Conservation Through Cultural Survival: Indigenous Peoples and Protected Areas

For more than a century the creation of national parks and protected areas was a major threat to the survival of indigenous peoples. Parks based on wilderness ideals outlawed traditional ways of life and forced from their homelands peoples who had shaped and preserved local ecosystems for centuries. Conservation Through Cultural Survival chronicles and assesses cutting-edge efforts to establish new kinds of parks and protected areas that are based on partnerships with indigenous peoples. It provides detailed case studies from Nepal, Australia, Papua New Guinea, Nicaragua, Honduras, Canada, and Alaska, and offers guidelines, models, and recommendations for international action.