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Irish Witchcraft and Demonology
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26.050000 USD

Irish Witchcraft and Demonology

by John D Seymour
Paperback
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A First Greek Reader with Notes and Vocabulary
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14.180000 USD

A First Greek Reader with Notes and Vocabulary

by Charles M Moss
Paperback
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'Who hopes still constantly with patience shall obtain victory in their claim' Sometime heir to the English throne, courtier in danger of losing her head, spy-mistress and would-be architect of a united Catholic Britain: Lady Margaret Douglas is the Tudor whose life demands a wider telling. As niece to Henry ...
So High a Blood: The Life of Margaret, Countess of Lennox
'Who hopes still constantly with patience shall obtain victory in their claim' Sometime heir to the English throne, courtier in danger of losing her head, spy-mistress and would-be architect of a united Catholic Britain: Lady Margaret Douglas is the Tudor whose life demands a wider telling. As niece to Henry VIII and half-sister to James V of Scotland, the beautiful and Catholic Margaret held a unique and precarious position in the English court. Throughout her life, she was to navigate treacherous waters: survival necessitated it. Yet Margaret was no passive pawn or bit-part player. As the Protestant Reformations unfolded across the British Isles and the Tudor monarchs struggled to produce heirs, she had ambitions of her own. She wanted to see her family ruling a united, Catholic Britain. When her niece Mary, Queen of Scots was left a widow, Margaret saw her chance. Through a thoroughly Machiavellian combination of timing, networking and family connections, she set in motion a chain of shattering events that would one day see her descendants succeed to the crowns of England, Ireland and Scotland. Morgan Ring has revived the story of Lady Margaret Douglas to vivid and captivating effect. From a richly detailed backdrop of political and religious turbulence Margaret emerges, full of resilience, grace and intelligence. Drawing on previously unexamined archival sources, So High a Blood presents a fascinating and authoritative portrait of a woman with the greatest of ambitions for her family, her faith and her countries.
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18.75 USD

So High a Blood: The Life of Margaret, Countess of Lennox

by Morgan Ring
Paperback
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Bitter Freedom is a new history of the Irish Revolution, placing Ireland in the global disorder born of the terrible slaughter of total war, as well as a kaleidoscopic portrait of the human face of the conflict. The Irish Revolution - the war between the British authorities and the newly-formed ...
Bitter Freedom: Ireland in a Revolutionary World, 1918-1923
Bitter Freedom is a new history of the Irish Revolution, placing Ireland in the global disorder born of the terrible slaughter of total war, as well as a kaleidoscopic portrait of the human face of the conflict. The Irish Revolution - the war between the British authorities and the newly-formed IRA - was the first successful revolt anywhere against the British Empire. But it was not alone. Nationalist movements across the world were fired by the American promise of self-determination. For too long, the story of Irish independence and its aftermath has been told within an Anglo-Irish context. Now, in a vividly written and compelling narrative, Maurice Walsh shows that Ireland was part of a civilisation in turmoil. A national revolution which captured worldwide attention from India to Argentina was itself profoundly shaped by international events, political, economic and cultural. In the era of Bolshevism and jazz, developments in Europe and America had a profound effect on Ireland, influencing the attitudes and expectations of combatants and civilians. The hopes, dreams and bitter disappointments of the revolutionary years affected everyone in Ireland whether they fought or not. Walsh also brings to life the experiences of Irish people removed from the fighting - the plays they went to, the exciting films they watched in the new cinemas and the books they read. But the price of freedom was partition, a devastating civil war and the daunting challenge of establishing a new nation in an uncertain world...
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28.99 USD

Bitter Freedom: Ireland in a Revolutionary World, 1918-1923

by Maurice Walsh
Paperback
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His words proved to be more than a warning: they were a prophecy, which was inexorably fulfilled. A siren of alluring beauty, the Irish coast also conceals deadly danger. Destiny was to conspire to transform it into an instrument of terrible destruction and tragic loss of life. In the Atlantic ...
The Downfall of the Spanish Armada in Ireland
His words proved to be more than a warning: they were a prophecy, which was inexorably fulfilled. A siren of alluring beauty, the Irish coast also conceals deadly danger. Destiny was to conspire to transform it into an instrument of terrible destruction and tragic loss of life. In the Atlantic the Armada encountered continuous southerly winds and unknown ocean currents. It was two centuries before it became possible to calculate longitude at sea, and they were unaware that they had not sailed far enough westwards to give themselves the prescribed safety margin. They became separated and lost, and when they at last turned southwards, scattered groups unintentionally descended on Ireland, arriving at fourteen different locations from Donegal to Kerry. Many found shelter, but a few were lost. But on 21 September fourteen ships were destroyed by hurricane force winds: the only occasion during the entire voyage when ships were completely destroyed by the weather. `A most extreme and cruel storm' the Irish described it. The Spanish recorded that `in the morning it began to blow from the west with a most terrible fury, bright and with little rain.' Ships that had stayed at sea survived. In Donegal Bay the galleass Girona had sheltered with about 1,000 men. In October, Don Alonso de Leyva arrived with almost 1,000 more. His entourage included young men from all the noble families of Spain. After being repaired, the Girona departed for Scotland at the end of October, overloaded with 1,300 survivors. She so nearly got there, but foundered near the Giant's Causeway with the loss of de Leyva and the flower of Spanish nobility. In all, 24 Spanish ships were lost in Ireland and about 5,000 men died - far greater losses than had been suffered in the English Channel. The English navy inflicted a narrow defeat on the Armada, but it was the Irish coast that encompassed its downfall. Long before it had been surveyed and charted, when it was almost as unknown to mariners as the surface of the moon, for a few brief months in the autumn of 1588, the Irish coast was caught in the headlights of history.
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11.28 USD

The Downfall of the Spanish Armada in Ireland

by Ken Douglas
Paperback / softback
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Forlorn: Lorn Trilogy
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8.390000 USD

Forlorn: Lorn Trilogy

by Honor Donohoe
Paperback
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Saints and Slaves: A History of Catholic Schooling and the Catholic Church in the Diocese of Townsville, North Queensland: 1870 - 1970
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31.500000 USD

Saints and Slaves: A History of Catholic Schooling and the Catholic Church in the Diocese of Townsville, North Queensland: 1870 - 1970

by Martin Sullivan
Paperback
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The Irish potato famine of the 1840s, perhaps the most appalling event of the Victorian era, killed over a million people and drove as many more to emigrate to America. It may not have been the result of deliberate government policy, yet British `obtuseness, short-sightedness and ignorance' - and stubborn ...
The Great Hunger: Ireland 1845-1849
The Irish potato famine of the 1840s, perhaps the most appalling event of the Victorian era, killed over a million people and drove as many more to emigrate to America. It may not have been the result of deliberate government policy, yet British `obtuseness, short-sightedness and ignorance' - and stubborn commitment to laissez-faire `solutions' - largely caused the disaster and prevented any serious efforts to relieve suffering. The continuing impact on Anglo-Irish relations was incalculable, the immediate human cost almost inconceivable. In this vivid and disturbing book Cecil Woodham-Smith provides the definitive account. `A moving and terrible book. It combines great literary power with great learning. It explains much in modern Ireland - and in modern America' D.W. Brogan.
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23.62 USD

The Great Hunger: Ireland 1845-1849

by Cecil Woodham-Smith
Paperback / softback
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OBSERVER BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2015 TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT BOOKS OF THE YEAR and OBSERVER BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2014 WINNER OF THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION'S MORRIS D. FORKOSCH PRIZE 2016 'The most complete and plausible exploration of the roots of the 1916 Rebellion...essential reading' Colm Toibin Vivid Faces surveys ...
Vivid Faces923
OBSERVER BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2015 TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT BOOKS OF THE YEAR and OBSERVER BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2014 WINNER OF THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION'S MORRIS D. FORKOSCH PRIZE 2016 'The most complete and plausible exploration of the roots of the 1916 Rebellion...essential reading' Colm Toibin Vivid Faces surveys the lives and beliefs of the people who made the Irish Revolution: linked together by youth, radicalism, subversive activities, enthusiasm and love. Determined to reconstruct the world and defining themselves against their parents, they were in several senses a revolutionary generation. The Ireland that eventually emerged bore little relation to the brave new world they had conjured up in student societies, agit-prop theatre groups, vegetarian restaurants, feminist collectives, volunteer militias, Irish-language summer schools, and radical newspaper offices. Roy Foster's book investigates that world, and the extraordinary people who occupied it. Looking back from old age, one of the most magnetic members of the revolutionary generation reflected that 'the phoenix of our youth has fluttered to earth a miserable old hen', but he also wondered 'how many people nowadays get so much fun as we did'. Working from a rich trawl of contemporary diaries, letters and reflections, Vivid Faces re-creates the argumentative, exciting, subversive and original lives of people who made a revolution, as well as the disillusionment in which it ended.
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18.75 USD

Vivid Faces923

by R F Foster
Paperback
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Masterfully blending narrative and interpretation, and R.F. Foster's Modern Ireland: 1600-1972 looks at how key events in Irish history contributed to the creation of the 'Irish Nation'. 'The most brilliant and courageous Irish historian of his generation' Colm Toibin, London Review of Books 'Remarkable ... Foster gives a wise and ...
Modern Ireland 1600-1972
Masterfully blending narrative and interpretation, and R.F. Foster's Modern Ireland: 1600-1972 looks at how key events in Irish history contributed to the creation of the 'Irish Nation'. 'The most brilliant and courageous Irish historian of his generation' Colm Toibin, London Review of Books 'Remarkable ... Foster gives a wise and balanced account of both forces of unity and forces of diversity ... a master work of scholarship' Bernard Crick, New Statesman 'A tour de force ... Anyone who really wants to make sense of Ireland and the Irish must read Roy Foster's magnificent and accessible Modern Ireland' Anthony Clare 'A magnificent book. It supersedes all other accounts of modern Irish history' Conor Cruise O'Brien, Sunday Times 'Dazzling ... a masterly survey not so much of the events of Irish history over the past four centuries as of the way in which those events acted upon the peoples living in Ireland to produce in our own time an Irish Nation ... a gigantic and distinguished undertaking' Robert Kee, Observer 'A work of gigantic importance. It is everything that a history book should be. It is beautifully and clearly written; it seeps wisdom through its every pore; it is full of the most elegant and scholarly insights; it is magnificently authoritative and confident ... Modern Ireland is quite simply the single most important book on Irish history written in this generation ... A masterpiece' Kevin Myers, Irish Times R. F. Foster is Carroll Professor of Irish History at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford. His books include Modern Ireland: 1600-1972, Luck and the Irish and W. B. Yeats: A Life.
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25.46 USD

Modern Ireland 1600-1972

by R Foster
Paperback / softback
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How do we give a future to the past? How do we perform acts of double remembrance which honor both sides of the story-- spoken and unspoken, acknowledged and forgotten? One hundred years after the Easter Rising, Twinsome Minds explores the complexities of commemoration against the backdrops of the famine ...
Twinsome Minds: An Act of Double Remembrance
How do we give a future to the past? How do we perform acts of double remembrance which honor both sides of the story-- spoken and unspoken, acknowledged and forgotten? One hundred years after the Easter Rising, Twinsome Minds explores the complexities of commemoration against the backdrops of the famine and 1916. Using word and image artist Sheila Gallagher and philosopher Richard Kearney retrieve some neglected micro-narratives of Irish historical trauma to illustrate how memory occurs at the cross section of story and history. In an inventive combination of archival imagery, historical records and narrative imagination, they mine the past for potential futures in a process of healing and recovery. Ireland's Great Hunger Museum at Quinnipiac University publishes Famine Folios, a unique resource for students, scholars and researchers, as well as general readers, covering many aspects of the Famine in Ireland from 1845-1852 - the worst demographic catastrophe of nineteenth-century Europe. The essays are interdisciplinary in nature, and make available new research in Famine studies by internationally established scholars in history, art history, cultural theory, philosophy, media history, political economy, literature and music.
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15.750000 USD

Twinsome Minds: An Act of Double Remembrance

by Sheila Gallagher, Richard Kearney
Paperback / softback
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The devastation of disease, the pace of death and fears of contagion not only altered the practices of mourning and burial during the calamitous height of the Famine, but have also shaped its visual representation and ongoing patterns of remembrance.Paintings and illustrations reflect on aspects of pre-famine conventions around death, ...
Ultimate Witnesses: The Visual Culture of Death, Burial and Mourning in Famine Ireland
The devastation of disease, the pace of death and fears of contagion not only altered the practices of mourning and burial during the calamitous height of the Famine, but have also shaped its visual representation and ongoing patterns of remembrance.Paintings and illustrations reflect on aspects of pre-famine conventions around death, burial and mourning, which drew on a culturally rich and complex range of Christian and Celtic pagan traditions. Later, famine-era images and objects reveal some of the distressing modifications to mortuary and funerary practices during the famine years. Since then, photographic archives, art works, monuments, memorial parks, cemeteries and unmarked burial grounds provide spaces for remembrance across the landscape of Ireland where visitor engagement is informed by competing forces of historical and touristic practices. This folio encompasses a cross-section of representational forms and strategies of remembrance of the Famine dead who were, to borrow Giorgio Agamben's term, the ultimate witnesses to that tragic period. Ireland's Great Hunger Museum at Quinnipiac University publishes Famine Folios, a unique resource for students, scholars and researchers, as well as general readers, covering many aspects of the Famine in Ireland from 1845-1852 - the worst demographic catastrophe of nineteenth-century Europe. The essays are interdisciplinary in nature, and make available new research in Famine studies by internationally established scholars in history, art history, cultural theory, philosophy, media history, political economy, literature and music.
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15.750000 USD

Ultimate Witnesses: The Visual Culture of Death, Burial and Mourning in Famine Ireland

by Niamh Ann Kelly
Paperback / softback
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On Easter Sunday, 23 April 1916, the seven members of the Irish Republican Brotherhood's military council met to proclaim an Irish Republic with themselves as the provisional government. After a week of fighting with the British army on the streets of Dublin, the Seven were arrested, court-martialled and executed. Cutting ...
The Seven: The Lives and Legacies of the Founding Fathers of the Irish Republic
On Easter Sunday, 23 April 1916, the seven members of the Irish Republican Brotherhood's military council met to proclaim an Irish Republic with themselves as the provisional government. After a week of fighting with the British army on the streets of Dublin, the Seven were arrested, court-martialled and executed. Cutting through the layers of veneration that have seen them regarded unquestioningly as heroes and martyrs by many, Ruth Dudley Edwards provides shrewd yet sensitive portraits of Ireland's founding fathers. She explores how an incongruous group, which included a communist, visionary Catholic poets and a tobacconist, joined together to initiate an armed rebellion that changed the course of Irish history. Brilliant, thought-provoking and captivatingly told, The Seven challenges us to see past the myths and consider the true character and legacy of the Easter Rising.
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17.05 USD

The Seven: The Lives and Legacies of the Founding Fathers of the Irish Republic

by Ruth Dudley Edwards
Paperback
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The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and ...
The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History
The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and embracing 400 years of Irish history, uniting early and late modernists as well as contemporary historians. The Handbook offers a set of scholarly perspectives drawn from numerous disciplines, including history, political science, literature, geography, and the Irish language. It looks at the Irish at home as well as in their migrant and diasporic communities. The Handbook combines sets of wide thematic and interpretative essays, with more detailed investigations of particular periods. Each of the contributors offers a summation of the state of scholarship within their subject area, linking their own research insights with assessments of future directions within the discipline. In its breadth and depth and diversity, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History offers an authoritative and vibrant portrayal of the history of modern Ireland.
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51.19 USD

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

Paperback / softback
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This is the first history of sport in Ireland, locating the history of sport within Irish political, social, and cultural history, and within the global history of sport. Sport and Ireland demonstrates that there are aspects of Ireland's sporting history that are uniquely Irish and are defined by the peculiarities ...
Sport and Ireland: A History
This is the first history of sport in Ireland, locating the history of sport within Irish political, social, and cultural history, and within the global history of sport. Sport and Ireland demonstrates that there are aspects of Ireland's sporting history that are uniquely Irish and are defined by the peculiarities of life on a small island on the edge of Europe. What is equally apparent, though, is that the Irish sporting world is unique only in part; much of the history of Irish sport is a shared history with that of other societies. Drawing on an unparalleled range of sources - government archives, sporting institutions, private collections, and more than sixty local, national, and international newspapers - this volume offers a unique insight into the history of the British Empire in Ireland and examines the impact that political partition has had on the organization of sport there. Paul Rouse assesses the relationship between sport and national identity, how sport influences policy-making in modern states, and the ways in which sport has been colonized by the media and has colonized it in turn. Each chapter of Sport and Ireland contains new research on the place of sport in Irish life: the playing of hurling matches in London in the eighteenth century, the growth of cricket to become the most important sport in early Victorian Ireland, and the enlistment of thousands of members of the Gaelic Athletic Association as soldiers in the British Army during the Great War. Rouse draws out the significance of animals to the Irish sporting tradition, from the role of horse and dogs in racing and hunting, to the cocks, bulls, and bears that were involved in fighting and baiting.
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32.40 USD

Sport and Ireland: A History

by Paul Rouse
Paperback
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In 1837, the power of Daniel O'Connell's oratory focused the attention of Europeans on Ireland. They were horrified at what they saw there. The Irish poor - a third of the population - had no food except the potatoes they grew, and not enough clothing to cover themselves. They went ...
Poverty in Ireland 1837: Szegenyseg Irlandban - A Hungarian's View
In 1837, the power of Daniel O'Connell's oratory focused the attention of Europeans on Ireland. They were horrified at what they saw there. The Irish poor - a third of the population - had no food except the potatoes they grew, and not enough clothing to cover themselves. They went hungry for two months of the year, and half-naked for all the year. Yet this would be their last 'good' decade before more than a million of them would vanish into unmarked graves in the 1840s. The idealistic young Baron Eotvos - a humanitarian and already a much-praised poet - struggled to understand how Ireland could have been reduced to this state under English rule, and why English journalists wrote with such bigotry about the Irish. In Hungary, he was a campaigner for the freedom of serfs, but conceded that those serfs lived in better conditions and had more protection than Irish tenants and labourers. The only protection for the Irish poor came from illegal organizations such as the Whiteboys.His visit coincided with a pivotal moment in Irish history, when debate was raging about the introduction of a 'Poor Law' (with Poor Tax to pay for it) - a charitable-sounding term for a cruel Act aimed at clearing the land of people who had no other means of survival. His deeply researched summary of the English occupation of Ireland - uninfluenced by modern revisionism - makes compelling, often harrowing reading.
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25.52 USD

Poverty in Ireland 1837: Szegenyseg Irlandban - A Hungarian's View

by Baron Jozsef Eotvos
Paperback
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This book discusses how and why American modernist writers turned to Ireland at various stages during their careers. By placing events such as the Celtic Revival and the Easter Rising at the centre of the discussion, it shows how Irishness became a cultural determinant in the work of American modernists. ...
American Literature and Irish Culture, 1910-55: The Politics of Enchantment
This book discusses how and why American modernist writers turned to Ireland at various stages during their careers. By placing events such as the Celtic Revival and the Easter Rising at the centre of the discussion, it shows how Irishness became a cultural determinant in the work of American modernists. It is the first study to extend the analysis of Irish influence on American literature beyond racial, ethnic or national frameworks. Through close readings and archival research, American literature and Irish culture, 1910-55 provides a balanced and structured approach to the study of the complexities of American modernist writers' responses to Ireland. Offering new readings of familiar literary figures - including Fitzgerald, Moore, O'Neill, Steinbeck and Stevens - it makes for essential reading for students and academics working on twentieth-century American and Irish literature and culture, and transatlantic studies. -- .
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28.99 USD

American Literature and Irish Culture, 1910-55: The Politics of Enchantment

by Tara Stubbs
Paperback / softback
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This book explores how news and information about the conflict in Northern Ireland was disseminated through the most accessible, powerful and popular form of media: television. It focuses on the BBC and considers how its broadcasts complicated the 'Troubles' by challenging decisions, policies and tactics developed by governments trying to ...
The Bbc'S 'Irish Troubles': Television, Conflict and Northern Ireland
This book explores how news and information about the conflict in Northern Ireland was disseminated through the most accessible, powerful and popular form of media: television. It focuses on the BBC and considers how its broadcasts complicated the 'Troubles' by challenging decisions, policies and tactics developed by governments trying to defeat a stubborn insurgency that threatened national security. The book uses highly original sources to consider how the BBC upset the efforts of a number of governments to control the narrative of a conflict that claimed over 3,500 lives and caused deep emotional scarring to thousands of people. Using recently released archival material from the BBC and a variety of government archives, the book addresses the contentious relationship between broadcasting officials, politicians, the army, police and civil service from the outbreak of violence throughout the 1980s. -- .
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30.70 USD

The Bbc'S 'Irish Troubles': Television, Conflict and Northern Ireland

by Robert Savage
Paperback / softback
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Between 1919 and 1923, Ireland was engulfed by violence as the Irish Republican Army (IRA) fought a guerrilla campaign against the British state and later fellow Irishmen and women in pursuit of an Irish Republic. Police barracks and government offices were attacked and burned, soldiers and policemen were killed and ...
The IRA in Britain, 1919-1923: `In the Heart of Enemy Lines'
Between 1919 and 1923, Ireland was engulfed by violence as the Irish Republican Army (IRA) fought a guerrilla campaign against the British state and later fellow Irishmen and women in pursuit of an Irish Republic. Police barracks and government offices were attacked and burned, soldiers and policemen were killed and the economic and social life of the country was dislocated. Britain itself was a theatre in the war too. `In the heart of enemy lines', as one IRA leader put it, cities such as London, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Glasgow and their environs saw the establishment of IRA companies, Irish Republican Brotherhood circles, Cumann na mBan branches and Na Fianna Eireann troops. Composed of Irish emigrants and the descendants of emigrants, these organizations worked to help their comrades across the Irish Sea. Their most important activity was gunrunning, acquiring and smuggling weapons to Ireland. In November 1920, setting fire to warehouses and timber yards in Liverpool, they launched a campaign of violence. Meanwhile, mass-membership organizations such as the Irish Self-Determination League of Great Britain and Sinn Fein sought to persuade the British public of Ireland's right to independence. Republican leaders such as Michael Collins, Rory O'Connor and Liam Mellows took a keen interest in these exploits. Making extensive use of archival sources and memoirs, The IRA in Britain is the first book to study this little known aspect of the Irish Revolutionary period. Tracing the history of the Irish Volunteers in Britain from their establishment in 1914 and participation in the Easter Rising two years later, through the weapons' smuggling activities and violent operations of the War of Independence to the bitter divisions of the Civil War and the response of the authorities, The IRA in Britain highlights the important role played by those outside of Ireland in the Revolution.
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42.58 USD

The IRA in Britain, 1919-1923: `In the Heart of Enemy Lines'

by Gerard Noonan
Paperback / softback
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`Emer O'Sullivan has made an indispensable contribution to Wildean literature ... Compelling, informative and fascinating' Stephen Fry Oscar Wilde's father - scientist, surgeon, archaeologist, writer - was one of the most eminent men of his generation. His mother - poet, journalist, translator - hosted an influential salon at 1 Merrion ...
The Fall of the House of Wilde: Oscar Wilde and His Family
`Emer O'Sullivan has made an indispensable contribution to Wildean literature ... Compelling, informative and fascinating' Stephen Fry Oscar Wilde's father - scientist, surgeon, archaeologist, writer - was one of the most eminent men of his generation. His mother - poet, journalist, translator - hosted an influential salon at 1 Merrion Square. Together they were one of Victorian Ireland's most dazzling and enlightened couples. When, in 1864, Sir William Wilde was accused of sexually assaulting a female patient, it sent shock waves through Dublin society. After his death some ten years later, Jane attempted to re-establish the family in London, where Oscar burst irrepressibly upon the scene, only to fall in a trial as public as his father's. A remarkable and perceptive account, The Fall of the House of Wilde is a major repositioning of our first modern celebrity, a man whose fall from grace marked the end of fin de siecle decadence.
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22.17 USD

The Fall of the House of Wilde: Oscar Wilde and His Family

by Emer O'Sullivan
Paperback
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Winnie and George tells the true and previously untold story of two individuals who lived remarkable lives, both before and after they crossed paths. Enhanced with dramatised dialogue, it is a powerful lesson in how love, once discovered, can be greater than the sum of all our divisions. Maria Winifred ...
Winnie and George: An Unlikely Union
Winnie and George tells the true and previously untold story of two individuals who lived remarkable lives, both before and after they crossed paths. Enhanced with dramatised dialogue, it is a powerful lesson in how love, once discovered, can be greater than the sum of all our divisions. Maria Winifred Carney, known to her friends as `Winnie', and George McBride came from different backgrounds and lived opposing lives. She was a Roman Catholic. He belonged to the Church of Ireland. She was a republican. He was a unionist. She was a member of Cumann na mBan. He had been in the Young Citizen Volunteers loyalist group. She became James Connolly's secretary and carried a Webley gun in the GPO during the Easter Rising. He fought for the British Army at the Somme during the Great War. Both shared a passion for fairness and the rights of the working class. Despite living in a Belfast rife with sectarian tension and opposition from both their families a very unlikely yet successful marriage occurred.
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25.200000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Few people nowadays are able to visualise the difficulties and dangers of learning to fly in 1910...flying was in the experimental stage, it was impossible to predict how the frail and flimsy structure would behave in the air. Captain Frederick Sykes, writing in 1940. This is a brand new account ...
Pioneers, Showmen and the RFC: Early Aviation in Ireland 1909-1914
Few people nowadays are able to visualise the difficulties and dangers of learning to fly in 1910...flying was in the experimental stage, it was impossible to predict how the frail and flimsy structure would behave in the air. Captain Frederick Sykes, writing in 1940. This is a brand new account of early aviation in Ireland. It describes and examines the key events in the field of aviation during the bare five years between Harry Ferguson's first flight and the outbreak of the Great War. It studies the people, the aircraft and the places involved, and makes much use of contemporary sources to reveal the story through the eyes of those who witnessed these exciting times. All main personalities are covered as well as much new research on several more obscure pioneers.
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27.30 USD

Pioneers, Showmen and the RFC: Early Aviation in Ireland 1909-1914

by Guy Warner
Paperback / softback
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While many Irish-Americans identify the Great Famine of the mid-nineteenth century as the pivotal event in their ethnic history, most people in Ireland knew little about it as its 150th-anniversary approached. The Great Famine continued from 1845 at least until 1852, with lesser, locally devastating, famines occurring at intervals: most ...
Voices Underfoot: Memory, Forgetting, and Oral Verbal Art: 2016
While many Irish-Americans identify the Great Famine of the mid-nineteenth century as the pivotal event in their ethnic history, most people in Ireland knew little about it as its 150th-anniversary approached. The Great Famine continued from 1845 at least until 1852, with lesser, locally devastating, famines occurring at intervals: most notable was the so-called 'Little Famine' of the late 1870s, which led to the formation of the Land League, and then to the Land War of the 1880s. Famine commemorations began in 1995 and ended in 1997, however, suggesting that the effects of mass hunger, destitution, and widespread premature death could now safely be consigned to scholarship, sculpture and oblivion. Intense social change in Ireland since the 1990s has coincided with new work by scholars and artists to raise awareness of the unacknowledged trauma suffered by those who survived famine, and by their descendants. Famine has left many traces in a landscape now best known through tourism. Less well known or understood, however, are its many reverberations in the minds and imaginations of individuals, families and communities.
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15.750000 USD

Voices Underfoot: Memory, Forgetting, and Oral Verbal Art: 2016

by Angela Bourke
Paperback / softback
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Taking poetry as an act of witness and restorative memory, this essay traces the development of poems relating to Ireland's Great Hunger from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. An international landscape of connected experience emerges through the work of Eavan Boland, Alan Shapiro, Patrick Kavanagh, Seamus Heaney, Paul ...
Leaves of Hungry Grass: Poetry and Ireland's Great Hunger: 2016
Taking poetry as an act of witness and restorative memory, this essay traces the development of poems relating to Ireland's Great Hunger from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. An international landscape of connected experience emerges through the work of Eavan Boland, Alan Shapiro, Patrick Kavanagh, Seamus Heaney, Paul Celan and many poets in Ireland, the U.S., Germany and Australia.In examining a world of poetry, the connections and parallels to contemporary famines and migrations become clear, and the response of Irish poets to famine in other countries is acknowledged. Vincent Woods shows how the post-Famine diaspora influenced the work of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman; and in presenting new work by Eilean Ni Chuilleanain and Miriam de Burca, argues that the creative response to the Irish Famine is ongoing and vital.
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15.750000 USD

Leaves of Hungry Grass: Poetry and Ireland's Great Hunger: 2016

by Vincent Woods
Paperback
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The most virulent and rancorous debate during the Great Irish Famine concerned the role of the state in economic affairs, with the 'science' of political economy, the authoritative official discourse, decreeing a policy of laissez-faire. Long regarded as either ignorant or neglectful of its principles, the Irish, from the 1830s, ...
Death by Discourse?: Political Economy and the Great Irish Famine: 2016
The most virulent and rancorous debate during the Great Irish Famine concerned the role of the state in economic affairs, with the 'science' of political economy, the authoritative official discourse, decreeing a policy of laissez-faire. Long regarded as either ignorant or neglectful of its principles, the Irish, from the 1830s, were the focus of systematic economic evangelism. During the Famine, officialdom and its powerful institutional allies defended the 'laws' of political economy then under unrelenting popular attack. According to one authority 'the providing food for sale in all districts, and under all circumstances, should be left to the foresight and enterprise of private merchants'. The laws of commerce were the laws of God and demanded unswerving obedience. But others argued, overwhelmingly in moral terms, that in the cataclysmic Irish circumstances these laws should be either modified or even completely disregarded, maintaining, like Bishop Hughes of New York, that 'the rights of life are dearer and higher than those of property'.Ireland was seen as economically backward, being over-populated, lacking industry, and being almost totally dependent on a grossly inefficient agricultural sector. The modernization of Irish agriculture entailed the substitution of capitalist farming for the cottier system, resulting in the consolidation of small farms into larger holdings and the general replacement of tillage with pasture. The ultimate cause of the Famine was held to be not so much the palpable economic state of Ireland but the more mediated and intangible agency of Irish character, the cause rather than the effect of poverty. Irish character, lacking steadiness, prudence, and foresight, needed externally-imposed discipline, the character-forming rigour of competition in free markets with the central discursive role being taken by political economy.
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15.750000 USD

Death by Discourse?: Political Economy and the Great Irish Famine: 2016

by Tadhg Foley
Paperback
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Grim Bastilles of Despair is a short study on the Poor Law Union workhouses in Ireland. The folio explores how, despite strong Irish resistance, the British authorities established the Act for the Effectual Relief of the Destitute Poor in Ireland, which was to become one of the most despised Acts ...
Grim Bastilles of Despair: The Poor Law Union Workhouses in Ireland: 2016
Grim Bastilles of Despair is a short study on the Poor Law Union workhouses in Ireland. The folio explores how, despite strong Irish resistance, the British authorities established the Act for the Effectual Relief of the Destitute Poor in Ireland, which was to become one of the most despised Acts ever to come into effect in Ireland. The study includes an account of the selection of the workhouse architect , George Wilkinson, and provides a short biography of his career, together with a detailed description of his model designs for the workhouse buildings which had been designed to ensure that nothing short of total destitution would compel anyone to seek refuge there. The ideology of segregation and confinement , as well as the traumatic daily experience of the paupers who had been forced by eviction and starvation to enter these brutal institutions, is described and illustrated with drawings and photographs. The folio also describes the devastating impact of Great Famine and how these flawed institutions imploded under the enormity of this great tragedy , causing almost one third of a million people to die within their grey stone walls during the Famine years (1846-51).
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15.750000 USD

Grim Bastilles of Despair: The Poor Law Union Workhouses in Ireland: 2016

by Paschal Mahoney
Paperback / softback
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The Policing of Belfast, 1870-1914 examines the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) in late Victorian Belfast in order to see how a semi-military, largely rural constabulary adapted to the problems that a city posed. Mark Radford explores whether the RIC, as the most public face of British government, was successful in ...
The Policing of Belfast 1870-1914
The Policing of Belfast, 1870-1914 examines the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) in late Victorian Belfast in order to see how a semi-military, largely rural constabulary adapted to the problems that a city posed. Mark Radford explores whether the RIC, as the most public face of British government, was successful in controlling a recalcitrant Irish urban populace. This examination of the contrast in styles between urban and rural policing and semi-rural and civil constabulary offers an important insight into the social, political and military history of Ireland at the turn of the twentieth century. The book concludes by showing how governmental neglect of the force and its failure to comprehensively address the issues of pay and conditions of service ultimately led to crisis in the RIC.
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45.100000 USD

The Policing of Belfast 1870-1914

by Mark Radford
Paperback / softback
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Tears were shed on the evening of 30 June 1962 when the final curtain came down on the expansive stage of Dublin's famous Theatre Royal, the largest entertainment venue in Ireland and Britain, with its capacity of almost 4,000. It was the end of an era for generations of fans ...
Showtime at the Royal: The Story of Dublin's Legendary Theatre
Tears were shed on the evening of 30 June 1962 when the final curtain came down on the expansive stage of Dublin's famous Theatre Royal, the largest entertainment venue in Ireland and Britain, with its capacity of almost 4,000. It was the end of an era for generations of fans who enjoyed evenings at the Hawkins Street cine-variety venue, where one could watch a film, have a meal and enjoy a big stage show. There has been nothing to match it since. Stars who appeared there read like a who's who of show business. Besides legendary Irish entertainers including Jimmy O'Dea, Noel Purcell, Jack Cruise, Cecil Sheridan, Danny Cummins, Frankie Blowers and many more, the Royal played host to the likes of Bob Hope, Gracie Fields, Joan Hammond, Maurice Chevalier, Judy Garland, James Cagney, Margot Fonteyn, Danny Kaye, Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Yehudi Menuhin, Arthur Rubinstein, Bill Haley, Frankie Vaughan, Paul Robeson, George Formby, Anna Neagle, the Three Stooges, Frankie Laine, Johnnie Ray, Nat King Cole, Allan Jones and Count John McCormack to mention a few. It was said in the entertainment world that if you hadn't appeared at the Royal, you hadn't really made it internationally. Showtime at the Royal covers the complete history of Ireland's most famous showplace dating back to the seventeenth century and its special place in the social history of the city. There are interviews, anecdotes and reports, and many unique photographs seen for the first time in public.
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32.550000 USD
Paperback / softback
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This book brings together research relating to the economics of disability in Ireland. It addresses a range of issues of relevance to the economic circumstances of people with disabilities, considering topics such as social inclusion, poverty, the labour market, living standards and public policy. It also considers issues of specific ...
The Economics of Disability: Insights from Irish Research
This book brings together research relating to the economics of disability in Ireland. It addresses a range of issues of relevance to the economic circumstances of people with disabilities, considering topics such as social inclusion, poverty, the labour market, living standards and public policy. It also considers issues of specific relevance to children, working-age adults and older people with disabilities, providing important evidence that can help improve disability policies, services and supports. Each chapter presents a clear and relatively non-technical treatment of the specific topic under consideration, making it accessible to a greater number of interested readers. In doing so, it provides an important addition to our knowledge and understanding of the economics of disability and will serve as a useful and up-to-date resource for a range of interested parties both in Ireland and internationally. -- .
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41.950000 USD

The Economics of Disability: Insights from Irish Research

Paperback / softback
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This book is unique in adopting a family history approach to Irish immigrants in nineteenth century Britain. It shows that the family was central to the migrants' lives and identities. The techniques of family and digital history are used for the first time to reveal the paths followed by a ...
Divergent Paths: Family Histories of Irish Emigrants in Britain, 1820-1920
This book is unique in adopting a family history approach to Irish immigrants in nineteenth century Britain. It shows that the family was central to the migrants' lives and identities. The techniques of family and digital history are used for the first time to reveal the paths followed by a representative body of Irish immigrant families, using the town of Stafford in the West Midlands as a case study. The book contains vital evidence about the lives of ordinary families. In the long term many intermarried with the local population, but others moved away and some simply died out. The book investigates what forces determined the paths they followed and why their ultimate fates were so varied. A fascinating picture is revealed of family life and gender relations in nineteenth-century England which will appeal to scholars of Irish history, social history, genealogy and the history of the family. -- .
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50.34 USD

Divergent Paths: Family Histories of Irish Emigrants in Britain, 1820-1920

by John Herson
Paperback / softback
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