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A rare, intimate account of a world-renowned Buddhist monk's near-death experience and the life-changing wisdom he gained as a result. 'One of the most generous, beautiful, and essential books I've ever read - thoroughly engaging, so clear, so honest, so courageous and full of wisdom.' George Saunders Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche's ...
In Love with the World: A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying
A rare, intimate account of a world-renowned Buddhist monk's near-death experience and the life-changing wisdom he gained as a result. 'One of the most generous, beautiful, and essential books I've ever read - thoroughly engaging, so clear, so honest, so courageous and full of wisdom.' George Saunders Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche's experience begins the night he has chosen to embark on a four-year wandering retreat, slipping past the monastery gates. Alone for the first time in his life, he sets out into the unknown. His initial motivation is to step away from his life of privilege and to explore the deepest, most hidden aspects of his being, but what he discovers throughout his retreat - about himself and about the world around us - comes to define his meditation practice and teaching. Just three weeks into his retreat, Rinpoche becomes deathly ill and his journey begins in earnest through this near-death experience. Moving, beautiful and suffused with local colour, In Love with the World is the story of two different kinds of death: that of the body and that of the ego, and how we can bridge these two experiences to live a better and more fulfilling life. Rinpoche's skilful and intimate account of his search for the self is a demonstration of how we can transform our dread of dying into joyful living.
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USD
Paperback / softback
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'The best book on teachers and children and writing that I've ever read. No-one has said better so much of what so badly needs saying.' Philip Pullman Kate Clanchy wants to change the world and thinks school is an excellent place to do it. She invites you to meet some ...
Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me
'The best book on teachers and children and writing that I've ever read. No-one has said better so much of what so badly needs saying.' Philip Pullman Kate Clanchy wants to change the world and thinks school is an excellent place to do it. She invites you to meet some of the kids she has taught in her thirty-year career. Join her as she explains everything about sex to a classroom of thirteen-year-olds. As she works in the school 'Inclusion Unit', trying to improve the fortunes of kids excluded from regular lessons because of their terrifying power to end learning in an instant. Or as she nurtures her multicultural poetry group, full of migrants and refugees, watches them find their voice and produce work of heartbreaking brilliance. While Clanchy doesn't deny stinging humiliations or hide painful accidents, she celebrates this most creative, passionate and practically useful of jobs. Teaching today is all too often demeaned, diminished and drastically under-resourced. Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me will show you why it shouldn't be.
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USD
Downloadable audio file
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This is the first biography in English of an uncommon American, Dr. David Murray, a professor of mathematics at Rutgers University, who was appointed by the Japanese government as Superintendent of Education in the Empire of Japan in 1873. The founding of the Gakusei-the first public school system launched in ...
Dr. David Murray: Superintendent of Education in the Empire of Japan, 1873-1879
This is the first biography in English of an uncommon American, Dr. David Murray, a professor of mathematics at Rutgers University, who was appointed by the Japanese government as Superintendent of Education in the Empire of Japan in 1873. The founding of the Gakusei-the first public school system launched in Japan-marks the beginning of modern education in Japan, accommodating all children of elementary school age. Murray's unwavering commitment to its success renders him a pioneer in the spread of Western education to the Far East, and an advocate for the future of Japan in the modern world. Benjamin Duke has compiled this comprehensive biography of David Murray to showcase Murray's work, both in helping the samurai students in their studies at Rutgers, and in his unprecedented role in early Japanese-American relations. This fascinating story uncovers a little-known link between Rutgers University and Japan, and it is the only book to conclude that Rutgers made a greater contribution to the development of modern education in the early Meiji Era than any other non-Japanese college or university in the world.
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73.450000 USD
Hardback
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'The best book on teachers and children and writing that I've ever read. No-one has said better so much of what so badly needs saying.' Philip Pullman Kate Clanchy wants to change the world and thinks school is an excellent place to do it. She invites you to meet some ...
Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me
'The best book on teachers and children and writing that I've ever read. No-one has said better so much of what so badly needs saying.' Philip Pullman Kate Clanchy wants to change the world and thinks school is an excellent place to do it. She invites you to meet some of the kids she has taught in her thirty-year career. Join her as she explains everything about sex to a classroom of thirteen-year-olds. As she works in the school `Inclusion Unit', trying to improve the fortunes of kids excluded from regular lessons because of their terrifying power to end learning in an instant. Or as she nurtures her multicultural poetry group, full of migrants and refugees, watches them find their voice and produce work of heartbreaking brilliance. While Clanchy doesn't deny stinging humiliations or hide painful accidents, she celebrates this most creative, passionate and practically useful of jobs. Teaching today is all too often demeaned, diminished and drastically under-resourced. Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me will show you why it shouldn't be.
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31.59 USD
Hardback
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August, 1755. Newcastle, on the north bank of the Tyne. In the fields, men and women are getting the harvest in. Sunlight, or rain. Scudding clouds and backbreaking labour. Three hundred feet underground, young Charles Hutton is at the coalface. Cramped, dust-choked, wielding a five-pound pick by candlelight. Eighteen years ...
Gunpowder and Geometry: The Life of Charles Hutton, Pit Boy, Mathematician and Scientific Rebel
August, 1755. Newcastle, on the north bank of the Tyne. In the fields, men and women are getting the harvest in. Sunlight, or rain. Scudding clouds and backbreaking labour. Three hundred feet underground, young Charles Hutton is at the coalface. Cramped, dust-choked, wielding a five-pound pick by candlelight. Eighteen years old, he's been down the pits on and off for more than a decade, and now it looks like a life sentence. No unusual story, although Charles is a clever lad - gifted at maths and languages - and for a time he hoped for a different life. Many hoped. Charles Hutton, astonishingly, would actually live the life he dreamed of. Twenty years later you'd have found him in Slaughter's coffee house in London, eating a few oysters with the President of the Royal Society. By the time he died, in 1823, he was a fellow of scientific academies in four countries, while the Lord Chancellor of England counted himself fortunate to have known him. Hard work, talent, and no small share of luck would take Charles Hutton out of the pit to international fame, wealth, admiration and happiness. The pit-boy turned professor would become one of the most revered British scientists of his day. This book is his incredible story.
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27.88 USD
Paperback / softback
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*NOW UPDATED WITH EXTRA MATERIAL* The boy who fled Afghanistan and endured a terrifying journey in the hands of people smugglers is now a young man intent on changing the world. His story is a deeply harrowing and incredibly inspiring tale of our times. Gulwali Passarlay was sent away from ...
The Lightless Sky: My Journey to Safety as a Child Refugee
*NOW UPDATED WITH EXTRA MATERIAL* The boy who fled Afghanistan and endured a terrifying journey in the hands of people smugglers is now a young man intent on changing the world. His story is a deeply harrowing and incredibly inspiring tale of our times. Gulwali Passarlay was sent away from Afghanistan at the age of twelve, after his father was killed in a gun battle with the US Army. He made a twelve-month odyssey across Europe, spending time in prisons, suffering hunger, making a terrifying journey across the Mediterranean in a tiny boat, and enduring a desolate month in the camp at Calais. Somehow he survived, and made it to Britain, where he was fostered, sent to school, and won a place at a top university. He was chosen to carry the Olympic torch in 2012. One boy's experience is the central story of our times. This powerful memoir celebrates the triumph of courage over adversity.
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18.57 USD
Paperback / softback
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August, 1755. Newcastle, on the north bank of the Tyne. In the fields, men and women are getting the harvest in. Sunlight, or rain. Scudding clouds and backbreaking labour. Three hundred feet underground, young Charles Hutton is at the coalface. Cramped, dust-choked, wielding a five-pound pick by candlelight. Eighteen years ...
Gunpowder and Geometry: The Life of Charles Hutton, Pit Boy, Mathematician and Scientific Rebel
August, 1755. Newcastle, on the north bank of the Tyne. In the fields, men and women are getting the harvest in. Sunlight, or rain. Scudding clouds and backbreaking labour. Three hundred feet underground, young Charles Hutton is at the coalface. Cramped, dust-choked, wielding a five-pound pick by candlelight. Eighteen years old, he's been down the pits on and off for more than a decade, and now it looks like a life sentence. No unusual story, although Charles is a clever lad - gifted at maths and languages - and for a time he hoped for a different life. Many hoped. Charles Hutton, astonishingly, would actually live the life he dreamed of. Twenty years later you'd have found him in Slaughter's coffee house in London, eating a few oysters with the President of the Royal Society. By the time he died, in 1823, he was a fellow of scientific academies in four countries, while the Lord Chancellor of England counted himself fortunate to have known him. Hard work, talent, and no small share of luck would take Charles Hutton out of the pit to international fame, wealth, admiration and happiness. The pit-boy turned professor would become one of the most revered British scientists of his day. This book is his incredible story.
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37.19 USD
Hardback
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Alan Hurwitz ascended the ranks of academia to become the president of not one, but two, universities--National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology and Gallaudet University. In Let's Go In: My Journey to a University Presidency, Hurwitz discusses the unique challenges he encountered as a Deaf ...
Let's Go In - My Journey to a University Presidency
Alan Hurwitz ascended the ranks of academia to become the president of not one, but two, universities--National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology and Gallaudet University. In Let's Go In: My Journey to a University Presidency, Hurwitz discusses the unique challenges he encountered as a Deaf person, and the events, people, and experiences that shaped his personal and professional life. He demonstrates the importance of building a strong foundation for progressive leadership roles in higher education, and provides insights into the decision-making and outreach required of a university president, covering topics such as community collaboration, budget management, and networking with public policy leaders. He also stresses that assessing students' needs should be a top priority. As he reflects on a life committed to service in higher education, Hurwitz offers up important lessons on the issues, challenges, and opportunities faced by deaf and hard of hearing people, and in doing so, inspires future generations of deaf people to aim for their highest goals.
31.450000 USD
Paperback / softback
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The candid tale of one of Britain's most outstanding contemporary philanthropists. Partly an uplifting memoir, partly an impassioned call for action, Sir Peter Lampl's autobiography explains how a self-made entrepreneur amassed a fortune - and then describes why he chose to use it to help others. From his humble beginnings ...
Untitled Memoir
The candid tale of one of Britain's most outstanding contemporary philanthropists. Partly an uplifting memoir, partly an impassioned call for action, Sir Peter Lampl's autobiography explains how a self-made entrepreneur amassed a fortune - and then describes why he chose to use it to help others. From his humble beginnings as the son of a Viennese refugee to realising, at age 49, that he had made more money than he would ever be able to spend, this book chronicles Sir Peter's varied career and storied past. This is, after all, the man who once asked his New York neighbour (Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones) if he would mind turning it down a bit. Sir Peter will recount his time in Boston, Paris and Munich working for the Boston Consulting Group, the challenges he encountered starting a private equity firm and the experiences that led him to set up the Sutton Trust. However, at the book's heart is a serious mission to present a concise and galvanising case for strategic philanthropy. When Sir Peter realised that the channels that had made his own journey from state school to Oxbridge to success possible had drastically narrowed and that the social mix among students was far less diverse, he knew he needed to do something. This book will lay out the Sutton Trust's story as an example of what 'managed philanthropy' can achieve and Sir Peter will offer his insights into effecting social change. We all have philanthropic potential if we learn to recognise and direct it; this book shows you how to.
USD

Untitled Memoir

by Sir Peter Lampl
Downloadable audio file
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Author Steven J. Harper pays tribute to a well-respected teacher with this biography of a distinguished William Smith Mason Professor of History at Northwestern University, Richard W. Leopold. Harper had maintained contact with his former professor, as had hundreds of other alumni, meeting with him in the apartment to which ...
Straddling Worlds: The Jewish-American Journey of Professor Richard W. Leopold
Author Steven J. Harper pays tribute to a well-respected teacher with this biography of a distinguished William Smith Mason Professor of History at Northwestern University, Richard W. Leopold. Harper had maintained contact with his former professor, as had hundreds of other alumni, meeting with him in the apartment to which his age and health confined him. When Leopold invited him to review his biographical materials to prepare a New York Times obituary, Harper began to catch glimpses of a deeper history in Leopold's life: that of Jews in America after the turn of the century. Across two years of Sundays, Leopold's life came together and Harper began to notice parallels between the life of his professor and the life of his recently deceased father-in-law. Both grew up in less orthodox households but were still identified as Jewish by others; both attended Ivy League colleges, fighting (and beating) anti-Semitism there; and both served their country with distinction in World War II. The two men persevered through a twentieth century Jewish-American experience that they and many others shared, but rarely discussed. Steven Harper has caught them both on the page just in time to document their lives, their culture, and the nation that grew and changed alongside them.
36.700000 USD
Paperback / softback
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The candid tale of one of Britain's most outstanding contemporary philanthropists. Partly an uplifting memoir, partly an impassioned call for action, Sir Peter Lampl's autobiography explains how a self-made entrepreneur amassed a fortune - and then describes why he chose to use it to help others. From his humble beginnings ...
Untitled Memoir
The candid tale of one of Britain's most outstanding contemporary philanthropists. Partly an uplifting memoir, partly an impassioned call for action, Sir Peter Lampl's autobiography explains how a self-made entrepreneur amassed a fortune - and then describes why he chose to use it to help others. From his humble beginnings as the son of a Viennese refugee to realising, at age 49, that he had made more money than he would ever be able to spend, this book chronicles Sir Peter's varied career and storied past. This is, after all, the man who once asked his New York neighbour (Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones) if he would mind turning it down a bit. Sir Peter will recount his time in Boston, Paris and Munich working for the Boston Consulting Group, the challenges he encountered starting a private equity firm and the experiences that led him to set up the Sutton Trust. However, at the book's heart is a serious mission to present a concise and galvanising case for strategic philanthropy. When Sir Peter realised that the channels that had made his own journey from state school to Oxbridge to success possible had drastically narrowed and that the social mix among students was far less diverse, he knew he needed to do something. This book will lay out the Sutton Trust's story as an example of what 'managed philanthropy' can achieve and Sir Peter will offer his insights into effecting social change. We all have philanthropic potential if we learn to recognise and direct it; this book shows you how to.
USD

Untitled Memoir

by Sir Peter Lampl
Hardback
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Richard W. Bulliet is an innovative historian of the Islamic world. His contributions have changed the way scholars think about the history of medieval city life, animal domestication, wheeled transport, religious conversion, Islamic institutions, and relations between Islam and Christianity. His fifty-year career at Harvard, Berkeley, and Columbia coincided with ...
Methodists and Muslims: My Life As An Orientalist
Richard W. Bulliet is an innovative historian of the Islamic world. His contributions have changed the way scholars think about the history of medieval city life, animal domestication, wheeled transport, religious conversion, Islamic institutions, and relations between Islam and Christianity. His fifty-year career at Harvard, Berkeley, and Columbia coincided with the rise of Middle East Studies as an American academic enterprise and with his Columbia colleague Edward Said's book Orientalism, which set off a lasting debate over the value of Americans' and Europeans' studying non-Western cultures. In Methodists and Muslims, Bulliet has fashioned a critique of both Orientalism and Middle East Studies. His memoir also recounts how a young Methodist from Illinois made his way into the then-arcane field of Islamic Studies, became involved in shaping Middle East Studies, and developed relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran, culminating in the controversial visit to New York City by President Ahmadinejad of Iran.
USD
Paperback / softback
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A third memoir from the author of the huge international bestsellers Angela's Ashes and 'Tis. In Teacher Man, Frank McCourt details his illustrious, amusing, and sometimes rather bumpy long years as an English teacher in the public high schools of New York City...Frank McCourt arrived in New York as a ...
Teacher Man
A third memoir from the author of the huge international bestsellers Angela's Ashes and 'Tis. In Teacher Man, Frank McCourt details his illustrious, amusing, and sometimes rather bumpy long years as an English teacher in the public high schools of New York City...Frank McCourt arrived in New York as a young, impoverished and idealistic Irish boy - but one who crucially had an American passport, having been born in Brooklyn. He didn't know what he wanted except to stop being hungry and to better himself. On the subway he watched students carrying books. He saw how they read and underlined and wrote things in the margin and he liked the look of this very much. He joined the New York Public Library and every night when he came back from his hotel work he would sit up reading the great novels. Building his confidence and his determination, he talked his way into NYU and gained a literature degree and so began a teaching career that was to last 30 years, working in New York's public high schools. Frank estimates that he probably taught 12,000 children during this time and it is on this relationship between teacher and student that he reflects in 'Teacher Man', the third in his series of memoirs. The New York high school is a restless, noisy and unpredictable place and Frank believes that it was his attempts to control and cajole these thousands of children into learning and achieving something for themselves that turned him into a writer. At least once a day someone would put up their hand and shout 'Mr. McCourt, Mr. McCourt, tell us about Ireland, tell us about how poor you were ...' Through sharing his own life with these kids he learnt the power of narrative storytelling, and out of the invaluable experience of holding 12,000 people's attention came 'Angela's Ashes'. Frank McCourt was a legend in such schools as Stuyvesant High School - long before he became the figure he is now he would receive letters from former students telling him how much his teaching influenced and inspired them - and now in 'Teacher Man' he shares his reminiscences of those 30 years and reveals how they led to his own success with 'Angela's Ashes' and Tis'.
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11.16 USD

Teacher Man

by Frank McCourt
Paperback
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Allison Davis (1902-83), a preeminent black scholar and social science pioneer, is perhaps best known for his groundbreaking investigations into inequality, Jim Crow America, and the cultural biases of intelligence testing. Davis, one of America's first black anthropologists and the first tenured African American professor at a predominantly white university, ...
The Lost Black Scholar: Resurrecting Allison Davis in American Social Thought
Allison Davis (1902-83), a preeminent black scholar and social science pioneer, is perhaps best known for his groundbreaking investigations into inequality, Jim Crow America, and the cultural biases of intelligence testing. Davis, one of America's first black anthropologists and the first tenured African American professor at a predominantly white university, produced work that had tangible and lasting effects on public policy, including contributions to Brown v. Board of Education, the federal Head Start program, and school testing practices. Yet Davis remains largely absent from the historical record. For someone who generated such an extensive body of work this marginalization is particularly surprising. But it is also revelatory. In The Lost Black Scholar, David A. Varel tells Davis's compelling story, showing how a combination of institutional racism, disciplinary eclecticism, and iconoclastic thinking effectively sidelined him as an intellectual. A close look at Davis's career sheds light not only on the racial politics of the academy but also the costs of being an innovator outside of the mainstream. Equally important, Varel argues that Davis exemplifies how black scholars led the way in advancing American social thought. Even though he was rarely acknowledged for it, Davis refuted scientific racism and laid bare the environmental roots of human difference more deftly than most of his white peers, by pushing social science in bold new directions. Varel shows how Davis effectively helped to lay the groundwork for the civil rights movement.
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47.250000 USD
Hardback
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In 2012, Richard E. Wainerdi retired as president and chief executive officer of the Texas Medical Center after almost three decades at the helm. During his tenure, Wainerdi oversaw the expansion of the center into the world's largest medical complex, hosting more than fifty separate institutions. I wasn't playing any ...
Richard E. Wainerdi and the Texas Medical Center
In 2012, Richard E. Wainerdi retired as president and chief executive officer of the Texas Medical Center after almost three decades at the helm. During his tenure, Wainerdi oversaw the expansion of the center into the world's largest medical complex, hosting more than fifty separate institutions. I wasn't playing any of the instruments, but it's been a privilege being the conductor, he once said to a newspaper reporter. William Henry Kellar traces Wainerdi's remarkable life story from a bookish childhood in the Bronx to a bold move west to study petroleum engineering at the University of Oklahoma. Wainerdi went on to earn a master's degree and a PhD from Penn State University where he immersed himself in nuclear engineering. By the late 1950s, Texas A&M University recruited Wainerdi to found the Nuclear Science Center, where he also served as professor and later associate vice president for academic affairs. In the 1980s, Wainerdi took charge of the Texas Medical Center, embarking on a second career that ultimately expanded the center from thirty-one institutions to fifty-three and increased its size threefold. Wainerdi pushed for and ensured a culture of collaboration and cooperation. In doing this, he developed a new nonprofit administrative model that emphasized building consensus, providing vital support services, and connecting member institutions with resources that enabled them to focus on their unique areas of expertise. At a time when Houston was widely known as the energy capital of the world, the city also became home to the largest medical complex in the world. Wainerdi's success was to enable each member of the Texas Medical Center to be an integral part of something bigger and something very special in the development of modern medicine.
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36.750000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
2016 Choice Outstanding Academic Title! Bringing Montessori to America traces in engrossing detail one of the most fascinating partnerships in the history of American educationaEURO that between Maria Montessori and S. S. McClure, from their first meeting in 1910 until their final acrimonious dispute in 1915. Born on the Adriatic, ...
Bringing Montessori to America: S. S. McClure, Maria Montessori, and the Campaign to Publicize Montessori Education
2016 Choice Outstanding Academic Title! Bringing Montessori to America traces in engrossing detail one of the most fascinating partnerships in the history of American educationaEURO that between Maria Montessori and S. S. McClure, from their first meeting in 1910 until their final acrimonious dispute in 1915. Born on the Adriatic, Montessori first entered the world stage in 1906 as the innovator of a revolutionary teaching method that creates an environment where children learn at their own pace and initiate skills like reading and writing in a spontaneous way. As her school in Rome swiftly attracted attention, curiosity, and followers, Montessori recruited disciples whom she immersed in a rigorous and detailed teacher-training regimen of her own creation. McClure was an Irish-born media baron of America's Gilded Age, best known as the founder and publisher of McClure's Magazine . Against the backdrop of Theodore Roosevelt's Bull Moose insurgency, the brilliant and mercurial McClure used his flagship publication as a vehicle to advance Progressive Party causes. After meeting in 1910, McClure and Montessori embarked on a five-year collaboration to introduce Montessori's innovative teaching style in the United States. Gerald and Patricia Gutek trace the dramatic arc of the partnership between the Italian teacher and American publisher united by a vision of educational change in the United States. After her triumphal lecture tour in 1913, Montessori, secure in her trust of her American partner, gave McClure her power of attorney and returned to Italy. The surge in popularity of Montessori education in America, however, deeply concerned Montessori, who had heretofore exerted total control over her method, apparatus, schools, and teacher training. The American entrepreneurial spirit, along with a desire to disseminate the Montessori Method quickly, led to major conflicts between the Italian educator and American businesspeople, particularly McClure. Feeling betrayed, Montessori ended her relationship with her erstwhile collaborator. Gutek and Gutek describe the fascinating story of this first wave of Montessori education in the United States, which did not sustain itself during Montessori's lifetime. It would not be until the 1950s that Montessori education was revived with the successful establishment of Montessori academies throughout the United States.
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31.450000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Originally published in 1969, this is the first biography of Susan Isaacs, the first attempt to estimate her incalculable contribution to the theory and practice of the education of young children. As a pioneer of new teaching methods, Susan Isaacs will be remembered mainly for her work at the Malting ...
Susan Isaacs: The First Biography
Originally published in 1969, this is the first biography of Susan Isaacs, the first attempt to estimate her incalculable contribution to the theory and practice of the education of young children. As a pioneer of new teaching methods, Susan Isaacs will be remembered mainly for her work at the Malting House School in Cambridge in the 1920s, and her contribution was such that in 1933 the Department of Child Development at the University of London, Institute of Education was specially created for her; she was Head of the Department until 1943. But Susan Isaacs was also a psychoanalyst, and D.W. Winnicott in his Foreword refers to the time when he was supplying cases for her child analysis training: `I watched with interest her sensitive management of the total family situation, a difficult thing when one is engaged in learning while carrying out a psycho-analytic treatment involving daily sessions over years.' D.E.M. Gardner, who was a close friend as well as student of Susan Isaacs, begins by describing Susan's childhood in a Lancashire cotton town, and throughout the book she helps us to feel the force of Susan's personality and intellect - `she was a truly great person, one who has had a tremendous influence for good on the attitude of parents and of teachers to the children in their care'.
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120.750000 USD
Hardback
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In China, John Leighton Stuart (1876-1962) is a controversial figure occupying an important position in the history of modern China and Sino-U.S. relations. As a scholar and educator, Stuart loved Chinese culture and contributed much to the development of Chinese education. While as a missionary, he was inherently prejudiced against ...
John Leighton Stuart's Missionary-Educator's Career in China
In China, John Leighton Stuart (1876-1962) is a controversial figure occupying an important position in the history of modern China and Sino-U.S. relations. As a scholar and educator, Stuart loved Chinese culture and contributed much to the development of Chinese education. While as a missionary, he was inherently prejudiced against Marxism. As the U.S. ambassador to China, Stuart executed U.S. government's policy, and was finally stereotyped as a symbol of American imperialism . This book is a comprehensive and systematic study of Stuart's missionary-educator's career in China. It gives a detailed account of Stuart's missionary activities and contribution to the establishment and development of Yenching University as the founding president in China. Yenching, founded in 1919, left a significant and lasting legacy to Chinese education. It also contributed much to western studies on Asian culture with the Harvard-Yenching Institute established in 1928. By collecting substantial relevant materials both at home and abroad, both published and unpublished, this book reveals the multidimensional and complex features of Stuart, getting rid of the stereotype. Academic and general readers interested in Stuart, missionary education in modern China and modern Chinese history will be attracted by this book.
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168.000000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
I will teach them literature, poetry, culture. I will teach them The Waste Land! I will be the Best Teacher Who Has Ever Lived! Or so The Secret Teacher thinks. On his first day at an inner-city state school he gets nuked. The class he is made to cut his ...
The Secret Teacher: Dispatches from the Classroom
I will teach them literature, poetry, culture. I will teach them The Waste Land! I will be the Best Teacher Who Has Ever Lived! Or so The Secret Teacher thinks. On his first day at an inner-city state school he gets nuked. The class he is made to cut his teeth on are an unruly mob stuffed with behavioural issues. There is: Milosz, who is put in detention for committing the sin of Onan with a Pritt Stick Kieran, the class rebel Donnie, a hard-working kid desperate for approval Mercedes, a volatile rude girl and Salim, who loves Bollywood and the number 5. Somehow, The Secret Teacher needs to enthuse this lot with a love of books. Or at least keep them sitting at their desks until the end of the lesson. And then he's got to deal with the Observations, marking, standardisations, book checks, OFSTED, Educational Consultants, spreadsheets, personal statements, school trips, strikes, class, race, love, death, birth, manhood, dry cleaning, the end of literary culture, the end of the Old World, the whole shebang ... In this vivid account of his first few years in the classroom, The Secret Teacher grapples with the complicated questions of how to teach, how we learn - and how little he actually knows. He celebrates the world's greatest stories, the extraordinary teachers he has worked with, and the kids: bolshy, bright, funny and absolutely electric. The result is a book brimful of wit, insight and tenderness.
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19.420000 USD
Paperback / softback
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As a young English teacher keen to make a difference in the world, Michelle Kuo took a job at a tough school in the Mississippi Delta, sharing books and poetry with a young African-American teenager named Patrick and his classmates. For the first time, these kids began to engage with ...
Reading With Patrick: A Teacher, a Student and the Life-Changing Power of Books
As a young English teacher keen to make a difference in the world, Michelle Kuo took a job at a tough school in the Mississippi Delta, sharing books and poetry with a young African-American teenager named Patrick and his classmates. For the first time, these kids began to engage with ideas and dreams beyond their small town, and to gain an insight into themselves that they had never had before. Two years later, Michelle left to go to law school; but Patrick began to lose his way, ending up jailed for murder. And that's when Michelle decided that her work was not done, and began to visit Patrick once a week, and soon every day, to read with him again. Reading with Patrick is an inspirational story of friendship, a coming-of-age story for both a young teacher and a student, an expansive, deeply resonant meditation on education, race and justice, and a love letter to literature and its power to transcend social barriers.
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31.59 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
As one of Roosevelt's brain trusters and a leading spokesman for the policies of the New Deal in the 1930s, Rexford Tugwell was a major force in government in one of the most critical periods in American history. In this colorful memoir, Tugwell begins with his entry as a freshman ...
To the Lesser Heights of Morningside
As one of Roosevelt's brain trusters and a leading spokesman for the policies of the New Deal in the 1930s, Rexford Tugwell was a major force in government in one of the most critical periods in American history. In this colorful memoir, Tugwell begins with his entry as a freshman into the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in the fall of 1911 and concludes with his acceptance in 1933 of the post of Assistant Secretary of Agriculture in the Roosevelt Administration. Along the way, the reader is treated to a wealth of reactions and asides about a number of significant people, among them Scott Nearing, Simon Nelson Patten, Joseph Wharton, Ezra Pound, Thorstein Veblen, Allen Tate, and his colleagues on the New Republic of the 1920s. Through his often wryly ironic anecdotes, Tugwell reveals how the unique combination of people and events he encountered in the academic world directly influenced his later controversial social and economic reform policies. These years shaped a man who would leave an indelible mark on American life.

To the Lesser Heights of Morningside illuminates not only the period of Rexford Tugwell's intellectual and political growth but the development of social reform and economic recovery ideas at two prominent universities during the twenties and thirties. Tugwell provides us with an intriguing and privileged glance into the intellectual climate and the complex of ideas that gave rise to the New Deal Era.

As Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, and then Undersecretary, Tugwell took a bold stance on the government's role in the regulation of industry and establishment of social welfare programs. From 1935-36 he headed the Rural Resettlement Administration and aided in the formation of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Tugwell was the originator of currency legislation and of the processing tax. In 1941 he became governor of Puerto Rico, where he did much to improve economic and political conditions. Among his written works is he definitive biography of FDR, The Democratic Roosevelt. Tugwell returned to teaching after his governorship and held both active and honorary posts until his death in 1979.

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83.950000 USD

To the Lesser Heights of Morningside

by Rexford Guy Tugwell
Hardback