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As a growing number of contemporary novelists write for publication in multiple languages, the genre's form and aims are shifting. Born-translated novels include passages that appear to be written in different tongues, narrators who speak to foreign audiences, and other visual and formal techniques that treat translation as a medium ...
Born Translated: The Contemporary Novel in an Age of World Literature
As a growing number of contemporary novelists write for publication in multiple languages, the genre's form and aims are shifting. Born-translated novels include passages that appear to be written in different tongues, narrators who speak to foreign audiences, and other visual and formal techniques that treat translation as a medium rather than as an afterthought. These strategies challenge the global dominance of English, complicate native readership, and protect creative works against misinterpretation as they circulate. They have also given rise to a new form of writing that confounds traditional models of literary history and political community. Born Translated builds a much-needed framework for understanding translation's effect on fictional works, as well as digital art, avant-garde magazines, literary anthologies, and visual media. Artists and novelists discussed include J. M. Coetzee, Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, Mohsin Hamid, Kazuo Ishiguro, Jamaica Kincaid, Ben Lerner, China Mieville, David Mitchell, Walter Mosley, Caryl Phillips, Adam Thirlwell, Amy Waldman, and Young-hae Chang Heavy Industries. The book understands that contemporary literature begins at once in many places, engaging in a new type of social embeddedness and political solidarity. It recasts literary history as a series of convergences and departures and, by elevating the status of born-translated works, redefines common conceptions of author, reader, and nation.
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27.300000 USD

Born Translated: The Contemporary Novel in an Age of World Literature

by Rebecca L. Walkowitz
Paperback / softback
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Newly translated by Gregory Rabassa and superbly edited by Enylton de Sa Rego and Gilberto Pinheiro Passos, this Library of Latin America edition brings to English-speaking readers a literary delight of the highest order.
The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas
Newly translated by Gregory Rabassa and superbly edited by Enylton de Sa Rego and Gilberto Pinheiro Passos, this Library of Latin America edition brings to English-speaking readers a literary delight of the highest order.
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36.740000 USD

The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas

by Machado de Assis
Paperback / softback
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The fourteen essays in Food, Texts, and Cultures in Latin America and Spain showcase the eye-opening potential of a food lens within colonial studies, ethnic and racial studies, gender and sexuality studies, and studies of power dynamics, nationalisms and nation building, theories of embodiment, and identity. In short, Food, Texts, ...
Food, Texts, and Cultures in Latin America and Spain
The fourteen essays in Food, Texts, and Cultures in Latin America and Spain showcase the eye-opening potential of a food lens within colonial studies, ethnic and racial studies, gender and sexuality studies, and studies of power dynamics, nationalisms and nation building, theories of embodiment, and identity. In short, Food, Texts, and Cultures in Latin America and Spain grapples with an emerging field in need of a foundational text, and does so from multiple angles. The studies span from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century, and the contributing scholars occupy diverse fields within Latin American and Hispanic Studies. As such, their essays showcase eclectic critical and theoretical approaches to the subject of Latin American and Iberian food. Food, Texts, and Cultures in Latin America and Spain also introduces the first English-language publication of works from such award-winning scholars as Adolfo Castanon of the Mexican Academy of Language; Sergio Ramirez, winner of the 2017 Miguel de Cervantes Prize in Literature; and Carmen Simon Palmer, winner of the 2015 Julian Marias Prize for Research.
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36.700000 USD

Food, Texts, and Cultures in Latin America and Spain

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Analyzing a wide variety of late-nineteenth-century sources, Sex, Skulls, and Citizens argues that Argentine scientific projects of the era were not just racial encounters, but were also conditioned by sexual relationships in all their messy, physical reality. The writers studied here (an eclectic group of scientists, anthropologists, and novelists, including ...
Sex, Skulls, and Citizens: Gender and Racial Science in Argentina (1860-1910)
Analyzing a wide variety of late-nineteenth-century sources, Sex, Skulls, and Citizens argues that Argentine scientific projects of the era were not just racial encounters, but were also conditioned by sexual relationships in all their messy, physical reality. The writers studied here (an eclectic group of scientists, anthropologists, and novelists, including Estanislao Zeballos, Lucio and Eduarda Mansilla, Ramon Lista, and Florence Dixie) reflect on Indigenous sexual practices, analyze the advisability and effects of interracial sex, and use the language of desire to narrate encounters with Indigenous peoples as they try to scientifically pinpoint Argentina's racial identity and future potential. Kerr's reach extends into history of science, literary studies, and history of anthropology, illuminating a scholarly time and place in which the lines betwixt were much blurrier, if they existed at all.
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36.700000 USD

Sex, Skulls, and Citizens: Gender and Racial Science in Argentina (1860-1910)

by Ashley Elizabeth Kerr
Paperback / softback
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What happens inside Latin American prisons? How does the social organisation of prisoners relate to the political structures beyond the walls? Is it possible to resist corrupt penal regimes? In Prison Writing of Latin America, Joey Whitfield turns to those best placed to answer these questions: people who have been ...
Prison Writing of Latin America
What happens inside Latin American prisons? How does the social organisation of prisoners relate to the political structures beyond the walls? Is it possible to resist corrupt penal regimes? In Prison Writing of Latin America, Joey Whitfield turns to those best placed to answer these questions: people who have been imprisoned themselves. Drawing on a century of material produced by Latin American prisoners from Mexico, Cuba, Costa Rica, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia and Brazil, Whitfield weaves readings of novels, memoirs and testimonial texts with social and political analysis. Rather than distinguishing between dictatorial and democratic periods of government, he shows that from the point of view of the prisoner, all states are authoritarian in nature. In the face of oppression, however, prisoners both 'political' and 'criminal' have found ways not only to resist but also to create alternative communities both real and imagined, sometimes in collaboration with each other.
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41.950000 USD

Prison Writing of Latin America

by Joey Whitfield
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Offers techniques for teaching modern Latin American poetry in college courses, including considerations of teaching the silva, human rights, poetry in indigenous Languages, community-based learning, lesser-known contemporary poetry, Afro-descendant poetry, performance, the long poem, and queer theory. Provides classroom exercises and assignments.
Teaching Modern Latin American Poetries
Offers techniques for teaching modern Latin American poetry in college courses, including considerations of teaching the silva, human rights, poetry in indigenous Languages, community-based learning, lesser-known contemporary poetry, Afro-descendant poetry, performance, the long poem, and queer theory. Provides classroom exercises and assignments.
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35.700000 USD

Teaching Modern Latin American Poetries

Paperback / softback
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From reviews of the first edition: A compulsively readable account of the life and works of our greatest...writer of fantasy. With a keen appreciation of Borges himself and a pleasant disregard for the critical cliches, Bell-Villada tells us all we really want to know about the modern master-from pronouncing his ...
Borges and His Fiction: A Guide to His Mind and Art
From reviews of the first edition: A compulsively readable account of the life and works of our greatest...writer of fantasy. With a keen appreciation of Borges himself and a pleasant disregard for the critical cliches, Bell-Villada tells us all we really want to know about the modern master-from pronouncing his name to understanding the stories. -New York Daily News Of the scores of Borges studies by now published in English, Bell-Villada's excellent book stands out as one of the freshest and most generally helpful.... Lay readers and specialists alike will find his book a valuable and highly readable companion to Ficciones and El Aleph. -Choice Since its first publication in 1981, Borges and His Fiction has introduced the life and works of this Argentinian master-writer to an entire generation of students, high school and college teachers, and general readers. Responding to a steady demand for an updated edition, Gene H. Bell-Villada has significantly revised and expanded the book to incorporate new information that has become available since Borges' death in 1986. In particular, he offers a more complete look at Borges and Peronism and Borges' personal experiences of love and mysticism, as well as revised interpretations of some of Borges' stories. As before, the book is divided into three sections that examine Borges' life, his stories in Ficciones and El Aleph, and his place in world literature.
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36.700000 USD

Borges and His Fiction: A Guide to His Mind and Art

by Gene H Bell-Villada
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Awarded the Nobel Prize in 2010 at the age of seventy-four, Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa has held pivotal roles in the evolution and revolutions of modern Latin American literature. Perhaps surprisingly, no complete history of Vargas Llosa's works, placed in biographical and historical context, has been published-until now. A ...
Mario Vargas Llosa: A Life of Writing
Awarded the Nobel Prize in 2010 at the age of seventy-four, Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa has held pivotal roles in the evolution and revolutions of modern Latin American literature. Perhaps surprisingly, no complete history of Vargas Llosa's works, placed in biographical and historical context, has been published-until now. A masterwork from one of America's most revered scholars of Latin American fiction, Mario Vargas Llosa: A Life of Writing provides a critical overview of Vargas Llosa's numerous novels while reinvigorating debates regarding conventional interpretations of the work. Weaving analysis with discussions of the writer's political commentary, Raymond Leslie Williams traces the author's youthful identity as a leftist student of the 1960s to a repudiation of some of his earlier ideas beginning in the 1980s. Providing a unique perspective on the complexity, nuance, and scope of Vargas Llosa's lauded early novels and on his passionate support of indigenous populations in his homeland, Williams then turns his eye to the recent works, which serve as a bridge between the legacies of the Boom and the diverse array of contemporary Latin American fiction writers at work today. In addition, Williams provides a detailed description of Vargas Llosa's traumatic childhood and its impact on him-seen particularly in his lifelong disdain for authority figures-as well as of the authors who influenced his approach, from Faulkner to Flaubert. Culminating in reflections drawn from Williams's formal interviews and casual conversations with the author at key phases of both men's careers, this is a landmark publication that will spark new lines of inquiry into an intricate body of work.
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24.100000 USD

Mario Vargas Llosa: A Life of Writing

by Raymond Leslie Williams
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This book began in what seemed like a counterfactual intuition . . . that what had been happening in Nicaraguan poetry was essential to the victory of the Nicaraguan Revolution, write John Beverley and Marc Zimmerman. In our own postmodern North American culture, we are long past thinking of literature ...
Literature and Politics in the Central American Revolutions
This book began in what seemed like a counterfactual intuition . . . that what had been happening in Nicaraguan poetry was essential to the victory of the Nicaraguan Revolution, write John Beverley and Marc Zimmerman. In our own postmodern North American culture, we are long past thinking of literature as mattering much at all in the `real' world, so how could this be? This study sets out to answer that question by showing how literature has been an agent of the revolutionary process in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. The book begins by discussing theory about the relationship between literature, ideology, and politics, and charts the development of a regional system of political poetry beginning in the late nineteenth century and culminating in late twentieth-century writers. In this context, Ernesto Cardenal of Nicaragua, Roque Dalton of El Salvador, and Otto Rene Castillo of Guatemala are among the poets who receive detailed attention.
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26.250000 USD

Literature and Politics in the Central American Revolutions

by Marc Zimmerman, John Beverley
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The Fiction of Robert Antoni: Writing in the Estuary is the first full-length study of the work of this important Trinidadian/ Bahamian Caribbean writer. When his first novel, Divina Trace , appeared in 1992, one critic compared it to a collaboration between James Joyce and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. But Antoni's ...
THE FICTION OF ROBERT ANTONI: Writing in the Estuary
The Fiction of Robert Antoni: Writing in the Estuary is the first full-length study of the work of this important Trinidadian/ Bahamian Caribbean writer. When his first novel, Divina Trace , appeared in 1992, one critic compared it to a collaboration between James Joyce and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. But Antoni's fiction is startlingly original. Each of his subsequent books is quite different from the one before, but all have their common origin in generations of experience in the West Indies, much of which was passed down to Antoni through a rich family tradition of storytelling. The novels are marked as well by Antoni's almost unique ability to navigate both the headwaters and tributaries of Caribbean folk tale and the limitless oceans of modernist and postmodernist texts. Taken together, Antoni's work postulates and embodies a Caribbean sensibility that is estuarial: almost every paragraph displays the multiple tributaries that form Caribbean culture, as well as the impulse to mix, mingle, and reach out to the wider world, like a river flowing into the sea. Patteson places Antoni's work in the multiple contexts of Caribbean storytelling, twentieth-century literature and contemporary Caribbean fiction, then explores each of his innovative and complex texts. In these diverse narratives Patteson finds reflections on the nature of human consciousness and its relationship to language, culture and storytelling itself, as well as sharp insight into the region and its tormented history. This book confirms Antoni's relevance to the literature of the Caribbean and the world.
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36.750000 USD

THE FICTION OF ROBERT ANTONI: Writing in the Estuary

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The Caribbean Islands have long been an uneasy meeting place among indigenous peoples, white European colonists, and black slave populations. Tense oppositions in Caribbean culture-colonial vs. native, white vs. black, male conqueror vs. female subject-supply powerful themes and spark complex narrative experiments in the fiction of Dominica-born novelist Jean Rhys. ...
Jean Rhys at World's End : Novels of Colonial and Sexual Exile
The Caribbean Islands have long been an uneasy meeting place among indigenous peoples, white European colonists, and black slave populations. Tense oppositions in Caribbean culture-colonial vs. native, white vs. black, male conqueror vs. female subject-supply powerful themes and spark complex narrative experiments in the fiction of Dominica-born novelist Jean Rhys. In this pathfinding study, Mary Lou Emery focuses on Rhys's handling of these oppositions, using a Caribbean cultural perspective to replace the mainly European aesthetic, moral, and psychological standards that have served to misread and sometimes devalue Rhys's writing. Emery considers all five Rhys novels, beginning with Wide Sargasso Sea as the most explicitly Caribbean in its setting, in its participation in the culminating decades of a West Indian literary naissance, and most importantly, in its subversive transformation of European concepts of character. From a sociocultural perspective, she argues persuasively that the earlier novels-Voyage in the Dark, Quartet, After Leaving Mr. Mackenzie, and Good Morning, Midnight-should be read as emergent Caribbean fiction, written in tense dialogue with European modernism. Building on this thesis, she reveals how the apparent passivity, masochism, or silence of Rhys's female protagonists results from their doubly marginalized status as women and as subject peoples. Also, she explores how Rhys's women seek out alternative identities in dreamed of, magically realized, or chosen communities. These discoveries offer important insights on literary modernism, Caribbean fiction, and the formation of female identity.
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26.250000 USD

Jean Rhys at World's End : Novels of Colonial and Sexual Exile

by Mary Lou Emery
Paperback / softback
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Jose de Alencar's prose-poem Iracema, first published in 1865, is a classic of Brazilian literature-perhaps the most widely-known piece of fiction within Brazil, and the most widely-read of Alencar's many works. Set in the sixteenth century, it is an extremely romantic portrayal of a doomed love between a Portuguese soldier ...
Iracema
Jose de Alencar's prose-poem Iracema, first published in 1865, is a classic of Brazilian literature-perhaps the most widely-known piece of fiction within Brazil, and the most widely-read of Alencar's many works. Set in the sixteenth century, it is an extremely romantic portrayal of a doomed love between a Portuguese soldier and an Indian maiden. Iracema reflects the gingerly way that mid-nineteenth cenury Brazil dealt with race mixture and multicultural experience. Precisely because of its nineteenth-century romanticism, Iracema strongly contributed to a Brazilian sense of nationhood - contemporary Brazilian writers and literary critics still cite it as a foundation for their own work.
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26.240000 USD

Iracema

by Jose De Alencar
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West Indian Literature, as a body of work, is a fairly recent phenomenon; and literary criticism has not always acknowledged the diversity of approaches to writing effectively. In Making West Indian Literature poet and critic Mervyn Morris explores examples of West Indian creativity shaping a range of responses to experience, ...
Making West Indian Literature
West Indian Literature, as a body of work, is a fairly recent phenomenon; and literary criticism has not always acknowledged the diversity of approaches to writing effectively. In Making West Indian Literature poet and critic Mervyn Morris explores examples of West Indian creativity shaping a range of responses to experience, which often includes colonial traces. Appreciating various kinds of making and a number of West Indian makers, these engaging essays and interviews display a recurrent interest in the processes of composition. Some of the prices highlight writer-performers who have not often been examined. This very readable book, often personal in tone, makes a distinctive contribution to the knowledge and understanding of West Indian Literature.
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17.800000 USD

Making West Indian Literature

by Mervyn Morris
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Starting in 1780, a fugitive slave, known as Three-Fingered Jack or Jack Mansong, terrorized colonial Jamaica for almost two years. An outlaw, thief, and killer, he was also a freedom fighter who sabotaged the colonial machine by preying on traveling planters until his death at the hands of colonial troops. ...
Thieving Three-Fingered Jack: Transatlantic Tales of a Jamaican Outlaw, 1780-2015
Starting in 1780, a fugitive slave, known as Three-Fingered Jack or Jack Mansong, terrorized colonial Jamaica for almost two years. An outlaw, thief, and killer, he was also a freedom fighter who sabotaged the colonial machine by preying on traveling planters until his death at the hands of colonial troops. The legend of Three-Fingered Jack still has currency in Jamaica, but the story has expanded and contracted over the years to serve the various purposes of the teller. Frances R. Botkin has compiled and analyzed the various plays and songs written about Three-Fingered Jack throughout the centuries in order to show how this story traveled from the Caribbean to England and the United States, returning to Jamaica in a sanitized literary and artistic form, and then evolving from there to be reclaimed by the Jamaicans as the tale of a heroic resistance figure to be revered. As the various productions about Jack show, depending on who is telling the story, the character can evoke sympathy for a wronged rebel, or horror at the destruction he caused.
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33.550000 USD
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Volume 231 in the North Carolina Studies in the Romance Languages and Literatures series.
The Name Game: Writing/Fading Writer in De Donde Son Los Cantantes
Volume 231 in the North Carolina Studies in the Romance Languages and Literatures series.
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31.500000 USD

The Name Game: Writing/Fading Writer in De Donde Son Los Cantantes

by Oscar Montero
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Colombian-born Santiago Martinez starts his adult life as a young gay writer living in Spain. Years later, as a university professor in New York City, Santiago is called back to his native Colombia upon the suicide of his sister. There he learns shocking secrets about his childhood and adolescence and ...
Twilight at the Equator: A Novel
Colombian-born Santiago Martinez starts his adult life as a young gay writer living in Spain. Years later, as a university professor in New York City, Santiago is called back to his native Colombia upon the suicide of his sister. There he learns shocking secrets about his childhood and adolescence and realizes that cherished memories of the past are only illusion.
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16.750000 USD

Twilight at the Equator: A Novel

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What was it like to be a small boy growing up in Kingston, Jamaica in the 1930's? When Me Was A Boy tells exactly what it was like. Charles Hyatt remembers his boyhood in vivid detail, and is his own inimitable voice talked about it in his radio programme When ...
When Me Was a Boy
What was it like to be a small boy growing up in Kingston, Jamaica in the 1930's? When Me Was A Boy tells exactly what it was like. Charles Hyatt remembers his boyhood in vivid detail, and is his own inimitable voice talked about it in his radio programme When Me Was A Boy. In his selection from those pieces, Hyatt brings his school days to life: the tramcar and horse-and-buggy days when cars were few and far between and taking a walk was a social occasion. These are hilarious moments look out for the Black Heart Man and historic ones, and Hyatt's sharp observation and remarkable memory put us right on the spot sharing his feelings and experiences.
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26.250000 USD

When Me Was a Boy

by Charles Hyatt
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Any observer of Dominican political and literary discourse will quickly notice how certain notions of hyper-masculinity permeate the culture. Many critics will attribute this to an outgrowth of traditional Latin American patriarchal culture. Masculinity after Trujillo demonstrates why they are mistaken. In this extraordinary work, Maja Horn argues that this ...
Masculinity after Trujillo: The Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature
Any observer of Dominican political and literary discourse will quickly notice how certain notions of hyper-masculinity permeate the culture. Many critics will attribute this to an outgrowth of traditional Latin American patriarchal culture. Masculinity after Trujillo demonstrates why they are mistaken. In this extraordinary work, Maja Horn argues that this common Dominican attitude became ingrained during the dictatorship (1930-61) of Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, as well as through the U.S. military occupation that preceded it. Where previous studies have focused mainly on Spanish colonialism and the controversial sharing of the island with Haiti, Horn emphasizes the underexamined and lasting influence of U.S. imperialism and how it prepared the terrain for Trujillo's hyperbolic language of masculinity. She also demonstrates how later attempts to emasculate the image of Trujillo often reproduced the same masculinist ideology popularized by his government. By using the lens of gender politics, Horn enables readers to reconsider the ongoing legacy of the Trujillato, including the relatively weak social movements formed around racial and ethnic identities, sexuality, and even labor. She offers exciting new interpretations of such writers as Hilma Contreras, Rita Indiana Hernandez, and Junot Diaz, revealing the ways they successfully challenge dominant political and canonical literary discourses.
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23.050000 USD

Masculinity after Trujillo: The Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature

by Maja Horn
Paperback / softback
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A national hero in Cuba and a champion of independence across Latin America, Jose Marti produced a body of writing that has been theorized, criticized, and politicized. However, one of the most understudied aspects of his work is how his time in the United States affected what he wrote about ...
Jose Marti, the United States, and Race
A national hero in Cuba and a champion of independence across Latin America, Jose Marti produced a body of writing that has been theorized, criticized, and politicized. However, one of the most understudied aspects of his work is how his time in the United States affected what he wrote about race and his attitudes toward racial politics. In the United States Marti encountered European immigrants and the labor politics that accompanied them and became aware of the hardships experienced by Chinese workers. He read in newspapers and magazines about the oppression of Native Americans and the adversity faced by newly freed black citizens. Although he'd first witnessed the mistreatment of slaves in Cuba, it was in New York City, near the close of the century, where he penned his famous essay My Race, declaring that there was only one race, the human race. Anne Fountain argues that it was in the United States that Marti - confronted by the forces of manifest destiny, the influence of race in politics, the legacy of slavery, and the plight and promise of the black Cuban diaspora - fully engaged with the specter of racism. Examining Marti's complete works with a focus on key portions, Fountain reveals the evolution of his thinking on the topic, indicating the significance of his sources, providing a context for his writing, and offering a structure for his works on race.
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20.950000 USD

Jose Marti, the United States, and Race

by Anne Fountain
Paperback / softback
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The Terror and the Time contributes to the ongoing project of mapping the myriad ways in which contemporary individual and social scenarios and suffering are rooted in unresolved traumas bequeathed by the origins of the New World societies of the Caribbean. This study traces legacies of enforced and voluntary migrations: ...
The Terror and the Time: Banal Violence and Trauma in Caribbean Discourse
The Terror and the Time contributes to the ongoing project of mapping the myriad ways in which contemporary individual and social scenarios and suffering are rooted in unresolved traumas bequeathed by the origins of the New World societies of the Caribbean. This study traces legacies of enforced and voluntary migrations: subjugation of language, custom and being, and violent rupture of ancestry and community, nation and ethnicity, family and sexuality. It draws its raw material from literature, personal narratives, print media and popular culture discourses to explore the interface between the psychological condition of having been colonized and the surviving cultural and material practices. Part 1 deals with traumas of being and becoming; part 2 focuses on social suffering that results from state torture, aging and Alzheimer's, child shifting, alcoholism and poverty. Morgan argues that modern Caribbean societies have been indelibly imprinted by the cataclysmic encounter between worlds and that substantial cross-sections of Caribbean populations are still reeling from the force of that wounding. This study probes the impulse of creative authors and cultural practitioners to revisit the seedbed of traumas and to variously respond with aesthetics of amnesia and negation, and/or to fashion therapeutic interventions through empowering narratives of resistance, self-fashioning, creativity and wholeness.
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33.600000 USD

The Terror and the Time: Banal Violence and Trauma in Caribbean Discourse

by Paula Morgan
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The introduction and eight chapters in English and Spanish that make up Teorizando las literaturas indigenas contemporaneas examine the textual production of indigenous authorship. The authors start from the nineties and problematize the relationship between Indigenous People and nation-state in Guatemala, Colombia, Peru, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Brazil. It is ...
Teorizando las Literaturas Indigenas Contemporaneas
The introduction and eight chapters in English and Spanish that make up Teorizando las literaturas indigenas contemporaneas examine the textual production of indigenous authorship. The authors start from the nineties and problematize the relationship between Indigenous People and nation-state in Guatemala, Colombia, Peru, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Brazil. It is one of the book's suggestions that current indigenous movements and their demands can be best understood through a critique of textual production of its organic intellectuals. While much has been written about the activities of the social movements and current indigenous textual production, there is still the need for a book that contextualizes what has enabled the emergence of a contemporary indigenous literary canon and its relationship to those social movements. This book aims to fill some of these gaps.
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31.500000 USD

Teorizando las Literaturas Indigenas Contemporaneas

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Earl McKenzie's pioneering philosophical study of the West Indian novel is based on three main assumptions: first, that philosophy is a reflection on the fundamental questions we can ask about ourselves and our world; second, that literature, particularly the novel, is the best method yet devised to provide a 'human ...
Philosophy in the West Indian Novel
Earl McKenzie's pioneering philosophical study of the West Indian novel is based on three main assumptions: first, that philosophy is a reflection on the fundamental questions we can ask about ourselves and our world; second, that literature, particularly the novel, is the best method yet devised to provide a 'human face' to these reflections; and third, Caribbean philosophy is at present embedded in other forms of cultural expression, like literature, and these forms need to be excavated to reveal what lies within. McKenzie examines ten novels by George Lamming, Roger Mais, Wilson Harris, V.S. Naipaul, Orlando Patterson, Jean Rhys, Erna Brodber, Lakshmi Persaud, Earl Lovelace and Jamaica Kincaid, each selected to represent differences in geography, chronology, ethnicity and gender. In this cross-section of novels, McKenzie identifies ancestral influences from the philosophies of Europe, Africa and India, and shows how West Indian fiction embodies ideas from several areas of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of education, social and political philosophy, ethics, feminist philosophy, and philosophy of literature. Philosophy in the West Indian Novel uncovers sections of the mostly unknown Caribbean philosophical mosaic, and McKenzie's work will encourage further study and refection on philosophical ideas in a Caribbean context. It will be of interest to philosophers, literary critics, educators, social scientists, and anyone interested in Caribbean studies.
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28.350000 USD

Philosophy in the West Indian Novel

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Caribbean Political Thought: The Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms uncovers, collects and reflects on the wealth of political thought produced in the Caribbean region. It traces the political thought of the Caribbean from the debate between Bartolome de Las Casas and Gines de Sepulveda on the categorization of Native people ...
Caribbean Political Thought: The Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms
Caribbean Political Thought: The Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms uncovers, collects and reflects on the wealth of political thought produced in the Caribbean region. It traces the political thought of the Caribbean from the debate between Bartolome de Las Casas and Gines de Sepulveda on the categorization of Native people in the New World, through the Haitian Revolution, to the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. The ideas of revolutionaries and intellectuals are counterposed with manifestos, constitutional excerpts and speeches to give a view of the range of political options, questions, and immense choices that have faced the region's people over the last 500 years. Includes Contributions from: Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrius, Trevor Munroe, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, Aviva Chomsky, Barry Carr and Pamela Maria Smorkaloff, Amy Jacques Garvey, Dantes Bellegarde, Jacques Roumain, W. Burghart Turner and Joyce Moore Turner Fidel Castro, Walter Rodney, Maurice Bishop, Sylvia Wynter, Gordon Lewis, Anthony Bogues, Hilary Beckles, Bechu, Roy Augier, David Scott, Antenor Firmin, Jose Marti , J.J. Thomas, Hubert Harrison, Marcus Garvey, Rhoda Reddock, Pedro Albizu Campos, George Padmore, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Claudia Jones, Cheddi Jagan, Lloyd Best, Frantz Fanon, C.L.R. James, Che Guevara, Lewis R. Gordon.
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41.950000 USD

Caribbean Political Thought: The Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms

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Studies of traumatic stress have explored the challenges to memory as a result of extreme experience, particularly in relation to the ways in which trauma resonates within the survivor's body and the difficulties survivors face when trying to incorporate their experience into meaningful narratives. Jennifer Griffiths examines the attempts of ...
Traumatic Possessions: The Body and Memory in African American Women's Writing and Performance
Studies of traumatic stress have explored the challenges to memory as a result of extreme experience, particularly in relation to the ways in which trauma resonates within the survivor's body and the difficulties survivors face when trying to incorporate their experience into meaningful narratives. Jennifer Griffiths examines the attempts of several African American writers and playwrights to explore ruptures in memory after a traumatic experience and to develop creative strategies for understanding the inscription of trauma on the body in a racialized cultural context. In the literary and performance texts examined here, Griffiths shows how the self is reconstituted through testimony - through the attempt to put into language and public statement the struggle of survivors to negotiate the limits placed on their bodies and to speak controversial truths. Dessa in her jail cell. Venus in the courtroom, Sally on the auction block, Ursa in her own family history, and Rodney King in the video frame - each character in these texts by Sherley Anne Williams, Suzan-Lori Parks, Robbie McCauley, Gayl Jones, and Anna Deavere Smith gives voice not only to the limits of language in representing traumatic experience but also to the necessity of testimony as the public enactment of memory and bodily witness. In focusing specifically and exclusively on the relation of trauma to race and on the influence of racism on the creation and reception of narrative testimony, this book distinguishes itself from previous studies of the literatures of trauma.
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22.580000 USD

Traumatic Possessions: The Body and Memory in African American Women's Writing and Performance

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It is hard to ignore the hotels. They rise like mammoths of iron and concrete above the homes, the office buildings, the trees of New Providence, island of my birth. So begins Ian Strachan's history of the idea of the Caribbean as paradise. The modern image of the Bahamas as ...
Paradise and Plantation: Tourism and Culture in the Anglophone Caribbean
It is hard to ignore the hotels. They rise like mammoths of iron and concrete above the homes, the office buildings, the trees of New Providence, island of my birth. So begins Ian Strachan's history of the idea of the Caribbean as paradise. The modern image of the Bahamas as a carefree tourist oasis has its origins in much earlier cultural mythology: the first colonizers conceptualized the Caribbean as a place beyond time, beyond the real, and the region produced profit seemingly without work. Yet an Edenic experience was made possible only by the existence of the plantation - the very opposite of paradise for the Amerindians, whose homeland was colonized, and for those brought as slaves. Examining poetry, plays, novels, travelogues, magazine ads, postcards, posters, brochures, stamps, popular songs, paintings, and illustrations, Paradise and Plantation presents telling links between the myth of a Caribbean paradise and colonial ideologies and economics. Strachan considers the cultural, economic, and social effects of tourism's brochure discourse in the modern Caribbean, specifically in the Bahamas, and he enriches his discussion with a fascinating exploration of the ways postcolonial Caribbean writers such as V. S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Paule Marshall, Jamaica Kincaid, and Michelle Cliff have responded to the paradise-plantation dichotomy. The conspicuous disparity between the Caribbean's reputation as paradise and the stark social, economic, and political realities of the region is not news. Ian Strachan's genealogy of the paradise-plantation myth goes far beyond the established discourse in paradise studies, however, providing a new and interdisciplinary approach to further the discussion.
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28.880000 USD

Paradise and Plantation: Tourism and Culture in the Anglophone Caribbean

by Ian Gregory Strachan
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The first book-length study of the role of farce in Spanish American theatre explores the intersection of politics and drama. Spanish American playwrights have realized that farce's lack of power and marginality can become a resourceful way to confront aggression and censorship, while rejecting the possibility of eventually becoming part ...
The Politics of Farce in Contemporary Spanish American Theatre
The first book-length study of the role of farce in Spanish American theatre explores the intersection of politics and drama. Spanish American playwrights have realized that farce's lack of power and marginality can become a resourceful way to confront aggression and censorship, while rejecting the possibility of eventually becoming part of the oppressive center. This book underscores the tendency of Spanish American farce for self-parody, its capacity to uncover and also carry out a profound critique of their nations' artistic, social, and political rituals. To use and transgress farce simultaneously, as a considerable number of Spanish American playwrights do, is to recognize the reality and power, as well as the limits, of laughter.
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31.500000 USD

The Politics of Farce in Contemporary Spanish American Theatre

by Priscilla Melendez
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Written in vivid, colourful detail, these rich, compelling stories recreate with sensitivity and wit a whole range of emotions, from childhood hope to brooding melancholy.
Summer Lightning & Other Stories
Written in vivid, colourful detail, these rich, compelling stories recreate with sensitivity and wit a whole range of emotions, from childhood hope to brooding melancholy.
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21.39 USD

Summer Lightning & Other Stories

by Olive Senior
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Beginning with the 1979 publication of Alejo Carpentier's El arpa y la sombra, the New Historical Novel has become the dominant genre within Latin American fiction. In this at-times tongue-in-cheek postmodern study, Seymour Menton explores why the New Historical Novel has achieved such popularity and offers discerning readings of numerous ...
Latin America's New Historical Novel
Beginning with the 1979 publication of Alejo Carpentier's El arpa y la sombra, the New Historical Novel has become the dominant genre within Latin American fiction. In this at-times tongue-in-cheek postmodern study, Seymour Menton explores why the New Historical Novel has achieved such popularity and offers discerning readings of numerous works. Menton argues persuasively that the proximity of the Columbus Quincentennial triggered the rise of the New Historical Novel. After defining the historical novel in general, he identifies the distinguishing features of the New Historical Novel. Individual chapters delve deeply into such major works as Mario Vargas Llosa's La guerra del fin del mundo, Abel Posse's Los perros del paraiso, Gabriel Garcia Marquez's El general en su laberinto, and Carlos Fuentes' La campana. A chapter on the Jewish Latin American novel focuses on several works that deserve greater recognition, such as Pedro Orgambide's Aventuras de Edmund Ziller en tierras del Nuevo Mundo, Moacyr Scliar's A estranha nacao de Rafael Mendes, and Angelina Muniz's Tierra adentro.
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26.250000 USD

Latin America's New Historical Novel

by Seymour Menton
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Winner, A Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Book Spanish American novels of the Boom period (1962-1967) attracted a world readership to Latin American literature, but Latin American writers had already been engaging in the modernist experiments of their North American and European counterparts since the turn of the twentieth century. Indeed, ...
The Twentieth-Century Spanish American Novel
Winner, A Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Book Spanish American novels of the Boom period (1962-1967) attracted a world readership to Latin American literature, but Latin American writers had already been engaging in the modernist experiments of their North American and European counterparts since the turn of the twentieth century. Indeed, the desire to be modern is a constant preoccupation in twentieth-century Spanish American literature and thus a very useful lens through which to view the century's novels. In this pathfinding study, Raymond L. Williams offers the first complete analytical and critical overview of the Spanish American novel throughout the entire twentieth century. Using the desire to be modern as his organizing principle, he divides the century's novels into five periods and discusses the differing forms that the modern took in each era. For each period, Williams begins with a broad overview of many novels, literary contexts, and some cultural debates, followed by new readings of both canonical and significant non-canonical novels. A special feature of this book is its emphasis on women writers and other previously ignored and/or marginalized authors, including experimental and gay writers. Williams also clarifies the legacy of the Boom, the Postboom, and the Postmodern as he introduces new writers and new novelistic trends of the 1990s.
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29.350000 USD

The Twentieth-Century Spanish American Novel

by Raymond Leslie Williams
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In 1899, the United Fruit Company (UFCO) was officially incorporated in Boston, Massachusetts, beginning an era of economic, diplomatic, and military interventions in Central America. This event marked the inception of the struggle for economic, political, and cultural autonomy in Central America as well as an era of homegrown inequities, ...
Dividing the Isthmus: Central American Transnational Histories, Literatures, and Cultures
In 1899, the United Fruit Company (UFCO) was officially incorporated in Boston, Massachusetts, beginning an era of economic, diplomatic, and military interventions in Central America. This event marked the inception of the struggle for economic, political, and cultural autonomy in Central America as well as an era of homegrown inequities, injustices, and impunities to which Central Americans have responded in creative and critical ways. This juncture also set the conditions for the creation of the Transisthmus-a material, cultural, and symbolic site of vast intersections of people, products, and narratives. Taking 1899 as her point of departure, Ana Patricia Rodriguez offers a comprehensive, comparative, and meticulously researched book covering more than one hundred years, between 1899 and 2007, of modern cultural and literary production and modern empire-building in Central America. She examines the grand narratives of (anti)imperialism, revolution, subalternity, globalization, impunity, transnational migration, and diaspora, as well as other discursive, historical, and material configurations of the region beyond its geophysical and political confines. Focusing in particular on how the material productions and symbolic tropes of cacao, coffee, indigo, bananas, canals, waste, and transmigrant labor have shaped the transisthmian cultural and literary imaginaries, Rodriguez develops new methodological approaches for studying cultural production in Central America and its diasporas. Monumental in scope and relentlessly impassioned, this work offers new critical readings of Central American narratives and contributes to the growing field of Central American studies.
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31.500000 USD

Dividing the Isthmus: Central American Transnational Histories, Literatures, and Cultures

by Ana Patricia Rodriguez
Paperback / softback
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