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Dmitry Likhachev (1906-1999) was one of the most prominent Russian intellectuals of the twentieth century. His life spanned virtually the entire century - a tumultuous period which saw Russia move from Tsarist rule under Nicholas II via the Russian Revolution and Civil War into seven decades of communism followed by ...
The Idea of Russia: The Life and Work of Dmitry Likhachev
Dmitry Likhachev (1906-1999) was one of the most prominent Russian intellectuals of the twentieth century. His life spanned virtually the entire century - a tumultuous period which saw Russia move from Tsarist rule under Nicholas II via the Russian Revolution and Civil War into seven decades of communism followed by Gorbachev's Perestroika and the rise of Putin. In 1928, shortly after completing his university education, Likhachev was arrested, charged with counter-revolutionary ideas and imprisoned in the Gulag, where he spent the next five years. Returning to a career in academia, specialising in Old Russian literature, Likhachev played a crucial role in the cultural life of twentieth-century Russia, campaigning for the protection of important cultural sites and historic monuments. He also founded museums dedicated to great Russian writers including Dostoevsky, Pushkin and Pasternak. In this, the first biography of Likhachev to appear in English, Vladislav Zubok provides a thoroughly-researched account of one of Russia's most extraordinary and influential public figures.
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41.950000 USD

The Idea of Russia: The Life and Work of Dmitry Likhachev

by Vladislav Zubok
Paperback / softback
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Awarded the Jane Grayson Prize by the International Vladimir Nabokov Society Nabokov and Nietzsche: Problems and Perspectives addresses the many knotted issues in the work of Vladimir Nabokov - Lolita's moral stance, Pnin's relationship with memory, Pale Fire's ambiguous internal authorship - that often frustrate interpretation. It does so by ...
Nabokov and Nietzsche: Problems and Perspectives
Awarded the Jane Grayson Prize by the International Vladimir Nabokov Society Nabokov and Nietzsche: Problems and Perspectives addresses the many knotted issues in the work of Vladimir Nabokov - Lolita's moral stance, Pnin's relationship with memory, Pale Fire's ambiguous internal authorship - that often frustrate interpretation. It does so by arguing that the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche, as both a conceptual instrument and a largely unnoticed influence on Nabokov himself, can help to untie some of these knots. The study addresses the fundamental problems in Nabokov's writing that make his work perplexing, mysterious and frequently uneasy rather than simply focusing on the literary puzzles and games that, although inherent, do not necessarily define his body of work. Michael Rodgers shows that Nietzsche's philosophy provides new, but not always palatable, perspectives in order to negotiate interpretative impasses, and that the uneasy aspects of Nabokov's work offer the reader manifold rewards.
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53.92 USD

Nabokov and Nietzsche: Problems and Perspectives

by Michael Rodgers
Paperback / softback
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More than 700 `utopian' novels are published in Russia every year. These utopias - meaning here fantasy fiction, science fiction, space operas or alternative history - do not set out merely to titillate; instead they express very real Russian anxieties: be they territorial right-sizing, loss of imperial status or turning ...
The Post-Soviet Politics of Utopia: Language, Fiction and Fantasy in Modern Russia
More than 700 `utopian' novels are published in Russia every year. These utopias - meaning here fantasy fiction, science fiction, space operas or alternative history - do not set out merely to titillate; instead they express very real Russian anxieties: be they territorial right-sizing, loss of imperial status or turning into a `colony' of the West. Contributors to this innovative collection use these narratives to re-examine post-Soviet Russian political culture and identity. Interrogating the intersections of politics, ideologies and fantasies, chapters draw together the highbrow literary mainstream (authors such as Vladimir Sorokin), mass literature for entertainment and individuals who bridge the gap between fiction writers and intellectuals or ideologists (Aleksandr Prokhanov, for example, the editor-in-chief of Russia's far-right newspaper Zavtra). In the process The Post-Soviet Politics of Utopia sheds crucial light onto a variety of debates - including the rise of nationalism, right-wing populism, imperial revanchism, the complicated presence of religion in the public sphere, the function of language - and is important reading for anyone interested in the heightened importance of ideas, myths, alternative histories and conspiracy theories in Russia today.
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120.750000 USD
Hardback
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Vasily Grossman (1905-1964) was a successful Soviet author and journalist, but he is more often recognized in the West as Russian literature's leading dissident. How do we account for this paradox? In the first collection of essays to explore the Russian author's life and works in English, leading experts present ...
Vasily Grossman: A Writer's Freedom
Vasily Grossman (1905-1964) was a successful Soviet author and journalist, but he is more often recognized in the West as Russian literature's leading dissident. How do we account for this paradox? In the first collection of essays to explore the Russian author's life and works in English, leading experts present recent multidisciplinary research on Grossman's experiences, his place in the history of Russian literature, key themes in his writing, and the wider implications of his life and work in the realms of philosophy and politics. Born into a Jewish family in Berdychiv, Grossman was initially a supporter of the ideals of the Russian Revolution and the new Soviet state. During the Second World War, he worked as a correspondent for the Red Army newspaper and was the first journalist to write about the Nazi extermination camps. As a witness to the daily violence of the Soviet regime, Grossman became more and more aware of the nature and forms of totalitarian coercion, which gradually alienated him from the Soviet regime and earned him a reputation for dissidence. A survey of the remarkable accomplishments and legacy left by this controversial and contradictory figure, Vasily Grossman reveals a writer's power to express freedom even under totalitarianism.
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115.500000 USD
Hardback
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At the age of twenty-one, Brian Boyd wrote a thesis on Vladimir Nabokov that the famous author called brilliant. After gaining exclusive access to the writer's archives, he wrote a two-part, award-winning biography, Vladimir Nabokov: The Russian Years (1990) and Vladimir Nabokov: The American Years (1991). This collection features essays ...
Stalking Nabokov
At the age of twenty-one, Brian Boyd wrote a thesis on Vladimir Nabokov that the famous author called brilliant. After gaining exclusive access to the writer's archives, he wrote a two-part, award-winning biography, Vladimir Nabokov: The Russian Years (1990) and Vladimir Nabokov: The American Years (1991). This collection features essays written by Boyd since completing the biography, incorporating material he gleaned from his research as well as new discoveries and formulations. Boyd confronts Nabokov's life, career, and legacy; his art, science, and thought; his subtle humor and puzzle-like storytelling; his complex psychological portraits; and his inheritance from, reworking of, and affinities with Shakespeare, Pushkin, Tolstoy, and Machado de Assis. Boyd offers new ways of reading Nabokov's best English-language works: Lolita, Pale Fire, Ada, and the unparalleled autobiography, Speak, Memory, and he discloses otherwise unknown information about the author's world. Sharing his personal reflections, Boyd recounts the adventures, hardships, and revelations of researching Nabokov's biography and his unusual finds in the archives, including materials still awaiting publication. The first to focus on Nabokov's metaphysics, Boyd cautions against their being used as the key to unlock all of the author's secrets, showing instead the many other rooms in Nabokov's castle of fiction that need exploring, such as his humor, narrative invention, and psychological insight into characters and readers alike. Appreciating Nabokov as novelist, memoirist, poet, translator, scientist, and individual, Boyd helps us understand more than ever the author's multifaceted genius.
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15.95 USD
Paperback / softback
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The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature is an engaging and accessible guide to Russian writing of the past thousand years. The volume covers the entire span of Russian literature, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet period, and explores all the forms that have made it so famous: poetry, drama ...
The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature
The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature is an engaging and accessible guide to Russian writing of the past thousand years. The volume covers the entire span of Russian literature, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet period, and explores all the forms that have made it so famous: poetry, drama and, of course, the Russian novel. A particular emphasis is given to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, when Russian literature achieved world-wide recognition through the works of writers such as Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Nabokov and Solzhenitsyn. Covering a range of subjects including women's writing, Russian literary theory, socialist realism and emigre writing, leading international scholars open up the wonderful diversity of Russian literature. With recommended lists of further reading and an excellent up-to-date general bibliography, The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature is the perfect guide for students and general readers alike.
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27.33 USD
Paperback / softback
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Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), the eminent Russian-American writer and intellectual, is best known for his novels, though he was also the author of plays, poems, and short stories. In this important new work, Paul D. Morris offers a comprehensive reading of Nabokov's Russian and English poetry, until now a neglected facet ...
Vladimir Nabokov: Poetry and the Lyric Voice
Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), the eminent Russian-American writer and intellectual, is best known for his novels, though he was also the author of plays, poems, and short stories. In this important new work, Paul D. Morris offers a comprehensive reading of Nabokov's Russian and English poetry, until now a neglected facet of his oeuvre. Morris' unique and insightful study re-evaluates Nabokov's poetry and demonstrates that poetry was in fact central to his identity as an author and was the source of his distinctive authorial - lyric - voice. After offering a critical overview of the multi-staged history of the reception of Nabokov's poetry and an extensive analysis of his poetic writing, Morris argues that Nabokov's poetry has largely been misinterpreted and its place in his oeuvre misunderstood. Through a detailed examination of the form and content of Nabokov's writings, Morris demonstrates that Nabokov's innovations in the realms of drama, the short story, and the novel were profoundly shaped by his lyric sensibility.
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25.61 USD
Paperback / softback
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Osip Mandel'shtam (1891-1938) is considered by many to have been the best Russian poet of his era, and he also wrote a number of critical essays, often considered to be almost impenetrable. Elena Glazov-Corrigan analyses Mandel'shtam's thoughts on poetry and art in the context of the major postmodern literary debates ...
Mandel'shtam's Poetics: A Challenge to Postmodernism
Osip Mandel'shtam (1891-1938) is considered by many to have been the best Russian poet of his era, and he also wrote a number of critical essays, often considered to be almost impenetrable. Elena Glazov-Corrigan analyses Mandel'shtam's thoughts on poetry and art in the context of the major postmodern literary debates and traces their development throughout his writings. This is the first attempt to describe in a comprehensive way Mandel'shtam's intellectual world and its effect on his evolution as a thinker, specifically, on differences in his attitude towards language. Of particular interest to Mandel'shtam scholars, general Slavists, and comparatists with a focus on theory, this original and thought-provoking approach shows that from the 1920s to the 1930s, a definite development takes place in Mandel'shtam's view of the poetic process. Many of Glazov-Corrigan's ideas run contrary to the received wisdom about Mandel'shtam. In contrast to her predecessors, Glazov-Corrigan examines the essays themselves systematically, not allowing herself to be sidetracked by the poetry. By following a series of patterns - metaphors - she convincingly reconstructs a hidden logic in Mandel'shtam's work. This book offers a new and stronger sense of Mandel'shtam's poetic enterprise and the questions he sought to confront in the course of developing his poetics.
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38.96 USD
Hardback
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One of the most famous quotations in the history of Russian literature is Fedor Dostoevskii's alleged assertion that 'We have all come out from underneath Gogol's Overcoat'. Even if Dostoevskii never said this, there is a great deal of truth in the comment. Gogol certainly was a profound influence on ...
Dostoevskii's Overcoat: Influence, Comparison, and Transposition
One of the most famous quotations in the history of Russian literature is Fedor Dostoevskii's alleged assertion that 'We have all come out from underneath Gogol's Overcoat'. Even if Dostoevskii never said this, there is a great deal of truth in the comment. Gogol certainly was a profound influence on his work, as were many others. Part of this book's project is to locate Dostoevskii in relationship to his predecessors and contemporaries. However, the primary aim is to turn the oft-quoted apocryphal comment on its head, to see the profound influence Dostoevskii had on the lives, work and thought of his contemporaries and successors. This influence extends far beyond Russia and beyond literature. Dostoevskii may be seen as the single greatest influence on the sensibilities of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. To a greater or lesser extent those concerned with the creative arts in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have all come out from under Dostoevskii's 'Overcoat'.
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128.100000 USD
Paperback / softback
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One of Pushkin's most famous works, Eugene Onegin has been called an enclyclopaedia of Russian life , a definition which suggests the mass of ideas, impressions, thoughts and possibilities to be found in the story of the doomed love of two members of Russian high society in the 1830s. This ...
Pushkin's Eugene Onegin
One of Pushkin's most famous works, Eugene Onegin has been called an enclyclopaedia of Russian life , a definition which suggests the mass of ideas, impressions, thoughts and possibilities to be found in the story of the doomed love of two members of Russian high society in the 1830s. This study aims to offer an up-to-date guide to the text and to the critical debate, as well as providing easy-to-follow readings . It takes a fresh look at its themes, ideas and intricacies, and suggests how scholars and non-specialists alike may gain greater understanding of Pushkin's work.
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24.100000 USD

Pushkin's Eugene Onegin

by Sally Dalton-Brown
Paperback
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What special possibilities for literary creation arise in periods of rapid transition from one set of social institutions to another? This book examines four such periods in Russian history: the era of Peter the Great and his successors, the epoch of the Great Reforms of the 1860's, the decades following ...
History in a Grotesque Key: Russian Literature and the Idea of Revolution
What special possibilities for literary creation arise in periods of rapid transition from one set of social institutions to another? This book examines four such periods in Russian history: the era of Peter the Great and his successors, the epoch of the Great Reforms of the 1860's, the decades following the Russian Revolution, and the period of social and political upheaval in the late 1980's and the 1990's. Since the eighteenth century, the idea of revolutionary social change has been a central element in the Russian understanding of history-in what may be called the historical mythology of Russia.The literary works studied in this book, some well known but most obscure, all engage the mythology of revolutionary social change as it was deployed in their times. Yet instead of describing their epochs as moments of triumphant transition from the outworn past to the glorious future, these works describe their social worlds as bizarre, comical, and confused hybrids of the past and future. The author sees these works as a variation of the grotesque, as a revolutionary grotesque that is intimately connected to the historical mythology of radical social transformation in Russia.Examining these works in their social-cultural-historical context, the author investigates what they reveal about the social transformations of their times and about the idea of revolution in Russia in general. He argues that the historical, or revolutionary, grotesque represents an approach to history that brings to center stage the tremendous ironies of historical periods that have been proclaimed as moments of human triumph, emancipation, and transcendence, yet have resulted in bloodshed and slavery on a vast scale.
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48.44 USD
Hardback
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In this volume of SSLP the contributions of Dutch scholars working in the field of Slavic literature and culture to the 14th International Congress of Slavists (Ohrid, Macedonia, September 10-16, 2008) are brought together. All of them except one (on the Polish poet Cyprian Norwid's story Stigma), deal with Russian ...
Dutch Contributions to the Fourteenth International Congress of Slavists: Ohrid, September 10-16, 2008. Literature
In this volume of SSLP the contributions of Dutch scholars working in the field of Slavic literature and culture to the 14th International Congress of Slavists (Ohrid, Macedonia, September 10-16, 2008) are brought together. All of them except one (on the Polish poet Cyprian Norwid's story Stigma), deal with Russian literature from the end of the 18th century up to recent years. A variety of topics is treated, such as the feminization of Russian literature, the reflection of poetry in prose, anthropological and religious dimensions of literature, the specifics of theme and of plot, Russian modernism and postmodernism, and the status of language, from different methodological angles: gender studies, structural analysis, philosophical-contextual, postcolonial. Works of such Russian authors as Ippolit Bogdanovich, Ivan Turgenev, Pavel Mel'nikov-Pecherskii, Ignatii Potapenko, Iurii Trifonov, Timur Kibirov and Viktor Pelevin are discussed in detail. This volume is of interest for a scholarly audience interested in Russian literature of the last 250 years.
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57.41 USD
Paperback / softback
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Shortly before Vladimir Nabokov died in 1977, he left instructions that the draft for his last novel, The Original of Laura, be destroyed. But in 2008 Dmitri Nabokov, the writer's only child and sole surviving heir, contravened his father's wishes. Formed from novelistic fragments that had been hidden from the ...
Shades of Laura: Vladimir Nabokov's Last Novel, The Original of Laura
Shortly before Vladimir Nabokov died in 1977, he left instructions that the draft for his last novel, The Original of Laura, be destroyed. But in 2008 Dmitri Nabokov, the writer's only child and sole surviving heir, contravened his father's wishes. Formed from novelistic fragments that had been hidden from the public eye for three decades, The Original of Laura is a construction based on the conjecture of the Nabokov estate, publishers, and scholars. Shades of Laura returns to the scene of the crime, elucidating the process of publishing Nabokov's unfinished novel from its conception - the reproduction of 138 handwritten index cards - to the simultaneous publication of translations of the final text in several languages. The essays in this collection investigate the event of publication and reconstitute the book's critical reception, reproducing a selection of some of the most salient reviews. Critics condemned Dmitri's choice, but as contributors to this volume attest, there are many more shades and nuances to his decision. The book also endeavours to allow readers to understand and evaluate an incomplete novel; contributors analyze its plot, structure, imagery, and motifs. Published after prolonged public debate, Vladimir Nabokov's The Original of Laura was dubbed the most eagerly awaited literary novel of this fledgling century. Covering the publication from a broad spectrum of perspectives, this collection reassesses the Nabokov canon and the roots of his literary prestige. Contributors include Paul Ardoin (Florida State University), Gennady Barabtarlo (University of Missouri), Brian Boyd (University of Auckland), Marijeta Bozovic (Colgate University), Maurice Couturier (University of Nice), Lara Delage-Toriel (Strasbourg University), Galya Diment (University of Washington), Leland de la Durantaye (Claremont McKenna College), Michael Juliar (Private collector), Eric Naiman (University of California, Berkeley), Ellen Pifer (University of Delaware), Anna Raffetto (Adelphi Publishing House, Milan), Michael Rodgers (University of Strathclyde), Rien Verhoef (Leiden University), Olga Voronina (Bard College), Tadashi Wakashima (Kyoto University), Michael Wood (Princeton University), and Barbara Wyllie (Slavonic and East European Review).
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115.500000 USD
Hardback
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The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature is an engaging and accessible guide to Russian writing of the past thousand years. The volume covers the entire span of Russian literature, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet period, and explores all the forms that have made it so famous: poetry, drama ...
The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature
The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature is an engaging and accessible guide to Russian writing of the past thousand years. The volume covers the entire span of Russian literature, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet period, and explores all the forms that have made it so famous: poetry, drama and, of course, the Russian novel. A particular emphasis is given to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, when Russian literature achieved world-wide recognition through the works of writers such as Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Nabokov and Solzhenitsyn. Covering a range of subjects including women's writing, Russian literary theory, socialist realism and emigre writing, leading international scholars open up the wonderful diversity of Russian literature. With recommended lists of further reading and an excellent up-to-date general bibliography, The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature is the perfect guide for students and general readers alike.
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173.250000 USD

The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature

Hardback
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In this reading of the works of Soviet author Yury Olesha, a member of the group of avant-garde writers who survived both revolution and brutal purges, Peppard employs techniques developed by Soviet critic Mikhail Bakhtin to examine Olesha's writings. Many of these works, especially what Peppard calls Olesha's metafictional masterpiece, ...
The Poetics of Yury Olesha
In this reading of the works of Soviet author Yury Olesha, a member of the group of avant-garde writers who survived both revolution and brutal purges, Peppard employs techniques developed by Soviet critic Mikhail Bakhtin to examine Olesha's writings. Many of these works, especially what Peppard calls Olesha's metafictional masterpiece, Envy , embody the carnival tradition. Peppard aims to give an analysis of Bakhtin's and Olesha's carnival cosmos, with its images of macabre destruction, outrageous suspensions of disbelief and banal horror. Peppard interweaves the writer's interest in the circus, carnivals and soccer with a discussion of these motifs in his fiction, capturing the connection between the carnival ambience of Olesha's world and the carnival essence of his works. Peppard discovers the fundamental poetic congruity that informs the work of this figure in Soviet literature, and he aims to establish Olesha as a significant contributor to the struggle waged by such writers as Zamyatin, Bely and Shklovsky to redefine and reform the genetic canons laid down by 19th century predecessors.
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USD
Hardback
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Intended as a companion to Constructing Russian Culture in the Age of Revolution: 1881-1940 (also published by OUP) and covering a later period until the present day, this stimulating, original, and controversial book will not only be a vital resource for university courses on Russian culture at undergraduate and postgraduate ...
Russian Cultural Studies: An Introduction
Intended as a companion to Constructing Russian Culture in the Age of Revolution: 1881-1940 (also published by OUP) and covering a later period until the present day, this stimulating, original, and controversial book will not only be a vital resource for university courses on Russian culture at undergraduate and postgraduate level but essential reading for all those interested in Russian culture in the Soviet and post-Soviet periods. In a wide-ranging account of a variety of cultural forms and sites of cultural production-literature, cinema, radio, television, the visual arts, journalism, advertising and consumerism, music, theatre, the Church-the book sets out to give greater prominence to the processes of cultural reception than in previous texts. The book highlights the role images of national identity, gender politics , youth culture and the interaction of public and private consciousness have played in the formation of cultural forms in the USSR and post-communist Russia. Drawing extensively but critically on the theoretical agenda of contemporary cultural studies the book challenges the `top-down' model according to which cultural production is determined principally by its relationship to `high' politics and political institutions. Contributors include leading specialists in Russian literature, cultural history, and cultural theory from Britain, the USA, and Russia and the text is liberally illustrated with picture features and includes a chronology of events and suggestions for further reading with each section.
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41.04 USD
Paperback / softback
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This book investigates the spectrum of meaning inherent in six orchestral works by Leos Janacek. It codifies his compositional style, first through a thorough examination of its origins in folk music and speech-melody, then in discussions of the features of its melody and motivic techniques. His harmonic style and multiple ...
The Symphonic Works of Leos Janacek: From Folk Concepts to Original Style
This book investigates the spectrum of meaning inherent in six orchestral works by Leos Janacek. It codifies his compositional style, first through a thorough examination of its origins in folk music and speech-melody, then in discussions of the features of its melody and motivic techniques. His harmonic style and multiple organizations of tonality are examined in rich detail. The analysis section consists of the examination of each musical work's musical elements, its affective and programmatic associations, as well as four narrative codes through which the listener discovers further meaning in the work: the hermeneutic code (which governs enigmas), the semic code of musical motives, the proairetic (formal) code, and the referential code (which draws on analogous passages from other pieces of music).
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79.750000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Sergei Bondarchuk's War and Peace, one of the world's greatest film epics, originated as a consequence of the Cold War. Conceived as a response to King Vidor's War and Peace, Bondarchuk's surpassed that film in every way, giving the USSR one small victory in the cultural Cold War for hearts ...
Bondarchuk's 'War and Peace': Literary Classic to Soviet Cinematic Epic
Sergei Bondarchuk's War and Peace, one of the world's greatest film epics, originated as a consequence of the Cold War. Conceived as a response to King Vidor's War and Peace, Bondarchuk's surpassed that film in every way, giving the USSR one small victory in the cultural Cold War for hearts and minds. This book, taking up Bondarchuk's masterpiece as a Cold War film, an epic, a literary adaptation, a historical drama, and a rival to Vidor's Hollywood version, recovers--and expands--a lost chapter in the cultural and political history of the twentieth century. Like many great works of literature, Tolstoy's epic tale proved a major challenge to filmmakers. After several early efforts to capture the story's grandeur, it was not until 1956 that King Vidor dared to bring War and Peace to the big screen. American critics were lukewarm about the film, but it was shown in the Soviet Union to popular acclaim. This book tells the story of how the Soviet government, military, and culture ministry--all eager to reclaim this Russian masterpiece from their Cold War enemies--pulled together to make Bondarchuk's War and Peace possible. Bondarchuk, an actor who had directed only one film, was an unlikely choice for director, and yet he produced one of the great works of Soviet cinema, a worthy homage to Tolstoy's masterpiece--an achievement only sweetened when Russia's Cold War adversary recognized it with the Academy Award's Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film of 1968. Denise Youngblood examines the film as an epic (and at seven hours long, released in four parts, at a cost of nearly $700,000,000 in today's dollars, it was certainly that), a literary adaptation, a complex reflection on history, and a significant artifact of the cultural Cold War between the US and the USSR. From its various angles, the book shows us Bondarchuk's extraordinary film in its many dimensions--aesthetic, political, and historical--even as it reveals what the film tells us about how Soviet patriotism and historical memory were constructed during the Cold War.
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36.700000 USD
Hardback
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Modern Russian literature has two first epochs: secular literature's rapid rise in the eighteenth century and Alexander Pushkin's Golden Age in the early nineteenth. In the shadow of the latter, Russia's eighteenth-century culture was relegated to an obscurity hardly befitting its actually radical legacy. And yet the eighteenth century maintains ...
The First Epoch: The Eighteenth Century and the Russian Cultural Imagination
Modern Russian literature has two first epochs: secular literature's rapid rise in the eighteenth century and Alexander Pushkin's Golden Age in the early nineteenth. In the shadow of the latter, Russia's eighteenth-century culture was relegated to an obscurity hardly befitting its actually radical legacy. And yet the eighteenth century maintains an undeniable hold on the Russian historical imagination to this day. Luba Golburt's book is the first to document this paradox. In formulating its self-image, the culture of the Pushkin era and after wrestled far more with the meaning of the eighteenth century, Golburt argues, than is commonly appreciated. Why did nineteenth-century Russians put the eighteenth century so quickly behind them? How does a meaningful present become a seemingly meaningless past? Interpreting texts by Lomonosov, Derzhavin, Pushkin, Viazemsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy, and others, Golburt finds surprising answers, in the process innovatively analyzing the rise of periodization and epochal consciousness, the formation of canon, and the writing of literary history.
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31.450000 USD
Paperback / softback
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