Wilson Jeremiah Moses author

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In Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus, Wilson Jeremiah Moses provides a critical assessment of Thomas Jefferson and the Jeffersonian influence. Scholars of American history have long debated the legacy of Thomas Jefferson. However, Moses deviates from other interpretations by positioning himself within an older, 'Federalist' historiographic tradition, offering vigorous and ...
Cambridge Studies on the American South: Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus
In Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus, Wilson Jeremiah Moses provides a critical assessment of Thomas Jefferson and the Jeffersonian influence. Scholars of American history have long debated the legacy of Thomas Jefferson. However, Moses deviates from other interpretations by positioning himself within an older, 'Federalist' historiographic tradition, offering vigorous and insightful commentary on Jefferson, the man and the myth. Moses specifically focuses on Jefferson's complexities and contradictions. Measuring Jefferson's political accomplishments, intellectual contributions, moral character, and other distinguishing traits against contemporaries like George Washington and Benjamin Franklin but also figures like Machiavelli and Frederick the Great, Moses contends that Jefferson fell short of the greatness of others. Yet amid his criticism of Jefferson, Moses paints him as a cunning strategist, an impressive intellectual, and a consummate pragmatist who continually reformulated his ideas in a universe that he accurately recognized to be unstable, capricious, and treacherous.
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41.990000 USD

Cambridge Studies on the American South: Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
Hardback
Book cover image
Building upon his previous work and using Richard Hofstadter's The American Political Tradition as a model, Professor Moses has revised and brought together in this book essays that focus on the complexity of, and contradictions in, the thought of five major African-American intellectuals: Frederick Douglass, Alexander Crummell, Booker T. Washington, ...
Creative Conflict in African American Thought
Building upon his previous work and using Richard Hofstadter's The American Political Tradition as a model, Professor Moses has revised and brought together in this book essays that focus on the complexity of, and contradictions in, the thought of five major African-American intellectuals: Frederick Douglass, Alexander Crummell, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. DuBois and Marcus M. Garvey. In doing so, he challenges both popular and scholarly conceptions of them as villains or heroes. In analyzing the intellectual struggles and contradictions of these five dominant personalities with regard to individual morality and collective reform, Professor Moses shows how they contributed to strategies for black improvement and puts them within the context of other currents of American thought, including Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, Social Darwinism, and progressivism.
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88.200000 USD

Creative Conflict in African American Thought

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
Hardback
Book cover image
Afrocentrism and its history has long been disputed and controversial. In this important book, Wilson Moses presents a critical and nuanced view of the issues. Tracing the origins of Afrocentrism since the eighteenth century, he examines the combination of various popular mythologies, some of them mystical and sentimental, others perfectly ...
Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture: Series Number 118: Afrotopia: The Roots of African American Popular History
Afrocentrism and its history has long been disputed and controversial. In this important book, Wilson Moses presents a critical and nuanced view of the issues. Tracing the origins of Afrocentrism since the eighteenth century, he examines the combination of various popular mythologies, some of them mystical and sentimental, others perfectly reasonable. This is a rich history of black intellectual life and the concept of race.
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60.890000 USD

Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture: Series Number 118: Afrotopia: The Roots of African American Popular History

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Building upon his previous work and using Richard Hofstadter's The American Political Tradition as a model, Professor Moses has revised and brought together in this book essays that focus on the complexity of, and contradictions in, the thought of five major African-American intellectuals: Frederick Douglass, Alexander Crummell, Booker T. Washington, ...
Creative Conflict in African American Thought
Building upon his previous work and using Richard Hofstadter's The American Political Tradition as a model, Professor Moses has revised and brought together in this book essays that focus on the complexity of, and contradictions in, the thought of five major African-American intellectuals: Frederick Douglass, Alexander Crummell, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. DuBois and Marcus M. Garvey. In doing so, he challenges both popular and scholarly conceptions of them as villains or heroes. In analyzing the intellectual struggles and contradictions of these five dominant personalities with regard to individual morality and collective reform, Professor Moses shows how they contributed to strategies for black improvement and puts them within the context of other currents of American thought, including Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, Social Darwinism, and progressivism.
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35.690000 USD

Creative Conflict in African American Thought

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In this controversial volume, Wilson Jeremiah Moses argues that by adopting European and American nationalist and separatist doctrines, black nationalism became, ironically, a vehicle for the assimilationist values among black American intellectuals. The book covers the period from the Compromise of 1850, with its Fugitive Slave Act, to the imprisonment ...
The Golden Age of Black Nationalism, 1850-1925
In this controversial volume, Wilson Jeremiah Moses argues that by adopting European and American nationalist and separatist doctrines, black nationalism became, ironically, a vehicle for the assimilationist values among black American intellectuals. The book covers the period from the Compromise of 1850, with its Fugitive Slave Act, to the imprisonment of Marcus Garvey in 1925, and inc ludes a section on black nationalism in literature. 'This impressive study will stir controversy among black scholars and proponents of separatism. That Professor Moses, himself a black, regards the period a golden age is itself heretical in some eyes.' Publishers Weekly
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47.250000 USD

The Golden Age of Black Nationalism, 1850-1925

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Martin Luther King is dead and the millenarian integrationalism that he symbolized sleeps with him, but messianic Christian rhetoric still characterizes black oratory both from the pulpit and on the hustings. Dead, too, are the chief American prophets of Pan-Islam, but the Ethiopian Hebrews and Moorish Science Temple are still ...
Black Messiahs and Uncle Toms: Social and Literary Manipulations of a Religious Myth. Revised Edition
Martin Luther King is dead and the millenarian integrationalism that he symbolized sleeps with him, but messianic Christian rhetoric still characterizes black oratory both from the pulpit and on the hustings. Dead, too, are the chief American prophets of Pan-Islam, but the Ethiopian Hebrews and Moorish Science Temple are still active. As black messianic myths die out, this book argues, new ones spring up to take their places. Dr. Moses views black messianism as a powerful and, in many respects, a beautiful myth, permeating the thinking of both white and black Americans since the late 18th century. But, he points out, black messianism was evident as early as 1788 in the writings of Othello, or 1791, when Benjamin Banneker wrote to Thomas Jefferson of the Negro's divine right to share the new nation's peculiar blessing of the heaven. The author carefully defines the concept of messianism, and considers redemptive mission as a key attribute of the conception--one with which Harriet Beecher Stowe endowed Uncle Tom (despite activists' mistaken notion of him as servile). The mythic black hero as messiah is a pervasive theme in literary and social expressions as disparate as the writings of Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, W.E.B. Dubois, and Ralph Ellison, and the cults that developed around Joe Louis, Malcolm X, and others. Following the methodology used by Henry Nash Smith in Virgin Land: The American West as Symbol and Myth, Dr. Moses presents a new angle of vision on many of the issues of black messianism and on the leading figures in the movement. The author concludes that--despite the frequent excesses and even absurdities of black messianism--the American traditions of evangelical reform, perfectionism, and the social gospel offer more promise than today's widespread narcissistic anarchism. Reviewers commented that [Dr. Moses'] analysis is as probing as anything and that the book will stir controversy as well as praise by other scholars in the field.
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37.750000 USD

Black Messiahs and Uncle Toms: Social and Literary Manipulations of a Religious Myth. Revised Edition

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Afrocentrism and its history has long been disputed and controversial. In this important book, Wilson Moses presents a critical and nuanced view of the issues. Tracing the origins of Afrocentrism since the eighteenth century, he examines the combination of various popular mythologies, some of them mystical and sentimental, others perfectly ...
Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture: Series Number 118: Afrotopia: The Roots of African American Popular History
Afrocentrism and its history has long been disputed and controversial. In this important book, Wilson Moses presents a critical and nuanced view of the issues. Tracing the origins of Afrocentrism since the eighteenth century, he examines the combination of various popular mythologies, some of them mystical and sentimental, others perfectly reasonable. This is a rich history of black intellectual life and the concept of race.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780521474085.jpg
136.490000 USD

Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture: Series Number 118: Afrotopia: The Roots of African American Popular History

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
Hardback
Book cover image
Alexander Crummell (1819-1898) was one the most prominent Afro-American intellectuals of the nineteenth-century. This biography places Crummell's ideas within the context of his life and times.
Alexander Crummell: A Study of Civilization and Discontent
Alexander Crummell (1819-1898) was one the most prominent Afro-American intellectuals of the nineteenth-century. This biography places Crummell's ideas within the context of his life and times.
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157.500000 USD

Alexander Crummell: A Study of Civilization and Discontent

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
Hardback
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In the early nineteenth century, the American Colonization Society was formed for the purpose of encouraging emigration of free blacks to Africa. While intent on ridding the United States of what they saw as a dangerous black population, the association also attracted some liberals who viewed its goals as an ...
Liberian Dreams: Back-to-Africa Narratives from the 1850s
In the early nineteenth century, the American Colonization Society was formed for the purpose of encouraging emigration of free blacks to Africa. While intent on ridding the United States of what they saw as a dangerous black population, the association also attracted some liberals who viewed its goals as an incentive toward emancipation. Attitudes among African Americans toward colonization were varied, viewed by some as an opportunity to start new lives in a free country and by others as a deceptive scheme of the white man. But when the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850 put the freedom of every person of African descent in jeopardy, many began to consider emigration their only option. This collection of historic documents illuminates the debate on emigration through the narratives of four black men who in 1853 traveled to the new black nation of Liberia. Their accounts offer surprisingly different views and insights on the young country and provide both endorsements and condemnations of the colonization effort.
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35.41 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
W. E. B. Du Bois was a public intellectual, sociologist, and activist on behalf of the African American community. He profoundly shaped black political culture in the United States through his founding role in the NAACP, as well as internationally through the Pan-African movement. Du Bois's sociological and historical research ...
Black Folk Then and Now (The Oxford W.E.B. Du Bois): An Essay in the History and Sociology of the Negro Race
W. E. B. Du Bois was a public intellectual, sociologist, and activist on behalf of the African American community. He profoundly shaped black political culture in the United States through his founding role in the NAACP, as well as internationally through the Pan-African movement. Du Bois's sociological and historical research on African-American communities and culture broke ground in many areas, including the history of the post-Civil War Reconstruction period. Du Bois was also a prolific author of novels, autobiographical accounts, innumerable editorials and journalistic pieces, and several works of history. In Black Folk Then and Now, W. E. B. Du Bois embarks on a mission to correct the omissions, misinterpretations, and deliberate lies he detected in previous depictions of black history. An exemplary revisionist exploration of history and sociology, this essay reflects Du Bois's lifelong mission to bring to light the truths of Black history and expose the African peoples' noble heritage. W. E. B. Du Bois writes extensively about the color line, which he believed at the time of publication to be the defining problem of the twentieth century. In 1946, following the Holocaust, Du Bois revised his arguments, reshaping them into the narrative we find in The World and Africa. With a series introduction by editor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and an introduction by Wilson Moses, this edition is essential for anyone interested in African American history.
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26.250000 USD

Black Folk Then and Now (The Oxford W.E.B. Du Bois): An Essay in the History and Sociology of the Negro Race

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses, W E B Du Bois
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Martin Luther King is dead and the millenarian integrationalism that he symbolized sleeps with him, but messianic Christian rhetoric still characterizes black oratory both from the pulpit and on the hustings. Dead, too, are the chief American prophets of Pan-Islam, but the Ethiopian Hebrews and Moorish Science Temple are still ...
Black Messiahs and Uncle Toms: Social and Literary Manipulations of a Religious Myth. Revised Edition
Martin Luther King is dead and the millenarian integrationalism that he symbolized sleeps with him, but messianic Christian rhetoric still characterizes black oratory both from the pulpit and on the hustings. Dead, too, are the chief American prophets of Pan-Islam, but the Ethiopian Hebrews and Moorish Science Temple are still active. As black messianic myths die out, this book argues, new ones spring up to take their places. Dr. Moses views black messianism as a powerful and, in many respects, a beautiful myth, permeating the thinking of both white and black Americans since the late 18th century. But, he points out, black messianism was evident as early as 1788 in the writings of Othello, or 1791, when Benjamin Banneker wrote to Thomas Jefferson of the Negro's divine right to share the new nation's peculiar blessing of the heaven. The author carefully defines the concept of messianism, and considers redemptive mission as a key attribute of the conception--one with which Harriet Beecher Stowe endowed Uncle Tom (despite activists' mistaken notion of him as servile). The mythic black hero as messiah is a pervasive theme in literary and social expressions as disparate as the writings of Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, W.E.B. Dubois, and Ralph Ellison, and the cults that developed around Joe Louis, Malcolm X, and others. Following the methodology used by Henry Nash Smith in Virgin Land: The American West as Symbol and Myth, Dr. Moses presents a new angle of vision on many of the issues of black messianism and on the leading figures in the movement. The author concludes that--despite the frequent excesses and even absurdities of black messianism--the American traditions of evangelical reform, perfectionism, and the social gospel offer more promise than today's widespread narcissistic anarchism. Reviewers commented that [Dr. Moses'] analysis is as probing as anything and that the book will stir controversy as well as praise by other scholars in the field.
43.91 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
In the early nineteenth century, the American Colonization Society was formed for the purpose of encouraging emigration of free blacks to Africa. While intent on ridding the United States of what the Society's members saw as a dangerous black population, the association also attracted some liberals who viewed its goals ...
Liberian Dreams: Back-to-Africa Narratives from the 1850s
In the early nineteenth century, the American Colonization Society was formed for the purpose of encouraging emigration of free blacks to Africa. While intent on ridding the United States of what the Society's members saw as a dangerous black population, the association also attracted some liberals who viewed its goals as an incentive toward emancipation. Attitudes among African Americans toward colonization were varied, some viewing it as an opportunity to start new lives in a free country and others seeing in it a deceptive scheme of the white man. But when the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850 put the freedom of every person of African descent in jeopardy, many began to consider emigration their only option. This collection of historic documents illuminates the debate on emigration through the narratives of four black men who in 1853 traveled to the new black nation of Liberia. Their accounts offer surprisingly different views and insights on the young country and provide both endorsements and condemnations of the colonization effort. Liberian Dreams contains four selections that have never before been published in a single volume: William Nesbit's attack on Liberia and its sponsors, Samuel Williams's spirited defense of the black republic in response to Nesbit, Daniel Peterson's pro-emigration tract commissioned by the ACS, and Augustus Washington's balanced critique of both sides of the issue. Each account offers a perspective not found in the others, and together they cover nearly the full range of debate among black Americans of that time. These narratives shed light not only on the experience of creating a new country but also on the conflict among African Americans over the colonization effort, and they offer a unique opportunity to witness African Americans encountering Africans and their cultures. The selection by Augustus Washington in particular reveals the insights of an educated community activist with a sure understanding of the issues at stake. Historian Wilson Moses, who has published widely on African American history and black nationalism, provides an introduction that expertly places the selections in context.
USD
Hardback
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