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From a distinguished assembly of twelve internationally acclaimed scholars comes this rich, interdisciplinary study that explores the Protestant Reformation and its revolutionary impact on the church and the world. The Reformation revolutionized the church and spiritual life as well as art, music, literature, architecture, and aesthetics. It transformed economics, trade, ...
The Protestant Reformation of the Church and the World
From a distinguished assembly of twelve internationally acclaimed scholars comes this rich, interdisciplinary study that explores the Protestant Reformation and its revolutionary impact on the church and the world. The Reformation revolutionized the church and spiritual life as well as art, music, literature, architecture, and aesthetics. It transformed economics, trade, banking, and more--transformations that shifted power away from the church to the state, unleashing radical new campaigns for freedom, equality, democracy, and constitutional order. In this authoritative but accessible study, the authors analyze the kaleidoscopic impact of the Reformation over the past 500 years--for better or worse, for richer or poorer, for the West and increasingly for the world.
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42.000000 USD

The Protestant Reformation of the Church and the World

by John Witte, Jr.
Paperback / softback
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Sean A. Adams and Seth M. Ehorn have drawn together an exciting range of contributors to evaluate the use of composite citations in Early Jewish, Greco-Roman, and Early Christian authors (up through Justin Martyr). The goal is to identify and describe the existence of this phenomenon in both Greco-Roman and ...
Composite Citations in Antiquity: Volume One: Jewish, Graeco-Roman, and Early Christian Uses
Sean A. Adams and Seth M. Ehorn have drawn together an exciting range of contributors to evaluate the use of composite citations in Early Jewish, Greco-Roman, and Early Christian authors (up through Justin Martyr). The goal is to identify and describe the existence of this phenomenon in both Greco-Roman and Jewish literature. The introductory essay will help to provide some definitional parameters, although the study as a whole will seek to weigh in on this question. The contributors seek to address specific issues, such as whether the quoting author created the composite text or found it already constructed as such. The essays also cover an exploration of the rhetorical and/or literary impact of the quotation in its present textual location, and the question of whether the intended audiences would have recognised and `reverse engineered' the composite citation and as a result engage with the original context of each of the component parts. In addition to the specific studies, Professor Christopher Stanley provides a summary reflection on all of the essays in the volume along with some implications for New Testament studies.
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41.950000 USD

Composite Citations in Antiquity: Volume One: Jewish, Graeco-Roman, and Early Christian Uses

Paperback / softback
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How did the medieval Middle East transform from a majority-Christian world to a majority-Muslim world, and what role did violence play in this process? Christian Martyrs under Islam explains how Christians across the early Islamic caliphate slowly converted to the faith of the Arab conquerors and how small groups of ...
Christian Martyrs under Islam: Religious Violence and the Making of the Muslim World
How did the medieval Middle East transform from a majority-Christian world to a majority-Muslim world, and what role did violence play in this process? Christian Martyrs under Islam explains how Christians across the early Islamic caliphate slowly converted to the faith of the Arab conquerors and how small groups of individuals rejected this faith through dramatic acts of resistance, including apostasy and blasphemy. Using previously untapped sources in a range of Middle Eastern languages, Christian Sahner introduces an unknown group of martyrs who were executed at the hands of Muslim officials between the seventh and ninth centuries CE. Found in places as diverse as Syria, Spain, Egypt, and Armenia, they include an alleged descendant of Muhammad who converted to Christianity, high-ranking Christian secretaries of the Muslim state who viciously insulted the Prophet, and the children of mixed marriages between Muslims and Christians. Sahner argues that Christians never experienced systematic persecution under the early caliphs, and indeed, they remained the largest portion of the population in the greater Middle East for centuries after the Arab conquest. Still, episodes of ferocious violence contributed to the spread of Islam within Christian societies, and memories of this bloodshed played a key role in shaping Christian identity in the new Islamic empire. Christian Martyrs under Islam examines how violence against Christians ended the age of porous religious boundaries and laid the foundations for more antagonistic Muslim-Christian relations in the centuries to come.
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41.950000 USD

Christian Martyrs under Islam: Religious Violence and the Making of the Muslim World

by Christian C. Sahner
Hardback
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What does it mean to contemplate? In the Middle Ages, more than merely thinking with intensity, it was a religious practice entailing utter receptiveness to the divine presence. Contemplation is widely considered by scholars today to have been the highest form of devotional prayer, a rarified means of experiencing God ...
Staging Contemplation: Participatory Theology in Middle English Prose, Verse, and Drama
What does it mean to contemplate? In the Middle Ages, more than merely thinking with intensity, it was a religious practice entailing utter receptiveness to the divine presence. Contemplation is widely considered by scholars today to have been the highest form of devotional prayer, a rarified means of experiencing God practiced only by the most devout of monks, nuns, and mystics. Yet, in this groundbreaking new book, Eleanor Johnson argues instead for the pervasiveness and accessibility of contemplative works to medieval audiences. By drawing together ostensibly diverse literary genres-devotional prose, allegorical poetry, cycle dramas, and morality plays-Staging Contemplation paints late Middle English contemplative writing as a broad genre that operated collectively and experientially as much as through radical individual disengagement from the world. Johnson further argues that the contemplative genre played a crucial role in the exploration of the English vernacular as a literary and theological language in the fifteenth century, tracing how these works engaged modes of disfluency-from strained syntax and aberrant grammar, to puns, slang, code-switching, and laughter-to explore the limits, norms, and potential of English as a devotional language. Full of virtuoso close readings, this book demonstrates a sustained interest in how poetic language can foster a participatory experience of likeness to God among lay and devotional audiences alike.
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31.500000 USD

Staging Contemplation: Participatory Theology in Middle English Prose, Verse, and Drama

by Eleanor Johnson
Paperback / softback
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Based on the 2010 Cadbury Lectures he gave at the University of Birmingham, UK, this book by the noted Catholic theologian introduces and explores the main issues of contemporary theologies in Asia-especially Catholic. It begins with a survey of Asian Christian theologies, followed by a historical overview and key issues ...
Asian Christianities: History, Theology, Practice
Based on the 2010 Cadbury Lectures he gave at the University of Birmingham, UK, this book by the noted Catholic theologian introduces and explores the main issues of contemporary theologies in Asia-especially Catholic. It begins with a survey of Asian Christian theologies, followed by a historical overview and key issues in Asian Christian theologies.
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52.500000 USD

Asian Christianities: History, Theology, Practice

by Peter C. Phan
Paperback
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Psalms 146a150asometimes called the Final Hallel aare often thought to comprise an end to the Psalter. Frequently seen as connected to other psalms through catchwords that act as both literary and theological links, these final psalms are thought to originally, and deliberately, close out the entire book of psalms. However, ...
The End of the Psalter: Psalms 146a150 in the Masoretic Text, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Septuagint
Psalms 146a150asometimes called the Final Hallel aare often thought to comprise an end to the Psalter. Frequently seen as connected to other psalms through catchwords that act as both literary and theological links, these final psalms are thought to originally, and deliberately, close out the entire book of psalms. However, Alma Brodersen questions this purported function of these psalms. The End of the Psalter presents new interpretations of Psalms 146a150 based on the oldest extant evidence: the Hebrew Masoretic Text, the Hebrew Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Greek Septuagint. Brodersen analyzes each psalm separately in all three sources, complete with a translation and detailed comments on form, intertextuality, content, genre, and date. Based on this rigorous analysis, Brodersen makes detailed comparisons of the individual psalms and their intertextual references that highlight substantial differences between the transmitted texts. Brodersen concludes that Psalms 146a150 were separate texts, which only came to form the end of the Psalter in the Masoretic tradition. Her work underscores the importance of psalms exegesis before Psalter exegesis, and illustrates how the use of ancient sources furthers the understanding of the Psalms.
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41.950000 USD

The End of the Psalter: Psalms 146a150 in the Masoretic Text, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Septuagint

by Alma Brodersen
Paperback / softback
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T. F. Torrance's influential The Doctrine of Grace in the Apostolic Fathers (1948) relegated the collection of Christianity's earliest noncanonical witnesses to a fall from grace. According to Torrance, the Apostolic Fathers abandoned Paul's justification by faith and instead advocated for various forms of works righteousness. Given the new perspectives ...
Justification in the Second Century
T. F. Torrance's influential The Doctrine of Grace in the Apostolic Fathers (1948) relegated the collection of Christianity's earliest noncanonical witnesses to a fall from grace. According to Torrance, the Apostolic Fathers abandoned Paul's justification by faith and instead advocated for various forms of works righteousness. Given the new perspectives on both Paul and first-century Judaism, Brian Arnold challenges Torrance's judgments of the Apostolic Fathers by assessing the clarity, prevalence, and importance of Paul's doctrine of justification one hundred years after Paul's death (ca. 165 CE). Arnold carefully examines the ancient writings of Clement of Rome, Ignatius of Antioch,and Justin Martyr, as well as the Epistle to Diognetus and the Odes of Solomon, providing close readings of key texts. Arnold concludes, contrary to Torrance, that Paul's teaching on justification is present, understood, and important in second-century writings. Arnold opposes arguments that claim the Early Church Fathers either misunderstood Paul or were uninterested in the doctrine. Arnold shows that Christianity, in its earliest practices, emphasized the virtuous life that must follow one's baptism, while also contending that faith is the only prerequisite for justification.While second-century Christian literature may not mimic Paul's language at every point, Arnold shows that the essence of Pauline soteriology--the liberation and new life that faith in Christ's atoning death provides apart from election and law--continues to be a dominant theme of Christian reflection, praxis, and worship.
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41.950000 USD

Justification in the Second Century

by Brian J. Arnold
Paperback
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When, in October 1517, Martin Luther pinned his Ninety-Five Theses to the door of All Saints' Church in Wittenberg he shattered the foundations of western Christendom. The Reformation of doctrine and practice that followed Luther's seismic action, and protest against the sale of indulgences, fragmented the Church and overturned previously ...
A Short History of the Reformation
When, in October 1517, Martin Luther pinned his Ninety-Five Theses to the door of All Saints' Church in Wittenberg he shattered the foundations of western Christendom. The Reformation of doctrine and practice that followed Luther's seismic action, and protest against the sale of indulgences, fragmented the Church and overturned previously accepted certainties and priorities. But it did more, challenging the relationship between spiritual and secular authority, perceptions of the supernatural, the interpretation of the past, the role of women in society and church, and clerical attitudes towards marriage and sex. Drawing on the most recent historiography, Helen L Parish locates the Protestant Reformation in its many cultural, social and political contexts. She assesses the Reformers' impact on art and architecture; on notions of authority, scripture and tradition; and - reflecting on the extent to which the printing press helped spread Reformation ideas - on oral, print and written culture.
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18.75 USD

A Short History of the Reformation

by Helen L. Parish
Paperback / softback
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At the turn of the twentieth century, a group of famed scholars at the University of GAttingen founded a movement that came to be known as the History of Religions School. In their approach to Christian origins and early Christian belief about Jesus they emphasized the degree to which Christianity ...
Hellenistic Mystery-Religions: Their Basic Ideas and Significance
At the turn of the twentieth century, a group of famed scholars at the University of GAttingen founded a movement that came to be known as the History of Religions School. In their approach to Christian origins and early Christian belief about Jesus they emphasized the degree to which Christianity was a product of its time. Christians borrowed and adapted ideas already in wide circulation to craft their claims about Christ. In his now classic Hellenistic Mystery-Religions (first published in 1910), Richard Reitzenstein seeks to establish the direct dependence of early Christianity on Hellenistic, Mandaean, and Iranian mythology and ritual. While written before the discoveries of Qumran and Nag Hammadi, Reitzenstein's knowledge of ancient texts still warrants careful reading. Even if one rejects his claim that the Apostle Paul was the greatest of all Gnostics, Reitzenstein's rigorous attempt to root Christianity in its historical context and demonstrate the genetic development of religious belief and practice merits both commendation and careful attention.
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52.450000 USD

Hellenistic Mystery-Religions: Their Basic Ideas and Significance

by Richard Reitzenstein
Paperback / softback
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In the early '70s, James M. Robinson (Claremont) and Helmut Koester (Harvard), both students of Bultmann, broke new ground in their Trajectories through Early Christianity. The eight essays that comprise this volume seek a wholesale redefinition of the task of New Testament studies, as well as illustrating this newly conceived ...
Trajectories through Early Christianity
In the early '70s, James M. Robinson (Claremont) and Helmut Koester (Harvard), both students of Bultmann, broke new ground in their Trajectories through Early Christianity. The eight essays that comprise this volume seek a wholesale redefinition of the task of New Testament studies, as well as illustrating this newly conceived task.Robinson and Koester claim that the New Testament cannot be read apart from other early Christian literature and that the regnant designation of canon is misleading because it obscures the essential fluidity of early Christianity. Robinson and Koester not only question the artificial limits of the New Testament as a whole, but also the utility of the most commonly accepted forms ( Gattungen) that constitute the New Testament.In the end, even the labels orthodoxy and heresy should be abandoned--along with an outmoded belief that orthodoxy preceded heresy and formed the center of Christianity. From its birth, Christianity was pluriform, and what later came to be known as orthodoxy and heresy were only two of many equally legitimate trajectories running through Christianity.Robinson and Koester's bold wrestling with the basic question of Christian origins proves as instructive today as it did over forty years ago: was there ever identifiable unity in early Christianity, or has diversity always been the measuring stick?
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41.950000 USD

Trajectories through Early Christianity

Paperback / softback
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The Gospel of John presents its readers, listeners, and interpreters with a serious problem: how can we reconcile the Gospel's exalted spirituality and deep knowledge of Judaism with its portrayal of the Jews as the children of the devil (John 8:44) who persecuted Christ and his followers? One widespread solution ...
Cast Out of the Covenant: Jews and Anti-Judaism in the Gospel of John
The Gospel of John presents its readers, listeners, and interpreters with a serious problem: how can we reconcile the Gospel's exalted spirituality and deep knowledge of Judaism with its portrayal of the Jews as the children of the devil (John 8:44) who persecuted Christ and his followers? One widespread solution to this problem is the so-called expulsion hypothesis. According to this view, the Fourth Gospel was addressed to a Jewish group of believers in Christ that had been expelled from the synagogue due to their faith. The anti-Jewish elements express their natural resentment of how they had been treated; the Jewish elements of the Gospel, on the other hand, reflect the Jewishness of this group and also soften the force of the Gospel's anti-Jewish comments. In Cast out of the Covenant, this book, Adele Reinhartz presents a detailed critique of the expulsion hypothesis on literary and historical grounds. She argues that, far from softening the Gospel's anti-Jewishness, the Gospel's Jewish elements in fact contribute to it. Focusing on the Gospel's persuasive language and intentions, Reinhartz shows that the Gospel's anti-Jewishness is evident not only in the Gospel's hostile comments about the Jews but also in its appropriation of Torah, Temple, and Covenant that were so central to first-century Jewish identity. Through its skillful use of rhetoric, the Gospel attempts to convince its audience that God's favor had turned away from the Jews to the Gentiles; that there is a deep rift between the synagogue and those who confess Christ as Messiah; and that, in the Gospel's view, this rift was initiated in Jesus' own lifetime. The Fourth Gospel, Reinhartz argues, appropriates Jewishness at the same time as it repudiates Jews. In doing so, it also promotes a parting of the ways between those who believe that Jesus is the messiah, the Son of God, and those who do not, that is, the Jews. This rhetorical program, she suggests, may have been used to promote outreach or even an organized mission to the Gentiles, following in the footsteps of Paul and his mid-first-century contemporaries.
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110.91 USD

Cast Out of the Covenant: Jews and Anti-Judaism in the Gospel of John

by Adele Reinhartz
Hardback
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Oscar Cullmann's The Christology of the New Testament was the standard student textbook in New Testament courses and the measuring stick for scholarly inquiry into Christology for decades. An enduring classic, this book is based on a lifetime of study from one of the most creative and disciplined minds ever ...
The Christology of the New Testament
Oscar Cullmann's The Christology of the New Testament was the standard student textbook in New Testament courses and the measuring stick for scholarly inquiry into Christology for decades. An enduring classic, this book is based on a lifetime of study from one of the most creative and disciplined minds ever to tackle the problem of New Testament Christology.Cullmann moves methodically through his careful philological and textual consideration of the various titles used for Jesus in the New Testament, dividing them into four groups: titles used to refer to Jesus' earthly life (prophet, servant, and priest); titles used to refer to Jesus' eschatological work (Messiah and Son of Man); titles used to refer to Jesus' present work in the church (Lord and Savior); and titles used to refer to Jesus' preexistence (Word and Son of God). In each case, he weighs the New Testament's usage of each title against the Old Testament, Second Temple Jewish, and Hellenistic semantic backgrounds.Though Cullmann sifts the evidence analytically and presents it systematically, the end result is not simply a christological lexicon. Instead, he creates a cohesive picture by showing that early Christianity's view of Jesus originated with the historical Jesus himself. For Cullmann, New Testament Christology was not a later Hellenistic imposition upon earlier Jewish beliefs about Jesus. Rather, the titles used for Jesus form a chain of specific events centered around Jesus, events that fit into and extend the long string of God's saving deeds in history.Cullmann's Christology remains as instructive and important today as when it first appeared--and still repays careful reading and study.
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36.700000 USD

The Christology of the New Testament

by Oscar Cullmann
Paperback / softback
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Harry H. Singleton is concerned in this work with the disparate ways blacks and whites have experienced American history and subsequently the way they have fashioned God's communication to humans, formerly referred to as revelation. This book makes the case that while white Christian leaders have rooted God's revelation either ...
Divine Revelation and Human Liberation
Harry H. Singleton is concerned in this work with the disparate ways blacks and whites have experienced American history and subsequently the way they have fashioned God's communication to humans, formerly referred to as revelation. This book makes the case that while white Christian leaders have rooted God's revelation either in an inherently inferior black humanity or a Christian faith void of black suffering, black theologians have rooted that same revelation in the plight of oppressed peoples in general and black people in particular, i.e., that God's essence is found in the struggle for human liberation. With clarity and passion, Professor Singleton draws on the treatments of revelation of the most celebrated white theologians to demonstrate that the Christian theological enterprise has by intent and effect linked God's revelation with black inferiority. Black theologians, on the other hand, have countered seeking a more liberating view of black humanity by making the case that the God of the Bible ultimately intervenes in contexts of human oppression not for their perpetuation but rather for their destruction. In this sense, Singleton pushes the reader to the conclusion that although the treatments of revelation between white and black theologians have been as different as their lived histories, the object of revelation has been the same - the humanity of black people! Thus, Singleton puts forth the bold argument that the racial struggle in America has not only been an historical struggle for determining the humanity of black people but a theological struggle for determining the humanity of black people as well. But far from remaining objective, Singleton takes the liberating path for black humanity and presses his way through the pages of this work seeking a new paradigm for revelation that no longer places God at the intersection of the white-black encounter as a condoner of racism or as a disinterested observer in the racial struggle but rather as an eternal light whose very nature is seen in the continuing quest for human liberation.
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102.38 USD

Divine Revelation and Human Liberation

by Harry H., III Singleton
Hardback
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Fighting the Antichrist analyzes the discourse against Catholicism from the breach from Rome in 1534 until the death of Elizabeth I in 1603. Cultural representations of Catholicism were decisive in creating and moulding the perceptions that many Englishmen had of the new Anglican Church and its alleged enemies. Such perceptions ...
Fighting the Antichrist: A Cultural History of Anti-Catholicism in Tudor England
Fighting the Antichrist analyzes the discourse against Catholicism from the breach from Rome in 1534 until the death of Elizabeth I in 1603. Cultural representations of Catholicism were decisive in creating and moulding the perceptions that many Englishmen had of the new Anglican Church and its alleged enemies. Such perceptions were essential not only in promoting policies against English Catholics, but in shaping English national identity. Anti-Catholic propaganda elaborated a stereotype of the Catholic that converged with other negative cultural types common in the period, such as that of the lazy, lecherous monk, the cruel Spaniard, the seductive and deceitful Jesuit and the Machiavellian schemer (the last three enjoying special popularity in the second half of the Elizabethan period). These stereotypes allowed anti-Catholics to send a clear message to their Protestant countrymen: that Catholicism was a devilish, corrupt foreign power that could undermine the most basic pillars of English society their Church and State. Dr Alvarez-Recio explores a wide number of texts of different genres in order to determine their contribution to the aforementioned cultural image of the Roman Catholic Church in England. Special attention is paid to political and doctrinal plays and pamphlets, given their appeal to different social groups and their role in creating a new public opinion. Other kinds of material that are also considered include chronicles and private letters, fragments of royal proclamations, and descriptions of royal entries and coronations. All these texts offer a wide spectrum of responses to the Catholic question and assist in understanding the role of anti-Catholic discourse in royal iconography. Originally published in Spanish by Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, the volume provides an inter-disciplinary approach, addressing issues such as the formation of public opinion, the influence of imperial discourse, and the overriding role of religion in nationalist issues.
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51.10 USD

Fighting the Antichrist: A Cultural History of Anti-Catholicism in Tudor England

by Leticia Alvarez Recio
Paperback / softback
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Quill and Cross in the Borderlands examines nearly four hundred years of history, folklore, literature, and art concerning the seventeenth-century Spanish nun and writer Sor Maria de Jesus de Agreda, identified as the legendary Lady in Blue who miraculously appeared to tribes in colonial-era New Mexico and taught them the ...
Quill and Cross in the Borderlands: Sor Maria de Agreda and the Lady in Blue, 1628 to the Present
Quill and Cross in the Borderlands examines nearly four hundred years of history, folklore, literature, and art concerning the seventeenth-century Spanish nun and writer Sor Maria de Jesus de Agreda, identified as the legendary Lady in Blue who miraculously appeared to tribes in colonial-era New Mexico and taught them the rudiments of the Catholic faith. Sor Maria, an author of mystical Marian works, became renowned not only for her alleged spiritual travel from her cloister in Spain to the New World, but also for her writing, studied and implemented by Franciscans on both sides of the ocean. Working from original historical accounts, archival research, and a wealth of literature on the legend and the historical figure alike, Anna M. Nogar meticulously examines how and why the legend and the person became intertwined in Catholic consciousness and social praxis. In addition to the influence of the narrative of the Lady in Blue in colonial Mexico, Nogar addresses Sor Maria's importance as an author of spiritual texts that influenced many spheres of New Spanish and Spanish society. Quill and Cross in the Borderlands focuses on the reading and interpretation of her works, especially in New Spain, where they were widely printed and disseminated. Over time, in the developing folklore of the Indo-Hispano populations of the present-day U.S. Southwest and the borderlands, the historical Sor Maria and her writings virtually disappeared from view, and the Lady in Blue became a prominent folk figure, appearing in folk stories and popular histories. These folk accounts drew the Lady in Blue into the present day, where she appears in artwork, literature, theater, and public ritual. Nogar's examination of these contemporary renderings leads to a reconsideration of the ambiguities that lie at the heart of the narrative. Quill and Cross in the Borderlands documents the material legacy of a legend that has survived and thrived for hundreds of years, and at the same time rediscovers the historical basis of a hidden writer. This book will interest scholars and researchers of colonial Latin American literature, early modern women writers, folklore and ethnopoetics, and Mexican American cultural studies.
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63.000000 USD

Quill and Cross in the Borderlands: Sor Maria de Agreda and the Lady in Blue, 1628 to the Present

by Anna M. Nogar
Hardback
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In Pulpit and Nation, Spencer McBride highlights the importance of Protestant clergymen in early American political culture, elucidating the actual role of religion in the founding era. Beginning with colonial precedents for clerical involvement in politics and concluding with false rumors of Thomas Jefferson's conversion to Christianity in 1817, this ...
Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America
In Pulpit and Nation, Spencer McBride highlights the importance of Protestant clergymen in early American political culture, elucidating the actual role of religion in the founding era. Beginning with colonial precedents for clerical involvement in politics and concluding with false rumors of Thomas Jefferson's conversion to Christianity in 1817, this book reveals the ways in which the clergy's political activism-and early Americans' general use of religious language and symbols in their political discourse-expanded and evolved to become an integral piece in the invention of an American national identity. Offering a fresh examination of some of the key junctures in the development of the American political system-the Revolution, the ratification debates of 1787-88, and the formation of political parties in the 1790s-McBride shows how religious arguments, sentiments, and motivations were subtly interwoven with political ones in the creation of the early American republic. Ultimately, Pulpit and Nation reveals that while religious expression was common in the political culture of the Revolutionary era, it was as much the calculated design of ambitious men seeking power as it was the natural outgrowth of a devoutly religious people.
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26.250000 USD

Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America

by Spencer W McBride
Paperback / softback
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This book presents the various ways that the Gospels function as sources for Second Temple Jewish thought and practice. While decades of research into their Jewish backgrounds have proven fruitful, little attention has been given to the manner in which the Gospels themselves give witness to the evolution of Judaism ...
Understanding The Gospels As Ancient Jew
This book presents the various ways that the Gospels function as sources for Second Temple Jewish thought and practice. While decades of research into their Jewish backgrounds have proven fruitful, little attention has been given to the manner in which the Gospels themselves give witness to the evolution of Judaism in antiquity. This book argues that when understood as part of the corpora of ancient Jewish texts (e.g., Dead Sea Scrolls, Mishnah, etc.), the Gospels are testimonies to the geographical, linguistic, historical, political, social and religious reality of ancient Judaism and are sometimes the very first literary witnesses to particular practices (e.g., naming a child on the 8th day).
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15.700000 USD

Understanding The Gospels As Ancient Jew

by Jeffrey P. Garcia
Paperback / softback
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This volume provides a theoretically and empirically-grounded study of the significance of landscape in the experience of Christian pilgrimage across different denominations and its intersection with cultural heritage and tourism. The book focuses on pilgrimages to Meteora (Greece), Subiaco (Italy) and the Isle of Man. These are each sites of ...
Christian Pilgrimage, Landscape and Heritage: Journeying to the Sacred
This volume provides a theoretically and empirically-grounded study of the significance of landscape in the experience of Christian pilgrimage across different denominations and its intersection with cultural heritage and tourism. The book focuses on pilgrimages to Meteora (Greece), Subiaco (Italy) and the Isle of Man. These are each sites of scenic beauty that boast a rich heritage associated respectively to Greek Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Ecumenical/ Protestant denominations. The study discusses different Christian theologies, practices and perspectives on the nature and the purpose of pilgrimage in these traditions. It draws on participant experiential accounts, archival research, and interviews with clergy, laity and local stakeholders. Special attention is paid to the themes of sacred space and practice, aesthetics, mobilities, embodiment and performance, emotional geographies, theology, cultural heritage, consumption and commodification, and the pilgrim-tourist continuum.
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63.12 USD

Christian Pilgrimage, Landscape and Heritage: Journeying to the Sacred

by Avril Maddrell, Veronica Della Dora, Alessandro Scafi, Heather Walton
Paperback
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In these vivid and approachable essays Eamon Duffy engages with some of the central aspects of Western religion in the thousand years between the decline of pagan Rome and the rise of the Protestant Reformation. In the process he opens windows on the vibrant and multifaceted beliefs and practices by ...
Royal Books and Holy Bones: Essays in Medieval Christianity
In these vivid and approachable essays Eamon Duffy engages with some of the central aspects of Western religion in the thousand years between the decline of pagan Rome and the rise of the Protestant Reformation. In the process he opens windows on the vibrant and multifaceted beliefs and practices by which medieval people made sense of their world: the fear of death and the impact of devastating pandemic, holy war against Islam and the invention of the blood libel against the Jews, provision for the afterlife and the continuing power of the dead over the living, the meaning of pilgrimage and the evolution of Christian music. Duffy unpicks the stories of the Golden Legend and Yale University's mysterious Voynich manuscript, discusses the cult of `St' Henry VI and explores childhood in the Middle Ages. Accompanying the book are a collection of full colour plates which further demonstrate the richness of late medieval religion. In this highly readable collection Eamon Duffy once more challenges existing scholarly narratives and sheds new light on the religion of Britain and Europe before and during the Reformation.
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42.66 USD

Royal Books and Holy Bones: Essays in Medieval Christianity

by Eamon Duffy
Hardback
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David Moessner proposes a new understanding of the relation of Luke's second volume to his Gospel to open up a whole new reading of Luke's foundational contribution to the New Testament. For postmodern readers who find Acts a `generic outlier,' dangling tenuously somewhere between the `mainland' of the evangelists and ...
Luke the Historian of Israel's Legacy, Theologian of Israel's `Christ': A New Reading of the `Gospel Acts' of Luke
David Moessner proposes a new understanding of the relation of Luke's second volume to his Gospel to open up a whole new reading of Luke's foundational contribution to the New Testament. For postmodern readers who find Acts a `generic outlier,' dangling tenuously somewhere between the `mainland' of the evangelists and the `Peloponnese' of Paul-diffused and confused and shunted to the backwaters of the New Testament by these signature corpora-Moessner plunges his readers into the hermeneutical atmosphere of Greek narrative poetics and elaboration of multi-volume works to inhale the rhetorical swells that animate Luke's first readers in their engagement of his narrative. In this collection of twelve of his essays, re-contextualized and re-organized into five major topical movements, Moessner showcases multiple Hellenistic texts and rhetorical tropes to spotlight the various signals Luke provides his readers of the multiple ways his Acts will follow all that Jesus began to do and to teach (Acts 1:1) and, consequently, bring coherence to this dominant block of the New Testament that has long been split apart. By collapsing the world of Jesus into the words and deeds of his followers, Luke re-configures the significance of Israel's Christ and the Reign of Israel's God for all peoples and places to create a new account of `Gospel Acts,' discrete and distinctively different than the narrative of the many (Luke 1:1). Luke the Historian of Israel's Legacy combines what no analysis of the Lukan writings has previously accomplished, integrating seamlessly two `generically-estranged' volumes into one new whole from the intent of the one composer. For Luke is the Hellenistic historian and simultaneously `biblical' theologian who arranges the one plan of God read from the script of the Jewish scriptures-parts and whole, severally and together-as the saving `script' for the whole world through Israel's suffering and raised up Christ, Jesus of Nazareth. In the introductions to each major theme of the essays, this noted scholar of the Lukan writings offers an epitome of the main features of Luke's theological `thought,' and, in a final Conclusions chapter, weaves together a comprehensive synthesis of this new reading of the whole.
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30.440000 USD

Luke the Historian of Israel's Legacy, Theologian of Israel's `Christ': A New Reading of the `Gospel Acts' of Luke

by David Paul Moessner
Paperback / softback
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This monograph demonstrates that the Fourth Gospel is a result of highly creative, hypertextual reworking of the Acts of the Apostles. The detailed reworking consists of around 900 strictly sequentially organized thematic, and at times also linguistic correspondences between John and Acts. The strictly sequential, hypertextual dependence on Acts explains ...
The Gospel of John: A Hypertextual Commentary
This monograph demonstrates that the Fourth Gospel is a result of highly creative, hypertextual reworking of the Acts of the Apostles. The detailed reworking consists of around 900 strictly sequentially organized thematic, and at times also linguistic correspondences between John and Acts. The strictly sequential, hypertextual dependence on Acts explains John's modifications of the synoptic material, relocations thereof, additions to it, and many other surprising features of the Fourth Gospel. Critical explanations of such features, which are offered in this study, ensure the reliability of the new solution to the problem of the relationship between John and the Synoptics.
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78.49 USD

The Gospel of John: A Hypertextual Commentary

by Bartosz Adamczewski
Hardback
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In the massive literature on the idea of the self, the Augustinian influence has often played a central role. The volume Augustine Our Contemporary, starting from the compelling first essay by David W. Tracy, addresses this influence from the Middle Ages to modernity and from a rich variety of perspectives, ...
Augustine Our Contemporary: Examining the Self in Past and Present
In the massive literature on the idea of the self, the Augustinian influence has often played a central role. The volume Augustine Our Contemporary, starting from the compelling first essay by David W. Tracy, addresses this influence from the Middle Ages to modernity and from a rich variety of perspectives, including theology, philosophy, history, and literary studies. The collected essays in this volume all engage Augustine and the Augustinian legacy on notions of selfhood, interiority, and personal identity. Written by prominent scholars, the essays demonstrate a connecting thread: Augustine is a thinker who has proven his contem - poraneity in Western thought time and time again. He has been the contemporary of thinkers ranging from Eriugena to Luther to Walter Benjamin and Jacques Derrida. His influence has been dominant in certain eras, and in others he has left traces and fragments that, when stitched together, create a unique impression of the presentness of Christian selfhood. As a whole, Augustine Our Contemporary sheds rele vant new light on the continuity of the Western Christian tradition. This volume will interest academics and students of philosophy, political theory, and religion, as well as scholars of postmodernism and Augustine.
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73.500000 USD

Augustine Our Contemporary: Examining the Self in Past and Present

Hardback
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In the mid-twentieth century, American Catholic churches began to shed the ubiquitous spires, stained glass, and gargoyles of their European forebears, turning instead toward startling and more angular structures of steel, plate glass, and concrete. But how did an institution like the Catholic Church, so often seen as steeped in ...
American Catholics and the Church of Tomorrow: Building Churches for the Future, 1925-1975
In the mid-twentieth century, American Catholic churches began to shed the ubiquitous spires, stained glass, and gargoyles of their European forebears, turning instead toward startling and more angular structures of steel, plate glass, and concrete. But how did an institution like the Catholic Church, so often seen as steeped in inflexible traditions, come to welcome this modernist trend? Catherine R. Osborne's innovative new book finds the answer: the alignment between postwar advancements in technology and design and evolutionary thought within the burgeoning American Catholic community. A new, visibly contemporary approach to design, church leaders thought, could lead to the rebirth of the church community of the future. As Osborne explains, the engineering breakthroughs that made modernist churches feasible themselves raised questions that were, for many Catholics, fundamentally theological. Couldn't technological improvements engender worship spaces that better reflected God's presence in the contemporary world? Detailing the social, architectural, and theological movements that made modern churches possible, American Catholics and the Churches of Tomorrow breaks important new ground in the history of American Catholicism, and also presents new lines of thought for scholars attracted to modern architectural and urban history.
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58.01 USD

American Catholics and the Church of Tomorrow: Building Churches for the Future, 1925-1975

by Catherine R. Osborne
Hardback
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Answering the Call: Understanding and Responding to the Call to Full-Time Ministry
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20.970000 USD

Answering the Call: Understanding and Responding to the Call to Full-Time Ministry

by Ron Lewis
Hardback
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All the Days of My Life: The Autobiography of a Pioneer Missionary in Europe
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36.700000 USD

All the Days of My Life: The Autobiography of a Pioneer Missionary in Europe

by Samuel D Faircloth
Paperback
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The Great Apparitions of Mary: An Examination of Twenty-Two Supranormal Appearances
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16.790000 USD

The Great Apparitions of Mary: An Examination of Twenty-Two Supranormal Appearances

by Ingo Swann
Paperback / softback
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Asceticism of the Mind: Forms of Attention and Self-Transformation in Late Antique Monasticism
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84.000000 USD

Asceticism of the Mind: Forms of Attention and Self-Transformation in Late Antique Monasticism

by Inbar Graiver
Hardback
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Love Tears & Autism: An Australian Mother's Journey from Heartbreak to Hope
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20.990000 USD

Love Tears & Autism: An Australian Mother's Journey from Heartbreak to Hope

by Cecily Paterson
Paperback / softback
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Transformational Truth: A Biblical Apologetic
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24.100000 USD

Transformational Truth: A Biblical Apologetic

by Andrew Thomas Knight
Paperback / softback
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The Pilgrim Church
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13.600000 USD

The Pilgrim Church

by E. H. Broadbent
Paperback / softback
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