by myriad factors, from the legacies of settler colonialism and indigenous resistance to state bureaucracy and corporate investment. Drawing on interviews with activists, campesinos, engineers, bureaucrats, politicians, and bankers, Boyer outlines the fundamental impact of energy and fuel on political power. Boyer also demonstrates how large conceptual frameworks cannot adequately explain the fraught and uniquely complicated conditions on the isthmus, illustrating the need to resist narratives of anthropocenic universalism and to attend to local particularities.
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42.76 USD

Energopolitics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene

by Dominic Boyer
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw ...
Ecologics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw on shared fieldsites, archives, and encounters that can be productively read together, yet can also stand alone in their analytic ambitions. In her volume, Ecologics, Howe narrates how an antidote to the Anthropocene became both failure and success. Tracking the development of what would have been Latin America's largest wind park, Howe documents indigenous people's resistance to the project and the political and corporate climate that derailed its renewable energy potential. Using feminist and more-than-human theories, Howe demonstrates how the dynamics of energy and environment cannot be captured without understanding how human aspirations for energy articulate with nonhuman beings, technomaterial objects, and the geophysical forces that are at the heart of wind and power.
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28.300000 USD

Ecologics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene

by Cymene Howe
Paperback / softback
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