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Floating City: Selected Poems 1978-1995
11.020000 USD

Floating City: Selected Poems 1978-1995

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Paperback
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Sex and drugs and rock 'n' roll: the exhilarating but deranging American 1960's, captured in a classic . Dazzling, innovative, and courageous, Dream Time plunges the reader deep into the sensibility of the '60's in a wonderful display of cultural archaeology. Far from being an unqualified celebration of the era, ...
Dream Time
Sex and drugs and rock 'n' roll: the exhilarating but deranging American 1960's, captured in a classic . Dazzling, innovative, and courageous, Dream Time plunges the reader deep into the sensibility of the '60's in a wonderful display of cultural archaeology. Far from being an unqualified celebration of the era, it is a deliberate experiment, combining the genres of memoir, novel, and cultural history in order to convey the complex impact of the late '60's counterculture. When Dream Time was published in 1988, it won Geoffrey O'Brien a Whiting Writer's Award. Previous books on the subject had focused primarily on media icons such as Bob Dylan, John Lennon, or Andy Warhol; Dream Time shifts the focus to the ways in which the psychedelic and countercultural currents of the era played themselves out in younger and more marginal lives. If you lived it, but never really came to grips with it; if you missed it but wish you hadn't--this is the book that tells it, at last, like it really was.
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15.700000 USD

Dream Time

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Paperback
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We watch what is moving fast from a platform that is also moving fast, writes Geoffrey O'Brien in the beginning of Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows. This collection--gathering the best of a decade's worth of writing on film by one of our most bracing and imaginative critics--ranges freely over the past, ...
Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002-2012
We watch what is moving fast from a platform that is also moving fast, writes Geoffrey O'Brien in the beginning of Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows. This collection--gathering the best of a decade's worth of writing on film by one of our most bracing and imaginative critics--ranges freely over the past, present, and future of the movies, from the primal visual poetry of the silent era to the dizzying permutations of the merging digital age. Here are 38 searching essays on contemporary blockbusters like Spider-Man and Minority Report; recent innovative triumphs like The Tree of Life and Beasts of the Southern Wild; and the intricacies of genre mythmaking from Chinese martial arts films to the horror classics of Val Lewton. O'Brien probes the visionary art of classic filmmakers--von Sternberg, Fod, Cocteau, Kurosawa, Godard--and the implications of such diverse recent work as Farenheit 9/11, The Passion of Christ, and The Sopranos. Each of these pieces is alert to the always-surprising intersections between screen life and real life, and the way that film from the beginning has shaped our sense of memory and history.
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26.250000 USD

Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002-2012

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Hardback
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The Fall of the House of Walworth: A Tale of Madness and Murder in Gilded Age America
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24.140000 USD

The Fall of the House of Walworth: A Tale of Madness and Murder in Gilded Age America

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Paperback
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Castaways of the Image Planet: Movies, Show Business, Public Spectacle
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18.850000 USD

Castaways of the Image Planet: Movies, Show Business, Public Spectacle

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Paperback
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In his intense and mysterious evocation of (seemingly) every kind of movie ever made, Geoffrey O'Brien erases the distinction between spectator and commentator and virtually reinvents film writing in our time.
The Phantom Empire: Movies in the Mind of the Twentieth Century
In his intense and mysterious evocation of (seemingly) every kind of movie ever made, Geoffrey O'Brien erases the distinction between spectator and commentator and virtually reinvents film writing in our time.
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23.050000 USD

The Phantom Empire: Movies in the Mind of the Twentieth Century

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Paperback
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From one of the most original writers now at work, an expansive, learned, and utterly charming reverie on what it means to be lost in a book. . Louis Menand, writing in The New Yorker , called Geoffrey O'Brien's The Phantom Empire a prose poem about the pleasures and distractions ...
Browser's Ecstasy
From one of the most original writers now at work, an expansive, learned, and utterly charming reverie on what it means to be lost in a book. . Louis Menand, writing in The New Yorker , called Geoffrey O'Brien's The Phantom Empire a prose poem about the pleasures and distractions of movie-watching, an ambitiously literary attempt to write about the [mystery of the] medium as though it were a dream the author had just awakened from. Now, in The Browser's Ecstasy , O'Brien has written a prose poem about reading, a playful, epigrammatic nocturne upon the dream-state one falls into when lost in a book, upon the uncanny, trancelike pleasure of making silent marks on paper utter sounds inside one's head. We call The Browser's Ecstasy a Meditation on Reading, but like any truly original book-and especially the short book that goes both far and deep-it resists easy summary and classification. As Luc Sante once wrote, The density of O'Brien's work makes word count irrelevant as an index of substance; he is seemingly capable of compressing entire encyclopedias into his parenthetical asides. I defy you to name any precedent for what he does. He's a school unto himself.
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17.800000 USD

Browser's Ecstasy

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Paperback
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Sixteen years of film criticism from one of America's leading cultural critics. Castaways of the Image Planet collects sixteen years' worth of Geoffrey O'Brien's essays on film and popular culture, most originally published in The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, Film Comment, Filmmaker, and the New York ...
Castaways of the Image Planet
Sixteen years of film criticism from one of America's leading cultural critics. Castaways of the Image Planet collects sixteen years' worth of Geoffrey O'Brien's essays on film and popular culture, most originally published in The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, Film Comment, Filmmaker, and the New York Times. The topics range from the invention of cinema to contemporary F-X aesthetics; from Shakespeare films to Seinfeld ; from '30's screwball comedies to Hong Kong martial-arts movies; from the roots of sexploitation pictures to the televising of Bill Clinton's grand jury testimony. There is an emphasis on the unpredictable interactions between film as a medium apt for expressing the most private dreams and film as the mass literature of the modern world, subject to all the pressures of financing and marketing. Many of the pieces are profiles of individual directors or actors--Orson Welles, Michael Powell, Ed Wood, Marlon Brando, Alfred Hitchcock, Dana Andrews, The Marx Brothers, Bing Crosby--whose careers are probed to look for the point where private obsession meets public myth-making.
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32.500000 USD

Castaways of the Image Planet

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Hardback
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Dashiell Hammett, Mickey Spillane, James M. Cain, Raymond Chandler, Jim Thompson, David Goodis , these are a few of the masters of noir responsible for the great lurid paperbacks of the thirties, forties, and fifties. With titles like The Big Sleep, Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye, and Street of the Lost, with ...
Hardboiled America: Lurid Paperbacks and the Masters of Noir
Dashiell Hammett, Mickey Spillane, James M. Cain, Raymond Chandler, Jim Thompson, David Goodis , these are a few of the masters of noir responsible for the great lurid paperbacks of the thirties, forties, and fifties. With titles like The Big Sleep, Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye, and Street of the Lost, with racy cover lines like My gun-butt smashed his skull! and Ruthless terror ripped away the mask that hid cold fear, and with some of the most extraordinary cover illustrations ever to grace American literature, these paperbacks held the ingredients of American nightmares. In Harboiled America ,lavishly illustrated with 135 paperback covers, and expanded with new material on Thompson, Goodis, and others,Geoffrey O'Brien masterfully explores the art, history, and ideas of the American paperback.
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18.850000 USD

Hardboiled America: Lurid Paperbacks and the Masters of Noir

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Paperback
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Postcards and poem-cards, a fistful of sonnets, a cento stitched out of forgotten poems and a lipogram on cosmology, a Greek myth retold by its regretful hero and a number of unwritten novels synopsized, a dance number from a lost Betty Grable musical, a very small opera and the catalogue ...
Red Sky Cafe
Postcards and poem-cards, a fistful of sonnets, a cento stitched out of forgotten poems and a lipogram on cosmology, a Greek myth retold by its regretful hero and a number of unwritten novels synopsized, a dance number from a lost Betty Grable musical, a very small opera and the catalogue description of a painting best not looked at, the text for a funerary rite, a silent cowboy picture verbalized, interpretive extrapolations of an old engraving and of frames from the Nibelungen of Fritz Lang: these might be the wall-hangings for an open-roofed taverna on the outskirts of an eroding cityscape, where the sounds of distant bombardments occasionally filter through the floor show's synthesized flute music. Red Sky Cafe is a mix of songs, narrative episodes, previews of coming attractions, and memorabilia of abandoned alleys, loft spaces, and television programs glimpsed in distorted form through the window of a neighbor's apartment. The intercepts transcribed are not devoid of static and are occasionally interrupted by ambient laughter and crowd noises, not to mention the odd and invariably distressing newscast: with special guest appearances by Medusa, Catullus, Clinton prosecutor Kenneth Starr, and a complement of jungle moon men. Red Sky Cafe collects poems from the last decade, many of which appeared previously in such places as Hambone, Fence, Conjunctions, Open City, and The Germ.
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12.73 USD

Red Sky Cafe

by Geoffrey O'Brien
Paperback
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Dazzling and original, Sonata for Jukebox is a brilliant foray into how pop music has woven itself into our lives since the dawn of the recording age. Geoffrey O'Brien delves into twentieth-century pop music as we experience it: a phenomenon that is at once public and private, personal yet popular. ...
Sonata for Jukebox: An Autobiography of My Ears
Dazzling and original, Sonata for Jukebox is a brilliant foray into how pop music has woven itself into our lives since the dawn of the recording age. Geoffrey O'Brien delves into twentieth-century pop music as we experience it: a phenomenon that is at once public and private, personal yet popular. O'Brien's book is more than a history of pop music, although fragments of that history find their way into its pages. And it reaches far beyond a memoir, although it is an entertaining biography of the author's ears and his family's exceptional affinity, with pop music--his father was a leading New York DJ and his grandfather led a dance band in Philadelphia. Ultimately, it is an exploration of what we as listeners hear, what we think we hear, and how we connect that experience with the rest of our lives. The dizzying array of musical references plays like a sound-track as O'Brien explores how our lives are lived in the presence--and in the memory of the presence--of music.
11.720000 USD
Paperback
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In A View of Buildings and Water Geoffrey O'Brien collects poetry from the last half-decade, among them poems that first appeared in such magazines as Talisman, The Germ, The Literary Review, and New American Writing, and including a number of long sequences that have not appeared anywhere in their complete ...
A View of Buildings and Water
In A View of Buildings and Water Geoffrey O'Brien collects poetry from the last half-decade, among them poems that first appeared in such magazines as Talisman, The Germ, The Literary Review, and New American Writing, and including a number of long sequences that have not appeared anywhere in their complete form. These poems extend a concern with mapping the geographies of dream, fantasy, and intuited history, and with finding a music that might realize those spaces in a flexible, responsive measure. In form the poems range from a monologue from an unmade film noir to a sonic sculpture where sense is made to follow where sounds lead. In Heads in Limbo a varied cast of characters is epitomized in a series of epitaph-like three-line poems. Central to the book is a cycle of five poems exploring the stages of grief against a shifting background of terrains both real and phantasmagoric. The book's narratives-slippery, splintered, referring back to lost earlier chronicles-take their form from the mythmaking of ordinary life, the stories partly found and partly invented out of which we try to forge a connection to what has vanished and what has not yet arrived.
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14.18 USD
Paperback
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In Bardic Deadlines, writer and editor Geoffrey O'Brien collects twenty of his essays on poetry that originally appeared in the Voice Literary Supplement and the New York Review of Books. O'Brien surveys an array of some of the most striking and innovative poets to emerge in recent decades, including Susan ...
Bardic Deadlines: Reviewing Poetry, 1984-95
In Bardic Deadlines, writer and editor Geoffrey O'Brien collects twenty of his essays on poetry that originally appeared in the Voice Literary Supplement and the New York Review of Books. O'Brien surveys an array of some of the most striking and innovative poets to emerge in recent decades, including Susan Howe, August Kleinzahler, Clark Coolidge, Nathaniel Mackey, Gustaf Sobin, and Michael O'Brien. Discussions of contemporary work are juxtaposed with considerations of other traditions going as far back as the second-century Chinese anthology The Songs of the South and the Sanskrit master Kalidasa, traditions considered highly relevant to current practice. There are engaging, in-depth portraits of the work of poets John Clare, Hugh MacDiarmid, Emily Bronte, Kenji Miyazawa, and Frank O'Hara, among others. There is also an exploration of the poetics of Walt Whitman that highlights themes addressed throughout the collection: the physicality and musicality of language, the spatial dimension of poetry, the intimate bond between poet and reader, and the secret and often obsessive strategies by which the poet hides secrets in plain sight and enlists the reader in the making of the poem. Each essay focuses on poetry as experience that impinges on basic questions of identity and being. Geoffrey O'Brien is the author of a number of nonfiction books and poetry collections, including Hardboiled America: Lurid Paperbacks and the Masters of Noir, Floating City: Selected Poems 1978-1995, and The Hudson Mystery, and a fictional work, The Times Square Story. He is editor-in-chief of the Library of America.
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19.900000 USD
Paperback
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The most important new literary journal to emerge since Granta, Open City has published some of the best work by major writers and artists such as Mary Gaitskill, Denis Johnson, Jeff Koons, David Foster Wallace, Irvine Welsh Terry Southern, Patrick McCabe, Sam Lipsyte, and David Berman. Edited by the writers ...
Open City #10: The Editor's Issue
The most important new literary journal to emerge since Granta, Open City has published some of the best work by major writers and artists such as Mary Gaitskill, Denis Johnson, Jeff Koons, David Foster Wallace, Irvine Welsh Terry Southern, Patrick McCabe, Sam Lipsyte, and David Berman. Edited by the writers Thomas Beller and Daniel Pinchbeck and originally published by the late Robert Bingham, writing from Open City has been included in many prestigious anthologies, including Best American Short Stories and The Pushcart Prize. Known for launching the careers of today's best new writers, the editors are also committed to printing important unpublished work by writers from past eras, such as Richard Yates, Delmore Schwartz, Jim Thompson, Cyril Connolly, Edvard Munch, and Gregor von Rezzori. With its innovative and daring mix of the old and the new, Open City combines undiscovered writing by classic authors with a fascinating portrait of a literary generation in the making.Open City #12 includes After the Wall, a special section on Berlin's new generation of fiction writers; a story by Lewis Cole on the end of radicalism; and debut fiction by Sam Brumbaugh and Heather Lorimer. This issue features a previously unpublished story by Ford Maddox Ford.
8.400000 USD

Open City #10: The Editor's Issue

by Geoffrey O'Brien, Professor Daniel Pinchbeck, Thomas Beller, Robert Bingham
Paperback / softback
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