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Published in 1776, Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations was the first comprehensive treatment of political economy. Today it is considered one of the most influential books ever written and its author is regarded as the father of classical economics. Smith did for economics what Darwin did for science. Here ...
Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations: A modern-day interpretation of an economic classic
Published in 1776, Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations was the first comprehensive treatment of political economy. Today it is considered one of the most influential books ever written and its author is regarded as the father of classical economics. Smith did for economics what Darwin did for science. Here Karen McCreadie interprets this inspiring book for the modern day world of finance, business and economics, illustrating the timeless nature of Smith's insights by bringing them to life with twenty-first century examples. Modern readers will discover: * How to improve productivity; * How to avoid divisive management; * Why you should pay your people well; * The importance of long-range thinking; * Why playing the lottery is no substitute for economic strategy. While we cannot know what Smith would have made of the excesses of capitalism we've already witnessed in the twenty-first century, the range of ideas inside demonstrates that The Wealth of Nations is every bit as relevant today as it was in 1776. This interpretation of Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations is not a substitute for the original. Its purpose is simply to illustrate the timeless nature of Smith's insights by bringing them to life with contemporary examples. Given the continuing turbulence of the global economy this brilliant interpretation of a classic of political economy couldn't be more timely.
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6.97 USD
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Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations was first published in 1776 and almost instantly it was recognized as fundamental to an understanding of economics. It was also recognized as being really long and as P. J. O'Rourke points out, to understand The Wealth of Nations, the cornerstone of free-market thinking ...
On the Wealth of Nations
Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations was first published in 1776 and almost instantly it was recognized as fundamental to an understanding of economics. It was also recognized as being really long and as P. J. O'Rourke points out, to understand The Wealth of Nations, the cornerstone of free-market thinking and a book that shapes the world to this day, you also need to peruse Smith's earlier doorstopper, The Theory of Moral Sentiments . But now you don't have to read either, because P. J. has done it for you. In this hilarious work, P. J. shows us why Smith is still relevant, why what seems obvious now was once revolutionary, and how the division of labour, freedom of trade and pursuit of self-interest espoused by Smith are not only vital to the welfare of mankind, they're funny too. He goes on to establish that far from being an avatar of capitalism, Smith was actually a moralist of liberty. As P.J. says, 'It's as if Smith, having proved that we can all have more money, then went on to prove that money doesn't buy happiness. And it doesn't. It rents it.'
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10.46 USD
Hardback
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Silk was first developed in ancient China as early as 2600 BC, and over the centuries that followed it gradually spread first to South East Asia and then to the Middle East, North Africa and Europe along the silk route, becoming established in England in the fourteenth century. The early ...
The Silk Industry
Silk was first developed in ancient China as early as 2600 BC, and over the centuries that followed it gradually spread first to South East Asia and then to the Middle East, North Africa and Europe along the silk route, becoming established in England in the fourteenth century. The early centres of the English silk industry, Spitalfields, Norwich and Canterbury, benefited from the arrival of the Dutch or Huguenot silk workers, and in 1718 the first factory system for producing silk was begun in Derby. This book traces the legendary silk route from China to the UK and explores the developments in silk production once it reached Europe, the changes to the loom, the popularity of silk clothing, and the industry's struggle with the removal of tariff protection. After reaching its peak in 1850, the industry began to decline with the introduction of Cobden's Free Trade Treaty of 1860, and was further diminished by the advent of artificial silk. Sarah Bush guides us through the ups and downs of the silk industry and provides a perfect introduction to the history of this ancient process.
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3.49 USD
Paperback
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Today, a host of forces are converging to challenge America's cherished notion of exceptionalism, and risky economic and foreign policies have steadily eroded the power structure that has been in place since the Cold War. Staggering under a huge burden of debt, the country must make some tough choices - ...
The Reckoning: Debt, Democracy, and the Future of American Power
Today, a host of forces are converging to challenge America's cherished notion of exceptionalism, and risky economic and foreign policies have steadily eroded the power structure that has been in place since the Cold War. Staggering under a huge burden of debt, the country must make some tough choices - or cede sovereignty to its creditors. In The Reckoning, geostrategy analyst Michael Moran explores the challenges ahead - and what, if anything, can be done to prevent chaos as America loses its perch at the top of the mountain. He warns that the coming shift will have serious consequences not just for the United States, but for the wider world. Countries that have traditionally depended on the United States for protection and global stability will have to fend for themselves. Moran describes how, with a bit of wise leadership, America can weather the transition gracefully - by managing entitlements, reigniting sustainable growth, reforming immigration policy, and breaking the poisonous deadlock in Washington.
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8.37 USD
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Although 1759 is not a date as well known in British history as 1215, 1588, or 1688, there is a strong case to be made that it is the most significant year since 1066. In 1759 - the fourth year of the Seven Years War - the British defeated the ...
1759: The Year Britain Became Master of the World
Although 1759 is not a date as well known in British history as 1215, 1588, or 1688, there is a strong case to be made that it is the most significant year since 1066. In 1759 - the fourth year of the Seven Years War - the British defeated the French in arduous campaigns in India and the West Indies, in Germany and Canada, and also achieved absolute mastery of the seas. As Thackeray famously remarked in Barry Lyndon, it would take a theologian, rather than an historian, to unravel the true causes of the Seven Years War in Europe, but the spine of the wider conflict was the struggle for global hegemony between Britain and France. Drawing on a mass of primary materials - from texts in the Vatican archives to oral histories of the North American Indians - Frank McLynn shows how the conflict between those two countries triggered the first 'world war', raging from Europe to Africa; the Caribbean to the Pacific; the plains of the Ganges to the Great Lakes of North America. It also brought about the War of Independence, the acquisition by Britain of the Falkland Islands and, ultimately, the French Revolution.
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6.28 USD
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Since the advent of the New Deal, unbalanced budgets have become an almost permanent feature of American government-enlightened economic policy to some, a scourge to others. In Deficit Government, Iwan Morgan makes understandable the main trends of budget policy from the Roosevelt to the Clinton presidencies, and surveys the political ...
Deficit Government: Taxing and Spending in Modern America
Since the advent of the New Deal, unbalanced budgets have become an almost permanent feature of American government-enlightened economic policy to some, a scourge to others. In Deficit Government, Iwan Morgan makes understandable the main trends of budget policy from the Roosevelt to the Clinton presidencies, and surveys the political and partisan debates surrounding the budget during these years. While focusing on federal expenditure and tax policies, Mr. Morgan explains why budget deficits have become the norm in modern American history, what impact they have had on the economy, and why the size of the deficit has grown so vast in recent years. He evaluates the importance of the budget as an instrument of economic management, including the development of Keynesian fiscal policy and the emergence of conservative doctrines that culminated in the supply-side approaches of the Reagan era. In all, readers who find their eyes glazing over at the thought of reading about budget policy will find Mr. Morgan's refreshing clarity a revelation.
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10.450000 USD
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This short and exploratory study is the first to engage with a social and economic history of natural disasters in India. Based on the study of a number of events that occurred in colonial India between 1770 and 1935, the author argues that the impact of natural disasters requires a ...
Natural Disasters and Indian History: Oxford India Short Introductions
This short and exploratory study is the first to engage with a social and economic history of natural disasters in India. Based on the study of a number of events that occurred in colonial India between 1770 and 1935, the author argues that the impact of natural disasters requires a graded sense of time. The book draws on three themes-market, politics, and knowledge, roughly corresponding to three time scales-the short, the medium, and the long run, respectively. These frame the case studies of famines, earthquakes, and storms covered in the book. These studies illustrate that disasters become devastating events by impairing the capacity of the state and civil society; they create gainers and losers; and they destroy cooperation. Yet, as the author points out, disasters have also enabled new understandings of nature, state, and society, on the basis of which useful new knowledge could grow.
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8.08 USD
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The Oxford India Short Introductions are concise, stimulating, and accessible guides to different aspects of India. Combining authoritative analysis, new ideas, and diverse perspectives, they discuss subjects which are topical yet enduring, as also emerging areas of study and debate. Monetary policy plays a pivotal role in shaping interest rates ...
Monetary Policy: Oxford India Short Introductions
The Oxford India Short Introductions are concise, stimulating, and accessible guides to different aspects of India. Combining authoritative analysis, new ideas, and diverse perspectives, they discuss subjects which are topical yet enduring, as also emerging areas of study and debate. Monetary policy plays a pivotal role in shaping interest rates and controlling inflation. Turbulence in both during the recent global financial crisis and current sovereign debt crisis in Europe has accentuated the ever-growing interest in the role of monetary policy and the functioning of central banks. It is in this context that this Short Introduction analyses the evolution of Indian monetary policy over the historical timeline of 1934 to present times. Dividing this period into several epochs, the author explains how at various points the monetary policy was shaped by the need of hour, be it the policy of credit control to support planned development in the 1950s or the introduction of liquidity adjustment facility to meet the needs of the changing economy in the post-liberalization phase. He also shows how India's monetary policies and practices have helped it absorb the shocks of the financial crisis.
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7.07 USD
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The succession of crises facing the U.S. economy in 2008 and 2009 have thrown a bright spotlight on Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke. Each of his moves to address the disastrous economic conditions are reported and analyzed at length in the press as he works to mitigate the effects of ...
Bernanke's Test: Ben Bernanke, Alan Greenspan, and the Drama of the Central Banker
The succession of crises facing the U.S. economy in 2008 and 2009 have thrown a bright spotlight on Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke. Each of his moves to address the disastrous economic conditions are reported and analyzed at length in the press as he works to mitigate the effects of the sub-prime lending debacle and resulting credit crisis. Bernanke is undergoing a stern test as America's central banker a test created for him, in large part, by his predecessor, Alan Greenspan. This new paperback edition of Bernanke's Test is completely updated with events through the end of 2009. As such, it's among the most valuable and up-to-the-minute works on Bernanke's career as Fed chair published to date, making it an essential look at the central figure shaping the recovery of the U.S. and world economies.
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10.69 USD
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In recent decades there has been a dramatic transformation around the Pacific Rim. No longer 'the Far East' - that exotic, mysterious land at the distant fringe of Western consciousness - East Asia today commands the attention of the entire world. In East Asia, Arthur Cotterell condenses into a compact, ...
East Asia: From the Chinese Predominance to the Rise of the Pacific Rim
In recent decades there has been a dramatic transformation around the Pacific Rim. No longer 'the Far East' - that exotic, mysterious land at the distant fringe of Western consciousness - East Asia today commands the attention of the entire world. In East Asia, Arthur Cotterell condenses into a compact, highly readable book an immense amount of historical knowledge, placing this amazing economic development in its proper perspective - an Asian one. Cotterell ranges from the dawn of Chinese civilization to Japan's emergence as the first East Asian nation to develop an industrial economy. And he brings his history up to the present, examining America's setbacks in the Korean and Vietnam Wars, Japan's rise as an economic superpower, and the recent histories of countries such as reunited Vietnam, Indonesia and Singapore. Cotterell goes on to suggest that Japan will eventually be overtaken by its neighbours, concluding that relations between the Chinese and the Japanese will ultimately determine the future of East Asia, although over the coming decades the key Pacific partners remain China and the United States. With spectacular historical perspective, Arthur Cotterell performs an invaluable service to all those who wish to have deeper understanding of our newest, and most competitive, trading partners.
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8.69 USD
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A provocative view of economic growth in the Third World argues that the countries that have achieved steady economic growth-including future economic superpowers India and China-have done so because they have resisted the American ideology of free markets. The American government has been both miracle worker and villain in the ...
Escape from Empire: The Developing World's Journey through Heaven and Hell
A provocative view of economic growth in the Third World argues that the countries that have achieved steady economic growth-including future economic superpowers India and China-have done so because they have resisted the American ideology of free markets. The American government has been both miracle worker and villain in the developing world. From the end of World War II until the 1980s poor countries, including many in Africa and the Middle East, enjoyed a modicum of economic growth. New industries mushroomed and skilled jobs multiplied, thanks in part to flexible American policies that showed an awareness of the diversity of Third World countries and an appreciation for their long-standing knowledge about how their own economies worked. Then during the Reagan era, American policy changed. The definition of laissez-faire shifted from Do it your way, to an imperial Do it our way. Growth in the developing world slowed, income inequalities skyrocketed, and financial crises raged. Only East Asian economies resisted the strict prescriptions of Washington and continued to boom. Why? In Escape from Empire, Alice Amsden argues provocatively that the more freedom a developing country has to determine its own policies, the faster its economy will grow. America's recent inflexibility-as it has single-mindedly imposed the same rules, laws, and institutions on all developing economies under its influence-has been the backdrop to the rise of two new giants, China and India, who have built economic power in their own way. Amsden describes the two eras in America's relationship with the developing world as Heaven and Hell -a beneficent and politically savvy empire followed by a dictatorial, ideology-driven one. What will the next American empire learn from the failure of the last? Amsden argues convincingly that the world-and the United States-will be infinitely better off if new centers of power are met with sensible policies rather than hard-knuckled ideologies. But, she asks, can it be done?
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9.71 USD
Paperback / softback
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Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Wealth. In this new book, he examines four plants: rubber, timber, tobacco and the wine grape, each of which enormously increased the wealth of those who dealt in them, created great new ...
Seeds of Wealth: Four plants that made men rich
Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Wealth. In this new book, he examines four plants: rubber, timber, tobacco and the wine grape, each of which enormously increased the wealth of those who dealt in them, created great new industries and changed the course of history. Ancient Rome's monopoly on wine production had huge economic and hygienic importance. Without rubber, there would have been no development of cars, buses and trucks, bicycles, waterproof clothing or even tennis balls and condoms. Tobacco has largely been condemned for its effects on health and its true role in history ignored. Tobacco has often been used in place of currency and its growth in Virginia supported a colony that produced much of the talent that made Independence possible. Timber shortages led the British Royal Navy to become dependent on American timber. The dearth of timber drove English coal mines deep, which led to the steam pumps, steam engines, and ultimately the Industrial Revolution. These are fascinating stories the effect of minutiae on the great waves of history. 'You cannot help but admire and enjoy the company of a man who takes such a novel and global view of history' Spectator
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10.46 USD
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The Dismal Science. The Worldly Philosophy. The Science of Scarcity. Most people think economics is one of the most challenging and complex fields of study. But with this book, it doesn't have to be! You will learn how the U.S. economy works in unbiased, easy-to-understand language. And you can learn ...
The Everything Economics Book: From theory to practice, your complete guide to understanding economics today
The Dismal Science. The Worldly Philosophy. The Science of Scarcity. Most people think economics is one of the most challenging and complex fields of study. But with this book, it doesn't have to be! You will learn how the U.S. economy works in unbiased, easy-to-understand language. And you can learn it without the complex equations, arcane graphs, and technical jargon you'll find in most economic texts. David A. Mayer and Melanie E. Fox explain: Why and how we trade How the government intervenes in markets Unemployment and inflation Supply and demand Competitive, financial, and foreign exchange markets How the economy is measured You will also learn about the causes and fallout of the recent recession and how global climate change may transform the way our economy operates. Most important, with this introduction, you'll learn how our complex and dynamic economy affects the way we actually live our lives.
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9.76 USD
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This is a carefully researched A-Z of women's employment, covering over 200 years of change. The entries themselves themselves are based on an encyclopaedic approach, each full of interest and information, as they chart the steadily evolving status of women and the job opportunities open to them. Early occupations considered ...
Female Occupations: Women's Employment from 1840 to 1950
This is a carefully researched A-Z of women's employment, covering over 200 years of change. The entries themselves themselves are based on an encyclopaedic approach, each full of interest and information, as they chart the steadily evolving status of women and the job opportunities open to them. Early occupations considered socially suitable included dairymaid, fisherwoman, governess, and stone picker. The decline of domestic service and the effect of the two World Wars way to the modern era of access for women to all categories and ranks of employment. These include accountants, army officers, and diplomats, as well as captains of industry and even Prime Minister. The Dictionary of Female Occupations is aimed especially at family historians, and contains over 300 entries. Each has some explanation of what the job entailed, the historical setting, and examples or stories of women who were involved with it.
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9.06 USD
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Americans have always believed that economic growth leads to job growth. In this groundbreaking analysis, Stanley Aronowitz argues that this is no longer true. Just Around the Corner examines the state of the American economy as planned by Democrats and Republicans over the last thirty years. Aronowitz finds that economic ...
Just Around The Corner: The Paradox Of The Jobless Recovery
Americans have always believed that economic growth leads to job growth. In this groundbreaking analysis, Stanley Aronowitz argues that this is no longer true. Just Around the Corner examines the state of the American economy as planned by Democrats and Republicans over the last thirty years. Aronowitz finds that economic growth has become \u0022delinked\u0022 from job creation, and that unemployment and underemployment are a permanent condition of our economy. He traces the historical roots of this state of affairs and sees under the surface of booms and busts a continuum of economic austerity that creates financial windfalls for the rich at the expense of most Americans. Aronowitz also explores the cultural and political processes by which we have come to describe and accept economics in the United States. He concludes by presenting a concrete plan of action that would guarantee employment and living wages for all Americans. With both measured analysis and persuasive reasoning, Just Around the Corner provides an indispensable guide to our current economic predicament and a bold challenge to economists and policymakers.
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11.39 USD
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The definitive account of the tumultuous events that led to Ireland going broke in 2010 From the night the Irish government guaranteed the debts of Irish banks in September 2008 Ireland was on a one-way road to ruin. In How Ireland Really Went Bust Matt Cooper, journalist, broadcaster and No ...
How Ireland Really Went Bust
The definitive account of the tumultuous events that led to Ireland going broke in 2010 From the night the Irish government guaranteed the debts of Irish banks in September 2008 Ireland was on a one-way road to ruin. In How Ireland Really Went Bust Matt Cooper, journalist, broadcaster and No 1 bestselling author of Who Really Runs Ireland?, describes the events that climaxed with the arrival of the heavy hitters from the IMF and the ECB in Government Buildings in November 2010 - and he assesses the fall-out of that fateful period in Ireland's recent history. Drilling deep into the human dramas, the business catastrophes, the economic collapse and the unprecedented political upheaval that characterised the time after the bank bailout, Cooper gets to the heart of what really happened. And he investigates the background of the key decisions and reveals why they were taken, and by whom, to throw new light on a period that changed Ireland forever. 'A considerable piece of work ... read it and weep' Irish Times 'Cooper's previous bestseller Who Really Runs Ireland? was an authoritative and hugely readable account that told you everything you needed to know about who's who in Ireland and the golden circles that linked business and politics for generations. How Ireland Really Went Bust is equally impressive' Irish Independent 'A lively commentary with nuggets galore ... not just readable, but full of surprises' Sunday Independent '[A] brilliant achievement that should be read by anyone interested in the state of the nation' Evening Herald 'Up-to-the-minute and exhaustive ... [Cooper] knows the players and they talk to him' Sunday Business Post
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6.28 USD
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Economics can help us understand the evolution and development of religion, from the market penetration of the Reformation to an exploration of today's hot-button issues including evolution and gay marriage. This startlingly original (and sure to be controversial) account of the evolution of Christianity shows that the economics of religion ...
The Marketplace of Christianity
Economics can help us understand the evolution and development of religion, from the market penetration of the Reformation to an exploration of today's hot-button issues including evolution and gay marriage. This startlingly original (and sure to be controversial) account of the evolution of Christianity shows that the economics of religion has little to do with counting the money in the collection basket and much to do with understanding the background of today's religious and political divisions. Since religion is a set of organized beliefs, and a church is an organized body of worshippers, it's natural to use a science that seeks to explain the behavior of organizations-economics-to understand the development of organized religion. The Marketplace of Christianity applies the tools of economic theory to illuminate the emergence of Protestantism in the sixteenth century and to examine contemporary religion-influenced issues, including evolution and gay marriage. The Protestant Reformation, the authors argue, can be seen as a successful penetration of a religious market dominated by a monopoly firm-the Catholic Church. The Ninety-five Theses nailed to the church door in Wittenberg by Martin Luther raised the level of competition within Christianity to a breaking point. The Counter-Reformation, the Catholic reaction, continued the competitive process, which came to include product differentiation in the form of doctrinal and organizational innovation. Economic theory shows us how Christianity evolved to satisfy the changing demands of consumers-worshippers. The authors of The Marketplace of Christianity avoid value judgments about religion. They take preferences for religion as given and analyze its observable effects on society and the individual. They provide the reader with clear and nontechnical background information on economics and the economics of religion before focusing on the Reformation and its aftermath. Their analysis of contemporary hot-button issues-science vs. religion, liberal vs. conservative, clerical celibacy, women and gay clergy, gay marriage-offers a vivid illustration of the potential of economic analysis to contribute to our understanding of religion.
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9.71 USD

The Marketplace of Christianity

by Robert D. Tollison, Robert F. Hebert, Robert B. Ekelund
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The record of the American economy since 1945 offers an embarrassment of riches for the historian, and Wyatt Wells has brought them together in a compact and incisive history. His theme is how greatly many economic circumstances changed-and how many other features remained essentially the same. He shows how throughout ...
American Capitalism, 1945-2000: Continuity and Change from Mass Production to the Information Society
The record of the American economy since 1945 offers an embarrassment of riches for the historian, and Wyatt Wells has brought them together in a compact and incisive history. His theme is how greatly many economic circumstances changed-and how many other features remained essentially the same. He shows how throughout the period the United States enjoyed not only the world's largest economy but by most measures its most diverse and sophisticated. The second half of the twentieth century witnessed extraordinary change: the development of entirely new industries, such as television and computers; the decline of established industries, such as steel and textiles; the impact of international trade and competition on growing numbers of Americans. As the boom of the 1950s and 1960s gave way to stagflation in the 1970s, the 1980s became a time of extensive reorganization, which in turn laid the foundation for another boom in the 1990s. Still, as Mr. Wells notes, industry remained in private hands; political debate consistently returned to the same issues involving the proper role of government in the economy; and the country remained committed to an open international economic system. American Capitalism examines the development of economic policy (government spending, taxes, regulation, and monetary policy), economic structure (companies, markets, technology, and labor), and ideas about both, explaining the complex interaction of these factors over the past half-century. The book offers an essential short course on American economic development over these years.
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15.700000 USD
Paperback / softback
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