Filter
(found 1098 products)
Book cover image
This is the first edition of Andreas for 55 years, also the first to present the Anglo-Saxon, or rather Old English, text with a parallel Modern English poetic translation. The book aims not only to provide both students and scholars with an up-to-date text and introduction and notes, but also ...
Andreas: An Edition
This is the first edition of Andreas for 55 years, also the first to present the Anglo-Saxon, or rather Old English, text with a parallel Modern English poetic translation. The book aims not only to provide both students and scholars with an up-to-date text and introduction and notes, but also to reconfirm the canonical merit of Andreas as one of the longest and most important works in Old English literature. The introduction to our text is substantial, re-positioning this poem in respect of nearly six decades' progress in the palaeography, sources and analogues, language, metrics, literary criticism and archaeology of Andreas. The book argues that the poet was Mercian, that he was making ironic reference to Beowulf and that his story of St Andrew converting pagan Mermedonian cannibals was coloured by King Alfred's wars against the Danes (871-9, 885-6, 892-6). Andreas is here dated to Alfred's later reign with such analysis of contexts in history and ideology that the author's name is also hypothesized. The Old English text and Modern English translation of Andreas are presented in a split-page format, allowing students at whatever level of familiarity with the Anglo-Saxon vernacular to gain a direct access to the poem in close to its original form. The translation follows the poem's word order and style, allowing modern readers to feel the imagination, ideology and humour of Andreas as closely as possible. The text of the Old English poem is accompanied by a full set of supporting notes, and a glossary representing the translation.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781789620726.jpg
47.200000 USD

Andreas: An Edition

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Published in 1999, the ten essays in this collection identify and examine reworkings of identifiable source texts from the medieval or Renaissance periods. The reasons for the modern adaptations depend variously on an individual author's personal perspectives, the worldview of his or her society, and the individual's place in it. ...
Modern Retellings of Chivalric Texts
Published in 1999, the ten essays in this collection identify and examine reworkings of identifiable source texts from the medieval or Renaissance periods. The reasons for the modern adaptations depend variously on an individual author's personal perspectives, the worldview of his or her society, and the individual's place in it. The various chapters therefore address issues such as why a particular model was chosen and how its retelling depends on the modern author/auteur's misreading or rereading of medieval chivalric conventions. This book compliments numerous existing studies of medievalism in the Enlightenment and Victorian eras by examining more recent adaptations of the much studied Arthurian romances, but primarily extends the discussion on the nature of revivals to other medieval or Renaissance chivalric texts, especially the Carolingian cycle epic. The collection includes not only literary retellings of medieval texts, but also some in different media, such as theatre and cinema.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781138327146.jpg
42.000000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Henry Daniel's Liber Uricrisiarum is the earliest known work of academic medicine written in Middle English, presented here for the first time in a complete edition. Working in the late 1370s, Daniel combined authoritative medicine from written sources with his own personal experience, creating a text that stands out for ...
Liber Uricrisiarum: A Reading Edition
Henry Daniel's Liber Uricrisiarum is the earliest known work of academic medicine written in Middle English, presented here for the first time in a complete edition. Working in the late 1370s, Daniel combined authoritative medicine from written sources with his own personal experience, creating a text that stands out for its linguistic originality, intellectual scope, and wide circulation. Extant in over three dozen manuscript witnesses and two early modern print copies, Liber Uricrisiarum describes medieval humoral theory, anatomy, physiology, disease, medical astronomy, reproductive processes, and more, all within the broader context of uroscopic diagnosis. The introduction situates the text and its author in their medical, intellectual, linguistic, and bibliographic contexts, outlining the uroscopic tradition to which Daniel contributes, and describing the relationships among the many manuscripts containing the Liber Uricrisiarum. This edition presents the Middle English text, with a general glossary, glossary of proper names, and explanatory notes that explain obscure words and phrases and identify Daniel's sources. It also includes the complete set of diagrams contained in the Royal manuscript; appendices providing the Latin and English versions of the prologue and epilogue; an extensive translation from one of Daniel's important sources, Isaac Israeli's De urinis; tables relevant to Daniel's astronomical measurements; and an analysis of the Royal manuscript's dialect. Cumulatively, the edition and apparatus introduce readers to an important yet understudied text, the details of which will have significant impact on studies of medieval medicine and science, intellectual history, and Middle English language and literature.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781487506018.jpg
USD
Hardback
Book cover image
No medieval text was designed to be read hundreds of years later by an audience unfamiliar with its language, situation, and author. By ascribing to these texts intentional anonymity, we romanticise them and misjudge the social character of their authors. Instead, most medieval poems and manuscripts presuppose familiarity with their ...
Last Words: The Public Self and the Social Author in Late Medieval England
No medieval text was designed to be read hundreds of years later by an audience unfamiliar with its language, situation, and author. By ascribing to these texts intentional anonymity, we romanticise them and misjudge the social character of their authors. Instead, most medieval poems and manuscripts presuppose familiarity with their authorial or scribal maker. Last Words: The Public Self and the Social Author in Late Medieval England attempts to recover this familiarity and understand the literary motivation behind some of most important fifteenth-century texts and authors. Last Words captures the public selves of such social authors when they attempt to extract themselves from the context of a lived life. Driven by archival research and literary inquiry, this book reveals where John Gower kept the Trentham manuscript in his final years, how John Lydgate wished to be remembered, and why Thomas Hoccleve wrote his best-known work, the Series. It includes documentary breakthroughs and archival discoveries, and introduces a new life record for Hoccleve, identifies the author of a significant political poem, and reveals the handwriting of John Gower and George Ashby. Through its investments in archival study, book history, and literary criticism, Last Words charts the extent to which medieval English literature was shaped by the social selves of their authors.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780198790785.jpg
26.250000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
No medieval text was designed to be read hundreds of years later by an audience unfamiliar with its language, situation, and author. By ascribing to these texts intentional anonymity, we romanticise them and misjudge the social character of their authors. Instead, most medieval poems and manuscripts presuppose familiarity with their ...
Last Words: The Public Self and the Social Author in Late Medieval England
No medieval text was designed to be read hundreds of years later by an audience unfamiliar with its language, situation, and author. By ascribing to these texts intentional anonymity, we romanticise them and misjudge the social character of their authors. Instead, most medieval poems and manuscripts presuppose familiarity with their authorial or scribal maker. Last Words: The Public Self and the Social Author in Late Medieval England attempts to recover this familiarity and understand the literary motivation behind some of most important fifteenth-century texts and authors. Last Words captures the public selves of such social authors when they attempt to extract themselves from the context of a lived life. Driven by archival research and literary inquiry, this book reveals where John Gower kept the Trentham manuscript in his final years, how John Lydgate wished to be remembered, and why Thomas Hoccleve wrote his best-known work, the Series. It includes documentary breakthroughs and archival discoveries, and introduces a new life record for Hoccleve, identifies the author of a significant political poem, and reveals the handwriting of John Gower and George Ashby. Through its investments in archival study, book history, and literary criticism, Last Words charts the extent to which medieval English literature was shaped by the social selves of their authors.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780198790778.jpg
68.250000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Divided into ten days of ten novellas each, Boccaccio's Decameron is one of the literary gems of the fourteenth century. The Decameron Eighth Day in Perspective is an interpretive guide to the stories of the text's Day Eight - a day dedicated to tales of tricks and practical jokes. By ...
The Decameron Eighth Day in Perspective
Divided into ten days of ten novellas each, Boccaccio's Decameron is one of the literary gems of the fourteenth century. The Decameron Eighth Day in Perspective is an interpretive guide to the stories of the text's Day Eight - a day dedicated to tales of tricks and practical jokes. By drawing on literary precursors such as fabliaux, epic, philosophy, exempla, Dante's Commedia, and scripture, and by meditating on the dynamics of civic engagement in fourteenth-century Florence, Boccaccio develops in these stories of jests a self-consciously literary representation of the Florentine social imaginary. The essays in this volume, all written by prominent scholars, survey previous scholarship and open up new cultural and historical perspectives on Boccaccio's sophisticated art of storytelling. They analyze both the literary sources that Boccaccio's comic narratives transform, as well as the political, legal, and ethical contexts with which they engage. Each contributor tackles a single tale, yet their essays also register major themes and concerns that recur throughout Day Eight, allowing for close connections among the essays.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781487506902.jpg
USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Reading Old English Biblical Poetry considers the Junius 11 manuscript, the only surviving illustrated book of Old English poetry, in terms of its earliest readers and their multiple strategies of reading and making meaning. Junius 11 begins with the creation story and ends with the final vanquishing of Satan by ...
Reading Old English Biblical Poetry: The Book and the Poem in Junius 11
Reading Old English Biblical Poetry considers the Junius 11 manuscript, the only surviving illustrated book of Old English poetry, in terms of its earliest readers and their multiple strategies of reading and making meaning. Junius 11 begins with the creation story and ends with the final vanquishing of Satan by Jesus. The manuscript is both a continuous whole and a collection with discontinuities and functionally independent pieces. The chapters of Reading Old English Biblical Poetry propose multiple models for reader engagement with the texts in this manuscript, including selective and sequential reading, reading in juxtaposition, and reading in contexts within and outside of the pages of Junius 11. The study is framed by particular attention to the materiality of the manuscript and how that might have informed its early reception, and it broadens considerations of reading beyond those of the manuscript's compiler and possible patron. As a book, Junius 11 reflects a rich and varied culture of reading that existed in and beyond houses of God in England in the tenth and eleventh centuries, and it points to readers who had enough experience to select and find wisdom, narrative pleasure, and a diversity of other things within this or any book's contents.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781487507466.jpg
USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Originally published in 1972. This important work of Chaucerian scholarship deals with two aspects of the poet and his work - his individual achievement and his place in history - and demonstrates that in both these senses Chaucer is a maker of English poetry. The author explores Chaucer's narrative art. ...
Chaucer and the Making of English Poetry, Volume 2: The Art of Narrative
Originally published in 1972. This important work of Chaucerian scholarship deals with two aspects of the poet and his work - his individual achievement and his place in history - and demonstrates that in both these senses Chaucer is a maker of English poetry. The author explores Chaucer's narrative art. The book includes an examination of the puzzling question of narrative structure in the Canterbury Tales and of the nature of Chaucerian comedy in these works. The author surveys the major themes of the poems: Fortune and free will, marriage, and the nobleness of man. In the final chapter she treats of the meaning of Chaucer's art for his successors. Throughout the work, Miss Kean deals extensively with the sources which Chaucer used for the writing of his poems, in a way which directs light on the more difficult aspects of his art.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780367357344.jpg
126.000000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Originally published in 1990. This study is of one of the world's great narrative poems and one of the few long poems in English about physical love. Although this work is often overshadowed by the Canterbury Tales, the author argues that it has its own profound multiplicity. Its mixture of ...
Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde
Originally published in 1990. This study is of one of the world's great narrative poems and one of the few long poems in English about physical love. Although this work is often overshadowed by the Canterbury Tales, the author argues that it has its own profound multiplicity. Its mixture of genres, styles, characters and other competing elements creates a powerful literary experience for each reader. This book explores the diversity and contradictions produced by the poem without attempting to resolve them. It is accessible to those reading the poem for the first time, but equally stimulating to those who know it well, stressing the importance of the role of individual readers in response to the openness of the poem. Although previous criticism tends to emphasize one or two aspects while ignoring others, Benson argues all critical readings are of interest because they make one aware of the poem's many contrasting layers and possibilities. Beginning with the principal source, Boccaccio's Filostrato, the work examines the many different elements added to this source; which contains internal tensions and thus develops Boccaccio's story in a variety of often contradictory directions. The author considers Chaucer's treatment of setting, characterization, love, fortune and religion, showing how these affect the character of the poem and make it simultaneously more chivalric and comic, more Christian and more pagan.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780367357245.jpg
126.000000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Originally published in 1986. This study asks 'What problems confront the narrator of a religious story?' and 'What different solutions to those problems are offered by the religious narratives of The Canterbury Tales?' The introduction explains the grounds for inclusion of the tales here studied then examined in three sections. ...
Patterns of Religious Narrative in the Canterbury Tales
Originally published in 1986. This study asks 'What problems confront the narrator of a religious story?' and 'What different solutions to those problems are offered by the religious narratives of The Canterbury Tales?' The introduction explains the grounds for inclusion of the tales here studied then examined in three sections. The first includes the tales of the Clerk, Prioress and Second Nun, and Chaucer's Melibee, and explores the parallels between the production of a religious narrative and that of a faithful translation. The second considers how the tales of the Man of Law, Monk and Physician, though formally similar to those in the first section, subvert the offered parallel by their creation of narrators who actively mediate them to their audience, and who seem as concerned with the projection of their own personalities as with the transmission of the given story. The final section shows how the tales of the Pardoner and Nun's Priest highlight the dilemma and provide distinctive resolutions. The whole study aims to explore the dynamic relationships that exist between two contrasting positions: an artist's commitment to the authority of a given story and his need to assert himself over it.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780367357283.jpg
141.750000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Originally published in 1994. This surveys the origin and development of one of Chaucer's most problematic characters, Griselda, who through the centuries has challenged the horizon of expectations of many an audience. Starting with Boccaccio's Decameron and suggesting in turn its precursors in whole or in part, Bronfman goes on ...
Chaucer's Clerk's Tale: The Griselda Story Received, Rewritten, Illustrated
Originally published in 1994. This surveys the origin and development of one of Chaucer's most problematic characters, Griselda, who through the centuries has challenged the horizon of expectations of many an audience. Starting with Boccaccio's Decameron and suggesting in turn its precursors in whole or in part, Bronfman goes on to summarize the reigning opinions of Chaucer's heroine and her situation. The advance of feminist perspectives on medieval literature had the result that for many the Clerk's Tale has political overtones where the Walter-Griselda marriage may serve as a metaphor for, among other things, the state or right order. This study looks at the story from a long view, from its sources to the flood of critical interpretations - the creative reception of Chaucer's story, outlining the many rewritings of Griselda from Chaucer to the twentieth century. A special chapter considers the Griselda story as represented in illustrations as well.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780367357269.jpg
115.500000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Originally published in 1988. The economic changes and the growth of commerce in fourteenth century England precipitated both social changes and a preoccupation with material wealth. This book examines Chaucer's treatment of economic and ethical value in The Canterbury Tales within the context of contemporary economic and social change and ...
Chaucer's Poetic Alchemy: A Study of Value and its Transformation in The Canterbury Tales
Originally published in 1988. The economic changes and the growth of commerce in fourteenth century England precipitated both social changes and a preoccupation with material wealth. This book examines Chaucer's treatment of economic and ethical value in The Canterbury Tales within the context of contemporary economic and social change and in relation to the scholastic economic theory that attempted to formulate ethical standards for commercial conduct. The importance of value and its determination and transformation is evident from the two enterprises that Chaucer defines as the motivating principles for his poem. The pilgrimage to St. Thomas's shrine should effect a transformation of their spiritual value. The story-telling competition that produces the tales themselves is established to judge the value of the pilgrims' literary productions. In the Middle Ages, economic value and ethical value were not perceived as unrelated phenomena. Chaucer's concern with the interrelationship of material and moral value is apparent in the number of pilgrims who are interested in material value at the obvious expense of moral value. This book examines this along with a discussion or money's growing importance in the late Middle Ages and the determination of its value.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780367357306.jpg
126.000000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Originally published in 1992. Although they were apparently much appreciated in his own time, Chaucer's lyrics have for most of the modern era been the most neglected of his poetic productions. This work offers a comprehensive overview of Chaucer's lyric corpus. The author extends his scope to include in-depth discussions ...
Many a Song and Many a Leccherous Lay : Tradition and Individuality in Chaucer's Lyric Poetry
Originally published in 1992. Although they were apparently much appreciated in his own time, Chaucer's lyrics have for most of the modern era been the most neglected of his poetic productions. This work offers a comprehensive overview of Chaucer's lyric corpus. The author extends his scope to include in-depth discussions of literary and cultural influences that have their impact on Chaucer's lyrics. Students who come to Chaucer's poems for the first time will here receive an excellent introduction to each poem, the important literary issues surrounding the poem as defined by previous scholarship, and Ruud's own clear style and balanced judgment. The persuasive proofs for Chaucer's lyric innovations and his special style of poetry will also be of interest to Chaucerian specialist academics. The book traces Chaucer's development as a lyric poet, from more conventional early works to more individualized later ones.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780367357412.jpg
141.750000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Experiencing Medieval Art is an extensive revision and expansion of the author's Seeing Medieval Art, originally published in 2004. Renowned art historian Herbert L. Kessler considers often-strange objects and the materials of which they are made, circumstances of production, the conflictual relationship between art objects and notions of an ineffable ...
Experiencing Medieval Art
Experiencing Medieval Art is an extensive revision and expansion of the author's Seeing Medieval Art, originally published in 2004. Renowned art historian Herbert L. Kessler considers often-strange objects and the materials of which they are made, circumstances of production, the conflictual relationship between art objects and notions of an ineffable deity, the context surrounding medieval art, the playfulness of art and the formal movements it engaged, as well as questions of apprehension, aesthetics, and modern presentation. Kessler introduces the exciting discoveries and revelations that have revolutionized the understanding of medieval art and identifies the vexing challenges that still remain. Examining such well-known monuments as the stained glass in Chartres cathedral, mosaics in San Marco Venice, and Utrecht Psalter, as well as newly discovered works - including the frescoes in Rome's aula gotica and a twelfth-century aquamanile in Hildesheim - Kessler makes the complex history of medieval art accessible for students of art history, teachers in the field, and scholars of medieval history, theology, and literature.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781442600737.jpg
99.750000 USD

Experiencing Medieval Art

by Herbert L. Kessler
Hardback
Book cover image
The first full-length study of the notion of marriage to Jesus in late medieval and early modern popular culture, this book treats the transmission and transformation of ideas about this concept as a case study in the formation of religious belief and popular culture. Marrying Jesus in Medieval and Early ...
Marrying Jesus in Medieval and Early Modern Northern Europe: Popular Culture and Religious Reform
The first full-length study of the notion of marriage to Jesus in late medieval and early modern popular culture, this book treats the transmission and transformation of ideas about this concept as a case study in the formation of religious belief and popular culture. Marrying Jesus in Medieval and Early Modern Northern Europe provides a history of the dispersion of theology about the bride of Christ in the period between the twelfth and seventeenth centuries and explains how this metaphor, initially devised for a religious elite, became integral to the laity's pursuit of salvation. Unlike recent publications on the bride of Christ, which explore the gendering of sanctity or the poetics of religious eroticism, this is a study of popular religion told through devotional media and other technologies of salvation. Marrying Jesus argues against the heteronormative interpretation that brides of Christ should be female by reconstructing the cultural production of brides of Christ in late medieval Europe. A central assertion of this book is that by the fourteenth century, worldly, sexually active brides of Christ, both male and female, were no longer aberrations. Analyzing understudied vernacular sources from the late medieval period - including sermons, early printed books, spiritual diaries, letters, songs, and hagiographies - Rabia Gregory shows how marrying Jesus was central to late medieval lay piety, and how the 'chaste' bride of Christ developed out of sixteenth-century religious disputes.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781138379978.jpg
58.800000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Examining those medieval texts which were extant for sixteenth-century use and reading, Professor Tuve attempts to discover how certain writers at a given time and for reasons we can trace read the allegorical books of the Middle Ages. Originally published in 1966. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand ...
Allegorical Imagery: Some Mediaeval Books and Their Posterity
Examining those medieval texts which were extant for sixteenth-century use and reading, Professor Tuve attempts to discover how certain writers at a given time and for reasons we can trace read the allegorical books of the Middle Ages. Originally published in 1966. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780691656397.jpg
187.900000 USD

Allegorical Imagery: Some Mediaeval Books and Their Posterity

by Rosemond Tuve
Hardback
Book cover image
Examining those medieval texts which were extant for sixteenth-century use and reading, Professor Tuve attempts to discover how certain writers at a given time and for reasons we can trace read the allegorical books of the Middle Ages. Originally published in 1966. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand ...
Allegorical Imagery: Some Mediaeval Books and Their Posterity
Examining those medieval texts which were extant for sixteenth-century use and reading, Professor Tuve attempts to discover how certain writers at a given time and for reasons we can trace read the allegorical books of the Middle Ages. Originally published in 1966. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780691616384.jpg
75.080000 USD

Allegorical Imagery: Some Mediaeval Books and Their Posterity

by Rosemond Tuve
Paperback / softback
Page 1 of 37