The Birth of the Idea of Photography

Sold by Gardners

This product may not be approved for your region.
Hardback
  • Free Shipping

    On orders of AED 100 or more. Standard delivery within 12-15 days.
  • Free Reserve & Collect

    Reserve & Collect from Magrudy's or partner stores accross the UAE.
  • Cash On Delivery

    Pay when your order arrives.
  • Free returns

    See more about our return policy.
A milestone work that examines the democratic idea of photography and its expansion in common culture, particularly in the United States; generously illustrated. This influential text by French historian and theorist Francois Brunet considers the invention and history of photography as the birth of an idea, rather than a new type of image. This idea photography combines a logical theme-that of an art without artistry-and the democratic political promise of an art for all. Officially endorsed by the 1839 French law on the daguerreotype, this idea reverberated throughout the nineteenth century in Europe and America. Brunet shows how emerging image technologies and practices in France and Britain were linked to this logical/political construction of photography, from the earliest researches of Nicephore Niepce, Louis-Jacques-Mande Daguerre, and Henry Fox Talbot up to the turn of the twentieth century. The parallel development of the Kodak camera and Alfred Stieglitz's straight vision in the United States then fulfilled, while also depreciating, the utopian promise of photography for all. This history reached a provisional climax with the reflections on images by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Hippolyte Adolphe Taine, Sigmund Freud, Henri-Louis Bergson, and Charles Sanders Peirce, reflections that both demonstrated the novelty of photography and forecast many later debates on its technology and aesthetics. The Birth of the Idea of Photography has been enriched with more than fifty photographs, reproduced in color, from North American and European collections. This edition also features a new preface by the author.