International Law Situated: An Analysis of the Lawyer's Stance Towards Culture, History and Community

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International Law Situated is the first study in the series of International Law Monographs by the Erik Castren Institute of International Law and Human Rights. It is an analysis of both theoretical ambition and practical relevance examining the existential and professional situation of the international lawyer from a range of different perspectives. How do international lawyers think about cultural difference and similarity? What is the role of historical facts in international law and practice? How do lawyers construe notions such as 'community' or 'humanity'; what role is played therein by normative ideas about similarity and difference; or of the good life? What kinds of ethical considerations are implicit in international law and how should practitioners think about them? This book provides a general framework for responding to these questions and shows their impact and relevance through doctrinal and case contexts. It argues for an emphasis on the individual jurist and her situation as an adviser, an advocate, an analyst, and a decision-maker.