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In Reading Exodus Beth Kissileff draws together academics, experts and practitioners from different and varied fields to examine the text of Exodus through a series of new lenses. A singer/songwriter comments on the Song at the Sea in Exodus 15, an architect on the process of building a tabernacle, a ...
Reading Exodus
In Reading Exodus Beth Kissileff draws together academics, experts and practitioners from different and varied fields to examine the text of Exodus through a series of new lenses. A singer/songwriter comments on the Song at the Sea in Exodus 15, an architect on the process of building a tabernacle, a video game specialist and designer on rules. Readers will enjoy Oliver Sacks on the Sabbath, political scientist Michael Walzer on how Exodus contributed to revolutionary thought and David Brion Davis on how American slaves viewed the Exodus. The chapters cover the diversity of Exodus, offering specialist views from outside biblical studies on topics such as midwives, iconography, the immigrant experience. Here, alongside work from biblical scholars is writing by anthropologists, computer scientists, poets, lawyers, novelists and artists. Each writer offers a different prism through which to see a core aspect of this ancient text, displaying the wide variety of possibilities that the biblical text can yield in diverse hands. As with Kissileff's previous collection Reading Genesis ( an anthology that breathes the sense of Genesis being a text that matters and speaks to the human condition at a fundamental level Journal for the Study of the Old Testament) the purpose of this volume is to draw meaning out of the text, to encourage participants to focus on questioning, on learning, and on intellectual engagement with the biblical story.
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Hardback
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In Reading Exodus Beth Kissileff draws together academics, experts and practitioners from different and varied fields to examine the text of Exodus through a series of new lenses. A singer/songwriter comments on the Song at the Sea in Exodus 15, an architect on the process of building a tabernacle, a ...
Reading Exodus
In Reading Exodus Beth Kissileff draws together academics, experts and practitioners from different and varied fields to examine the text of Exodus through a series of new lenses. A singer/songwriter comments on the Song at the Sea in Exodus 15, an architect on the process of building a tabernacle, a video game specialist and designer on rules. Readers will enjoy Oliver Sacks on the Sabbath, political scientist Michael Walzer on how Exodus contributed to revolutionary thought and David Brion Davis on how American slaves viewed the Exodus. The chapters cover the diversity of Exodus, offering specialist views from outside biblical studies on topics such as midwives, iconography, the immigrant experience. Here, alongside work from biblical scholars is writing by anthropologists, computer scientists, poets, lawyers, novelists and artists. Each writer offers a different prism through which to see a core aspect of this ancient text, displaying the wide variety of possibilities that the biblical text can yield in diverse hands. As with Kissileff's previous collection Reading Genesis ( an anthology that breathes the sense of Genesis being a text that matters and speaks to the human condition at a fundamental level Journal for the Study of the Old Testament) the purpose of this volume is to draw meaning out of the text, to encourage participants to focus on questioning, on learning, and on intellectual engagement with the biblical story.
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Chava Rosenfarb (1923-2011) was one of the most prominent Yiddish novelists of the second half of the twentieth century. Born in Poland in 1923, she survived the Lodz ghetto, Auschwitz, and Bergen-Belsen, immigrating to Canada in 1950 and settling in Montreal. There she wrote novels, poetry, short stories, plays, and ...
Confessions of a Yiddish Writer and Other Essays
Chava Rosenfarb (1923-2011) was one of the most prominent Yiddish novelists of the second half of the twentieth century. Born in Poland in 1923, she survived the Lodz ghetto, Auschwitz, and Bergen-Belsen, immigrating to Canada in 1950 and settling in Montreal. There she wrote novels, poetry, short stories, plays, and essays, including The Tree of Life: A Trilogy of Life in the Lodz Ghetto, a seminal novel on the Holocaust. Confessions of a Yiddish Writer and Other Essays comprises thirteen personal and literary essays by Rosenfarb, ranging from autobiographical accounts of her childhood and experiences before and during the Holocaust to literary criticism that discusses the work of other Jewish writers. The collection also includes two travelogues, which recount a trip to Australia and another to Prague in 1993, the year it became the capital of the Czech Republic. While several of these essays appeared in the prestigious Yiddish literary journal Di goldene keyt, most were never translated. This book marks the first time that Rosenfarb's non-fiction writings have been presented together in English. A compilation of the memoir and diary excerpts that formed the basis of Rosenfarb's widely acclaimed fiction, Confessions of a Yiddish Writer and Other Essays deepens the reader's understanding of an incredible Yiddish woman and her experiences as a survivor in the post-Holocaust world.
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31.450000 USD
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Chava Rosenfarb (1923-2011) was one of the most prominent Yiddish novelists of the second half of the twentieth century. Born in Poland in 1923, she survived the Lodz ghetto, Auschwitz, and Bergen-Belsen, immigrating to Canada in 1950 and settling in Montreal. There she wrote novels, poetry, short stories, plays, and ...
Confessions of a Yiddish Writer and Other Essays
Chava Rosenfarb (1923-2011) was one of the most prominent Yiddish novelists of the second half of the twentieth century. Born in Poland in 1923, she survived the Lodz ghetto, Auschwitz, and Bergen-Belsen, immigrating to Canada in 1950 and settling in Montreal. There she wrote novels, poetry, short stories, plays, and essays, including The Tree of Life: A Trilogy of Life in the Lodz Ghetto, a seminal novel on the Holocaust. Confessions of a Yiddish Writer and Other Essays comprises thirteen personal and literary essays by Rosenfarb, ranging from autobiographical accounts of her childhood and experiences before and during the Holocaust to literary criticism that discusses the work of other Jewish writers. The collection also includes two travelogues, which recount a trip to Australia and another to Prague in 1993, the year it became the capital of the Czech Republic. While several of these essays appeared in the prestigious Yiddish literary journal Di goldene keyt, most were never translated. This book marks the first time that Rosenfarb's non-fiction writings have been presented together in English. A compilation of the memoir and diary excerpts that formed the basis of Rosenfarb's widely acclaimed fiction, Confessions of a Yiddish Writer and Other Essays deepens the reader's understanding of an incredible Yiddish woman and her experiences as a survivor in the post-Holocaust world.
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126.000000 USD
Hardback
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Vasily Grossman (1905-1964) was a successful Soviet author and journalist, but he is more often recognized in the West as Russian literature's leading dissident. How do we account for this paradox? In the first collection of essays to explore the Russian author's life and works in English, leading experts present ...
Vasily Grossman: A Writer's Freedom
Vasily Grossman (1905-1964) was a successful Soviet author and journalist, but he is more often recognized in the West as Russian literature's leading dissident. How do we account for this paradox? In the first collection of essays to explore the Russian author's life and works in English, leading experts present recent multidisciplinary research on Grossman's experiences, his place in the history of Russian literature, key themes in his writing, and the wider implications of his life and work in the realms of philosophy and politics. Born into a Jewish family in Berdychiv, Grossman was initially a supporter of the ideals of the Russian Revolution and the new Soviet state. During the Second World War, he worked as a correspondent for the Red Army newspaper and was the first journalist to write about the Nazi extermination camps. As a witness to the daily violence of the Soviet regime, Grossman became more and more aware of the nature and forms of totalitarian coercion, which gradually alienated him from the Soviet regime and earned him a reputation for dissidence. A survey of the remarkable accomplishments and legacy left by this controversial and contradictory figure, Vasily Grossman reveals a writer's power to express freedom even under totalitarianism.
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115.500000 USD
Hardback
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This book examines Jewish writers and intellectuals in Austria, analyzing filmic and electronic media alongside more traditional publication formats over the last 25 years. Beginning with the Waldheim affair and the rhetorical response by the three most prominent members of the survivor generation (Leon Zelman, Simon Wiesenthal and Bruno Kreisky) ...
Contemporary Jewish Writing: Austria After Waldheim
This book examines Jewish writers and intellectuals in Austria, analyzing filmic and electronic media alongside more traditional publication formats over the last 25 years. Beginning with the Waldheim affair and the rhetorical response by the three most prominent members of the survivor generation (Leon Zelman, Simon Wiesenthal and Bruno Kreisky) author Andrea Reiter sets a complicated standard for `who is Jewish' and what constitutes a `Jewish response.' She reformulates the concepts of religious and secular Jewish cultural expression, cutting across gender and Holocaust studies. The work proceeds to questions of enacting or performing identity, especially Jewish identity in the Austrian setting, looking at how these Jewish writers and filmmakers in Austria `perform' their Jewishness not only in their public appearances and engagements but also in their works. By engaging with novels, poems, and films, this volume challenges the dominant claim that Jewish culture in Central Europe is almost exclusively borne by non-Jews and consumed by non-Jewish audiences, establishing a new counter-discourse against resurging anti-Semitism in the media.
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58.800000 USD
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This compelling and incisive study opens a fascinating window into the key genres of writing that emerged in Israeli writing during the 1980s and 1990s, and provides new understandings about how contemporary Israeli literature evolved to be what it is today.It examines the social and political background of the dramatic ...
Back to the Future: Israeli Literature of the 1980s and 1990s
This compelling and incisive study opens a fascinating window into the key genres of writing that emerged in Israeli writing during the 1980s and 1990s, and provides new understandings about how contemporary Israeli literature evolved to be what it is today.It examines the social and political background of the dramatic and broad transformations that took place in Israeli society during this period of transition-the Yom Kippur War, the election of the Likkud Party, the Lebanon War, the rise of postmodernism, the impact of feminism, and the collapse of national consensus-and links those developments to the literary changes that seeped into the fabric of Israeli writing of that time.The book deals with three pivotal areas that emerged and flowered in the 1980s and 1990s-namely, Second Generation Holocaust literature, the Mizrachi novel, and detective fiction-and meticulously and comprehensively analyses the works' subject-matters, ideas and aesthetic strategies. Extensively discussed and evaluated here are the groundbreaking themes found in the stories of the authors David Grossman, Sami Michael, Ronit Matalon, Batya Gur, Eli Amir, Shulamit Lapid, Itamar Levy, Gila Almagor, Nava Semel, Dorit Rabinyan, Yitzhak Gormezano Goren, and Lily Peri Amitai.From best-sellers to cult-classics, from the mainstream to the marginal, Back to the Future is an important book that celebrates the creative energy of Israeli arts, and is a must-read for anyone interested in Israeli culture and fiction.
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48.11 USD
Hardback
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In a series of writing workshops at the Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh, survivors assembled recently to remember the pivotal moments in which their lives were irreparably changed by the Nazis. These flares of memory invoke lost childhoods, preserving the voices of over forty Jews from throughout Europe who experienced a ...
Flares of Memory: Stories of Childhood During the Holocaust
In a series of writing workshops at the Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh, survivors assembled recently to remember the pivotal moments in which their lives were irreparably changed by the Nazis. These flares of memory invoke lost childhoods, preserving the voices of over forty Jews from throughout Europe who experienced a history that cannot be forgotten-by them nor us. Including a timeline that chronicles the rise of the Nazis, their devastating campaigns for control of Europe, and the successive edicts that would annihilate millions, Flares of Memory consists of 92 brief vignettes arranged both chronologically and thematically. Survivors from Munich, Austria, Poland, Hungary, Lithuania, and the Netherlands recreate the disbelief and chaos that ensued as families were separated, political rights were abolished, and synagogues and Jewish businesses were destroyed-before and especially after Kristallnacht. We had entered a twilight zone between memories of earning our keep at our occupations and the fear of becoming game during hunting season, writes one survivor. Others remember the daily humiliation, the quiet heroes among their friends, and the painful abandonment by neighbors as Jews were restricted to ghettos, forced to don yellow stars, and loaded like cattle in trains destined for the camps: We were completely stripped of all human identity. Vivid memories of hunger, disease, and a daily existence dependent on cruel luck in Dachau, Auschwitz, and other concentration camps provide penetrating testimonies to the ruthlessness of the Nazi killing machine, yet they also bear witness to the resilience and fortitude of individual souls bombarded by evil. This book also includes poignant recollections of American liberators who were often devastated by the horrors that they discovered after the fall of the Nazis. A mix of emotions-disbelief, rage-overwhelmed us; tears blinded our eyes, recalls one soldier. Flares of Memory will inspire these emotions and will stay with you, long after you finish its pages.
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78.24 USD
Hardback
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Peter Erspamer explores the 'Jewish question' in German literature from Lessing's Nathan der Weise in 1779 to Sessa's Unser Verkehr in 1815. He analyzes the transition from an enlightened emancipatory literature advocating tolerance in the late eighteenth century to an anti-Semitic literature with nationalistic overtones in the early nineteenth century. ...
The Elusiveness of Tolerance: The Jewish Question From Lessing to the Napoleonic Wars (gls, No. 117
Peter Erspamer explores the 'Jewish question' in German literature from Lessing's Nathan der Weise in 1779 to Sessa's Unser Verkehr in 1815. He analyzes the transition from an enlightened emancipatory literature advocating tolerance in the late eighteenth century to an anti-Semitic literature with nationalistic overtones in the early nineteenth century. Erspamer examines Nathan in light of Lessing's attempts to distance himself from the excesses of his own Christian in-group through pariah identification, using an idealized member of an out-group religion as a vehicle to attack the dominant religion. He also focuses on other leading advocates of tolerance and explores changes in Jewish identity, particularly the division of German Jewry into orthodox Jews, adherents of the Haskalah, and converted Jews. The tolerance discourse ended with the Napoleonic incursions into Germany, when nationalism was on the rise and Judaism came to be viewed in racial as well as religious terms.
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25.200000 USD

The Elusiveness of Tolerance: The Jewish Question From Lessing to the Napoleonic Wars (gls, No. 117

by Peter R Erspamer
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An Ideological Death: Suicide in Israeli Literature examines literary challenges to Israel's national narratives. The centrality of the army, the mythology of the New Jew, the vision of the first Israeli city, Tel Aviv, and the very process by which a nation's history is constructed are confronted in fiction by ...
An Ideological Death: Suicide in Israeli Literature
An Ideological Death: Suicide in Israeli Literature examines literary challenges to Israel's national narratives. The centrality of the army, the mythology of the New Jew, the vision of the first Israeli city, Tel Aviv, and the very process by which a nation's history is constructed are confronted in fiction by many prominent Israeli writers. Using the image of suicide, A. B. Yehoshua, Amos Oz, Etgar Keret, Yehudit Katzir, Alon Hilu, Yaakov Shabtai, Benjamin Tammuz, and Yehoshua Kenaz each engage in a critical and rhetorical process that examines the nation's formation and reconsiders myths at the heart of the Zionist project. In Israeli literature, suicide represents a society's compulsion to create impossible ideals that leave its populace disappointed and deluded. Yet as Rachel S. Harris shows, even at their harshest these writers also represent the idealism that helped build Israel as a modern nation-state.
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83.950000 USD
Hardback
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What have I in common with Jews? I hardly have anything in common with myself! --Franz Kafka Kafka's quip--paradoxical, self-questioning, ironic--highlights vividly some of the key issues of identity and self-representation for Jewish writers in the 20th century. No group of writers better represents the problems of Jewish identity than ...
Radical Poetics and Secular Jewish Culture
What have I in common with Jews? I hardly have anything in common with myself! --Franz Kafka Kafka's quip--paradoxical, self-questioning, ironic--highlights vividly some of the key issues of identity and self-representation for Jewish writers in the 20th century. No group of writers better represents the problems of Jewish identity than Jewish poets writing in the American modernist tradition--specifically secular Jews: those disdainful or suspicious of organized religion, yet forever shaped by those traditions. This collection of essays is the first to address this often obscured dimension of modern and contemporary poetry: the secular Jewish dimension. Editors Daniel Morris and Stephen Paul Miller asked their contributors to address what constitutes radical poetry written by Jews defined as secular, and whether or not there is a Jewish component or dimension to radical and modernist poetic practice in general. These poets and critics address these questions by exploring the legacy of those poets who preceded and influenced them--Stein, Zukofsky, Reznikoff, Oppen, and Ginsberg, among others. While there is no easy answer for these writers about what it means to be a Jew, in their responses there is a rich sense of how being Jewish reflects on their aesthetics and practices as poets, and how the tradition of the avant-garde informs their identities as Jews. Fragmented identities, irony, skepticism, a sense of self as other or outsider, distrust of the literal, and belief in a tradition that questions rather than answers--these are some of the qualities these poets see as common to themselves, the poetry they make, and the tradition they work within.
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38.21 USD
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Never Better! concerns the polit ( fugitive ), a literary type-an unheroic hero -who is rather like the picaro ( rogue ) from whom the Picaresque genre takes its name. Focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on Yiddish literature, Udel puts that literature into productive conversation with European and American texts, ...
Never Better!: The Modern Jewish Picaresque
Never Better! concerns the polit ( fugitive ), a literary type-an unheroic hero -who is rather like the picaro ( rogue ) from whom the Picaresque genre takes its name. Focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on Yiddish literature, Udel puts that literature into productive conversation with European and American texts, as well as critical and theoretical sources. If the bildungsroman is the novel form that is most clearly associated with nineteenth-century European novels, the polit is the figure more appropriate for the post-Jewish Enlightenment era, and especially its critique of the nineteenth century. More than a study of a particular genre or literary type, Udel's work considers what may happen when a minority author or a minor literature (in the Deleuze-Guattari sense, where a minority writer positions himself/herself as a sort of stranger within his own [major] language ) adopts what Udel refers to as the picaresque sensibility. She examines how embedded such writers may be within the broader national, literary, and linguistic contexts in which they find themselves, and also how they interrupt, counter, and sometimes undermine those contexts.
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68.250000 USD
Hardback
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After Auschwitz to write even a single poem is barbaric . The Conflagration of Community challenges Theodor Adorno's famous statement about aesthetic production after the Holocaust, arguing for the possibility of literature to bear witness to extreme collective and personal experiences. J. Hillis Miller considers how novels about the Holocaust ...
The Conflagration of Community: Fiction Before and After Auschwitz
After Auschwitz to write even a single poem is barbaric . The Conflagration of Community challenges Theodor Adorno's famous statement about aesthetic production after the Holocaust, arguing for the possibility of literature to bear witness to extreme collective and personal experiences. J. Hillis Miller considers how novels about the Holocaust relate to fictions written before and after it, and uses theories of community from Jean-Luc Nancy and Derrida to explore the dissolution of community bonds in its wake. Miller juxtaposes readings of books about the Holocaust - Keneally's Schindler's List , McEwan's Black Dogs , Spiegelman's Maus , and Kertesz's Fatelessness - with Kafka's novels and Morrison's Beloved , asking what it means to think of texts as acts of testimony. Throughout, Miller questions the resonance between the difficulty of imagining, understanding, or remembering Auschwitz - a difficulty so often a theme in records of the Holocaust - and the exasperating resistance to clear, conclusive interpretation of these novels. The Conflagration of Community is an eloquent study of literature's value to fathoming the unfathomable.
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36.750000 USD
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The `Jewish mother' figure is a hallmark of Jewish culture, one which appears in the works of rabbis, artists, poets, and activists across time and place. While depictions of mothers and motherhood abound in Jewish writings, they vary significantly according to social context. These representations therefore offer important insights into ...
Mothers in the Jewish Cultural Imagination: Jewish Cultural Studies, Volume 5
The `Jewish mother' figure is a hallmark of Jewish culture, one which appears in the works of rabbis, artists, poets, and activists across time and place. While depictions of mothers and motherhood abound in Jewish writings, they vary significantly according to social context. These representations therefore offer important insights into the Jewish cultural imagination, and the ways in which writers resort to the figure of the Jewish mother to comprehend and construct their world. The contributors to this volume highlight the complex network of symbols and images associated with Jewish mothers and motherhood as well as the vast array of social, historical, and cultural patterns that characterizations of mothers reflect. Each essay treats the topic from a specific perspective, spanning from mother--daughter relationships in the Talmud to depictions of mothers in twentieth-century American Jewish children's literature. Collectively, they present a provocative examination of the ways mothers shape and problematize Jewish identity. This volume seeks to give the figure of the mother a new and enhanced place at the heart of Judaism: not only as a central figure in family life, but also as a key agent in the transmission of Jewish religion and culture.
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39.380000 USD
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In the seventeenth century, Florence was the splendid capital of the Medici Grand Dukedom of Tuscany. Meanwhile, the Jews in its tiny Ghetto struggled to earn a living by any possible means, especially loan-sharking, rag-picking and second-hand dealing. They were viewed as an uncanny people with rare supernatural powers, and ...
Jews and Magic in Medici Florence: The Secret World of Benedetto Blanis
In the seventeenth century, Florence was the splendid capital of the Medici Grand Dukedom of Tuscany. Meanwhile, the Jews in its tiny Ghetto struggled to earn a living by any possible means, especially loan-sharking, rag-picking and second-hand dealing. They were viewed as an uncanny people with rare supernatural powers, and Benedetto Blanis-a businessman and aspiring scholar from a distinguished Ghetto dynasty-sought to parlay his alleged mastery of astrology, alchemy and Kabbalah into a grand position at the Medici Court. He won the patronage of Don Giovanni dei Medici, a scion of the ruling family, and for six tumultuous years their lives were inextricably linked. Edward Goldberg reveals the dramas of daily life behind the scenes in the Pitti Palace and in the narrow byways of the Florentine Ghetto, using thousands of new documents from the Medici Granducal Archive. He shows that truth-especially historical truth-can be stranger than fiction, when viewed through the eyes of the people most immediately involved.
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46.54 USD
Hardback
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In the seventeenth century, Florence was the splendid capital of the Medici Grand Dukedom of Tuscany. Meanwhile, the Jews in its tiny Ghetto struggled to earn a living by any possible means, especially loan-sharking, rag-picking and second-hand dealing. They were viewed as an uncanny people with rare supernatural powers, and ...
Jews and Magic in Medici Florence: The Secret World of Benedetto Blanis
In the seventeenth century, Florence was the splendid capital of the Medici Grand Dukedom of Tuscany. Meanwhile, the Jews in its tiny Ghetto struggled to earn a living by any possible means, especially loan-sharking, rag-picking and second-hand dealing. They were viewed as an uncanny people with rare supernatural powers, and Benedetto Blanis-a businessman and aspiring scholar from a distinguished Ghetto dynasty-sought to parlay his alleged mastery of astrology, alchemy and Kabbalah into a grand position at the Medici Court. He won the patronage of Don Giovanni dei Medici, a scion of the ruling family, and for six tumultuous years their lives were inextricably linked. Edward Goldberg reveals the dramas of daily life behind the scenes in the Pitti Palace and in the narrow byways of the Florentine Ghetto, using thousands of new documents from the Medici Granducal Archive. He shows that truth-especially historical truth-can be stranger than fiction, when viewed through the eyes of the people most immediately involved.
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21.85 USD
Paperback / softback
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Story-telling has been an integral part of the hasidic movement from its very beginnings in the eighteenth century to the present day. Stories about the holy hasidic leaders-the tsadikim, or rebbes-and their mystical powers have been a key factor in attracting followers and maintaining their devotion. Such tales were told ...
The Hasidic Tale
Story-telling has been an integral part of the hasidic movement from its very beginnings in the eighteenth century to the present day. Stories about the holy hasidic leaders-the tsadikim, or rebbes-and their mystical powers have been a key factor in attracting followers and maintaining their devotion. Such tales were told by the tsadikim and their followers alike. The tsadikim saw them as a way to promote the movement and justify their leadership; their followers saw them as a way to exalt their masters, cleanse them of any shred of imperfection, and defend them from every trace of criticism. No other social or religious movement in the entire course of Jewish history has engaged so intensively in the telling of stories, and nor have stories occupied such a central and important place in any other intellectual movement within Judaism. Originally published in Hebrew and expanded for this English edition by a new introduction, this book is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the history of hasidism or of Hebrew literature and the literary aspects of Jewish popular culture. It acts both as a compendium of stories by theme and as a reference work for the identification of the subject-matter, authors, editors, and editions of books that have been a popular Jewish literary genre since the second half of the eighteenth century. Hasidic tales have been reprinted many times, anthologized, and even quoted by contemporary scholars, without the identity of their authors or editors being known, and without any awareness of their background and origin. In this important work, based on analysis of all the published anthologies as well as tales scattered in a variety of obscure sources, the author traces the sources and development of the different stories. An introductory historical survey is followed by full discussions of the stories themselves, grouped by subject. Among the themes covered are matchmaking and marriages, childbirth and progeny, sickness, death and the world to come, dybbuks and the powers of evil, apostasy, and many more.
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20.41 USD

The Hasidic Tale

by Gedalyah Nigal
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This pioneering study is the first to show how Jews have been seen through modern Ukrainian literature. Myroslav Shkandrij uses evidence found within that literature to challenge the established view that the Ukrainian and Jewish communities were antagonistic toward one another and interacted only when compelled to do so by ...
Jews in Ukrainian Literature: Representation and Identity
This pioneering study is the first to show how Jews have been seen through modern Ukrainian literature. Myroslav Shkandrij uses evidence found within that literature to challenge the established view that the Ukrainian and Jewish communities were antagonistic toward one another and interacted only when compelled to do so by economic necessity. Jews in Ukrainian Literature synthesizes recent research in the West and in the Ukraine, where access to Soviet-era literature has become possible only in the recent, post-independence period. Many of the works discussed are either little-known or unknown in the West. By demonstrating how Ukrainians have imagined their historical encounters with Jews in different ways over the decades, this account also shows how the Jewish presence has contributed to the acceptance of cultural diversity within contemporary Ukraine.
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40.54 USD
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What is the difference between writing a novel about the Holocaust and fabricating a memoir? Do narratives about the Holocaust have a special obligation to be 'truthful'-that is, faithful to the facts of history? Or is it okay to lie in such works? In her provocative study A Thousand Darknesses, ...
A Thousand Darknesses: Lies and Truth in Holocaust Fiction
What is the difference between writing a novel about the Holocaust and fabricating a memoir? Do narratives about the Holocaust have a special obligation to be 'truthful'-that is, faithful to the facts of history? Or is it okay to lie in such works? In her provocative study A Thousand Darknesses, Ruth Franklin investigates these questions as they arise in the most significant works of Holocaust fiction, from Tadeusz Borowski's Auschwitz stories to Jonathan Safran Foer's postmodernist family history. Franklin argues that the memory-obsessed culture of the last few decades has led us to mistakenly focus on testimony as the only valid form of Holocaust writing. As even the most canonical texts have come under scrutiny for their fidelity to the facts, we have lost sight of the essential role that imagination plays in the creation of any literary work, including the memoir. Taking a fresh look at memoirs by Elie Wiesel and Primo Levi, and examining novels by writers such as Piotr Rawicz, Jerzy Kosinski, W.G. Sebald, and Wolfgang Koeppen, Franklin makes a persuasive case for literature as an equally vital vehicle for understanding the Holocaust (and for memoir as an equally ambiguous form). The result is a study of immense depth and range that offers a lucid view of an often cloudy field.
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20.26 USD
Hardback
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Provides critical overviews of the main writers and key themes of Anglophone Jewish fiction. This spell binding Companion highlights the wealth of diversity in this field, identifying and exploring key themes including immigration, Diaspora, the Holocaust, Judaism, assimilation, anti Semitism and Zionism. Each expert contributor analyses one of the main ...
The Edinburgh Companion to Modern Jewish Fiction
Provides critical overviews of the main writers and key themes of Anglophone Jewish fiction. This spell binding Companion highlights the wealth of diversity in this field, identifying and exploring key themes including immigration, Diaspora, the Holocaust, Judaism, assimilation, anti Semitism and Zionism. Each expert contributor analyses one of the main trends in Anglophone Jewish fiction and situates it in historical context. Anglophone Jewish fiction is discussed in relation to theoretical frameworks and areas of study including transatlanticism, transnationalism and globalisation; ethnicity and multiculturalism; post colonial studies, feminist studies and queer studies. The 31 essays are by contributors including Vicki Aarons (Trinity University, Texas), Eitan Bar Yosef (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva), Valentine Cunningham (Corpus Christi, Oxford), Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading), Phyllis Lassner (Northwestern University), Ira Nadel (University of British Columbia), Beate Neumeier (University of Cologne) and Aranzazu Usandizaga (University of Barcelona). Highlights the rich diversity of the field and identifies its key themes, including immigration, Diaspora, the Holocaust, Judaism, assimilation and anti Semitism Zionism. It analyses the main trends in Anglophone Jewish fiction and situates them in historical context; discusses the place of Anglophone Jewish fiction in relation to:transatlanticism, transnationalism and globalisation; ethnicity and multiculturalism; post colonial studies, feminist studies and queer studies and the 29 essays are by contributors including Vicki Aarons (Trinity University, Texas), Efraim Sicher (Ben Gurion University, Sasha Senderovich (Princeton), Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading), Phyllis Lassner (Northwestern University), Ruth Gilbert (University of Winchester), Beate Neumeier (University of Cologne), Sandra Singer (University of Guelph).
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278.95 USD
Hardback
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Starting with a discussion on the elements of the genre of alternative (counterfactual) history and on its place between the poles of historical determinism and relativism, this book develops a literary theory of the historical alternativeness principle and applies it to the reading of The City with All That is ...
Literature, History, Choice: The Principle of Alternative History in Literature (S.Y. Agnon, The City with All That is Therein)
Starting with a discussion on the elements of the genre of alternative (counterfactual) history and on its place between the poles of historical determinism and relativism, this book develops a literary theory of the historical alternativeness principle and applies it to the reading of The City with All That is Therein (Ir u-mloa) - one of the most important and less-studied books of the greatest Israeli writer, Nobel Prize winner S.Y. Agnon (1887-1970). The investigation reveals that this principle is by no means inherent solely in modernism and postmodernism, but lies at the very basis of the reading process, particularly at the levels of plot and character origination, and historical and historiographical conceptions that underlie the author's imagination.The book is intended for all who are interested in modern literature and theory.
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89.200000 USD
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Primo Levi, Holocaust survivor and renowned memorist, is one of the most widely read writers of post-World War II Italy. his works are characterised by the lean, dispassionate eloquence with which he approaches his experience of incarceration of in Auschwitz. His memoirs - as well as his poetry and fiction ...
Approaches to Teaching the Works of Primo Levi
Primo Levi, Holocaust survivor and renowned memorist, is one of the most widely read writers of post-World War II Italy. his works are characterised by the lean, dispassionate eloquence with which he approaches his experience of incarceration of in Auschwitz. His memoirs - as well as his poetry and fiction and his many interviews - are often taught in several field, including Jewish studies and Holocaust studies, comparative literature, and Italian literature and language, and can enrich the study of history, psychology, and philosophy.The first part of this volume provides instructors with an overview of the available editions, anthologies, and translations of Levi's work and identifies other useful classroom aids, such as films, music, and online resources. In the second part, contributors describe different approaches to teaching Levi's work.
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42.000000 USD
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