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Harlots, hoodlums, and heathens in Brassai's Paris Brassai is a living eye, wrote Henry Miller of the Hungarian born artist who adopted Paris after World War I and became one of its most celebrated photographers. Originally a painter before he moved on to writing, sculpture, cinema and, most famously, photography, ...
Brassai, Paris
Harlots, hoodlums, and heathens in Brassai's Paris Brassai is a living eye, wrote Henry Miller of the Hungarian born artist who adopted Paris after World War I and became one of its most celebrated photographers. Originally a painter before he moved on to writing, sculpture, cinema and, most famously, photography, Brassai (1899-1984) was a member of Paris s cultural elite, counting Miller, Picasso, Sartre, Camus, and Cocteau, among his friends. Camera in hand, he scoured the streets and bars of Paris, unabashedly capturing the city s inhabitants in their natural habitats. Prostitutes, hoodlums, and other marginal characters were the most famous heroes of Brassai s moody, gritty photographs taken often by night. Including an extensive selection of Brassai s finest photographs and an essay describing his life and work, this book explores the world of Brassai in thematic chapters: Minotaure magazine, Paris at Night, Secret Paris, Day Visions, Artists of My Life, and Graffiti and Transmutations.
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6.28 USD
Hardback
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Riverside Park is an illustrated tribute to Frederick Law Olmsted's other New York City sanctuary. Since its conception in the 1870s, the park has undergone a number of transformations and suffered from periods of misuse and neglect, but in 1984, much-needed renovations turned this city oasis into what is today ...
Riverside Park: The Splendid Sliver
Riverside Park is an illustrated tribute to Frederick Law Olmsted's other New York City sanctuary. Since its conception in the 1870s, the park has undergone a number of transformations and suffered from periods of misuse and neglect, but in 1984, much-needed renovations turned this city oasis into what is today one of Manhattan's most beautiful attractions. If the West Side does not stir you, you are a clod, past redemption. -Robert Moses Millions visit the Upper West Side landmark annually, and despite the heavy use, thousands of volunteers keep the grounds pristine. The park is now being extended southward as part of Manhattan's plan to reclaim the island's six hundred miles of waterfront, and Riverside Drive-Olmsted's curving thoroughfare flanking the park-has long been one of Manhattan's premier addresses. I often feel drawn to the Hudson River...I never get tired of looking at it; it hypnotizes me. -Joseph Mitchell, from The Rivermen From the time it was carved out of an unpromising landscape, Riverside Park has continued to reinvent itself. Using photographs (both contemporary and historical), illustrations, poems, and original and excerpted narrative, Edward Grimm and E. Peter Schroeder tell the intriguing story of a symbol of the modern revitalization of New York City. Riverside Park will be a genuine riverside reservation, dedicated forever to the use of the people, beautiful in the highest sense. -The New York World, April 24, 1892 *Includes the official Riverside Park Fund Map of 2007*
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17.66 USD
Hardback
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An intimate window into the secret lives of more than seventy - five great artists by one of France's most successful and best-known photographers. During the golden age when Montparnasse was teeming with artists, Robert Doisneau gained remarkable access to the key figures working in Paris from 1937 onwards, and ...
Doisneau: Portraits of the Artists
An intimate window into the secret lives of more than seventy - five great artists by one of France's most successful and best-known photographers. During the golden age when Montparnasse was teeming with artists, Robert Doisneau gained remarkable access to the key figures working in Paris from 1937 onwards, and he visited their studios and caught them in various private moments: working, reflecting, and even playing with their children. This book, which includes some previously unpublished photographs, shares Doisneau's intimate view on the work and lives of these artists. Many remain famous-Picasso, David Hockney, Jasper Johns, Giacometti, Saul Steinberg, Marcel Duchamp, Le Corbusier, Foujita-while others have fallen into obscurity, perhaps one day to be rediscovered. Regardless of the artist's social status-whether major luminary of the day or struggling newcomer- Doisneau approached each subject with the same humble eye. His signature black-andwhite photographs capture the nostalgia of the period and bear witness to these artists in the act of creating some of the world's finest art. This book, published in conjunction with Doisneau's daughters, is a fascinating document of the daily lives of artists by one of the world's most famous and popular photographers.
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68.250000 USD
Hardback
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On 26 April 1986, reactor number 4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded. The accident released at least 100 times more radiation than the bombs dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima in Japan, and is considered to be the worst nuclear accident in the history of humanity. It is classified ...
Chernobyl's Atomic Legacy
On 26 April 1986, reactor number 4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded. The accident released at least 100 times more radiation than the bombs dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima in Japan, and is considered to be the worst nuclear accident in the history of humanity. It is classified as a level 7 incident, the highest level on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The only other incident to be categorized at this level is the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster of 2011. In the days, months and years that followed, over half a million civilians and military personnel ( liquidators ) were involved in the decontamination process to avert a potential second catastrophe. Pripyat was home to a population of 49,000 and today it stands abandoned, overgrown by vegetation, subjected to looting and vandalism, as a monument to the lives lost and the memories of those evacuated. Jonglez Chernobyl atomic legacy is a photographic testimony to the desolation left by the nuclear catastrophe.
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31.450000 USD
Hardback
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During a period of thirty-five years, from 1927 until 1962, a group of friends gathered to hunt, socialize, and savor good times in the vanishing southern wilderness. They convened at the Ten Point Deer Club in Issaquena County, the last wooded stronghold of the Mississippi Delta. Among the friends were ...
Ten Point: Deer Camp in the Mississippi Delta
During a period of thirty-five years, from 1927 until 1962, a group of friends gathered to hunt, socialize, and savor good times in the vanishing southern wilderness. They convened at the Ten Point Deer Club in Issaquena County, the last wooded stronghold of the Mississippi Delta. Among the friends were P. K. and Florence Huffman, whose grandson is the author of this photographic record of happy times at the camp. By 1950 the Huffmans had made the hunting club their year-round home. They remained there until the woods were destroyed by developers and the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. For more than three decades Florence photographed the land and the people who came to the camp. Her pictures, at once intimate, visually intriguing, and historically significant, record a world in which two powerful forces coexisted - the relentless drive of progress and the persistent draw of nature. Few other photographers of her day chose to document hunting and fishing scenes. The pictures testify to her eye for unique subjects and to her sympathetic view of the natural world around her. They give pleasure and surprises. Women hunters are seen among the men, and blacks are shown socializing with whites prior to desegregation. As a child in the 1950s and early 1960s Alan Huffman was there too. Throughout his life he has treasured the hundreds of pictures his grandmother took. He grew to appreciate not only the time and the place and its importance for his family and the other club members but also the club's larger meaning within southern and American cultural experience. In the skillful integration of his text with his grandmother's vintage photographs of camp life rituals, here is a vivid record of the waning years of one of North America's most prolific hunting grounds. Alan Huffman has been a farmer, newspaper reporter, and historical researcher. His essays and articles have appeared in The Oxford American, Mississippi Magazine, Mississippi Folklife, and other publications.
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42.000000 USD

Ten Point: Deer Camp in the Mississippi Delta

by Alan Huffman
Hardback
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Throughout history, mass demonstrations and protests - both peaceful and violent - have been used to demand and bring about reform. The recent Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions and the resulting shockwaves that continue to reverberate across the Middle East serve as a potent reminder of people power in the quest ...
Protest!: Sixty-Five Years of Rebellion in Photographs
Throughout history, mass demonstrations and protests - both peaceful and violent - have been used to demand and bring about reform. The recent Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions and the resulting shockwaves that continue to reverberate across the Middle East serve as a potent reminder of people power in the quest for change. Protest! is a photographic history covering over 60 years of demonstrations and rebellion. Broad in scope, the powerful images in this book capture diverse and key moments in the history of popular protest, from the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 and the momentous struggle for African-American civil rights in the 1950s and '60s, to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the huge anti-war marches held after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. In an age of 24-hour television news coverage, it is clear that the still photograph retains the power to capture what Henri Cartier Bresson the decisive moments of history . Protest! features the work of some of the world's best photo-journalists, including acclaimed photographers Josef Koudelka, whose iconic photographs of the Prague Spring became symbols of the resistance, Bruno Barbey, who documented the French student riots of 1968, and Alex Majoli, who is currently photographing the ongoing Libyan uprising. Ambitious and unique, the stirring photographs in this compelling book provide a window upon a period of unprecedented political, social and cultural protest.
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19.02 USD
Hardback
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Still Life is a unique and hauntingly beautiful photographic study of the Antarctic huts that served as expedition bases for explorations led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton. At the turn of the twentieth century Antarctica was the focus of one of the last great races of ...
Still Life: Inside the Antarctic Huts of Scott and Shackleton
Still Life is a unique and hauntingly beautiful photographic study of the Antarctic huts that served as expedition bases for explorations led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton. At the turn of the twentieth century Antarctica was the focus of one of the last great races of exploration and discovery. Known as the 'heroic age', from 1895 to 1917 Antarctic explorers set off from their huts in search of adventure, science and glory but some, such as Scott, were never to return. The World Wars intervened and the huts were left as time capsules of Edwardian life; a portrait of King Edward VII hangs amid seal blubber, sides of mutton, a jar of gherkins, penguin eggs, cufflinks and darned trousers. One of New Zealand's best known photographers, Jane Ussher, was invited by the Antarctic Heritage Trust to record 'the unusual, the hidden and minutae of these sites'. The Executive Director of the Trust, Nigel Watson, provides a fascinating introduction to the history and atmosphere of each hut and detailed photographic captions.
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52.500000 USD
Hardback
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The name Titanic has become synonymous with catastrophe, the story of this luxurious liner legendary. Wrecked after colliding with an iceberg on her maiden voyage, the loss of around 1,500 lives among her passengers and crew has gone down in history as one of the most emotive and tragic disasters ...
Titanic in Photographs
The name Titanic has become synonymous with catastrophe, the story of this luxurious liner legendary. Wrecked after colliding with an iceberg on her maiden voyage, the loss of around 1,500 lives among her passengers and crew has gone down in history as one of the most emotive and tragic disasters in history. In this evocative collection of photographs the authors of Titanic The Ship Magnificent tell her full story, from the shipyards of Harland & Wolff and its early vessels, with the backdrop of the great race to build the biggest and best passenger liner, to the frenzy of excitement surrounding her launch. Looking at her officers and crew, as well as her stops at Cherbourg and Queenstown - including some special, rare photographs - the book follows the story to its inevitable conclusion, considering the lifeboats, the presence of the Carpathia and the aftermath of the disaster. STEVE HALL and BRUCE BEVERIDGE set up the Titanic Research & Modeling Association (TRMA). Steve has built an extensive Olympic-class library and photographic portfolio, one of the finest collections privately held. All of the authors are often contacted by the media to comment the wreck, theories and research surrounding the ship, have published articles, and conduct Titanic talks.
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16.45 USD

Titanic in Photographs

by Scott Andrews, Art Braunschweiger, Bruce Beveridge, Steve Hall, Daniel Klistorner
Hardback
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In 1871, newly freed slaves established the community ofTamina-then called Tammany -north of Houston, near therich timber lands of Montgomery County. Located in proximityto the just-completed railroad from Conroe to Houston, thecommunity benefited from the burgeoning local lumber industryand available transportation. The residents built homes, churches,a one-room school, and a ...
The Ground on Which I Stand: Tamina, a Freedmen's Town
In 1871, newly freed slaves established the community ofTamina-then called Tammany -north of Houston, near therich timber lands of Montgomery County. Located in proximityto the just-completed railroad from Conroe to Houston, thecommunity benefited from the burgeoning local lumber industryand available transportation. The residents built homes, churches,a one-room school, and a general store. Over time, urban growth and change has overtaken Tamina.The sprawling communities of The Woodlands, Shenandoah,Chateau Woods, and Oak Ridge have encroached, introducingboth opportunity and complication, as the residents of this ruralcommunity enjoy both the benefits and the challenges of urban life.On the one hand, the children of Tamina have the opportunity toattend some of the best public schools in the nation; on the otherhand, residents whose education and job skills have not kept pacewith modern society are struggling for survival. Through striking and intimate photography and sensitivelygleaned oral histories, Marti Corn has chronicled the lives,dreams, and spirit of the people of Tamina. The result is a multifaceted portrait of community, kinship, values, and shared history.
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42.000000 USD
Hardback
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Gert Verbelen is a young photographer and designer. For his Master's project, he has visited the mathematically calculated centres of the eighteen countries of the Eurozone. Going there, he ended up in the middle of people's daily lives in poor and deserted places. Europe is clearly not only the well-known ...
Inner Circle of Europe
Gert Verbelen is a young photographer and designer. For his Master's project, he has visited the mathematically calculated centres of the eighteen countries of the Eurozone. Going there, he ended up in the middle of people's daily lives in poor and deserted places. Europe is clearly not only the well-known institutions or the cities to which we make city trips. Verbelen avoided tourism and went to god-forsaken villages where no young people live anymore, because there is no work for them. Verbelen's photo-documentary shows a lot of sadness and loneliness, while at the same time, displaying the power of little communities and an affection for the place, the house, the kitchen, the chair in front of the TV ...Those small rooms are treasuries, and every detail tells a different story. If you look closely enough, you can find stories everywhere. This book accompanies the exhibition 'The Inner Circle of Europe' at the photo-festival '80 days of summer, stories of identity' during the International Photo Festival Gent, from June 12 until August 30, 2015.
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47.250000 USD
Hardback
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- Collects Schreiber's iconic Cowboy photography - A romanticized yet gripping depiction of archetypal masculinity and homoeroticism Our idea of what a cowboy looks like is shaped by many influences: Hollywood with its countless movies, American country music in all its variety, the famous Marlboro commercials and, of course, Brokeback ...
Last of a Breed: Working with Cowboys
- Collects Schreiber's iconic Cowboy photography - A romanticized yet gripping depiction of archetypal masculinity and homoeroticism Our idea of what a cowboy looks like is shaped by many influences: Hollywood with its countless movies, American country music in all its variety, the famous Marlboro commercials and, of course, Brokeback Mountain. What all these images have in common is that they are mostly fictitious or at least removed from reality. Similarly, Martin Schreiber does not claim to depict reality in his photographs. His works mix romantic, idealized images of a pristine landscape with the toils of hard labor, and blend the smell of testosterone with a sultry homoeroticism. And yet his photographs are more truthful, closer to reality than many others. Of course, Schreiber took his pictures more than 30 years ago, long before the debate about male role models began to take hold. This is what makes them so appealing. For more than a year, Schreiber roamed the vast landscapes of Texas, camera in hand, visiting cattle farms and rodeo shows and portraying cowboys at work, in their leisure time, in the saddle and on the couch.
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47.250000 USD
Hardback
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In a continuum of past and present, Pittsburgh Then and Now portrays the city through 161 pairs of matching photographs. Each archival image, culled from old books, municipal records, and library collections, was rephotographed in 1986-89 from the same camera position, forming an evocation of the past and a record ...
Pittsburgh Then and Now
In a continuum of past and present, Pittsburgh Then and Now portrays the city through 161 pairs of matching photographs. Each archival image, culled from old books, municipal records, and library collections, was rephotographed in 1986-89 from the same camera position, forming an evocation of the past and a record of urban continuity and change. Pittsburgh Then and Now recalls specific locations in the city of the past and then compares them to the present, showing both how much and how little Pittsburgh has changed. Most of the pairs of photographs illustrate continuity with the past, features that have remained over the decades. A steep residential street in Perry Hilltop, for example, is little changed, and a jagged hillside staircase on the South Side is still in use. Other images document urban change. Massive Duquesne Gardens, on Craig Street in Oakland, is shown alongside the University Square Apartments of the present. The old Loew's Penn Theatre on Sixth Street in 1935 is copared to its modern manifestation as Heinz hall, 1987. The pre-Renaissance cornor of Stanwyx Street and Penn Avenue is recalled before the Gateway buildings were constructed. This journey into the past shows how change and continuity have mingled in the city landscape, reveling Pittsburgh as it has evolved from architecutral styles that reflected turn-of-the-century eclecticism to the more recent styles labeled modernist and postmodernist, from horse to streetcar to automobile, and from steel mills to high-technology centers. Pittsburgh Then and Now is a treasury of photographic images for those who remember the old Pittsburgh, those who are curious about its past, and anyoneinterested in the evolution of a city.
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USD
Hardback
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When Karol Wojtyla was elected Pope on October 16, 1978, he became the first Slavic Pope in history and the first non-Italian in 455 years. Taking the name John Paul II, the new Pope delivered a message in his first homily in St. Peter's Square that has resounded throughout his ...
John Paul II: A Light for the World, Essays and Reflections on the Papacy of John Paul II
When Karol Wojtyla was elected Pope on October 16, 1978, he became the first Slavic Pope in history and the first non-Italian in 455 years. Taking the name John Paul II, the new Pope delivered a message in his first homily in St. Peter's Square that has resounded throughout his entire papacy: Be not afraid! Created for the occasion of his twenty-fifth anniversary as Pope, John Paul II: A Light for the World provides a celebration in photographs and words of the courageous pastor who guides more than one billion Catholics and has made his mark on history the world over. Elegantly designed and produced, John Paul II: A Light for the World features over 140 photographs-many of which seldom have been seen outside the Vatican-by official Vatican photographers who have captured the Pope's remarkable life and ministry for two and a half decades. These beautiful photographs are accompanied by selections from the Pope's own speeches and writings as well as essays and personal reflections by scholars and friends that provide insight into the public and private person of Pope John Paul II. Organized into three sections-Pastor, Pilgrim, Prophet-more than forty essays by staff of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops explore the depth and breadth of the themes central to John Paul's papacy, while nearly thirty personal reflections by cardinals, bishops, and others who have had personal encounters with the Pope reveal his profoundly human, and often humorous, side. A joint effort between the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Catholic Communications Campaign and Sheed & Ward, John Paul II: A Light for the World is the definitive commemoration of John Paul II's twenty-fifth anniversary as Pope. The book opens with a personal greeting from Angelo Cardinal Sodano, Vatican Secretary of State; a foreword by Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations; an introduction by Bishop Wilton D. Gregory, president of the USCCB; and a historical sketch by John Thavis, Rom
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20.87 USD
Hardback
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Through striking architectural photographs and lively, readable narrative, this pictorial account of early-twentieth-century Jacksonville tells the triumphant story of photographer Leah Mary Cox while revealing Jacksonville's architectural history. Nearly 50 years after her death, a treasure trove of more than 4,000 glass negatives were discovered, stashed in the basement of ...
Jacksonville Greets the Twentieth Century: The Pictorial Legacy of Leah Mary Cox
Through striking architectural photographs and lively, readable narrative, this pictorial account of early-twentieth-century Jacksonville tells the triumphant story of photographer Leah Mary Cox while revealing Jacksonville's architectural history. Nearly 50 years after her death, a treasure trove of more than 4,000 glass negatives were discovered, stashed in the basement of Cox's home. Cox's images capture Jacksonville at the turn of the century; from the Spanish-American War and the Great Fire of 1901 to the city's rich architectural diversity and everyday street scenes, her photographs serve as one of the most significant visual records available of Jacksonville in the early 1900s. Ann Hyman takes 61 captivating photographs from this vast collection and reconstructs an image of life in Jacksonville, weaving it together with pieces of Cox's life to create a lively narrative. Background insights, such as Cox's determination to keep her family together after the death of her father and the illness of her mother, provide the reader with a sense of context for her photography. This illustrated account of Jacksonville's architectural achievements is an incredible find for photographers, Jacksonville historians, and those interested in early photography and women's studies.
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31.450000 USD
Hardback
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Ms. Booth is the photographer's grandmother. Jack Kotz is an amazed outsider from Washington, D. C., and Santa Fe, N. M., who goes South to visit her. Kotz shows Ms. Booth in her dignified frailty as she moves through daily rituals in her rustic Mississippi town. Indeed, her garden is ...
Ms. Booth's Garden
Ms. Booth is the photographer's grandmother. Jack Kotz is an amazed outsider from Washington, D. C., and Santa Fe, N. M., who goes South to visit her. Kotz shows Ms. Booth in her dignified frailty as she moves through daily rituals in her rustic Mississippi town. Indeed, her garden is the mellowing community itself, her lifelong, intimate friend. These exceptional, poignant photographs of Ms. Booth in her homey, local world capture an ever-constant irony--that although nature and mortals age together, nature endures as mortals fade. Yet in her state of advancing age she presides with majesty and grace among the things and the people she knows. What most interested me over time was simply my grandmother's day-to-day life, Kotz says. I was constantly intrigued by the seemingly simple way she lived and the reverence with which she regarded the simplest of things and most commonplace of experiences. His observing eye has told him that people's spirits are inextricable from the land they inhabit. During a period of twenty years Kotz's camera has found a natural splendor in the community's even, ticking pace as Ms. Booth accommodates her life to its rhythms. He shows her in trips to the bank, to the church, and to the local shops. He shows too the cozy home place she has created. These are serene, loving images, mainly of life in the exuberant garden. Ms. Booth affords them a humanizing presence. In praise of this collection Bailey White, the author and NPR commentator, says, These photographs give so much that you have the feeling that if you just look hard enough you will be able to understand it all--the complexities of old, old friendships, the sweep of change, and the touching adjustments resourceful people make to accommodate it, the little eruptions of art that make up an enduring community. Jack Kotz has been a photographer for twenty years. His work has appeared in Americana, Architectural Digest, Smithsonian, Time, Su Casa, and Santa Fean. He lives in Santa Fe, N. M.
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36.750000 USD
Hardback
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At the crossroads of Central Texas, cotton once ruled as king. Around this demanding monarch, numerous communities grew up and thrived. From the distant horizon, the communities were marked by church steeples stretching skyward. Today, cotton has disappeared from the land, and the communities too are largely gone. Only the ...
Rock beneath the Sand: Country Churches in Texas
At the crossroads of Central Texas, cotton once ruled as king. Around this demanding monarch, numerous communities grew up and thrived. From the distant horizon, the communities were marked by church steeples stretching skyward. Today, cotton has disappeared from the land, and the communities too are largely gone. Only the churches remain--the rock beneath the sands of time. This powerfully illustrated book seeks to explain the staying power of these rural churches and to introduce the people who keep them alive while the surrounding communities have given way to the larger towns and cities nearby. Beyond the power of religion itself, the authors have uncovered the roles of geography, race, ethnicity, and family in giving life to these small churches. Authors Lois Myers and Rebecca Sharpless enhance our understanding of the interplay of religion and culture, the qualities of late twentieth-century rural life, and the continuing draw of the open country churches and their members in vivid black and white photographs. Churches featured in the volume include the oldest Norwegian Lutheran church in Texas, four African American Baptist churches organized soon after emancipation, white Southern Baptist churches, Protestant and Catholic churches founded by European and Mexican immigrants, and one union church that for most of the past century accommodated both Methodists and Baptists. Drawing on memories of longtime members, church minutes and histories, baptism records, and family histories, the authors collapse decades of tradition into the enchanting and informative pages of this book.
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36.750000 USD
Hardback
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This title features photographs that reveal the two faces of the Everglades. The Everglades is the largest subtropical wilderness left in the continental United States. It was established as a national park in 1934 when the National Park Service set aside approximately 2,354 of the estimated 5,000 square miles comprising ...
Everglades: Outside and within
This title features photographs that reveal the two faces of the Everglades. The Everglades is the largest subtropical wilderness left in the continental United States. It was established as a national park in 1934 when the National Park Service set aside approximately 2,354 of the estimated 5,000 square miles comprising the original Everglades. Today, the national park is a World Heritage Site, an International Biosphere Reserve, and a Wetland of International Importance. The park even includes a Nike Missile Site that is on the U.S. Registry of Historic Places.More than one million people visit the park annually, but vast changes have drastically altered the natural landscape they see. Few visitors realize that, for more than a century, the state and federal governments have constructed drainage canals and ditches to redirect some 1.7 billion gallons of water per day toward the Atlantic and Gulf coasts in order to support agricultural pursuits and large-scale urban and suburban development. The ensuing conflicts over water and the 'best' use of land - between preservation, restoration, and desecration - have led to a curious blending of natural and human landscapes that are both around and inside Everglades National Park.After reading The Orchid Thief by Susan Orlean, and with a Guggenheim Fellowship in hand, Marion Belanger headed south to the Everglades to discover for herself what the writer had seen and so vividly captured in prose. Belanger went to find wilderness, because that is what a traditional national park is supposed to promote. Instead she found a puzzling dichotomy: visually, it is often hard to know whether one is outside or within this 'natural' sanctuary, thus blurring the lines between what is natural and what is not.
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52.500000 USD
Hardback
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The African American at the end of the nineteenth century was described by W. E. B. Du Bois as two souls in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder. In the United States today, the hyphen between these two souls-African and American, African-American-is still ...
Harlem
The African American at the end of the nineteenth century was described by W. E. B. Du Bois as two souls in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder. In the United States today, the hyphen between these two souls-African and American, African-American-is still being negotiated. In Harlem , Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak engages with twenty-four photographs by Alice Attie as she attempts teleopoiesis, which she describes as a reaching toward the distant other through the empathetic power of the imagination. In the hands of Spivak, teleopoiesis is a kind of identity politics in which one disrupts identity as a result of migration or exile. For the last two decades, Spivak notes, Harlem has been the focus of major economic development. As the old Harlem disappears into a present that simultaneously demands and rejects a cultural essence, Spivak dwells in Attie's images, trying to navigate some middle ground between the rock of social history and the hard place of a collective culture.
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21.000000 USD

Harlem

by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
Hardback
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How many times have you walked by homeless people and pretended not to notice them? B. J. Lacasse, photographer and author of The Street, decided to stop not noticing and photograph the homeless of Fort Worth to help the rest of us perceive those we usually try to ignore. In ...
The Street: A Journey into Homelessness
How many times have you walked by homeless people and pretended not to notice them? B. J. Lacasse, photographer and author of The Street, decided to stop not noticing and photograph the homeless of Fort Worth to help the rest of us perceive those we usually try to ignore. In addition to photographing the homeless living in and around the city, she took the time to get to know them as well, keeping a journal of their stories and her observations. The Street is the end product of her journey into the lives of the homeless. These photos are poignant, heartbreaking, and at times difficult to look at, but in them there is also an air of hope. With a foreword by former Fort Worth mayor Mike Moncrief, The Street starts with a note about change that confronts us with the face of homelessness, opening our eyes to the world that we've blatantly ignored. In The Street, you will meet B. J.'s friend Johnny, follow the success story of Wild Bill, root for Brenda and Anna, and mourn for Mary Ann. You'll get to see them in every aspect of their lives, both positive and negative. The ending of the book is positive, with pictures that show the impact housing can have on people who-perhaps for the first time in their lives-have a home of their own. The photographs and stories in this book will not just open your eyes-they will spur you to action.
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31.450000 USD
Hardback
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