International Economic Law with a Human Face

Hardback
International Economic Law with a Human Face addresses a vital question in contemporary international economies: the design, structure and content of the legal and institutional framework within an increasingly globalized civil society and market economy. It is based on the belief that liberalized global markets cannot be expected to provide the public goods required to secure the acquis communautaire for human rights worldwide, let alone to extend those rights to peoples hitherto deprived of their benefits. Scholars from Europe, America, Asia and Australia examine a variety of aspects of relevant state practice in a fresh and stimulating manner. They combine `international social critique' of state practice with ideas for `social engineering', offering critical legal analysis and ideas about policy options for setting standards to induce legal change and development. International Economic Law with a Human Face is a `user-friendly' book. Twenty-seven chapters are sub-titled and arranged under three main headings: Towards a new human and economic order (chapters 1-8); Trade, environmental protection and resource management (chapters 9-18); and Investment and finance (chapters 19-27). It also contains a detailed Table of Contents and an Index.