Early Twentieth-Century Brass Idioms: Art, Jazz, and Other Popular Traditions

Hardback
The work of multiple scholars is combined in this single volume, bringing together in conversation the traditions of brass instrumentalism and jazz idiom. Early Twentieth-Century Brass Idioms: Art, Jazz, and Other Popular Traditions, edited by Howard T. Weiner, features articles by some of the most distinguished jazz and brass scholars and performers in the world. The topics covered span continents and decades and bridge gaps that until now remained uncrossed. Two primary themes emerge throughout the book and enter into dialogue with each other: the contribution brass performers made to the evolution of jazz in the early 20th century, and the influence jazz and popular music idioms had on the evolution of brass performance. The 13 articles in this volume cover a range of topics from Italian jazz trumpet style to the origins of jazz improvisation to the role of brass in klezmer music. New Orleans becomes a focal point as the essays examine the work of many important musicians, including Louis Armstrong, Buddy Bolden, Bunk Johnson, King Oliver, James Reese Europe, and Newell Spiegle Willcox. Included as well is an interview with two legends of jazz trumpet, William Fielder and Joe Wilder, and the renowned performer and teacher Jimmy Owens reveals his practice techniques. Many of the essays include bibliographies, discographies, and other reference information. The meeting of the Historic Brass Society and the Institute of Jazz Studies represents the first time scholars have gathered to bring these two fields into such comprehensive discussion with each other. Early Twentieth-Century Brass Idioms: Art, Jazz, and Other Popular Traditions presents this historic conversation.