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Internationally renowned photographer Lucian Niemeyer and National Park Service historian Art Gomez have combined talents in a new presentation on New Mexico. Over 150 colour photographs encompass the entire state throughout the seasons presenting New Mexico's people, cultures, and magnificent scenery at the millennium. Gomez's sweeping history views the state ...
New Mexico: Images of a Land and Its People
Internationally renowned photographer Lucian Niemeyer and National Park Service historian Art Gomez have combined talents in a new presentation on New Mexico. Over 150 colour photographs encompass the entire state throughout the seasons presenting New Mexico's people, cultures, and magnificent scenery at the millennium. Gomez's sweeping history views the state in terms of corridors, geographic as well as cultural. New Mexico's mountains, deserts, and rivers form natural corridors that migrating birds and animals have traditionally used for survival. Navigating these same corridors across the state, human cultures of Paleo, Plains and Pueblo Indians, Hispanos, and Anglos forged viable communities on the astringent New Mexican landscape. Pueblo ancestors migrated from austere environments throughout the Southwest to more inviting surroundings on the Rio Grande. Plains Indians from the north and Hispano tradesmen from the south converged via the Camino Real. American settlers migrated west along the Santa Fe Trail, the southernmost corridor around the formidable Rocky Mountains. Improved transportation such as the railroad and later Route 66, precursors to the interstate highway system, annually lured new inhabitants to this compelling land called New Mexico.
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47.250000 USD

New Mexico: Images of a Land and Its People

by Arthur R. Gomez, Lucian Niemeyer
Hardback
Book cover image
The devastating fire that swept through Los Alamos, New Mexico, in the spring of 2000 may have been caused by one controlled burn gone wild, but it was far from an isolated event. All through the twentieth century, our national forests have been under assault from all sides: first ranchers ...
FORESTS UNDER FIRE
The devastating fire that swept through Los Alamos, New Mexico, in the spring of 2000 may have been caused by one controlled burn gone wild, but it was far from an isolated event. All through the twentieth century, our national forests have been under assault from all sides: first ranchers and loggers laid their claims to our national forests, then recreationists and environmentalists spoke up for their interests. Who are our national forests really for? In this book, leading environmental historians show us what has been happening to these fragile woodlands. Taking us from lumber towns to Indian reservations to grazing lands, Forests under Fire reveals the interaction of Anglos, Hispanics, and Native Americans with the forests of the American Southwest. It examines recent controversies ranging from red squirrel conservation on Mt. Graham to increased tourism in our national forests. These case studies offer insights into human-forest relationships in places such as the Coconino National Forest, the Vallecitos Sustained Yield Unit, and the Gila Wilderness Area while also drawing on issues and concerns about similar biospheres in other parts of the West. Over the century, forest management has evolved from a field dominated by the conservationist perspective with humans exploiting natural resources-to one that emphasizes biocentrism, in which forests are seen as dynamic ecosystems. Yet despite this progressive shift, the assault on our forests continues through overgrazing of rangelands, lumbering, eroding mountainsides, fire suppression, and threats to the habitats of endangered species. Forests under Fire takes a closer look at the people calling the shots in our national forests, from advocates of timber harvesting to champions of ecosystem management, and calls for a reassessment of our priorities before our forests are gone. Contents-Introduction: Toward a Twenty-First-Century Forest Ecosystem Management Strategy / Christopher J. Huggard-Industry and Indian Self-Determination: Northern Arizona's Apache Lumbering Empire, 1870-1970 / Arthur R. Gomez-A Social History of McPhee: Colorado's Largest Lumber Town / Duane A. Smith: The Vallecitos Federal Sustained-Yield Unit: The (All Too) Human Dimension of Forest Management in Northern New Mexico, 1945-1998 / Suzanne S. Forrest-Grazing the Southwest Borderlands: The Peloncillo-Animas District of the Coronado National Forest in Arizona and New Mexico, 1906-1996 / Diana Hadley-America's First Wilderness Area: Aldo Leopold, the Forest Service, and the Gila of New Mexico, 1924-1980 / Christopher J. Huggard- Where There's Smoke : Wildfire Policy and Suppression in the American Southwest / John Herron-Struggle in an Endangered Empire: The Search for Total Ecosystem Management in the Forests of Southern Utah, 1976-1999 / Thomas G. Alexander-Biopolitics: A Case Study of Political Influence on Forest Management Decisions, Coronado National Forest, Arizona, 1980s-1990s / Paul W. Hirt-Epilogue: Seeing the Forest Not for the Trees: The Future of Southwestern Forests in Retrospect / Hal K. Rothman
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53.17 USD
Hardback
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