Problems in Dynamic Psychology; A Critique of Psychoanalysis and Suggested Formulations

Paperback / softback
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1922. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... chapter xvii the theories of rivers Urged probably by the materialistic drift of modern philosophy, psychologists have, for a generation, been attempting to bridge over the gap between body.and mind, abandoning the older methods of metaphysics and introspection. Conceiving mental processes as the physiology of the brain they have been unwilling to accept psychic phenomena as definite entities but have endeavored to reduce them to terms of such physical processes as can be weighed and measured. Wundt, an unsuccessful physiologist, was largely responsible for this new line of attack and he left a legacy to psychologists (particularly in America) which has been expended in tireless research into the physiology of the special senses. Although much valuable material has been the return on this investment, it has not brought us nearer to an understanding of man as a unit organism, which is psychology. In fact one leader of ' experimental psychology" has been honest enough to declare that the object of the science of psychology is to eliminate "mind." Another attempt at "physiologizing" psychology has been the invocation of the involuntary nervous system to account for instinctive and emotional re actions. The James-Lange hypothesis is one of the early examples. Cannon and-his school have done most excellent critical work in this field, yet Cannon is forced to admit that, although he can demonstrate bodily effects of several emotions, he can find nothing specific in these effects. The differentiation remains psychological. So far as his work goes, the discovery of the physical basis of the emotions is rendered more remote. The findings which it had been hoped would show the physiology of the emotions have added to physiological lore and left psychology where it was. Th...