Henry Vii, Prince Arthur and Cardinal Morton, from a Group Representing the Adoration of the Three Kings on the Chancel Screen of Plymtree

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878. Excerpt: ... complained to one of the General's messengers who called on him on his way to London. But ho did more than complain, for he told the messenger in a pet he need not go to London, and sent him back in double quick time to Coldstream, where he arrives laden with welcome intelligence from Newcastle and from the Metropolis. Besides other news, he had now to tell Monk that the Fleet was coming up the Thames to stop the trade of London, unless the Committee of Safety allowed Parliament to meet again. And now there came news from Ireland that the army there had declared for Parliament. From various other points news carne that forces were actually marching upon London, to reinstate Parliament. But the worst of all defections from Lambert were those in his own army. His men had their relations, whether private or religious, with all the other parties revolting to Parliament, and they began to desert, or to show themselves refractory. Lambert now concluded that the only chance left for him was to break up his quarters at Newcastle, before worse happened, and march to London, for which he had fifty miles start of Monk, besides double or more the number of mounted troops. Just then, hardly expecting this move, and fuller of pursuing than of being pursued, Fairfax had openly declared for Parliament, and was in arms; so that Lambert's army, if it only held together and kept on its way, would soon be down upon the Yorkshire squires and their tenantry; veterans upon raw recruits. Monk was bound to hasten to the support of Fairfax, and he did. On the very point of moving, he received the unexpected and embarrassing news that Fleetwood had dropped the reins. He and his Committee of Safety, terrified by the universal defection, and the impossibility of raising either money ...